Wellington

Forum Replies Created

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,930 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #277431

    Wellington
    Member
  • #276859

    Wellington
    Member

    Your first issue is with regard to a getting visa that permits work and residence You would need to find a sponsoring employer who is unable to fulfill a vacant position with a person from the local labour market who has your particular skill set. Realistically, you would need to have relevant experience in your field rather than be a recent graduate. Marketing in Brazil is something of a craze and there are new graduates falling out of the sky.

  • #276395

    Wellington
    Member

    All you need to do is enter Brazil and marry her but you must have your paperwork prepared and legalized by the Brazilian consulate in India beforehand. Your fiancee should make the necessary enquiries on your behalf as to what documents are needed and what treatment those documents must undergo. She should get this first hand from the official source rather than from you, a foreigner passing on tips garnered from a bulletin board plagued by trolls. That is the only sure way to avoid making mistakes. Assuming she is an adult in command of her normal mental faculties, should go the cartorio de registro civil in her location and get all of the relevant information on marriage to a foreigner. If she is not able to do this for you, that will be a very good indicator or your future, which in turn should set alarm bells ringing. In the event of this scenario, I would be inclined to follow the advice in the post immediately above this one.man of leisure2015-07-20 05:42:57

  • #276024

    Wellington
    Member

    How topical! It was just today that I noticed a newCasa de Empadafranchise has opened at my regular bus stop in Largo do Machdo (RJ). The was a worried looking guy standing outside the store kicking his heels (because there were no customer inside the store) and the fact that he was Chinese piqued my interest with regard to investment visas. I wonder how long it will be before the place closes?

  • #275840

    Wellington
    Member
  • #275772

    Wellington
    Member

    Yes, Fermento em po. Fermento em po organico is live yeast for making bread. You can also buy farina com fermento which is a self-raising flour that already has the raising agent added.

    If you want your pancakes super fluffy try separating the whites from the yolks and, after mixing all the other ingredients, you can whist the just the egg whites until it forms stiff peaks and then fold this into the batter.
  • #275606

    Wellington
    Member
    Much of that previously-posted link concerns the law prior to 2006 and deals with registering a claim for British Citizenship rather than registering a birth of a person who is already considered British at birth (the latter is what you are asking). Since 2006, if the father or mother is British (and him or herself born in the UK) then his or her child born outside the UK will be British automatically. You will not need to register a claim for British citizenship for your child as might be indicated in that link. However, unlike you (British, born in the UK) your child will be British by descent. Meaning that he or she will hold full British citizenship rights but your future grandchild will only be British if born in the UK. This is because British citizenship only passes through one single generation in the case of children born outside the UK – the chain stops with your child! One simple solution is to make sure that in the distant future, your child has his own children inside the UK rather than in Brazil (assuming he is living in Brazil at the time).
    To register the birth of a child here in Brazil, you’ll need your passport, full Birth Certificate (legalized by the BR consulate in the UK) and those of the mother and child. However, it’s not a mandatory requirement to register the birth at the British Consulate as you can see from reading this:
    I have 2 kids born in Brazil. The first was registered at the British Consulate (for a steep fee) and was given a consular Birth Registration. Then I found out it was pointless (really nothing more than a souvenir). The consular registration cert is not a Birth Certificate, and for British kids born outside the UK there is always a need to show the foreign BC duly translated (as stated in the link) So, for the second child I did not bother registering. When it came to applying for their UK passports, it made no difference that the older had been registered at the Consulate and both UK passports were issued without any problems. My kids are British like me in every legal sense, but they have been made aware that any children they have in the future must be born inside the UK if they are to inherit British citizenship.

    Now you have to think about the logistics. Does your GF have a plano de saude (heath insurance in your vernacular) or will you be paying for private heathcare or does she hope to have a natural birth at a public hospital? Over 80% of births here are C-sections; a rate that is driven by the private healthcare system. She will be pretty much guaranteed a C Section in the private system (whether she wants this or not) and is assured a natural birth in the public system (unless there is a real and pressing medical emergency that demands surgical intervention).

    man of leisure2015-06-11 07:52:09

  • #275118

    Wellington
    Member

    My kid’s photos came back slightly cropped also! I guess the exact sizing and proportions of the face is only relevant to the requirements of the scanning process – a high-res scan of the photo is held in a database and used for face-recognition purposes. The actual paper photo is not used in the passport, unlike in olden days when it would have been physically glued onto the information page. I’ve noticed that the newer passports have not only a clear printed picture inside, but also fuzzy version of the same photo made up of dots and squiggles. If you hold a magnifying glass over this, you can see the printing is not pixels but, rather, the name and DOB of the holder in tiny lettering.

