US Appliances

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This topic contains 22 replies, has 20 voices, and was last updated by  ConsideringSP 14 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #86256

    wbrutus22
    Member

    Are American style electric washers and dryers usable in Brazil with converters?

  • #86260

    bersaxa
    Member

    From what i understand, a forum member has an American washer and dryer setup.

    When I had my washer in Brazil, it wasn’t all too foreign looking to be honest. the connecters looked the same and where removable. Just be aware of the power differences depending upon where you are going to live (part of brazil uses 110 and the other 220)

  • #86262

    analivia
    Member

    [QUOTE=bglenn]Are American style electric washers and dryers usable in Brazil with converters?[/QUOTE] Nothing much to convert, maybe the plug. Apartments here are 110 and/or 220v, the plugs vary here, there are three basic shapes. the Typical USA outlet with 2 or 3 prongs (one ground), typically the wall has 2 prong and you can by a 3 prong converter jack just about everywhere. They also have the two prong round jacks. My place has jacks that accomodate both as they have a rounded hole that has two slots. These two prong jacks can be 110 OR 220, you have to check first. Then there is a 3 prong jack with flat blades that sort of form a Y pattern. These can be 110 or 200, they are typically for appliances. I bought a dryer here (and it takes FOREVER to dry anything) and it is 110v with Y connector, I did a simple change on the wall jack to convert to the Y connector. I guess a 110V dryer is just not enough to dry my clothes. I a dreding the electric bill. Off Road2007-12-29 15:11:49

  • #86272

    HFA Trading
    Member

    [QUOTE=Off Road]Apartments here are 110 or 220v[/QUOTE]
    Some are both. I have a 220V socket in my service/utility area, which I’m guessing was put there for a dryer.

  • #86273

    Sian
    Member

    bglenn – Last month I paid R$ 211,27 for 421 kWh electricity (MT is probably high). Maybe you could look on the back of a machine and tell us what it would cost to do a load. It would be interesting as I always thought this was the reason you didn’t see many down here.

  • #86274

    Anonymous

    In Riomost decent buildings are wired for 110v and 220v with the 220v being mainly for washing machines, driers and air conditioners. I guess the main reason being so they can keep the current draw to a reasonable level thus keeping the cable sizes down to a minimum.

    Although, in our building the cables are sized below the limit as the lights dim for a second when an air conditioner kicks in, if two of them kick in at the same time the computer reboots and the TV suffers a brownout.

  • #86276

    Dunga, you’re correct, electricity is a little higher in MT as our office electricity bill in Rio last month was R$73.69 for 185kWh which is 0.39836 per unit as opposed to your 0.50182 per unit.

    Also just noticed there are no service or line maintenance charges, we pay only for the power consumed, guess it’s built in to the unit cost.

    As for the washing machine running costs, it’s not really that bad, for example if you have a top model with all the bells and whistles it probably has no larger than a 1kW motor. So, if you run it on average for an hour every day, at 0.5018 just R$15.05 will be added to your monthly account, or if you live in Rio R$11.95.

    Interestingly, an energy efficient county like New Zealandhas domestic electricity charges of R$0.2176 kWh which means your monthly washing machine cost would be R$6.52

    I guess here we are subsidizing all the illegal “hookups” one sees around Rio, particularly in the not so flash part of town.

  • #86278

    mileoff
    Member

    I use the dryer at my house mostly during winter, and it takes about 3 hours to dry a load. I dont do much machine drying, nor does anyone else (I only dry my coats and jeans in the dryer during the winter or else they take forever on the clothesline) and the bill comes up to almost 100, as opposed to anywhere between 45 and 80 that is the norm during other seasons.

  • #86286

    Tenzin
    Member

    I was thinking ‘dryer’ but neglected to say it. We don’t have piped gas so I always thought an all-electric dyer would be prohibitive, at least compared to the clothes line method. I have never got around to doing any figuring as the dryers in the stores here seem odd at best and a real US dryer would probably shrink all the clothes to about 1/2 size … great if you need a load of Hooters style tee-shirts.

  • #86287

    Tenzin
    Member

    Yikes, this gets better, they must have a Cray computer to calculate the bills….

    I just looked down the page a little and I was wrong, there are indeed service charges and of course taxes, however unlike other countries where the service charges are a fixed monthly cost, here in Riothese costs are compounded with your consumption under Resolucao 166 of 10/10/2005.

