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Top Reasons I Hate Living in Brazil…

Home Forums Vent Your Frustrations Top Reasons I Hate Living in Brazil…

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  • #236206
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Gilmour
    Member

    I disappeared for a couple of months, and then I came back. I think I must attract trolls.
    Some of what you say exists here where I live, and other things not. It’s a different culture, what do you expect? For everything to be the same?
    Jeez, time to disappear again.

  • #236209
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    I guess it’s time for the OP to think about going home.

  • #236217
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    “14. It’s hot as hell 9months out of the year, and central heating/cooling doesn’t exist here becausethe houses are not constructed to be airtight or insulated or include airducts. So you either suffer for 9 months or confine yourself to a small roomwith a wall a/c unit. And in the 3 months where it actually gets”cold,” you freeze at night.”
    Where in Brazil do you live ? I am in São Paulo, its 23 degrees and raining. And, btw, its summer.
    BUt if you came from Yellowknife in Canada, or Vladivostok in Russia I understand….

  • #236219
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism. Wherever you are from, Brazilians willalways be immediately upfront in telling you that it’s “better here”. They willbe quick to tell you to your face all about how gringos don’t bathe and are“cold”.
    ITS true: Brazilians take 3 showers a day on average. Try to enter a bus or tram in some European country and you will see the difference. Body odor that could kill.
    Sure that “latinos” are warmer people

  • #236220
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    63. Brazilians also do not cover their mouths when they cough, evenupper-class folk who should know better. Sealed in a crowded elevator? Thewaiter serving your food? The guy sitting behind you on the bus?
    Sad, but TRue

  • #236222
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    64. Don’t forget that stinky garbage can of excrement-stained tissue rightnext to the toilet Wink
    Allow me to add, that this stuff is LOVED by cockroaches, its a big Yummy for them to eat this used paper
    WENGER2013-02-07 10:31:42

  • #236223
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    36. Brazil is a 3rd world country at ridiculously inflated prices forsub-par quality items. To give you an idea, São Paulo is ranked the 10th MOSTEXPENSIVE city in the world. (New York is #32.) People go on 12-24 monthpayment plans to purchase a no-name hairdryer that will break before it’s paidoff.
    Now you have got me. I thought that São Paulo is at least the 3rd expensive in the world

  • #236225
    Profile photo of Andrewfroboy
    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    You can come up with negativity about any country. I have my issues with Brasil and to some extent I think most people that complain about Brasil here only do so on the threads to vent. I feel that way, I don’t complain much here, but if I do it’s because it’s a group of people that can understand. All that being said, after my last trip to the US I have decided that Brazilians are the new “Americans”, terrible travlers, they speak loudly their own language, don’t tip well and in general are very entitled. I would argue much more so than the typical US world traveler.

  • #236233
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy] You can come up with negativity about any country. I have my issues with Brasil and to some extent I think most people that complain about Brasil here only do so on the threads to vent. I feel that way, I don’t complain much here, but if I do it’s because it’s a group of people that can understand. All that being said, after my last trip to the US I have decided that Brazilians are the new “Americans”, terrible travlers, they speak loudly their own language, don’t tip well and in general are very entitled. I would argue much more so than the typical US world traveler. [/QUOTE]
    While it is true that you can come up with negativity about any country Brazil and its people seem to inspire a lot more discussion about its and their short comings than almost any other country. This is of course just anecdotal but I have the habit of reading the comments of about every article I find about Brazil. Of course the USofA and its people receive a lot of criticism a lot of it deserved, but given Brazil’s relatively small international presence and the small quantity of foreigners who actually travel and live here compared to other countries, there must be something about it and its people that rub many people from other countries the wrong way. A really intelligent student of mine once made the comment “Every Brazilian is an American in Training” I thought at the time it was pretty funny and possibly true but I now think it might be more appropriate to say “Your average Brazilian is your stereotypical American…on steroids”nesne22013-02-07 11:49:48

  • #236289
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Any sentence starting with “Brazilians are …” are of the same quality as the stereotypes promulgated on the gringo-basher girl’s blog we’ve been discussing on the other thread.
    I have been traveling a lot all around the world and I find that most humans are, well, human, and essentially don’t mean to be mean or stupid. There are some foul apples everywhere. And a lot is related to getting essential needs met. If people lack more basic things, they tend to not care as much about higher level issues. But most people in the world mean to be good. And I have seen this no different in Brazil than elsewhere.
    When I lived in an apartment complex in the US mid-west, I had some really awful neighbors. In Campo Grande we had caring people and essentially were left unbothered, my (ex)namorada would always say “ninguem mexe”, and it was true. The Assemblia de Deus next door (literally we shared one wall) was horribly annoyingly loud, until I stepped up and complained (in the right way), they really seemed to have taken it to heart, it’s been much better ever since.
    Karaoke nights until 5am — we had still suffered through those in 2010 — have mostly disappeared. Its getting better. Mostly.

  • #236293

    Squid, I don`t see anything wrong with starting a vent with `Brazilians are….` because, as Wenger so nicely pointed out in this thread, many Brazilians don`t have a problem with lumping all Americans/foreigners/etc into a group (and neither do you I assume, since you said `you must be American` if you don`t like speedos…sterotyping freely) and frequently verbally attacking us with unprovoked rants based on stereotypes.
    Here is my `brazilians are` statement –
    Brazilians are more prone than any other group I have met to lump people into groups and `stereotype.` Even the most intelligent ones seem confused when presented with a statement like yours, about not judging a book or being open minded. Even if those around them belong to the group they decide to cricize at that moment (Nordestinhos, gauchos, negros, brancos, pobres, ricos, gringos, etc) it is very rare to see a Brazilian apologize for hurting someone`s feelings or being prejudiced and they will rarely concede that they have (to themselves or anyone else).
    Yes, I am stereotyping and yes, I would like to apologize to the rare Brazilians who may read this and be willing to utter the first half of this sentence when they do the same, but I don`t find the original post that off the mark on many point and I don`t know how people would find it offensive as the guy clearly states (and emphasizes several times) that those are the things that PERSONALLY vex him, not that they are inherently good or bad or bother everyone.nikkij121852013-02-07 15:51:55

  • #236295
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    Squiddie: I don’t think to say “Brazilians are” is as bad to say “gringos are” because gringos have many different cultures. I mean honestly to me your average Italian has much more in common with your average white Brazilian than Italians do with non ethnic white Americans for example. It really shows complete ignorance and prejudice of the outside world to consider us to be even remotely similar.
    on another note, I still think the majority of people are good at heart here or any other country I have been in. The problem, I think isn’t the majority but how large the minority who are A-holes are and if it is socially acceptable for them to express their A-holeness. I think in a lot of Brazil it is socially acceptable, as in some places in the US. That being said I think there is something else that rubs a lot of a lot of people the wrong way about Brazil and its people. I have never really put my finger on it but when you look at internet discussions involving Brazil and Brazilians there is a level of irritation that I don’t see with other cultures. Save maybe the USofA. But with the USofA it is pretty evident why, being the country and people that most affect the rest of the world. Oh and being loud,obnoxious and brash……on average! nesne22013-02-07 16:07:22

  • #236313
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER] 57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism. Wherever you are from, Brazilians will
    always be immediately upfront in telling you that it’s “better here”. They will
    be quick to tell you to your face all about how gringos don’t bathe and are
    ‚Äúcold‚Äù.ITS true: Brazilians take 3 showers a day on average. Try to enter a bus or tram in some European country and you will see the difference. Body odor that could kill.Sure that “latinos” are warmer people
    [/QUOTE]
    Did you ever ride the train or bus in São Paulo in the afternoon? When I was an English teacher I did. Maybe the three showers is just an attempt to get the stench off…in vain! rsrsrs
    I almost vomited on the Emerald line train in São Paulo and the guy was NOT a homeless man….no hyperbole… nauseous MESMO

  • #236319
    Profile photo of Business-Services
    Business-Services
    Participant

    One thing is for sure, Brazilians are not going to change their way of living just because somebody don’t agree with it and neither the complainer is going to change his point of view.
    Welcome to diversity.

  • #236321
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    All of those points are 100% true. FACT.
    Referring back to another post, I LMAO, LOL’d, PMSL and ROFL.
    I am the first to admit that I prefer dogs to humans, and while my Brazilian dogs do most of the stuff on that list, I can at least forgive them for it when they do that cute roll-on-their-backs-and-beg-for-a-tummy-rub, which I struggle to do with my in-laws or employees.

  • #236328
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    ukbr
    Member

    I have never heard a Brazilian say “I do not understand, repeat that please” or “I do not know”. Ever! After 20 years here.
    I detest how they wipe their noses, from the fingertips to the heel of their flat hand hand, disgusting. Seeing an attractive woman do that is disturbing. I just as soon want to shake hands with a Brazilian in the winter as a one armed SE Asian Muslim.
    I hate being called boy at 56 by anybody but especially a boy of 7.
    I hate the constant, constant interrupting when trying to talk to Brazilians.
    Being on crutches due to a severely broken ankle at this time I do appreciate the drivers that stop and allow me to cross the street.
    I do appreciate them trying to help me in English if they can the minute I open my mouth confirming I am a estrangeiro.
    I hate the Brazilian government allowing my daughter to sue me and them extorting from me a sum of money each and every month for possibly 8 years with to date no hearing.
    I hate the RJ criminal justice system.
    I hate the Civil Court system.
    So far (9 to date)I have only had dishonest, at times criminal, lazy, lying, overpriced Brazilian lawyers.
    My latest, after paying his R$10,000 fee upfront will not communicate via email, I must go to his office. I suspect this is to protect himself by diminishing the written record.
    Marcos9892013-02-07 19:45:14

  • #236330
    Profile photo of Business-Services
    Business-Services
    Participant

    I have never heard a Brazilian say “I do not understand, repeat that please” or “I do not know”. Ever! After 20 years here.
    And I believe if you hear it will be rare, because that’s part of the cultural attitude. Never let anybody knows that you don’t know something or didn’t understand.
    I detest how they wipe their noses, from the fingertips to the heel of their flat hand hand, disgusting.
    I still don’t know where that came from. lol
    I hate being called boy at 56. And if you don’t like of being called boy, try to explain to them why, sometimes it works.
    That can be slang if you are talking to people of 14 to 30 years old. I notice they are used to call them boy sometimes.
    I hate the constant interrupting when trying to talk to Brazilians.
    Just lack of education.

  • #236336
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Marcos989]
    .I detest how they wipe their noses, from the fingertips to the heel of their flat hand hand, disgusting.   
    [/QUOTE]
    As compared to dragging the back of your hand across your nose from the wrist to the tip of your index finger? Yeah, big difference

  • #236356
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=Marcos989]I have never heard a Brazilian say “I do not understand, repeat that please” or “I do not know”. Ever! After 20 years here.
    I detest how they wipe their noses, from the fingertips to the heel of their flat hand hand, disgusting. Seeing an attractive woman do that is disturbing. I just as soon want to shake hands with a Brazilian in the winter as a one armed SE Asian Muslim.
    I hate being called boy at 56 by anybody but especially a boy of 7.
    I hate the constant, constant interrupting when trying to talk to Brazilians.
    Being on crutches due to a severely broken ankle at this time I do appreciate the drivers that stop and allow me to cross the street.
    I do appreciate them trying to help me in English if they can the minute I open my mouth confirming I am a estrangeiro.
    I hate the Brazilian government allowing my daughter to sue me and them extorting from me a sum of money each and every month for possibly 8 years with to date no hearing.
    I hate the RJ criminal justice system.
    I hate the Civil Court system.
    So far (9 to date)I have only had dishonest, at times criminal, lazy, lying, overpriced Brazilian lawyers.
    My latest, after paying his R$10,000 fee upfront will not communicate via email, I must go to his office. I suspect this is to protect himself by diminishing the written record.
    [/QUOTE]
    Lawyers are the same all over the world (with exception of Sven, of course 🙂

  • #236365
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=WENGER] Lawyers are the same all over the world (with exception of Sven, of course :)[/QUOTE]
    With all due respect to Sven, who seems quite a nice guy, lawyers are all sh*ts. It’s the profession, not the person.
    Calling them ‘Doutor’ here makes my eyeballs bleed, and I refuse to do it.

  • #236366
    Profile photo of Steven
    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd] Calling them ‘Doutor’ here makes my eyeballs bleed, and I refuse to do it. [/QUOTE] You should see the look on their faces when I call them by their first names. Pure hatred.

  • #236372
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=finrudd]

    Calling them ‘Doutor’ here makes my eyeballs bleed, and I refuse to do it. [/QUOTE]
    You should see the look on their faces when I call them by their first names. Pure hatred.

    [/QUOTE]
    Like many of us here I have gone through a few bad lawyers during my time in Brasil. I thought I had found a good one when she asked me to call her by her first name–none of this “doutor” nonsense. And I was right–great lawyer, great person. She and her law partner (and husband) work hard, always respond (usually in a matter of minutes), have won cases (and money) for us and always get my recommendation.

  • #236373
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Steven] [QUOTE=finrudd]

     

    Calling them ‘Doutor’ here makes my eyeballs bleed, and I refuse to do it. [/QUOTE]

     

    You should see the look on their faces when I call them by their first names.  Pure hatred.

    [/QUOTE]
    Ok, for that alone, I retracts my statement about ALL lawyers being sh*ts – Sven, you get my vote for lawyer-baiting skills!