  • #275111

    Wellington
    Member

    For my kids photos I went to a shop that takes ID photos but they messed up the precise sizing requirements so I ended up doing it myself. It was very easy! All you need to do is take a good quality, well- framed selfie against a white or very pale background (which will be off white in the actual photo). Do you have a photo quality colour printer – they cost next to nothing these days?

    You don’t need to have any photo software on your PC. You can simply open a MS Word document (A4 size) and drag/drop the photo file onto that. Crop the photo into a portrait 4:3 crop ratio (one of the preset sizes that you can select when choosing a cropping ratio), so it looks like a passport photo showing only your head and neck, and then reduce the actual size of that cropped picture to 45mm x 35mm. Play around a few times with the crop so you get the measurements of the forehead to chin within the limits. Copy and paste onto the same page a few times so you have several. As you have made the size of the photos 45 x 35, that will be the real size as they appear on the printed glossy or matt photo paper (can be any size of your choice). The finished product was comparable to any professional and I had absolutely no problems with the IPS guys in Durham who processed the passports.

    man of leisure2015-05-06 14:44:56

  • #275086

    Wellington
    Member

    I have always had problems transferring money out of Brazil. They need to see the source beforehand so running back and forth with relevant paperwork etc is a major headache. CGT is not generally included in the annual tax return in Brazil and tax on gains here falls due for payment on the last day of the month that comes after the month in which the gain was realised. In other words, you can’t simply state that you will deal with it at the end of tax year. Given that all international transfers are directed through the central bank, I strongly suspect that your money will not be cleared unless and until you can show that the relevant taxes have been paid. . Wait for a more informed answer.man of leisure2015-05-05 07:28:08

  • #274720

    Wellington
    Member

    Regardless of that, VITEM V does not permit the partner/spouse to take employment with an entity incorporated in Brazil. It’s fine to be self-employed or work remotely inside Brazil for a company based outside Brazil.man of leisure2015-04-10 09:06:58

  • #274707

    Wellington
    Member
  • #274198

    Wellington
    Member

    Stellar, your post is confusing. How does purchasing airline tickets on-line relate to getting cash from an ATM? Paying for something with a debit card (in a shop or on-line) is not related to withdrawing money from an ATM using that debit card, and such payments have no limit other than the amount of money you hold in your bank account. However, cash withdrawals from ATMs have always been subject to daily ceiling (and that applies to all banks throughout the world). This is for your own security. Here’s just one example from Barclays in the UK.

    man of leisure2015-03-17 05:54:15

  • #273993

    Wellington
    Member

    All the accountants you have spoken to must be incompetent. Brazil taxes the worldwide income and gains of its permanent residents, regardless of whether those incomes and gains are actually brought over to Brazil. According to the law you must declare your overseas CGT and pay tax (less any tax credit given by Brazil in the event that you have been taxed on the same gain in the source country). What is a matter of choice for you is whether you wish to declare your overseas income. I am told that some don’t and pull it out of Brazilian ATMs using their foreign bank card, under the radar of the Brazilian tax authorities. You must decide for yourself if you want to do that and risk the consequences. If you use your overseas card to make purchases in Brazil where you CPF is required, your CPF will be tracked and linked to those payments, and they may wonder about the source of the money.

    When you first became a permanent resident you should have made a declaration of your worldwide assets. This way, it will be seen as patrimonio and not taxed as a new gain when you bring it into Brazil. Did you do that? If you did not, you are in a pickle!

    man of leisure2015-03-11 17:42:29

  • #273971

    Wellington
    Member

    Define your understanding of ‘ill-gotten’. You would have had to declare that amount on entering Brazil so one must assume you did that and will have no problems. Otherwise, if you ‘acquired’ the money in Brazil you will need a good explanation of the source and purpose. Good luck!

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 2,930 total)