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  • #116786

    Anonymous

    Are there places where we will find expat communities outside of the big cities?

  • #116791

    lmaonade5
    Member

    Expat communities? You mean like a bunch of American ranchers in Rondonia or something? Or a group of pousada owners at one of the over 2000 beaches? Or the Brazilian equivalent of suburban Sun City, Arizona, but for expatretirees? The big(ger) cities are where the most economic opportunities are to be found for those needing to work, and where cultural opportunities are for those interested in that quality of life. If you give us a clue about where you are planning to settle with the stuff you are asking about moving, or are thinking of settling, maybe someone could help you better.

  • #116794

    ClaudePeebles
    Participant

    You know I heard there was a town (small city perhaps) up in the North East somewhere that has a bunch of happy expat campers from many foreign parts, all concentrated in a small area….just can’t recall the name at the moment but it could well be the equivalent of Sun City.

  • #116802

    akogg.org
    Member

    I think like about 20,000 Americans settled outside of and around Sao Paulo a while back. One of their cities was even named “Americana.” But there is little trace of them anymore. So beware of the seductive powers of Brasil!!

  • #116808

    lmaonade5
    Member

    Well, “awhile back” was just after the American Civil War ! LOLThe city is stillnamed Americana, and there is still a Civil War festival every year by/for the descendents, so all trace has not been totally lost.

  • #116809

    akogg.org
    Member

    No, its not. Great for you B77! See you at the picnic on 4th July?

  • #116821

    Anonymous

    Okay sorryConfusedI regretted the way I phrased that question almost immediately. Because our portuguese isn’t that great yet, I thought it might be helpful to know of a place where there might be a community of english speaking expats to help with the transition. But honestly one of the main reasons for moving to Brazil is because we love the Brazillian people, so the last thing we want is to locate inside some gated enclave full of wealthy Americans. Coming from the mountains of Northeastern US where we live a sustainable life, growing our own organic food, surrounded by the quiet sounds of a mountain river – looking for a community of kindred spirits and prefer a quiet place surrounded by nature to the excitement of city life…something simple…Any ideas?

  • #116823

    mastercoop
    Member

    Avoid SP!

  • #116829

    micko
    Member

    [QUOTE=Mindy]Coming from the mountains of Northeastern US where we live a sustainable life, growing our own organic food, surrounded by the quiet sounds of a mountain river – looking for a community of kindred spirits and prefer a quiet place surrounded by nature to the excitement of city life…something simple…Any ideas?[/QUOTE]You are looking for a complete change of pace I take it? You can buy a ‘sitio’ and move into the countryside here but you won’t find many “kindred spirits” as most folks who are interested in culture move to the city. And don’t worry about tuning into NPR on you computer because there most likely won’t be any internet. If you are interested in a place that has a bit of infra-structure you would have to move to an area, near a megopolis, where rich people have weekend chacaras which would be all right but no bargain.
    Or you can do like me and live is some rural state like MS or MT with the real ranchers and farmers and learn a whole new culture.
    But generaly, forget the english part unless you want to move to JP; they will ‘set you up’ there.
    Best Luck!!!

  • #116847

    Are you from Vermont? Small towns in Brazil are often very provincial…and not in a good way. They are nothing like picturesque New England towns. The education level is far behind as are sanitation practices in some areas (you’ll find people drinking from and defecating in the same river). Trichinosis, cholera, chagas and lepracy are real and persistent problems. You are unlikely to find lots of neighbors who speak English or people interested in organic farming, environmentalism, etc. You may well buy your gasoline out of 2 liter soda bottles and see barefooted children driving horse drawn carts full of produce down the road in the middle of the day instead of going to school. People live simply there because they are forced to. You are not likely to find many kindred spirits among the suffering.
    You also will likely find a population much more conservative than what you are accustomed to. While Brazil is considered a “liberal” country by many, it is fundamentally a Catholic country with strong and growing Evangelical leanings. The “Brazilians” you have met in the American North East are most likely from Sampa, Rio or BH. In my experience, machismo, nepotism and ignorance seem more prevalent in smaller areas.
    You could heed Dungas instructions, but ranching is hard work and a big investment. It really is a “whole new culture” compared to a New England farm. If you pursue this route be prepared to deal with neighbors who cut lots of corners and place current profit high above sustainability concerns.
    I would recommend that you first go to Appalachia. Head down around Buena Vista County VA or West Viriginia. Talk to the people, check out the towns. If you don’t think you would be happy there in the long run, then don’t even consider trying this move to Brazil. Conditions here are much worse.

  • #116866

    lmaonade5
    Member

    Nicely summed up, nikkij12185 (although there are quite a lot of “Brazilians”from Rondonia and Mato Grosso in the U.S. northeast now too).

  • #14265

    Nipoar
    Member

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