  • #236378
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    ukbr
    Member

    One of the many Brazilians that has robbed me is Junior Issais Baptiste of Nova Friburgo. He claimed he got a Bachelors degree in Florida and from what his father told me he suspected his son defrauded an American whom had befriended him, allowing him to capitalize his Brazilian day-care center.
    He required his employees refer to him as “doctor”.

  • #236381
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Marcos989] He required his employees refer to him as “doctor”.[/QUOTE]

    There are several similar cases that where brought to the courts. Lawyers, judges and the likes, demanding to be called Doutor where slapped on the wrist and made to pay “danos morais”.

  • #236446
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Tremble was spelled correctly, however “crumby” should have been crummy.
    Assuming arguendo (lawyer talk for assuming for the sake of argument), that Brasil has all of these alleged annoyances, there is something indescribable that keeps us all here. Yes, there are some cultural mannerisms that can be unpleasant, and yes, things do take longer to process, and yes, things are more expensive (I have agonizing saudades for my Ralph Lauren Polo outlet in the U.S.).
    However, the language is very pleasant to hear daily, and there is much more beyond rice and beans. Brasil has wonderful diversity, and 26 states chock full of new experiences (and exotic animals).
    Since I am a lawyer from the U.S., can I be called Doutor? I might enjoy that.
    Maybe I have been called “boy” in some stores, which I much prefer over senhor.
    What confuses me, is when I hear “morsa.”
    Doesn’t that mean walrus?
    Smile
    BossaNova20122013-02-08 15:34:53

  • #236482
    Profile photo of Business-Services
    Business-Services
    Participant

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012]
    ¬† What confuses me, is when I hear “morsa.”Doesn’t that mean walrus?Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    Dr. BossaNova2012 lol. You’re right actually, if you are talking about the animal “morsa” is a walrus, but people call “morsa” or the real name “prensa” for clamps too.Wagner2013-02-08 18:15:05

  • #236562
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Vira-lata
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER] ITS true: Brazilians take 3 showers a day on average. Try to enter a bus or tram in some European country and you will see the difference. Body odor that could kill.Sure that “latinos” are warmer people
    [/QUOTE]
    In Brazil, I noticed that Brazilians are in many respects close to Ukrainians, but not in this very point.
    In Ukrainian busses the smell is sometimes infernal, as if one of four people here has no idea of washing and deodorants. Ukarine is even a bit more odorful than Russia. Just_a_bit, though.Berau2013-02-09 15:33:22

  • #236563
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Vira-lata
    Member

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012]
    Maybe I have been called “boy” in some stores, which I much prefer over senhor.¬† What confuses me, is when I hear “morsa.”Doesn’t that mean walrus?Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    Standing in a queue in some supermercado, a lady apparently in her late forties / early fifties called me “nego” (I was 35 then), and I’d never think it didn’t suit me

  • #236587
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hollywhite
    Member

    ola my grengo handsom mans! Brasil not all great for all but we hav mani good things here darlins! we love forin mans here! if u want see me and my pretti girls big bundas plese contat me! tanks !!!!

  • #236623
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    Although I agree with most of what you are saying to be true, some of it is nick-picking. I am American from Seattle living in Jundiai which is about 38 miles outside of Sao Paulo with my Brazilian wife and soon to be 3 year old daughter and I hate it here. My wife totally stooped me into moving here, in the fact that she said everything would be cheaper (food, gas and lodging) , better (food, friends, weather and opportunities) and our quality of life. What kills me about this place is the decision making, frame of mind and lack of education, which I believe is the root of all the problems here. Education is such a hard commodity here that 90% or above Brazilians don’t or can’t get it and that lack trickles down to all the problems here. Like case in point, window screens. I told my wife that we should buy some window screens cause I’m always leaving the windows and doors open cause I’m hot. Anything above 60 degrees for me is warm (being that I’m from the south of Alaska in Seattle) and she dismissed it. She said it was a stupid idea, but yet it’s stupid to have all the fans running on full power and to invest into a A/C but not screens for the doors and windows??? That is what I’m talking about! Just plain stupid behavior, something so simple and inexpensive.
    I generally think that Brazilians are very friendly and have great music, bbq’s and weather here….but that is about it! I can’t wait to move back to the US asap! Not that the US has it’s problems too. Yes there is corruption and violence but those two pale in comparison to what is down here. There is too much crime, filth, corruption and stupid behavior here for me to tolerate or anyone for that matter! I’m so tired of hearing my wife refer to all the problems and close minded thinking as ‘it’s the culture’. This place will always be a 3rd World Country or “developing’. The Portuguese really fooked up this country! They should’ve never kicked out the Dutch! But then again if they hadn’t then we wouldn’t have New York. NitroBiz2013-02-10 13:10:28

  • #236627
    Profile photo of Kathy2012
    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz]Like case in point, window screens. I told my wife that we should buy some window screens cause I’m always leaving the windows and doors open cause I’m hot. Anything above 60 degrees for me is warm (being that I’m from the south of Alaska in Seattle) and she dismissed it. She said it was a stupid idea, but yet it’s stupid to have all the fans running on full power and to invest into a A/C but not screens for the doors and windows??? That is what I’m talking about! Just plain stupid behavior, something so simple and inexpensive. [/quote]
    If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?

  • #236643
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] Although I agree with most of what you are saying to be true, some of it is nick-picking. I am American from Seattle living in Jundiai which is about 38 miles outside of Sao Paulo with my Brazilian wife and soon to be 3 year old daughter and I hate it here. My wife totally stooped me into moving here, in the fact that she said everything would be cheaper (food, gas and lodging) , better (food, friends, weather and opportunities) and our quality of life. What kills me about this place is the decision making, frame of mind and lack of education, which I believe is the root of all the problems here. Education is such a hard commodity here that 90% or above Brazilians don’t or can’t get it and that lack trickles down to all the problems here. Like case in point, window screens. I told my wife that we should buy some window screens cause I’m always leaving the windows and doors open cause I’m hot. Anything above 60 degrees for me is warm (being that I’m from the south of Alaska in Seattle) and she dismissed it. She said it was a stupid idea, but yet it’s stupid to have all the fans running on full power and to invest into a A/C but not screens for the doors and windows??? That is what I’m talking about! Just plain stupid behavior, something so simple and inexpensive.
    I generally think that Brazilians are very friendly and have great music, bbq’s and weather here….but that is about it! I can’t wait to move back to the US asap! Not that the US has it’s problems too. Yes there is corruption and violence but those two pale in comparison to what is down here. There is too much crime, filth, corruption and stupid behavior here for me to tolerate or anyone for that matter! I’m so tired of hearing my wife refer to all the problems and close minded thinking as ‘it’s the culture’. This place will always be a 3rd World Country or “developing’. The Portuguese really fooked up this country! They should’ve never kicked out the Dutch! But then again if they hadn’t then we wouldn’t have New York. [/QUOTE]
    @BossaNova, if you are a lawyer from the US, why are you here? I looked at a LSAT practice test years ago, and said, WTF is this.. this is hard!! Then I moved to Brazil! hahaha. But this was yeaaaars ago around the time I was boozzing it up and met some nice girl who was a legal secretary wanting to become a lawyer in Dallas.
    @Nitro, Brazil is a big country. Where I live, high up in the mountains, it gets hot sporadically, but then a cold front comes in temps drop. Rarely is it an inferno that I can’t stand like the South of the USofA. If you want to see it for yourself, I’m only a few hours away from Belo Horizonte. Forewarning: I’m a bit of a risk taker, boozer (at night), work-a-holic (during the day), sinuca afficionado (whenever possible)! But for me, I could never imagine moving back to the US. Someone could offer me $200k/year and I wouldn’t go. I may make half of that in Brazil, but at least I have family here. Everything I have is here.
    I’m not saying that this is your case, most likely it’s NOT, but I’m going to say it because I’m sure it’s a problem for a lot of people who complain about here, maybe even the OP:just ACT like a Brazilian. I’ve been here for what, 6-7 years. I have to greet so many people daily that it’s almost absurd according to American terms, but that’s the way it’s done here. Shake everyones’ hand. Say “Hi” to everyone. When I started doing this, I felt this humungous weight off my chest. Just act like a Brazilian….spongebob2013-02-10 16:57:01

  • #236656
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [/quote]If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?[/QUOTE]
    If they were available then I would, but that is besides the point.

  • #236664
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    blue
    Member

    I’m from just north of Seattle myself, and it took a couple years to get used to the climate here…but I did.
    Then we flew to Seattle last December to spend Christmas with my family – damn near froze to death and it was only in the low 30’s! Wind came up a little once we were outside of the airport and I actually felt pain from the cold. Meanwhile native Washingtonians walked by wearing their usual shorts. We drove straight from the airport to Southcenter to buy warmer clothes.
    I get what you’re saying, but the only way to survive here is to accept Brazil as Brazil. It’s not the US, it never will be the US so quit comparing them.
    I made a decision that THIS is my home. I learned about my city, I get involved in what’s going on here. I try to understand why some things are the way they are – there IS a reason, it’s just not an American reason! LOL!
    And you know…I don’t think I’ve EVER seen screens for windows while here…I’m not even sure they sell the screening! At least no one we know uses them, although most only run the fans when they are in that room.

  • #236677
    Profile photo of Kathy2012
    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] [/quote]If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?[/QUOTE]
    If they were available then I would, but that is besides the point. [/QUOTE]
    How is your wife’s position on the issue in any way relevant if the screens are unavailable anyway?

  • #236687
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN] [QUOTE=NitroBiz] [/quote]If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?[/QUOTE]
    If they were available then I would, but that is besides the point. [/QUOTE]
    How is your wife’s position on the issue in any way relevant if the screens are unavailable anyway?[/QUOTE]
    Screens are available here. I put screens in a house I had built a few years ago in Salvador. I also have them on the bedroom windows in my current apartment. It’s because I don’t like constant mosquito bites. There are companies that make metal frames for screens that will slide on the frames of aluminum windows that are installed in many homes and apartments here. Many big hardware and building stores have screen material If you prefer to make your own.

  • #236700
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Boa tarde SpongeBob,
    I was in-house legal counsel for wind energy companies in the U.S., and I knew that energia eolica (wind energy) was going to grow hugely in Brasil. There were so many other reasons as well to encourage my coming here.
    As for the LSAT, that is a NASTY exam. People take prep courses just for that. There was one section, maybe it was called logical reasoning, where you would be dead meat if you could not make a Venn diagram (interconnecting circles) in order to answer the questions that followed the fact pattern.
    There are 5 cages. Monkeys can go with otters, but not with lions, lobsters can share a cage with pangolins, but only if coatis are next door. Everyone can share a cage on Wednesday. It is Friday, who can be in cage 3? It’s Thursday, there is a coati next door – who cannot be in cage 1? It is Monday, there is a lion in cage 5, who cannot be in cage 4?
    Boa sorte! Smile
    BossaNova20122013-02-11 13:24:27

  • #236701
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Since my last posting, I got called the dreaded “walrus” again. I don’t have a moustache, and when last I checked, I didn’t have flippers either.
    Maybe the name is “morso,” and not morsa, pode ser?
    I sure hope so!
    Smile

  • #236715
    Profile photo of Paulo
    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Wagner]
    ¬† What confuses me, is when I hear “morsa.”Doesn’t that mean walrus?Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    What about mo√ßo, it shouldn’t be mo√ßa, though it could be in certain circles.

  • #236725
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    @bobnbrazil2 Climate isn’t really an issue for me, it’s the frame of mind, crime and corruption that follows. Education is a rarity here and that has trickled down to all the problems that is Brazil. But like you said I have to deal with it. That is the hard part! Why settle when you know somewhere else is better?

  • #236727
    Profile photo of Business-Services
    Business-Services
    Participant

    [QUOTE=cardi]
    What about mo√ßo, it shouldn’t be mo√ßa, though it could be in certain circles.
    [/QUOTE]
    Mo√ßo = dude (LOL), people are used to call when they don’t know you and need information. Hey mo√ßo, could you help me please?
    Moça = female of moço.Wagner2013-02-11 20:08:32

  • #236728
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    purebishop
    Member

    [QUOTE=Wagner]
    Mo√ßo = dude (LOL), people are used to call when they don’t know you and need information. Hey mo√ßo, could you help me please?
    Moça = female of moço.[/QUOTE]

    Or Moça = dudette Wink
  • #236733
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Thank you, Cardi, Wagner, and SilverSurfer! The mystery is solved!
    I know how this all started. I saw a cartoon, and it was with a walrus (morsa), and he had a bucket (balde).
    It turns out that the walrus was named Stanley, and he was from California, and he DID have a bucket.
    http://capinaremos.com/2007/11/24/a-morsa-e-o-balde/
    So, I have walrus on the brain. Smile
    BossaNova20122013-02-11 23:14:42

  • #236875

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] Like case in point, window screens. I told my wife that we should buy some window screens cause I’m always leaving the windows and doors open cause I’m hot. …Just plain stupid behavior, something so simple and inexpensive.
    The Portuguese really fooked up this country! They should’ve never kicked out the Dutch! [/QUOTE]
    1. Yes- window screens: would be nice to leave the windows open when it’s hot and not get bitten to death by mosquitoes… My friend worked in Gambia, West Africa (one of the poorest countries on earth), and even they had screens on their doors and windows (though to be fair the malaria down there is rather fatal…). Why is it somehow illiterate Medieval peasants in Spain, Morrocco and Turkey were somehow able to construct their ancient houses to stay cool in the summer and warm in the colder winter months, yet here, a passably modern country with modern technology/engineering etc., it’s impossible! People LIKE to be uncomfortable, inconvenienced, stuck in traffic, frustrated. Or, they don’t like it, but to do ANYTHING to try and change even the simplest discomforts is not even worth the thought power or effort…
    2. Blame: it’s always the Portuguese’s fault for “chaos” or “bureaucracy”, or British financiers in the mid-19th Century, or America, or the IMF or whoever. Never the Brazilian’sfault for their own problems. But, we’re a young country they say, only 500 years old!! I don’t know, Italy and Germany only came into being as countries in the later half of the 1800’s, Canada and Australia are about 100yrs old. Israel, Taiwan and South Korea have only existed for a little more than 60. If they can get it together, why can’t the Brazilians??