    It was a little misleading, on the top of the bill they show kWh consumed = 185, Preco/Unit = 0.39836 and Valor = R$73.69

    Now looking at the bottom of the bill, here is the true breakdown;

    Energia 26.68

    Transmissao 2.48

    Distribuicao 18.19

    Encargos Setorriaia (tax) 7.65

    Tributos (tax) 18.69

    All this adds up to R$73.69 and if you divide it by 185 kWh it works out to R$0.39836 per unit as stated on top of the bill.

    The taxes I can understand, but the more electricity you use the more you pay in transmission and distribution costs.

    Now, here’s the kicker, going back a month the consumption was 303 kWh with a total cost of R$149.35. The Preco/Unit here is R$0.4929 with the following breakdown;

    Energia 45.90

    Transmissao 4.26

    Distribuicao 31.29

    Encargos Setorriaia (tax) 13.17

    Tributos (tax) 54.73

    All this adds up to R$149.35 and if you divide it by 303 kWh it works out to R$0.4929 per unit as stated on the top of the bill.

    In summary, a 64%increase in actual kWh consumption results in a 101%increase in your bill…..go figure….and do the washing by hand.

  • #86290

    RickM
    Member

    Here’s some of those “hookups” mentioned previously, not too many consumption meters in this neighborhood…..

  • #86294

    wbrutus22
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2]Yikes, this gets better,…[/QUOTE]
    Yeah, I just used ‘Consumo’ and ‘Valor at√© Vencimento’; that’s why it appeared to be so high … If you look at the tarifa it’s only 0,328810 or R$ 138,43 vs. R$ 211,27 total billing.

  • #86310

    qxglyvzbzr
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2]Although, in our building the cables are sized below the limit as the lights dim for a second when an air conditioner kicks in, if two of them kick in at the same time the computer reboots and the TV suffers a brownout[/quote]
    LOL, yep used to get this with the shower going on and off! A UPS (nobreak) became a necessity.
    Brilliant photo btw. Were the electric company guys there to cut them all? LOL
    [QUOTE=supermary]I use the dryer at my house mostly during winter, andit takes about 3 hours to dry a load.[/QUOTE]
    Is that with 220V? I’ve not used a washer/dryer much, although am considering buying back in the UK. The only time I did use one though it took about an hour to dry some jeans.
    Russell2007-12-28 12:21:33

  • #86315

    mstevenson
    Member

    Yea, I think its 220V. If I’m not mistaken, it’s the only 220v in the house.

  • #86365

    Aaronk
    Member

    [QUOTE=Russell]Were the electric company guys there to cut them all? [/QUOTE]

    Absolutely, a first class exercise in futility as, within hours of the electric company guys leaving, most of the “hookups” were back up there again……..probably qualifies for a Darwinaward.

    Now this photo shows what happens when the electric company gets serious about people pinching electricity…….

  • #86391

    AnnaO
    Member

    I love your pics, Terry!

  • #86416

    frenchie66
    Member

    [QUOTE=Russell] [QUOTE=Off Road]Apartments here are 110 or 220v[/QUOTE]
    Some are both. I have a 220V socket in my service/utility area, which I’m guessing was put there for a dryer.
    [/QUOTE] Right, I updated my post 110V and/or 220V. I have 220v for my A/C units.. danger is plugs can look the same but have either voltage.. test first..

  • #86417

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Off Road][QUOTE=Russell] [QUOTE=Off Road]Apartments here are 110 or 220v[/QUOTE]
    Some are both. I have a 220V socket in my service/utility area, which I’m guessing was put there for a dryer.
    [/QUOTE] Right, I updated my post 110V and/or 220V. I have 220v for my A/C units.. danger is plugs can look the same but have either voltage.. test first..use a lamp if you do not have a tester.[/QUOTE]

  • #86420

    sphiatt
    Member

    I have Whirlpool appliances (washer and dryer) imported from the US. The dryer is obviously 220V and is on a separate ring to the other circuits. Takes about an hour to dry a full load of heavy cottons but we really only use it mainly to fluff up (and un-crease) semi-dry material and thus avoid the pain of using an iron. The empregada (having finally realised that these items are not a threat to her job) is as happy as a pig in ***!

  • #86448

    sphiatt
    Member

    [QUOTE=Denise]
    I love your pics, Terry!
    [/QUOTE] Thanks Denise, as the saying goes, “worth a thousand words…” All the best for the 2008.

  • #86480

    phsp23
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2] All the best for the 2008. [/QUOTE]
    The same to you ! Smile

  • #86481

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]Both those photos are hysterical, Terry, and soooooo true to life. LOL[/QUOTE]
    Fantastic, aren’t they? You’d think they’re from a movie!

  • #11543

    milkshake
    Member

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