Portuguese Tip: If Clauses Part 2

By Teacher Claudia
August 3, 2007

Dear readers, in April last year I began writing on the subjunctive mood, that is, Brazilian Portuguese if clauses. My tip then was the subjunctive future, and now it’s finally time for the subjunctive present. Do pay attention, and should you have any doubt, contact me, as always. By the way, I’d like to thank you for the suggestion of a new Scottish singer, Paolo Nutini, and his beautiful song Last Request. On the other side (mine, so to say), I recommend a new Brazilian movie, Saneamento Bsico, a comedy on red-tape versus what really matters.

Activity 1 – Introductory text
Read a piece of the song Pequenas Coisas”, by 14 Bis:

Cada instante que ouo bater
Meu coraão dentro de mim
Ouo as palavras do vento
Me confessar
Que desde o incio dos tempos
Busca chegar
Onde possa se transformar
Numa brisa
Pra transportar e guardar


(Small things

Every time I hear
My heartbeat inside of me
I hear the wind’s words
Confessing to me
That it has since the beginning of time
Tried to come to a place
Where it can be transformed
Into a breeze
To take and keep)

Activity 2 – Grammar in Context
On the song above, there’s an underlined word possa. It is an example of the present of the subjunctive mood, or the verb tense that represents a strong possibility. Read some more sentences:

Que eu possa ser uma boa professora para voc.
Que nós possamos estudar juntos por bastante tempo.
Que voc possa ajudar muitas pessoas.


Activity 3 – Grammar in Form
To use the subjunctive present, we need to remember the first person singular of the indicative present and remove its last letter “o”. After that, to first conjugation verbs we add E, E, EMOS and EM, accordingly to the pronoun, for ex:

Falar (eu falo): que eu fale, que voc fale, que nós falemos, que vocs falem.

To second and third conjugation verbs we add A, A, AMOS, AM, also accordingly to the pronoun, for ex:

Poder (eu posso): que eu possa, que voc possa, que nós possamos, que vocs possam.
Partir (eu parto): que eu parta, que voc parta, que nós partamos, que vocs partam.


Activity 4
Attention, please! There are two very special verbs, completely irregular, ser and ir. Their present subjunctive is, respectively: que eu seja, que voc seja, que nós sejamos, que eles sejam; and que eu v, que voc v, que nós vamos, que eles vão.

Que voc seja sempre saudvel.
Que eles sejam felizes.

Que o Brasil v a uma boa direão.
Que nós vamos em paz.


Activity 5 – Exercise
Conjugate these verbs in the subjunctive present:

Amar / viajar / conhecer / saber / trazer / abrir / conseguir / criar / atrair

See you next class,

Cludia

Teacher Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

To read previous articles by Teacher Claudia click below:

Brazil: Third World Chaos
Brazil&rsquot;s Catholic Parties in June
Portuguese Tip: Sounds Part 2 – De & Di
Portuguese Tip: Diminutives
Portuguese Tip: Regularity of Verbs in Portuguese – Final Part
Portuguese Tip: Regularity of Verbs in Portuguese – Exceptions
Portuguese Tip: Regularity of Verbs
Brazil: A Day in São Paulo
Why Not? (Or on Brazilian Indians)
Portuguese Tip: Infinitives and Gerunds Part 1
Brazil: Portuguese Tip – Ningum X Nenhum
Brazil: Portuguese Tip – Tudo vs. Todo
Brazil&rsquot;s Independence Day
Brazil: Portuguese Tips – Denials
Brazil: Portuguese Tips – Não and Nem
Portuguese Tip: If Clauses Part 1
Portuguese Tip: If Clauses Part 1
Portuguese Tip: The X Doubts Part 2
Portuguese Tip: The X Doubts
Brazil: To Tell or Not to Tell
Brazil: Ipiranga Museum
Portuguese Tip: Odd words
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
A Brazilian Holiday: October 12th
Portuguese Tip: Sounds
Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses
Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

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