  • #237028
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Suiço
    Member

    OP funny post. Love it.
    I find it odd how people are always defending Brazil.
    Sure, things can be said about any country but never have they been so in-your-face as I’ve seen here.
    “57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism” fuels the fire.

  • #237071

    [QUOTE=shinrai]OP funny post. Love it.
    I find it odd how people are always defending Brazil.
    Sure, things can be said about any country but never have they been so in-your-face as I’ve seen here.
    “57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism” fuels the fire.[/QUOTE]
    Seriously- there was an article about massive corruption in government salaries in the NYTimes the other week (i.e. Mayors and judges of small Brazilian cities getting paid higher than their developed world counterparts of larger cities).
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/11/world/americas/brazil-seethes-over-public-officials-super-salaries.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
    If this happened in any country, the citizens of that country would rightly be outraged, yet one Brazilian writes into the comments section of the article:
    “Guys, No matter what people say…. I love live in Sao Paulo and be Brazilian!! Very proud!!… At least brazilian people’s have EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE.!!!”
    WTF does that even mean?!? What does it have to do with anything? Just dig a hole in the sand, bury your head in it and scream: “I’m so PROUD! It’s SO GREAT HERE!!!”

  • #237076
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    Seriously- there was an article about massive corruption in government salaries in the NYTimes the other week (i.e. Mayors and judges of small Brazilian cities getting paid higher than their developed world counterparts of larger cities).
    http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/11/world/americas/brazil-seethes-over-public-officials-super-salaries.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0
    If this happened in any country, the citizens of that country would rightly be outraged, yet one Brazilian writes into the comments section of the article:
    “Guys, No matter what people say…. I love live in Sao Paulo and be Brazilian!! Very proud!!… At least brazilian people’s have EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE.!!!”

    [/QUOTE]
    Perhaps he “be” a judge. LOL

  • #237080
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    [QUOTE=shinrai]OP funny post.¬† Love it.I find it odd how people are always defending Brazil.Sure, things can be said about any country but never have they been so in-your-face as I’ve seen here. “57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism” fuels the fire.
    [/QUOTE]Seriously- there was an article about massive corruption in government salaries in the NYTimes the other week (i.e. Mayors and judges of small Brazilian cities getting paid higher than their developed world counterparts of larger cities).http://www.nytimes.com/2013/02/11/world/americas/brazil-seethes-over-public-officials-super-salaries.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0¬†If this happened in any country, the citizens of that country would rightly be outraged, yet one Brazilian writes into the comments section of the article: “Guys, No matter what people say…. I love live in Sao Paulo and be Brazilian!! Very proud!!… At least brazilian people’s have EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE.!!!”WTF does that even mean?!? What does it have to do with anything? Just dig a hole in the sand, bury your head in it and scream: “I’m so PROUD! It’s SO GREAT HERE!!!”[/QUOTE]
    I saw that too and had to laugh. The funny thing is Brazzers are probably, on average, the least emotionally intelligent people I have come across. So funny how in many ways they are the exact opposite of how they see themselves. Stangest fruit in the bunch that is for sure.

  • #237085
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] Since I am a lawyer from the U.S., can I be called Doutor? 
    [/QUOTE]
    Dude, this is Brazil, here they even call the police officer on the street corner “Doutor”.
    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?
    [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN]
    If they were available then I would, but that is besides the point. [/QUOTE] [/QUOTE]
    A saw, some wood, some screws and some screen.
    You can’t get that?
    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] Since my last posting, I got called the dreaded “walrus” again.¬† I don’t have a moustache, and when last I checked, I didn’t have flippers either. Maybe the name is “morso,” and not morsa, pode ser?I sure hope so!Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    Don’t you think they are calling you mo√ßo?

  • #237086
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Gilmour
    Member

    What “gets me” about Brazilians is that you can sit there ALL DAY LONG telling them that when you give a Brazilian a hand, they take your arm. They will emphatically agree.
    Then when they do it, they just can’t see it. There no such thing as a “sem no√ßão’ meter for Brazilians, I think.

  • #237088
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] Since I am a lawyer from the U.S., can I be called Doutor? 
    [/QUOTE]
    Dude, this is Brazil, here they even call the police officer on the street corner “Doutor”.
    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] If it’s so simple, why don’t you do it?
    [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN]
    If they were available then I would, but that is besides the point. [/QUOTE] [/QUOTE]
    A saw, some wood, some screws and some screen.
    You can’t get that?
    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] Since my last posting, I got called the dreaded “walrus” again.¬† I don’t have a moustache, and when last I checked, I didn’t have flippers either. Maybe the name is “morso,” and not morsa, pode ser?I sure hope so!Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    Don’t you think they are calling you mo√ßo?

  • #237119
    Profile photo of Steven
    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=spongebob]What “gets me” about Brazilians is that you can sit there ALL DAY LONG telling them that when you give a Brazilian a hand, they take your arm. They will emphatically agree.

    Then when they do it, they just can’t see it. There no such thing as a “sem no√ßão’ meter for Brazilians, I think.

    [/QUOTE] A friend of my wife asked me to order a small tablet computer for him and bring it on my next trip. He told me to just give him my account number and he would transfer the cash. Well, I brought it on my visit last week and asked a friend of a friend to make sure he got it. Guess what? I’m still waiting for the money. He e-mailed my wife with a hard luck story and she told him to wait until he had the money. That’s it – now the chase begins. I told her that I won’t buy anything more for anyone in Brazil until we get the cash from her deadbeat friend. And the outcome is predictable – I’m the one that everyone is ticked off at.

  • #237121
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Steven]A friend of my wife asked me to order a small tablet computer for him and bring it on my next trip.  He told me to just give him my account number and he would transfer the cash.

     

    Well, I brought it on my visit last week and asked a friend of a friend to make sure he got it.¬† Guess what? I’m still waiting for the money.¬† He e-mailed my wife with a hard luck story and she told him to wait until he had the money.

     

    That’s it – now the chase begins.¬† I told her that I won’t buy anything more¬†for anyone in Brazil until we get the cash from her deadbeat friend.¬† And the outcome is predictable – I’m the one that everyone is ticked off at.

    [/QUOTE]
    Better than that – he’s probably stolen your identity, and using your bank account information is now ordering LOADS of tablets, and selling them under a dodgy company he opened in your name in some side street in Zona Este Sao Paulo!

  • #237128
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    [QUOTE=sven]
    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] Since my last posting, I got called the dreaded “walrus” again.¬† I don’t have a moustache, and when last I checked, I didn’t have flippers either. Maybe the name is “morso,” and not morsa, pode ser?I sure hope so!Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    Don’t you think they are calling you mo√ßo?[/QUOTE]
    i spent the weekend with our family in SP and an auntie from Mosquito Armpit, Paraná. Her country pronunciation was so strong that there were times that we all looked at each other completely confounded. We went to Bragan√ßa to visit some other old aunties. When we got back [we were in 4 cars] she was excitedly commenting about “tuners”. It took us a while to realize that it was the tunnel we had passed through. I would bet that if she said mo√ßo it would come out mor√ßo.3casas2013-02-14 15:23:56

  • #237155
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    rkearns
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven]

    Well, I brought it on my visit last week and asked a friend of a friend to make sure he got it.¬† Guess what? I’m still waiting for the money.¬† He e-mailed my wife with a hard luck story and she told him to wait until he had the money.

     

    That’s it – now the chase begins.¬† I told her that I won’t buy anything more¬†for anyone in Brazil until we get the cash from her deadbeat friend.¬† And the outcome is predictable – I’m the one that everyone is ticked off at.

    [/QUOTE]
    I can’t believe you fell for that one. But live and learn, right. I won’t lift a damn finger without getting a promissory notesigned. That way, I can sue them in the small claims court, with juros e corre√ßão monetária. Brazilians like to push the limit, until they burn their hand.
    The only downside to that is you have to know the legal forms, which aren’t that hard to understand. Secondly, if the person really has nothing, you will get nothing. BUT BUT BUT there is a HUGE misconception in Brazil. The average person thinks that they can “dar cano” and be free of the debt after a number of years. In truth, the debt NEVER goes away. Even after they die, you can make a claim against their estate.

  • #237191
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] Like case in point, window screens. I told my wife that we should buy some window screens cause I’m always leaving the windows and doors open cause I’m hot. …Just plain stupid behavior, something so simple and inexpensive.
    The Portuguese really fooked up this country! They should’ve never kicked out the Dutch! [/QUOTE]1. Yes- window screens: would be nice to leave the windows open when it’s hot and not get bitten to death by mosquitoes… My friend worked in Gambia, West Africa (one of the poorest countries on earth), and even they had screens on their doors and windows (though to be fair the malaria down there is rather fatal…). Why is it somehow illiterate Medieval peasants in Spain, Morrocco and Turkey were somehow able to construct their ancient houses to stay cool in the summer and warm in the colder winter months, yet here, a passably modern country with modern technology/engineering etc., it’s impossible! People LIKE to be uncomfortable, inconvenienced, stuck in traffic, frustrated. Or, they don’t like it, but to do ANYTHING to try and change even the simplest discomforts is not even worth the thought power or effort…2. Blame: it’s always the Portuguese’s fault for “chaos” or “bureaucracy”, or British financiers in the mid-19th Century, or America, or the IMF or whoever. Never the Brazilian’sfault for their own problems. But, we’re a young country they say, only 500 years old!! I don’t know, Italy and Germany only came into being as countries in the later half of the 1800’s, Canada and Australia are about 100yrs old. Israel, Taiwan and South Korea have only existed for a little more than 60. If they can get it together, why can’t the Brazilians??[/QUOTE]
    Young country…HA! I’ve heard that before! Why you ask. Frame of mind. They think their way of life is better cause they have beautiful beaches, great food, soccer and don’t have a enemy in the world that they don’t need to evolve and better themselves. They’re stuck on themselves and not until they’ve been to the US, Canada, Europe or Australia they start to realize how crappy it is down here!

  • #237192
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz]They’re stuck on themselves and not until they’ve been to the US, Canada, Europe or Australia they start to realize how crappy it is down here![/QUOTE]
    So true. I recently had a conversation with a friend of my stepson’s who had just returned from a few years of living and travelling in Europe. Years earlier he was an exchange student in the U.S. for a year He’s an extremely bright guy now in his mid-20s. In his words: “We go around saying this is a paradise. This is no paradise. Anyone who travels knows that. It isn’t even close. It’s a beautiful country and most of it has a good climate. But it is no paradise, and it won’t be until we fix the problems.”

  • #237193
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=toolio] and it won’t be until we fix the problems.”[/QUOTE]
    Not going to happen in our lifetimes.

  • #237205
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=sven]Not going to happen in our lifetimes.[/QUOTE]So is THAT why they call it the country of the future?

  • #237209
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=toolio]
    [QUOTE=NitroBiz]They’re stuck on themselves and not until they’ve been to the US, Canada, Europe or Australia they start to realize how crappy it is down here![/QUOTE]So true. I recently had a conversation with a friend of my stepson’s who had just returned from a few years of living and travelling in Europe. Years earlier he was an exchange student in the U.S. for a year¬† He’s an extremely bright guy now in his mid-20s. In his words: “We go around saying this is a paradise. This is no paradise. Anyone who travels knows that. It isn’t even close. It’s a beautiful country and most of it has a good climate. But it is no paradise, and it won’t be until we fix the problems.”[/QUOTE]
    The funny thing is I don’t even find Brazil to be that beautiful. There are countries that have way more varied landscape than Brazil and are therefore, I think, more beautiful. Look at the USofA, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, the Med. European countries ect. ect., is Brazzerland really more beautiful?

  • #237211
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=nesne2]
    The funny thing is I don’t even find Brazil to be that beautiful. There are countries that have way more varied landscape than Brazil and are therefore, I think, more beautiful. Look at the USofA, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, the Med. European countries ect. ect., is Brazzerland really more beautiful? [/QUOTE]
    I think Brasil is quite a “beautiful” country, although by no means the world winner. The geography of Rio is stunning, the Amazon has a beauty of its own, places like Chapada Diamantina in Bahia are spectacular etc. I’d rate my original country, Canada, at least equal to Brasil if not more “beautiful.” And I’ve been to many countries that exceed Brazil (and for that matter, Canada) in many ways. Beauty, of course, is in the eye of the beholder.

  • #237212
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=picolino]
    [QUOTE=sven]Not going to happen in our lifetimes.[/QUOTE]So is THAT why they call it the country of the distantfuture?
    [/QUOTE]
    You forgot a word. I added it for you

  • #237213
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=nesne2]Look at the USofA, Mexico, Argentina, Chile, the Med. European countries ect. ect., is Brazzerland really more beautiful? [/QUOTE]
    You forget many. Italy, France, Spain, India, Indonesia, Norway and the list goes on and on.
    Brazil is not so special.
    [QUOTE=nesne2]
    There are countries that have way more varied landscape than Brazil [/QUOTE]
    That may be because you haven’t see it all.

  • #237214
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=toolio]. Beauty, of course, is in the eye of the beholder.[/QUOTE]
    The beholder:
    sven2013-02-15 14:54:07

  • #237221
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Only at Gringoes . com can one find the grumpy bunch getting all upset about Brazil not being beautiful and Italy or Canada being better. I think that’s nonsense. Nonsense to make these comparisons. If you live in Milano or Torino, of course Rio has more beautiful landscape. What’s the point of comparing Churchill in Canada to Manaus in Brazil? And why is Delhi better (or worse) than São Paulo? I love India, but I certainly don’t think Mumbai is even half as beautiful as Rio. If you get upset about Brazilian beaches, don’t try Indian beaches. Nor even Thailand (in the northern Gulf of Siam, what a dump!), nor the Adriatic sea.
    When I fly over Brazil I am always amazed by the monotony of the landscape until a half hour before landing in GIG. But then, when I fly from Amsterdam to Kenya, there is 5 hours of crossing the Sahara, not more pretty. And no, I certainly don’t think Kenya is any nicer than Brazil.
    What is the point of that? Brazil is pretty nice. It’s a developing country with the inevitable issues. Just suck it up, do something about it, be happy or leave. Why this constant bitching and moaning?
    PS: we had the talk about Venezuela, not better. Colombia, may be interesting, but don’t forget that their riches are born from the international Cocaine trade. Prove to me that there is less corruption in Colombia, or that you can run a business with any less red tape there. Certainly India isn’t easier. Also, the people, I like about Brazil (similar to India) that dress code is very casual. Colombia, I hear, you have to wear tie to be acceptably dressed. And in Thailand, oh torture, you have to run around in a suit in 40 degree weather if you meet business people. Brazil, Germany, India, sandals, casual pants, and t-shirt are no problem anywhere. This I like very much.
    Squiddie2013-02-15 15:44:38

  • #237223
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    As I said, the adage “beauty is in the eye of the beholder” certainly applies here.

  • #237224
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Suiço
    Member

    Squid we come here to bitch and complain to vent our frustrations and for a good laugh. We need this because every single day we have people jamming:
    brazil is the best country in the world/has the most beautiful women/has the most beautiful beaches/portuguese is the most difficult language in the world and you’ll never fully learn it/it’s much better here/brazil has the best food in the world/you can find everything in sao paulo/gurgel would have surpassed the success of henry ford if it wasn’t for the coalition of foreign manufacturers/i went to the best school in brazil/embraer is much better than boeing/i’m an expert/i’m a specialist/ etc.
    in our faces.
    none of this is true. simply myths passed on down through generations of ignorance. it’s o.k. to call ’em on it.

  • #237226
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=shinrai]gurgel would have surpassed the success of henry ford if it wasn’t for the coalition of foreign manufacturers
    [/QUOTE]
    LOLLOLLOL

  • #237228

    It took me four years after I arrived in Floripa to make it up to the serra. I’d heard the road was treacherous, and already felt unsafe just traversing BR-101. Then I’d heard the road was repaved, widened, passing lanes added, so I finally ventured the 4-5 hours it takes to drive up there. WOW!!! I’ve posted this link before, but it’s worth repeating.
    Campo dos Padres
    Tell me THAT isn’t amazingly beautiful?!?
    Each state has areas/regions of natural wonders, but the general mindset is when one has time off, to head to the beach. There are some pretty beaches in Brasil, but I’ve been to many in other countries far more beautiful! To see the real beauty, to appreciate the natural wonders of this vastcountry, you need to ‘go West young man’ (and woman).
    How many here have even been to Foz do Igua√ßu? If you’ve never been, then thatshould go to the top of your list! A mere one hour flight from SP (or Ctba), not an arduous trek, like getting deep into the Pantanal (which is at the top of mylist).
    Yet part of what makes me stand in awe of the natural beauty of this country, is considering what lies underneath‚Ķ the wealth of natural resources. The iron ore deposits and newly discovered pre-sal oil fields are already well known. But how many know that the largest underground reservoir of fresh water, pristine drinking water, ON THE ENTIRE PLANET, lies mainly within Brasil’s borders?!? The Guarani Aquifer might not make the same headlines as the Pre-Sal oil fields‚Ķ now. But I guarantee you, someday it will!
    And I only recently learned about a mineral/chemical called Niobium. Well over 90% of the world’s known reserves are in Brasil!
    When you take all of this together, and include it in the equation that also contains the negative factors of burro-cracia, corruption, crime, and a seemingly dysfunctional culture when it comes to accepting responsibility, any list someone makes of why they hate it here, falls short of being taken seriously.
    Yet to each his own….
    Gringo.Floripa2013-02-15 16:32:54

  • #237231
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    Brazil is beautiful….in the parts with the fewest people.
    Wherever they congregate in large numbers, they seem to f*** up royal.

  • #237236
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    Foz do igua√ßu is awesome…agree 100%…Caraiva in Bahia is gorgeous too. Where I live now is f**king horrid…but it is because of the people and the crap buildings going up. think there is a lot of natural beauty but it’s ruined by the inhabitants
    Current town:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150510058935762&l=f00b1ba636
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150507412020762&l=1492ede938
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150562639715762&l=e2b1bd1add
    Caraiva:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150311724350762&l=48ea1fd6c7
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10150311725090762&l=6355955c91
    my morning drive is through this forest:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151348803645762&l=d43140104b
    this is the little city in the middle of the jungle where I teach:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151352868270762&l=f518fb411f
    view from outside of one of my friend’s house. nothing there but little concrete buildings…but the landscape is great
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151416543345762&l=0e51390a2d
    and our airport in the middle of the jungle:
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151271126720762&l=63b4f861f5

  • #237256
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Squiddie you miss the point – for me, Gringoes .com is a pressure release, a way of letting off some steam when things here get too much.
    When I feel I am the only person in a sea of Brazilians who don’t think ‘WTF?’
    When I get near to screaming point with employees, clients, the general way of doing business here.
    When nothing works, when services are shocking in both price and what they deliver.
    When I turn away from some horror on the street of Sao Paulo that I feel unable to help and guilt for looking away.
    When it’s tanking down with rain, and the endless plastic bags are clogging the drains and flooding the city.
    When it isn’t raining and the smell of human excrement is a painful reminder of the human suffering here, and why I don’t ever want a flying insect alighting on me.
    When above all, I want to throw the towel in, and leave – go anywhere, hell, even return to Anytown UK and live a grey life there. Then I come to Gringoes .com (daily) and see I am not the only one, that it’s normal for things to be not-normal, that I am not alone. Along with this, I read things that make me smile, make me curious, and make me glad I live here.
    I leave the city at weekends, I am surrounded by the wildlife here, less than an hour away from the city (subject to traffic – so 2.5hrs) and actually living the life I came here to live. Then it doesn’t seem so bad.
    I moan and bitch on Gringoes .com, I take the piss, I am cynical, and occasionally helpful, but like many here, am carving out my life in Brazil (as some of my family have before me), for better or for worse, and sometimes, just sometimes, it all makes sense, and it’s not so bad.
    I am feeling poetic tonight.

  • #237260
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    Foz do Iguaçu is beautiful? Sorry but I have taken people there three times and none of them were impressed. It is full of tourists and seems like a disney attraction with water. There are so many more beautiful places with so many less people. It is not bad but it is really nothing special. It is so amazing to hear Brazlians jerk off their country when in my little state we have a temperate rainforest, volcanoes, semi arid desert and much more and I never brag about it. Why would I be impressed with Brazil when we have this within hours of where I am from. I am not saying I want to move back home but Brazzers are idiots to think where they are from is special. It may even be less than average.
    http://www.nutt.us/SnoqualmieFalls.htm
    http://www.sfu.ca/geog/geog351spring09/group06/Volcano/1volcanogallery.htm
    http://www.globeimages.net/img8076.search.htm
    http://wallpapers.free-review.net/42__Gold_Beach,_Olympic_National_Park,_Washington.htm
    http://fineartamerica.com/featured/palouse-river-canyon-3–eastern-washington-state-daniel-hagerman.html

  • #237265

    [QUOTE=nesne2]Foz do Iguaçu is beautiful? Sorry but I have taken people there three times and none of them were impressed. It is full of tourists and seems like a disney attraction with water.[/QUOTE]
    I stated it’s a natural wonder, and in terms of volume of water, it is. Havasu Falls, in the Grand Canyon, isbeautiful (and hard to reach, so very few people, and no infrastructure other than a simple foot trail). Granted, when human infrastructure is imposed, it can be a distraction, but one merely needs the ability to still see the forest, in spite of the tree in front of their face.
    As mentioned earlier, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Yet perhaps you visited in a dry season, when the falls weren’t so forceful? Also, any visit there warrants seeing it from not only the Brasil side, but also the Argentine side. The sensory overload one gets from standing right at the edge of what is called the Devil’s Throat, cannot be put into words! I find it hard to believe someone would walk away ‘unimpressed’. But I’ve never climbed Everest, so what do I know?
    I still stand on the premise that any gringo living in Brasil needs to visit this natural wonder!

  • #237266
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    You are right, beauty really in the eye of the beholder, but I have been to both sides of the falls all three times and neither I nor the people I took there were impressed. But then we were all from the west coast of the USofA where there is some pretty amazing scenery that is much less Disneyfied. My family and friends are real outdoors people, mountains, islands, ect. I’m not saying some people may not think Brazil is really amazing but I have not met anybody from the PNW who thought that the topography of Brazil was exceptionally amazing. Hell even the climate in Cali is better. I don`t want to cut it down, because Brazil is an ok place but it just isn`t that exceptional and it drives me crazy that the people and the Brazzer lovers think it is.nesne22013-02-15 19:33:41

  • #237267

    [QUOTE=nesne2] But then we were all from the west coast of the USofA where there is some pretty amazing scenery that is much less Disneyfied. My family and friends are real outdoors people, mountains, islands, ect. I’m not saying some people may not think Brazil is really amazing but I have not met anybody from the PNW who thought that the topography of Brazil was exceptionally amazing. Hell even the climate in Cali is better.[/QUOTE]
    Then you must familiar with Yosemite and Big Sur. Now THOSE are beautiful areas!!!
    Yet you can’t compare the topography of the central and eastern portion of the South American continent with the western portion of the North American continent. Geologically, they’re apples & oranges. Comparing the PNW with Chile and Peru is apples/apples. In fact, I’d say the Andes blows the Cascades and Rocky Mountains away!
    Ditto with the climate. The cooler north Pacific Ocean creates a far different climate than the warm southern Atlantic Ocean. Again, apples/oranges. Head to Georgia or Florida, and you’ll find similar humidity as here in Brasil.
    My principal point in mentioning awe-inspiring (for me at least) Foz do Igua√ßu (my focus being on the actual falls and not the human interjection of infrastructure), is that I believe many (most?) gringos in Brasil have at best (other than some beaches), the vista from Corcovado as their one and only point of reference in Brasil as to experiencing a ‘natural wonder’ in this vast country. Foz is easy to get to, and virtually anyone, regardless of their physical capacity, can go and enjoy it.
    Gringo.Floripa2013-02-17 06:39:51

  • #237275

    I’veflown figures of eight photographing the smoke that thunders, aka VictoriaFalls. I’ve done the Maid of the Mist and the helicopter thing at Niagara Falls.I’ve splashed about a bit at Foz do Iguaçu,yet in terms of awe and wonderment, nothing compares to the great fall of AuntAgatha into a tulip bed where she impaled her sherry glass into a rhyming partof her anatomy.

  • #237277
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Thanks for the pictures Gringo.Floripa. What you show there does not look out-crowded by tourists.
    Finrudd, well said. I get that point, yes. And its good to hear your full perspective including the poetic ending.
    And Esprit, why always so profane? You have a hard time saying something that does not involve the insertion of items into the rectum. Did you ever notice that? What is your anal preoccupation? Hm, come to think of it, it does match your customary writing both in style and content. Though I grant you, in the past few months you have loosened up a little bit.
    Squiddie2013-02-15 21:41:20

  • #237278
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    purebishop
    Member

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]Brazil is beautiful….in the parts with the fewest people.
    Wherever they congregate in large numbers, they seem to f*** up royal. [/QUOTE]

    It doesnt take that many believe me LOL
    Haha, yes its beautiful, the only problem is that its in Brazil. LOL
  • #237282

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]…
    And Esprit, why always so profane? You have a hard time saying something that does not involve the insertion of items into the rectum. Did you ever notice that? What is your anal preoccupation? Hm, come to think of it, it does match your customary writing both in style and content. Though I grant you, in the past few months you have loosened up a little bit.
    [/QUOTE]

    Squiddie,you do both me and the word, profane, an injustice; I do not have, as therecord may show, an anal preoccupation.

    Imust confess however that pugnacious persons exemplified by those, such as yourgood self, often put me in mind of those that may be characterised as anal orifices.And when, in particular, I think of you, Squiddie, I’m tormented by the vision of apouting ring of fleshy unsightliness ready, yet again, to disgorge its fatuous,if not flatulent, contents. Stern%20Smile

  • #237284
    Profile photo of Steven
    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]Brazil is beautiful….in the parts with the fewest people.

    Wherever they congregate in large numbers, they seem to f*** up royal. [/QUOTE] It reminds me of Paris. Beautiful. But, if only they could build a wall around it to keep the French out.

  • #237289
    Profile photo of toolio
    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd] Squiddie you miss the point – for me, Gringoes .com is a pressure release, a way of letting off some steam when things here get too much.
    When I feel I am the only person in a sea of Brazilians who don’t think ‘WTF?’
    When I get near to screaming point with employees, clients, the general way of doing business here.
    When nothing works, when services are shocking in both price and what they deliver.
    When I turn away from some horror on the street of Sao Paulo that I feel unable to help and guilt for looking away.
    When it’s tanking down with rain, and the endless plastic bags are clogging the drains and flooding the city.
    When it isn’t raining and the smell of human excrement is a painful reminder of the human suffering here, and why I don’t ever want a flying insect alighting on me.
    When above all, I want to throw the towel in, and leave – go anywhere, hell, even return to Anytown UK and live a grey life there. Then I come to Gringoes .com (daily) and see I am not the only one, that it’s normal for things to be not-normal, that I am not alone. Along with this, I read things that make me smile, make me curious, and make me glad I live here.
    I leave the city at weekends, I am surrounded by the wildlife here, less than an hour away from the city (subject to traffic – so 2.5hrs) and actually living the life I came here to live. Then it doesn’t seem so bad.
    I moan and bitch on Gringoes .com, I take the piss, I am cynical, and occasionally helpful, but like many here, am carving out my life in Brazil (as some of my family have before me), for better or for worse, and sometimes, just sometimes, it all makes sense, and it’s not so bad.
    I am feeling poetic tonight. [/QUOTE]
    Bravo.

  • #237291
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Esprit, you haven’t checked the record and you just added another one to it. You do have an anal preocupation, and from your latest graphic description you seem to have much experience with watching. Squiddie2013-02-16 09:05:33

  • #237327
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Pouting ring!
    Esprit – I thank you, once again, from the bottom of my heart. Smile

  • #237329

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012]Pouting ring!
    Esprit – I thank you, once again, from the bottom of my heart. Smile
    [/QUOTE]
    I found “fatuous,if not flatulent” to be quite delightful! Such a nice lilt to that. LOL

  • #237354

    Insteadof vexing the forum censor with the naughtiness of calling a fellow poster anasshole, I wonder, since it appears to amuse, is it possible that the term‘pouting ring’ could be adopted as a more decorous euphemism by way of analternative to disguising the spelling with a series of asterisks or say, aplay with words such as, ‘ah soul’ or ‘as sole’?

    InSquiddie’s case however none of the above is adequately descriptive of hisactivities of late which may be described as a stupid stunt.

  • #237447
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    With all due respect, I would hate to see “pouting ring,” become commercialized like a “McRib.”
    I trust that the author of the same (“pouting ring”), who has a true gift with both turn of phrase and cadence, will soon delight this forum with more creations of a similar ilk.
    Smile

  • #237473
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] With all due respect, I would hate to see “pouting ring,” become commercialized like a “McRib.
    [/QUOTE]it may be beginning!
    http://gothamist.com/2013/01/14/is_that_calamari_or_pig_rectum.php

  • #237484

    [QUOTE=3casas] [QUOTE=BossaNova2012] With all due respect, I would hate to see “pouting ring,” become commercialized like a “McRib.
    [/QUOTE]it may be beginning!
    http://gothamist.com/2013/01/14/is_that_calamari_or_pig_rectum.php%5B/QUOTE%5D

    LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

    ‚Äú‚ĶObviously it would be illegal in America to serve porkrectum and call it calamari, and the USDA says they’ve never heard of anyonetrying to pass pork bung as squid.‚Äù

    Well pouting rings that pose as squid may very well beillegal in the US, yet, mentioning no names; we have our very own perfectly legal collection ofpork bungs here on the forum.

    http://gothamist.com/2013/01/14/is_that_calamari_or_pig_rectum.php

  • #237489
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    I think it’s perfectly legal to call it artificial calamari, as long as it also indicates that pork meat was used….

  • #237497

    [QUOTE=finrudd]Squiddie you miss the point – for me, Gringoes .com is a pressure release, a way of letting off some steam when things here get too much.
    When I feel I am the only person in a sea of Brazilians who don’t think ‘WTF?’
    When I get near to screaming point with employees, clients, the general way of doing business here.
    When nothing works, when services are shocking in both price and what they deliver.
    When I turn away from some horror on the street of Sao Paulo that I feel unable to help and guilt for looking away.
    When it’s tanking down with rain, and the endless plastic bags are clogging the drains and flooding the city.
    When it isn’t raining and the smell of human excrement is a painful reminder of the human suffering here, and why I don’t ever want a flying insect alighting on me.
    When above all, I want to throw the towel in, and leave – go anywhere, hell, even return to Anytown UK and live a grey life there. Then I come to Gringoes .com (daily) and see I am not the only one, that it’s normal for things to be not-normal, that I am not alone.
    [/QUOTE]
    Amen- brother.This is an extreme country, that’s for sure. Especially Sao Paulo- and not in a good way…
    [QUOTE=shinrai]Squid we come here to bitch and complain to vent our frustrations and for a good laugh. We need this because every single day we have people jamming:
    brazil is the best country in the world/has the most beautiful women/has the most beautiful beaches/portuguese is the most difficult language in the world and you’ll never fully learn it/it’s much better here/brazil has the best food in the world/you can find everything in sao paulo/gurgel would have surpassed the success of henry ford if it wasn’t for the coalition of foreign manufacturers/i went to the best school in brazil/embraer is much better than boeing/i’m an expert/i’m a specialist/ etc.
    in our faces.
    none of this is true. simply myths passed on down through generations of ignorance. it’s o.k. to call ’em on it.
    [/QUOTE]
    This sh*te gets really tiring to hear, especially because none of it is true and people are constantly telling you about it. Brazilians remind me of Americans in this respect. The worse things get, the louder they scream, wave the flag and paint their truck the colors of the Star Spangled Banner. I believe during the dictatorship in Brazil, the military used the idea of Patriotism and rallying around the national football team as a way to unite the country and stifle dissent. Throw in some novelas, and Presto!: a blind, unquestioning population…
    When the Soviet Union came crashing down, supposedly people Could Not, Would Not believe that other countries in the world actually had a better life and system than they did. How could it be not so? They had been fed propaganda their entire lives that the USSR had the best standard of living in the world, the most equality, the most humanistic system. The world outside the Communist system was dark, primitive and cold. If you think you have it the “Best in the World”, you’re a lot less likely to try and change anything that’s F’ked up in your country.

  • #237499

    Normal0falsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONE< ![endif]-->

    Anyway- to continue our list. Feel free to add some of your own:

    67. Brazil is a pretty much a South African Apartheid-era society. The 10%European elite live pretty much like their Western counterparts: nice apartments,good jobs, maids etc. The other 90% (the Browns and Blacks) live in wretched 3rdWorld conditions in the Townships (Favelas/Periferia) and take the bus for twohours to come into the rich, whiter areas to clean apartments and work assecurity guards.

    < ![endif]-->

  • #237504
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]

    Anyway- to continue our list. Feel free to add some of your own:

    67. Brazil is a pretty much a South African Apartheid-era society. The 10%
    European elite live pretty much like their Western counterparts: nice apartments,
    good jobs, maids etc. The other 90% (the Browns and Blacks) live in wretched 3rd
    World conditions in the Townships (Favelas/Periferia) and take the bus for two
    hours to come into the rich, whiter areas to clean apartments and work as
    security guards.

    [/QUOTE]
    Funny comment, Neguinho Beija Flor is 75% European DNA and only 20% Black.

  • #237508
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=donpelon415]

    Anyway- to continue our list. Feel free to add some of your own:

    67. Brazil is a pretty much a South African Apartheid-era society. The 10%
    European elite live pretty much like their Western counterparts: nice apartments,
    good jobs, maids etc. The other 90% (the Browns and Blacks) live in wretched 3rd
    World conditions in the Townships (Favelas/Periferia) and take the bus for two
    hours to come into the rich, whiter areas to clean apartments and work as
    security guards.

    [/QUOTE]
    Funny comment, Neguinho Beija Flor is 75% European DNA and only 20% Black.[/QUOTE]
    I think the testing was done for a veja article if I remember right. Not sure if they were really checking all DNA markers. Veja has a tendency to manipulate data to fit their own political view. They do this with drugs all the time.
    At any rate the view that 10 percent of the population that is white is ruling over 90 percent that is brown and black and poor is an oversimplification. Although the top 10 percent is pretty much only white save some football stars, actors ect. the bottom 90 percent is certainly not all brown and black. Hell there is a guy who pushes a cart around on my street whose parents are from Portugal. He certainly is not in the 10 percent but he certainly is white.

  • #237544
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]InSquiddie’s case however none of the above is adequately descriptive of hisactivities of late which may be described as a stupid stunt.[/QUOTE]
    Hey, someone informed me that you made such comments about me. I don’t really care. To me, you are what you are so interested in. You may bask in the applause of some fans here, but that doesn’t impress me nor those other people who don’t like you but find it worthless to spend their time on you. There is always the reporting button, I guess, but I don’t report you when you attack me, only if you attack others with your tasteless verbal excretions. As it is with you, there is always a next time.

  • #237568

    [QUOTE=Squiddie][QUOTE=Esprit]InSquiddie’s case however none of the above is adequately descriptive of hisactivities of late which may be described as a stupid stunt.[/QUOTE]
    Hey, someone informed me that you made such comments about me. I don’t really care. To me, you are what you are so interested in. You may bask in the applause of some fans here, but that doesn’t impress me nor those other people who don’t like you but find it worthless to spend their time on you. There is always the reporting button, I guess, but I don’t report you when you attack me, only if you attack others with your tasteless verbal excretions. As it is with you, there is always a next time.
    [/QUOTE]

    OhSquiddie, you’re such an old lady; so someone informed you that I made commentsabout you? Did you get a midnight PM from a fellow forum vigilante? Bless yourheart. You seem to forget that it was you who made the initial unprovoked and derogatorycomment falsely mentioning that I had an “anal preoccupation.” From there on in you started to dig a holefor yourself and you seem determined to continue digging. You cannot expect topull a stupid stunt like that and expect me not to make merry with it. I lookforward to the “next time” should you wish to give your artificial calamarianother irrigation.

  • #237574

    [QUOTE=Esprit]Bless yourheart.[/QUOTE]
    In the Deep South (US, not Brasil), “Bless your heart” is a ‘decorous euphemism’ for fook you. If one wants to really be insulting, they include “precious” before the word heart.

  • #237614
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Well, like I said, I have no problem with your retaliatory verbal excretions, Esprit. The funny thing is, you just added a few more to the record, and it looks like you won’t stop, Tongue… when someone can’t stop excreting, it’s diarrhea I guess. You are proving my point that you do have an anal preoccupation, Esprit.
    Squiddie2013-02-18 17:59:46

  • #237639

    Goodgrief, you’re doing it yet again Squiddie! Dear boy, it looks like you havelearning difficulties typified by, Attention Deficit HyperactivityDisorder.Get yourself checked out as this seems to be having a catastrophic effect on yourlife. First we had the pathetic tale of woe about your ill-fated romance withyour Brazilian dusky maiden; an affair which led to your unfortunate divorceand family destruction, swiftly followed by your infatuation with becoming a propertyTsar and now this focus on me and all things anal. I can enjoy a bit of banter,perhaps more than most, but please leave me out of your depraved mental intrigues.

    Nowpay attention: in an earlier part of this thread, page 8, dated 15thFeb I made a light-hearted comment about Aunt Agatha falling on her sherryglass and from that you started your character assassination attack. My replysuggested that the record may show that little if any of my 2000 + posts have afixation or delectation of matters pertaining to the large bowel, its contentsor its exit point and yet you persist with this nonsense.

    Nowit is not for me to offer you any pop Freudian psychology or comment on your libido or your psychosexualenergy but I can assure you that persons with your obvious disabilities or analissues hold little interest or amusement for me; now stop digging and go sellcrazy elsewhere.

  • #237655
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Oh poor Esprit is suffering a “character assassination attack” spending 3 full paragraphs on it. I am sure the world is in uproar over such injustice. How could such a nice guy possibly become victim of such unprovoked character assassination?! I did notice you stayed out of my way for a while here. But I had not been reprimanded for my derogatory comments against fellow Gringoes.com posters, so your staying out of my way does not obligate me to stay out of yours. So, no attention disorder here.
    And you are doing it again in this post, adding one to the record. I knew it would go on. And the world has not seen the end of it, I am sure.
    Your opinions about me (or anyone for that matter) leave me completely cold. Whether you are amused or not, likewise. Meanwhile I will be or say whatever and wherever I want. Practicing my ability not to sink to your levels should this engagement escalate any further.
    Squiddie2013-02-18 20:23:50

  • #237668

    Squid,I note that you’re ‘the last word’ kind of guy and so I’ll drop this subject inyour best interests. For me to continue with a fool and his foolishness is awaste of my otherwise thumb twiddling time as I sit awaiting the next stool todrop.

  • #237672
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Interesting how you always need to add your insults, there is just about no posting from you that does not insult someone, be that an OP, myself, all men of India, or Nelson Mandela. Sadly I had some hopes for you for a brief moment, but those came to naught, I expect nothing better from you. Now I shall do you the favor of having the last word, and you may depart in peace.
    PS: oh, I almost overlooked it. You just left your droppings again. LOL
    Squiddie2013-02-18 21:12:03

  • #237673
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    It’s simply not safe for me to drink or eat while I am reading Esprit’s next coup de grace.
    1.) should you wish to give your artificial calamarianother irrigation
    2.) dusky maiden
    3.) another stool to drop
    I am overwhelmed Smile

  • #237675
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    my point exactly. whether you laugh or puke doesn’t matter really.

  • #237695
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Whether I laugh or choke, when I am reading posts in this forum, greatly matters to me, as I suspect it would for most people Smile

  • #237697
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    squiddie & espirt: 2 players of the same board…and very entertaining affectations, to be sure.

  • #237698

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]Interesting how you always need to add your insults, there is just about no posting from you that does not insult someone, be that an OP, myself, all men of India, or Nelson Mandela. Sadly I had some hopes for you for a brief moment, but those came to naught, I expect nothing better from you.[/QUOTE]
    You’ve obviously never heard of ‘insult comedy’ Squid. Rodney Dangerfield, Don Rickles, Joan Rivers, and Andrew Dice Clay, to name a few, are classics in this genre. Do those names ring a bell? While you might only see insults, some people here comprehend, and appreciate, the comedic gift Esprit bestows us with by his skillfully woven words.
    The more irreverent his posts, the better, IMO. Not only do I get a good chuckle, even a gut busting laugh from time to time (and yes, I too have learned not to be drinking a beverage when I see one of his posts appear) but my vocabulary is definitely enriched whenever I digest an Espritoic aphorism. It’s refreshing to have someone of genuine intelligence share their words here‚Ķ and certainly far more interesting than estóriasabout real estate czardom-ship and women that turn one’s life inside out and their head upside down (you wish!).
    So lighten up Squid, and stop being such a pouting artificial-calamari ring!
    Or to put it another way… if you can’t take a joke, then bless your precious heart!
    Gringo.Floripa2013-02-19 05:05:50

  • #237699
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    not so…comedians benefit from a straight man; satirists from those with blinders. brilliance often needs some foil.

  • #237701

    [QUOTE=Grads]not so…comedians benefit from a straight man; satirists from those with blinders. brilliance often needs some foil.[/QUOTE]
    Again, there are many genres of comedy. Not all people ‘get’ some forms, and not all people appreciate them. Give me dry sarcastic wit over slapstick anytime.

  • #237721
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    rkearns
    Member

    ‘Ole Squiddiedam.

  • #237850
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    pouting artificial-calamari ring!
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Smile

  • #237851
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    I’m still laughing!
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Smile

  • #237855
    Profile photo of BossaNova2012
    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Gringo.Floripa:
    A recent treat from our friend Esprit:
    “pretty pigtailed pregnant teenager”
    Smile

  • #238093

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    And I only recently learned about a mineral/chemical called Niobium. Well over 90% of the world’s known reserves are in Brasil!
    [/QUOTE]
    omg I LOVE those wikipedia.org element entries and their huge resolution photos!
    VidaNascendo2013-02-20 20:09:33

  • #238100

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012]Gringo.Floripa:
    A recent treat from our friend Esprit:
    “pretty pigtailed pregnant teenager”
    [/QUOTE]
    Bossa, I don’t recall what thread this one was from, but when I read it, I had to print it, and it’s been taped to my fridge ever since. I use it frequently! LOL
    “If you truly open your eyes it will be possible for you to see yesterday‚Äôs breakfast being digested. So guess where your head is?”

  • #238106
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    ^^ that is exactly why I say “anal preoccupation”

  • #238250
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    0

  • #238253
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I live in Bahia, Porto Seguro area, most people here are living without a brain, so it is difficult for a visitor to co-exist here, yes, they are rude, but mai and pai never taught them etiquette, they have mortocycles and like to skim the pedestrians, scare the hell out of them, then they give you the bird, they exit doorways while folks are waiting to get in, they will work cheap but usually they don’t show up, or call to tell you they will be late, but that is a way of life here, and it is perfectly allright to not do as they promised, they will deliver free, so you wait all day for the goods, but they never show, they don’t care. It’s cool to have a hatchback, opening up to offer a sound system that can be heard around the world, and it gets your attention when you are dealing with a Baiana, and get interrupted, because it is more important that they need to have it done right now. Their vocal chords are enhanced with higher volume by inhaling Cerveja, Skol works the best. If the moto taxi is 6 reals and you hand them ten, they usually are fresh out of troca, and besides, you got where you wanted to go alive, and it was so fast you got there sooner. But, all things considered, the climate is great. wgm

  • #238263

    All excellent points, wilmil, but by no means regional. Please add “elevators” to “doorways”… Here in Freguesia, Ilha do Governador, Rio de Janeiro- aka “The c√∫ da Ilha”, we have a multitude of horrid VW Kombis and Vans in addition to the ‘mototaxis’. Taken all together, they are hell on earth, cheia de “beleza” (thumbs-up sign)…
    Don’t know what number this Pet Peeve of mine may be, but why is it when Brazilians contemplate anything: crossing the street, changing lanes, opening their car door- traffic side, getting out of transport vehicles, stepping off a curb, making a left turn, backing out of a parking spot, etc., etc… they finally ACT on it at the very last possible instant before you are right on top of them? Certainly the other choice is to wait until you f***ing pass by, but without a collective modicum of patience, it clearly must be impossible.
    VidaNascendo2013-02-21 17:50:40

  • #238293
    Profile photo of Tony
    Tony
    Participant

    You forgot the part of Brazilians are lousy tippers.
    They will spend hands over fist on trinkets, yet will not cough enough tip money if any to cabbies and wait staff.
    That’s from a Brazilian with over 25 years in the US.
    And as i have found out here , they do not tip well on Their home country.
    Tony

  • #238705

    [QUOTE=wilmil]I live in Bahia, Porto Seguro area, most people here are living without a brain, so it is difficult for a visitor to co-exist here, yes, they are rude, but mai and pai never taught them etiquette, they have mortocycles and like to skim the pedestrians, scare the hell out of them, then they give you the bird, they exit doorways while folks are waiting to get in, [/QUOTE] [QUOTE=VidaNascendo] All excellent points, wilmil, but by no means regional. Please add “elevators” to “doorways”…
    Don’t know what number this Pet Peeve of mine may be, but why is it when Brazilians contemplate anything: crossing the street, changing lanes, opening their car door- traffic side, getting out of transport vehicles, stepping off a curb, making a left turn, backing out of a parking spot, etc., etc… they finally ACT on it at the very last possible instant before you are right on top of them? Certainly the other choice is to wait until you f***ing pass by, but without a collective modicum of patience, it clearly must be impossible.
    [/QUOTE] All of these behaviors drive me CRACKERS. Even walking 2 city blocks in São Paulo becomes an hazardous, passive-aggressve, ignorant obstacle course: complete with bullet-proof, black SUVs roaring into and out of their private, fortified, subterrean garages- woe betide anyone unfortunate enough to have the audacity to get in their way… The most dangerous place in Brazil must be, not the favelas, but the supermarket parking lot. Go first- Then look! Confused

  • #238932

    1. Brazilians have no consideration for people outside their immediate circle, and are often just plain rude. For example, a neighbor who plays loud music all night; and even if you ask him politely to turn the volume down, he tells you to f**k off. And basic politeness? A simple “excuse me” when someone almost knocks you over on the street? Forget it.

    personally this is the big ONE for me – there is just no sense of society… I used to think the sense of family replaced it… but you soon learn this is just bullsh*t!

    family just means who you can get the most off to get by….
    as for the rich.. vile, vulgar and ugly creatures!
  • #238933

    9. Brazilians have a very prominent class system. The rich have a sense of entitlement that is beyond a caricature. They think the rules do not apply to them, that they are above the system, and are very arrogant and inconsiderate, especially with each other. The poor, meanwhile, are paid so little that they never have an opportunity to lift themselves out of poverty and therefore often turn to crime or simply become lazy and indignant regarding their jobs because they see no hope for the future and no point in trying to do a good job.

    so true, so true….

  • #238946

    dripping such venom, scottyh! I love it; both posts right on target, especially the part about the rich!
    driving my humble car through the Hell that is Visconde de Pirajá, the main thoroughfare in Ipanema, is always an exercise in NOT mowing down stupid, arrogant, wealthy pedestrians!

  • #238966
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    SFO Murphy
    Member

    You guys are so silly! Please, go and take your foolish Brasilian husband/wife back to your home country if you are able. Report back to us in a year or two how that is going for you all (even if you could).

  • #238972

    [QUOTE=Kitten]You guys are so silly! Please, go and take your foolish Brasilian husband/wife back to your home country if you are able. Report back to us in a year or two how that is going for you all (even if you could).

    [/QUOTE]

    This is an unfortunate and regrettableresponse; the now infamous, ‘Why don’t you go back from whence you came?’ Thisis the typical rather lack lustre and intellectually frail response tojustified criticism when such criticism strikes home in the embarrassment of undeniabletruth. It is a form of frustration that seeks not only to insult while failing toaddress the actual criticism, or ponder its solution, but rather tolerate andtherefore become part of the problem and its continuity further adding toreasons why some hate living in Brazil, or rather, living among Brazilianphuckwits.

  • #238976
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    So after reading almost everyone’s comments and speaking with my own small circle of friends I have here in Brazil and family, how can ANYONE in their right mind say the the quality of life here in Brazil is better? I’ve heard just recently that the attention to family life is better and that outweighs the problems and advantages of the US. Being married and a parent my values have changed over the past 3-7 years but I don’t see how family life is so horrible in the US that it makes you think that dealing with all the b.s. that is Brazil is a better life. I am willing to bet that between 50-90% or higher if given the chance to live in the US over Brazil, Brazilians would take that chance given that they knew how much better it is. I’m not saying that the US is perfect, sure it has it’s own problems but the same problems that are there are here and a lot more intense! The murder rate alone is 4-5 times higher then the US. Corruption is the second highest only to Venezuela in South America. Public education is virtually non existent, to get any kind of decent education here you have to be in the upper class and go to a private school. These three points alone are far inferior to that of the US!

  • #238978

    [QUOTE=Kitten]You guys are so silly! Please, go and take your foolish Brasilian husband/wife back to your home country if you are able. Report back to us in a year or two how that is going for you all (even if you could).

    [/QUOTE]
    Esprit has deservedly reamed this comment, but I would like to add for Kitten and any other clearly native Brazilian members deciding to post who “don’t like to read”…
    PLEASE NOTE THE GRAY FOLDER ICON ON YOUR UPPER LEFT:
    Topic: Top Reasons I Hate Living in Brazil…
    And just above that:
    Gringoes.com: Brazil: Vent Your Frustrations: Post Reply
    Vent your frustrations, reasons to hate, etc… We are not looking for your responses to our statements or questions here, unless of course you want to add to the growing list of factors comprising “Bizarro World”. If so, be welcome. If not, well then STFU.

  • #238980
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]
    [QUOTE=Kitten]
    You guys are so silly! Please, go and take your foolish Brasilian husband/wife back to your home country if you are able. Report back to us in a year or two how that is going for you all (even if you could).

    [/QUOTE]Esprit has deservedly reamed this comment, but I would like to add for Kitten and any other clearly native Brazilian members deciding to post who “don’t like to read”… PLEASE NOTE THE GRAY FOLDER ICON ON YOUR UPPER LEFT: <span =”lgText”>Topic: Top Reasons I Hate Living in Brazil… </span>And just above that:Gringoes.com: Brazil: Vent Your Frustrations: Post ReplyVent your frustrations, reasons to hate, etc…¬† We are not looking for your responses to our statements or questions here, unless of course you want to add to the growing list of factors comprising “Bizarro World”.¬† If so, be welcome.¬† If not, well then STFU.[/QUOTE]
    BIZARRO WORLD! LMFAO!!!

  • #238987

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz]I’ve heard just recently that the attention to family life is better and that outweighs the problems and advantages of the US. Being married and a parent my values have changed over the past 3-7 years but I don’t see how family life is so horrible in the US that it makes you think that dealing with all the b.s. that is Brazil is a better life. [/QUOTE]
    Family is what you make of it. It has the same problems, contradictions and complications everywhere. In my experience Brazilian families socialize more at home as a group together, and it’s not considered uncool to hang out with your parents on a Saturday night. But, I think this also stems from the prohibitive cost of going out for young people in Brazil. For common people, a party/fun is a lot more along the lines of making some food, drinking some beer and putting on music at home with friends and neighbors as opposed to going to some snooty R$60 cover fee night club. This doesn’t mean that Brazilian families don’t have their fair share of arguments, abuse, feuds and mooching.
    Some American families are separated, dysfunctional and contain alcoholics or deadbeat dads, but I could find plenty of examples of this type of human behavior in Brazil too- it’s just that Brazilians are often stuck with the jerks of the family in the same house whether they like it or not. Just looking at my wife’s family’s house, it’sall too much drama if you ask me. Brazilian families are bigger and kids move out at a much later age, but this is the case for most of the world’s population (think Italy or Japan). Only really the US, Canada and a few other European countries do 18yr olds move out into their own apartment, usually housing costs are too prohibitive for young people. In the absence of a good economy and welfare state services, family is a vital life line for most Brazilians, elders live with the main family and children stay at home until they can become independent in the world- again this is probably the case for 90% of the world’s population.
    As for myself, a British/American, I think my family is pretty close, we get together every Sunday for lunch at a parents home, or a walk in the park or go to a movie. We care for and support each other, and take trips together (maybe we’re some weird or strange exception). We have cousins and large family reunions in another part of the state at Xmas time, and I periodically go to London to visit my Grandparents, Aunt/Uncle and cousins whenever I can. In my personal experience, I don’t feel a big difference between family here in Brazil and my own, but again maybe I am the exception(?)

  • #238989
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jheathco
    Member

    Yet one more reason. I bought a motorcycle 3 weeks ago, used, private party. The guy at my school who helps make things happen for new teachers took me to the Porto Seguro office, and I signed up for insurance. Unfortunately, I had not had my U.S. driver’s license translated, so they said that the insurance would lapse in a few days if they didn’t get a copy of the translated license.
    Got the translated license, finally, yesterday. Apparently the Porto Seguro folks are now saying that they need to see a *Brazilian* driver’s licence in order to re-instate the insurance. There are at least 6 other teachers at my school who have vehicles insured with Porto Seguro, but who only have translated licenses. At least one of them has a motorcycle.
    Why would they do this? Are they seriously not interested in having someone give them their business?
    I messaged the guy who sold me the bike, offered to sell it right back to him, I don’t even care if I lose a R$1k on the deal. My blood pressure is through the roof due to this utter bullsh*t of burro-cracy. Having a motorcycle, paid for, for three weeks, and not being able to use it, is driving me nuts.

  • #238991

    [QUOTE=KellyGuy]Yet one more reason. I bought a motorcycle 3 weeks ago, used, private party. The guy at my school who helps make things happen for new teachers took me to the Porto Seguro office, and I signed up for insurance. Unfortunately, I had not had my U.S. driver’s license translated, so they said that the insurance would lapse in a few days if they didn’t get a copy of the translated license.
    Got the translated license, finally, yesterday. Apparently the Porto Seguro folks are now saying that they need to see a *Brazilian* driver’s licence in order to re-instate the insurance. There are at least 6 other teachers at my school who have vehicles insured with Porto Seguro, but who only have translated licenses. At least one of them has a motorcycle.
    Why would they do this? Are they seriously not interested in having someone give them their business?
    I messaged the guy who sold me the bike, offered to sell it right back to him, I don’t even care if I lose a R$1k on the deal. My blood pressure is through the roof due to this utter bullsh*t of burro-cracy. Having a motorcycle, paid for, for three weeks, and not being able to use it, is driving me nuts.[/QUOTE]
    They probably want a bribe(?)

  • #238992
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jheathco
    Member

    Yeah, they probably do, and they’re not going to get it.
    The question now is whether I just tough it out for the next year and a half, or get the hell out of here in June at the end of the school year, and break contract. The latter is very very tempting. If I can get my hands on some anti-depressants, I might be able to last 16 months.

  • #238994
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    We have cousins and large family reunions in another part of the state at Xmas time, and I periodically go to London to visit my Grandparents, Aunt/Uncle and cousins whenever I can. In my personal experience, I don’t feel a big difference between family here in Brazil and my own, but again maybe I am the exception(?)[/QUOTE]
    No, you are not the exception. Whether you are Italian, Latino, Armenian, Jewish, Chinese etc – American, you retain those close family values. What makes it different is that most of 18 year olds in ” the US, Canada and a few other European countries ” are able to function independently of their mothers and so many choose to adventure out on their own. I find that young adult (and even older)Brasilian men are incapable of normal function without the servitude and authority of their mothers and/or family and eventually rely on a wife to care for them. They are not taught to function as a mature individual.

  • #239004
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    [QUOTE=NitroBiz]I’ve heard just recently that the attention to family life is better and that outweighs the problems and advantages of the US. Being married and a parent my values have changed over the past 3-7 years but I don’t see how family life is so horrible in the US that it makes you think that dealing with all the b.s. that is Brazil is a better life. [/QUOTE]Family is what you make of it. It has the same problems, contradictions and complications everywhere. In my experience Brazilian families socialize more at home as a group together, and it’s not considered uncool to hang out with your parents on a Saturday night. But, I¬† think this also stems from the prohibitive cost of going out for young people in Brazil. For common people, a party/fun is a lot more along the lines of making some food, drinking some beer and putting on music at home with friends and neighbors as opposed to going to some snooty R$60 cover fee night club. This doesn’t mean that Brazilian families don’t have their fair share of arguments, abuse, feuds and mooching. Some American families are separated, dysfunctional and contain
    alcoholics or deadbeat dads, but I could find plenty of examples of this
    type of human behavior in Brazil too- it’s just that Brazilians are
    often stuck with the jerks of the family in the same house whether they
    like it or not. Just looking at my wife’s family’s house, it’sall too much
    drama if you ask me. Brazilian families are bigger and kids move out at a
    much later age,¬† but this is the case for most of the world’s
    population (think Italy or Japan). Only really the US, Canada and a few
    other European countries do 18yr olds move out into their own apartment,
    usually housing costs are too prohibitive for young people. In the absence of a good economy and welfare state services, family is a vital life line for most Brazilians, elders live with the main family and children stay at home until they can become independent in the world- again this is probably the case for 90% of the world’s population.As for myself, a British/American, I think my family is pretty close, we get together every Sunday for lunch at a parents home, or a walk in the park or go to a movie. We care for and support each other, and take trips together (maybe we’re some weird or strange exception). We have cousins and large family reunions in another part of the state at Xmas time, and I periodically go to London to visit my Grandparents, Aunt/Uncle and cousins whenever I can. In my personal experience, I don’t feel a big difference between family here in Brazil and my own, but again maybe I am the exception(?)[/QUOTE]
    This is extremely well put.

  • #239016
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Suiço
    Member

    [QUOTE=KellyGuy]Yeah, they probably do, and they’re not going to get it.
    The question now is whether I just tough it out for the next year and a half, or get the hell out of here in June at the end of the school year, and break contract. The latter is very very tempting. If I can get my hands on some anti-depressants, I might be able to last 16 months.[/QUOTE]

    KG I’ve gone through all this crap before. Fact is nothing is consistent in Brazil. Try hitting up another office or a different person on another day and you might have better results. Like mentioned before in this thread Brazil is intensive therapy for type A personalities.
    I too will leave this place one day with my middle finger pressed up against the airplane window. For now, just enjoy the place for what it is. And have a beer or two.
  • #239017
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=KellyGuy]The question now is whether I just tough it out for the next year and a half, or get the hell out of here in June at the end of the school year, and break contract. The latter is very very tempting. If I can get my hands on some anti-depressants, I might be able to last 16 months.[/QUOTE] You’ve posted about apparently being unhappy since even before you made the move, so maybe Brazil wasn’t a good choice, esp. for someone who’d never been here to understand what he was getting himself into. What exactly would you lose by breaking your contract?

  • #239025
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jheathco
    Member

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano]

    You’ve posted about apparently being unhappy since even before you made the move, so maybe Brazil wasn’t a good choice, esp. for someone who’d never been here to understand what he was getting himself into.

     

    What exactly would you lose by breaking your contract?

    [/QUOTE]
    I wasn’t particularly unhappy in Wisconsin, just wanted a change. But you’re spot on, Brazil probably wasn’t a good choice, I didn’t research this nearly enough before I accepted the job offer.
    As Shinrai pointed out, this isn’t a good place for type A personalities. I’ve actually never ever been accused of being type A, but I have enough of the traits that it is definitely hard for me to deal with the burro-cracy here.
    If I break my contract, I stand a really good chance of sh*t-canning my entire future international teaching career. The superintendent at my school has made it very clear that he will contact every other superintendent he knows around the world (and he knows most of them) and tell them that I broke contract. I’d be blacklisted.
    So as shinrai said, I need to find a way to get through the next 16 months without having a heart attack. Unfortunately, “have a beer or two” is not the best idea for me, I’m trying very hard to cut back on my drinking, since I’m probably an alcoholic. But there’s bodyboarding and, once my foot heals, going for runs on the beach.

  • #239040
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=KellyGuy] [QUOTE=Solteropolitano]

    You’ve posted about apparently being unhappy since even before you made the move, so maybe Brazil wasn’t a good choice, esp. for someone who’d never been here to understand what he was getting himself into.

     

    What exactly would you lose by breaking your contract?

    [/QUOTE]
    I wasn’t particularly unhappy in Wisconsin, just wanted a change. But you’re spot on, Brazil probably wasn’t a good choice, I didn’t research this nearly enough before I accepted the job offer.
    As Shinrai pointed out, this isn’t a good place for type A personalities. I’ve actually never ever been accused of being type A, but I have enough of the traits that it is definitely hard for me to deal with the burro-cracy here.
    If I break my contract, I stand a really good chance of sh*t-canning my entire future international teaching career. The superintendent at my school has made it very clear that he will contact every other superintendent he knows around the world (and he knows most of them) and tell them that I broke contract. I’d be blacklisted.
    So as shinrai said, I need to find a way to get through the next 16 months without having a heart attack. Unfortunately, “have a beer or two” is not the best idea for me, I’m trying very hard to cut back on my drinking, since I’m probably an alcoholic. But there’s bodyboarding and, once my foot heals, going for runs on the beach.[/QUOTE]
    Many of us have become addicts of some kind after being here for a while, or at least very heavy habitual users, gets us through the week. I would suggest pot if you want to cut back on the drinking nesne22013-02-28 15:22:40

  • #239047
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jheathco
    Member

    Good suggestion, nesne2, and one I will take to heart. Like, right about now…

  • #239048
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Ooh! Had to delete this one in case I am accused of using Gringos for illegal purposes finrudd2014-01-07 08:31:07

  • #239060
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=nesne2] Many of us have become addicts of some kind after being here for a while, or at least very heavy habitual users, gets us through the week. I would suggest pot if you want to cut back on the drinking [/QUOTE]
    That’s quite a good idea – perhaps we can use Gringos.com as a secret forum and delivery platform for aforementioned high-grade pot? I saw another thread from someone wanting isopropyl alcohol in Brazil, and it got me thinking that someone’s making some iso-hash somewhere! We could be onto something – what everyone on this thread needs to get through the day… [/QUOTE]
    If we could set this up I would be one VERY happy camper. I can only get my hands on what we referred to in the US as “Mexican Dirt”. And even this proves difficult sometimes…LIKE RIGHT NOW!!!!!

  • #239061
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    Let me add this to the OP’s list:
    67. It is hard to get your hands on quality trees in Brazil. It is an extreme hassle and danger just to get your hands on low grade stuff.

  • #239065

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]Let me add this to the OP’s list:
    67. It is hard to get your hands on quality trees in Brazil. [/QUOTE]
    “Quality trees”… KKKKKKKKK! LOL

  • #239069
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]Let me add this to the OP’s list:
    67. It is hard to get your hands on quality trees in Brazil. [/QUOTE]”Quality trees”… KKKKKKKKK!√جø¬Ω LOL[/QUOTE]
    Dammit, even if I do edit my supposedly incriminating posts that are being passed to the PF, it is still quoted elsewhere… finrudd2014-01-07 08:32:10

  • #239074

    Having just returned fromthe garden where, under a full moon, I’ve been sucking on a low branch of myquality mango tree, I can attest that, notwithstanding the mosquito bites andappearing particularly foolish before my somewhat quizzical dogs, thehallucinogenic or other intoxicating effects were absolutely zero. Thanks abunch fellas! The lip balm isn’t helping either. Boy, do I feel stupid.

  • #239075
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    That sounds like the perfect setting to spark one. Sans the tree sucking.

  • #239076
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    SFO Murphy
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit][QUOTE=Kitten]You guys are so silly! Please, go and take your foolish Brasilian husband/wife back to your home country if you are able. Report back to us in a year or two how that is going for you all (even if you could).

    [/QUOTE]

    This is an unfortunate and regrettableresponse; the now infamous, ‘Why don’t you go back from whence you came?’ Thisis the typical rather lack lustre and intellectually frail response tojustified criticism when such criticism strikes home in the embarrassment of undeniabletruth. It is a form of frustration that seeks not only to insult while failing toaddress the actual criticism, or ponder its solution, but rather tolerate andtherefore become part of the problem and its continuity further adding toreasons why some hate living in Brazil, or rather, living among Brazilianphuckwits.

    [/QUOTE]

    My mistake. You are obviously not in Brasil on a mission of love. Misguidedly, you can only be here in a failed attempt to instruct our natives in your ridiculous form of the English language. “Brazilian phuckwits”? Really. You must not be very well liked here.
  • #239077
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    ^^ LOL

  • #239140

    [QUOTE=bobnbrazil2]
    And you know…I don’t think I’ve EVER seen screens for windows while here…I’m not even sure they sell the screening! At least no one we know uses them, although most only run the fans when they are in that room.
    [/QUOTE]
    We live in a Rio suburb and found some guys (literally, no company name, nothing) who installed window screens for us. What a friggin’ difference they have made. Along with the AC they literally changed our lives here. Mosquitoes eat both my daughters alive. My sogra, of course, still has NO CLUE to leave the gd doors closed, but that’s a whole other story. Next in my wet dream are screen doors- now THOSE I’ve never seen here in Rio or SP. There must be a binness/tariff reason for this as I can’t imagine there would not be huge demand for screens even in the favelas.
    If anyone wants the number of the guys who installed our window screens, you can PM me and I’ll see if my wife still has it.

  • #239223
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jheathco
    Member

    Yes! I will be leaving in June, and NOT COMING BACK. I’m breaking contract.
    After some recent experiences with burro-cracy and just general life here, I feel like I’ll be escaping an insane asylum. What a relief.

  • #239225
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    May your journey from these troubles send you with wisdom to serve you in life.
    very best of luck in all endeavours…

  • #239227
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    if you have a Leroy Merlin nearby (or even if you don’t, as they have a site and they ship) you can buy cheap window screens that install with velcro that could work in a pinch. there’s really no reason to not have screens!

  • #239241

    [QUOTE=3casas]if you have a Leroy Merlin nearby (or even if you don’t, as they have a site and they ship) you can buy cheap window screens that install with velcro that could work in a pinch. there’s really no reason to not have screens![/QUOTE]
    There is one not far from here 3Casas. If I were Leroy ( Wink), I would market the SH*Tout of them. Alas…
    (Fun fact: my birth name actually is Lee Roy… kkkkk)

  • #239243
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    Yea now that I think about it….it is pretty F_ing crazy that nobody has screens on their windows.

  • #239245
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    scotty447
    Member

    Why don’t you use the plastic net (with small mesh)available in the market as a temporary measure ? it is so light, so some temporary arrangement is enough to fix it. It doesn’t look that good but does the job.
    Once I was away for a while and came back, I saw my wife(Brazilian) put it on all windows as she hate cockroaches and flies and our apartment is on the ground floor .
    ganeshrkara2013-03-02 09:32:46

  • #239246
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=nesne2] Yea now that I think about it….it is pretty F_ing crazy that nobody has screens on their windows. [/QUOTE]
    Nobody??? Not true. We have screens; most of my neighbors have screens. Screens are available, either ready made or custom, to anyone who would like to have them. Could it be that really the biggest complaint about screens here is that they may take a little more effort to procure and that there are not stores everywhere to find them.
    For our screens, I went down to the people who handle a lot of aluminium extrusions for doors, windows, etc. I chose the aluminium extrusion for the job and had them sandwich the nylon screen material which I bought at a garden shop between the 2 pieces. Yes, it took a little work and thought, but we have screens…and they weren’t really that expensive.

  • #239247

    While aluminum is certainly a better material as for durability and low maintenance, same can easily be made from light strips of wood, some wood trim, finishing nails, and a staple gun. Where I grew up in the southern US, it was quite common for most houses to have an entire porch screened in, like in the photo below. It was all done with lumber. Have yet to see a screened-in porch here in Brasil. Has anyone?! Seems like it would be a no-brainer for this climate, and insect population.
    The problem I ran into with my house for screens is that many of the widows are awning-type (basculante), manually opened, not with a crank. Therefore, the only option (fixed) was install something that pulls down like a shade, and locks in place, and then pulls up when you want to close the window. I won’t even mention the cost, because it pisses me off when I think about how frikkin’ expensive they were! But regardless of the price, screens on the windows are a must-have!

    All that’s missing is to light the grill and pop a cold one! Wink

  • #239248

    [QUOTE=ganeshrkara]
    Why don’t you use the plastic net (with small mesh)available in the market as a temporary measure ? it is so light, so some temporary arrangement is enough to fix it. It doesn’t look that good but does the job.
    Once I was away for a while and came back, I saw my wife(Brazilian) put it on all windows as she hate cockroaches and flies and our apartment is on the ground floor .
    [/QUOTE]
    If you don’t do the correct measuring of corners, etc. creatures will get in despite your having put up mesh. As the lady said, go to Leroy Merlin and get it done “properly”!

  • #239252

    [QUOTE=Grads] [QUOTE=nesne2] Yea now that I think about it….it is pretty F_ing crazy that nobody has screens on their windows. [/QUOTE]
    Nobody??? Not true. We have screens; most of my neighbors have screens. Screens are available, either ready made or custom, to anyone who would like to have them. Could it be that really the biggest complaint about screens here is that they may take a little more effort to procure and that there are not stores everywhere to find them.
    For our screens, I went down to the people who handle a lot of aluminium extrusions for doors, windows, etc. I chose the aluminium extrusion for the job and had them sandwich the nylon screen material which I bought at a garden shop between the 2 pieces. Yes, it took a little work and thought, but we have screens…and they weren’t really that expensive.[/QUOTE]
    Ours were the same; not really that expensive. And in the land of Dengue, who knows what else we saved?
    The “business” that put ours up came out and measured the windows in question, built the screens, then came back to install them. Of course, the main living room window was measured/built slightly off, but we live in Brazil. It’s a bit extra effort as you say, Grad, but oh so worth it.

  • #239253
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.

  • #239256

    … Gringo.Floripa, can’t recall any screened in porches/verandas either. Go figure.
    Is that your house in the photo or an internet find?
    VidaNascendo2013-03-02 11:47:45

  • #239257
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano] Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.[/QUOTE]
    Block the breeze??? That’s hilarious!

  • #239261
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano] Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.[/QUOTE]
    KKKKKKK!
    I’m adding that to the list of Brazilian “wisdom”.
    I don’t know why the polish get such a bad rap in the US. Are neighbors to the south are much bigger “donkies”.

  • #239268
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    h.york
    Member

    [QUOTE=NitroBiz] [QUOTE=Solteropolitano] Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.[/QUOTE]
    Block the breeze??? That’s hilarious![/QUOTE]
    It does a little
    this is what I did in my room (Amazon Jungle), it did got a less breezy in there

  • #239277
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Sweetie
    Member

    Cool hat, bro

  • #239285

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano]Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.[/QUOTE]
    LOLkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkLOL
    VidaNascendo2013-03-02 17:07:16

  • #239315

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano]Many Brazilians apparently think screens block the breeze–at least that’s the story I’ve gotten.[/QUOTE]
    Just as ‘thermal shock’ will make you deathly ill! LOL
    Give me less breeze, with no buzzing of mosquitoes in my ear as I’m trying to sleep, ANYTIME!
    Screens + ceiling fan = Happy Camper! Thumbs%20Up

  • #239328

    Eh,before we completely wet our panties giggling, it should be mentioned that,from a technical view point, a screen will, by virtue of its physical presence,reduce the aperture size and therefore the volumetric flow capacity. The secondpoint regarding screen mesh is to note that the automotive industry actually employssuch screens in some high-end convertible/sports cars. Such screens are fittedimmediately behind the seats to substantially reduce the uncomfortable backwashwind [breeze]. Those who have had the experience of driving a sports car willknow that the wind/breeze comes from the rear and not what might logically beassumed. I must add that I have screens fitted throughout my house and have nointention of removing them to check on any unlikely increase in breeze.

  • #239331
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    Esprit: I noticed this with my Ferrari, Magnum PI edition of course. nesne22013-03-02 21:36:51

  • #239434
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;” =”Msonormal”><span =”st”><span style=’line-height: 115%; font-family: “Verdana”,”sans-serif”; font-size: 10pt; mso-bidi-font-family: “Times New Roman”;’>Eh,
    before we completely wet our panties giggling, it should be mentioned that,
    from a technical view point, a screen will, by virtue of its physical presence,
    reduce the aperture size and therefore the volumetric flow capacity. The second
    point regarding screen mesh is to note that the automotive industry actually employs
    such screens in some high-end convertible/sports cars. Such screens are fitted
    immediately behind the seats to substantially reduce the uncomfortable backwash
    wind [breeze]. Those who have had the experience of driving a sports car will
    know that the wind/breeze comes from the rear and not what might logically be
    assumed. I must add that I have screens fitted throughout my house and have no
    intention of removing them to check on any unlikely increase in breeze. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><?:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /><o:p></o:p></span></span><font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>
    [/QUOTE]
    Reduce < Block

  • #239471
    Profile photo of Janio Edwards
    Janio Edwards
    Participant

    I will add other things that are starting to piss me off. Busses, trucks, and other folks putting on thier turn signal and merging into me trying to test the Pauli exclusion principal.

    Brazilians making a left turn from the far right hand lane or vice versa and getting mad at me because I could not read their minds when we almost have an accident.
    Brazilian management (corporate)! These folks cant seem to manage ANYTHING from a business perspective.
  • #239479

    The Pauli Principle?
    It wasn’t translated into Brazilian Portuguese.

  • #239481
    Profile photo of Janio Edwards
    Janio Edwards
    Participant

    The Physics principle that two things cannot occupy the same space at the same time.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pauli_exclusion_principle

  • #239482
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    Perhaps “Testicle’s Deviant to Fudd’s Law,” which states that the first thing to arrive is that which occupies the space, is more applicable to Brasil.

  • #239490

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]The Pauli Principle?
    It wasn’t translated into Brazilian Portuguese.
    [/QUOTE]
    Sorry about that, I was unclear… I know what it is- I was saying many, many, many Brazilians don’t.
    There must be a reason they so poorly understand two physical objects cannot occupy the same space, ergo, the theory just hasn’t been translated yet. And if you don’t like to read… Well, we see the result.
    Or perhaps they’re all relying on Schroedinger’s cat to step in and save the day? Keep your eyes closed and maybe, just maybe things will work out your way.

  • #239492
    Profile photo of Janio Edwards
    Janio Edwards
    Participant

    If they don’t get the Pauli Exclusion Principle, they surely wont know anything about Schroedinger’s cat Smile. I like the Fudd Principle, never heard of that. Brazilian Management seems to live and dye by the Peter Principle:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Principle

  • #239495

    LOLCryLOLCryLOL
    very true.
    Clap

  • #239508
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    This list is so spot on in every way shape and form.
    I send this to every American I know to warn them about Brazil.
    I reread the list at least once a week to remind myself that I am not the crazy one.
    Just to add a few more items.
    a) Brazilians are greedy. I mean REALLY greedy. They only think it terms of money. I know Americans get the bad rap for this but I have never seen such blatant price-gougging in my entire life. Really you want 300 reais for a no-name brand t-shirt that looks like it’s going to fall apart after the first wash? Or how about all people concern themselves when choosing a career is the monthly wage. There is no thought of the quality of work or your actual interest in the area. I can’t tell you how many students have told me they hate math but what to be engineers.
    b) Despite the fact what Brazilians say or how Brazilian models look, Brazilian women are not as beautiful as they are made out to be. Sure, you will find absolutely stunning women in the South and in Minas Gerais but that it no way makes them the “best looking women in the world”. I see so many guts hanging out of shirts on a regular basis, it makes my stomach turn. Most women don’t work-out, or only “fake” work out (going to the gym but not actually doing anything because it will ruin their hair, etc.) so that by the time they are 20 years old they look terrible.
    c) Fake Brazilian cleanliness. Just because you use a napkin to eat your sandwich don’t mean jack. In fact, once you get to know Brazilians personally and aren’t in a public setting where “status” counts, Brazilians are quite squalor. The best example is handling meat or eggs and then touching everything in the kitchen afterwards. Or how about washing with cold water. As I understand it, you MUST use hot water for soap to be effective.
    d) The lack of style. I am no fashion designer or critic but Brazilians have no sense of style.
    I really could go on all day…

  • #239509
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    …I really could go on all day…[/QUOTE]
    Go away.

  • #239511
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    NEVER!!
    Looks like I found one of those Americans who love Brazil more that their own country.
    Let’s talk about that, shall we?
    I am going nowhere, so we might as well discuss it.
    USA>Brazil usaalltheway2013-03-04 20:37:26

  • #239518

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]NEVER!!
    Looks like I found one of those Americans you love Brazil.
    Let’s talk about it.
    I am going nowhere, so we might as well discuss it.
    peace to you [/QUOTE]
    Based on his/her last two posts, Grads is clearly one of those clever, binary folks we bump into every now and then. ‘Either/or’ is their modus operandi, as they observe us little people from above. No greyscale… Such a person, living in Zona Sul or Morumbi, would find Brazil utterly enchanting and those of us living in the reality of it… tiresome.
    I recommend you not waste your time “discussing it” with he/she, usa… and definitely don’t “go away”, because your list items were right on target.

  • #239522
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    Yo Vida!
    You are just the type of person I am looking for.
    I don’t want any yes men but I do need to have some like-minded folks to run ideas by.
    Thanks for the words man!
    I am here if you want to talk.
    peace

  • #239530

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]Yo Vida!
    You are just the type of person I am looking for.
    I don’t want any yes men but I do need to have some like-minded folks to run ideas by.
    Thanks for the words man!
    I am here if you want to talk.
    peace [/QUOTE]
    usaa…
    living on a razor-blade here in rio. for almost 10 years brasil has been a major part of my life. music, adventure, romance, wife, kids, in-laws, visits, residence, family, friends, company, etc. it will continue so for some time. however, there are indisputable deep, nearly insurmountable divides between brazilian culture and every single other i have ever visited or lived… which are several, more than 20 globally… i have never seen anything like the behaviors we complain about, and i cannot understand for the life of me how brazilians tolerate it here, let alone us gringos/gringoes. any of us knows this and some do love it. i’ve ‘heard’ it said in this forum that gringos who love ‘slumming’ love brasil. it makes sense UNLESS one lives in the confines of zona sul or rich sp neighborhoods.
    brazilians do things in the civic sphere i literally beg my carioca wife to explain to me; and she can’t. she is actually the driving force for us moving back to the states before the end of this month! she loves the organization we have there. i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls. education is abyssmal. and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others. if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private. wait in line? forget it. obey the teacher? you must be joking? do your homework? maybe tomorrow… all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.
    and behind it all looms the church/government monster waiting to gobble up everything in sight- the greed to which you so correctly referred. they set the tone for this society, and the people know no better… and the linguistic island where they live prevents them from learning outside the globo filter. the worst people i’ve met here have been crente.
    there is beauty, but they sure don’t understand how to take care of it, let alone preserve it- at least in the cities. jardin botanico in rio is amazing as is parque ibirapuera in sao paulo… but imho few examples outside those succeed in these two cities. since brazil is sooo huge i really don’t know the hinterlands, although the “interiorrrrr de sao paulo” is stunning.
    so… we’re out as far as residence goes, at least until our girls finish high school. however i like gringoes.com and am always up for a chat. got some buddies on here too. hope these weren’t too many words!

  • #239543
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]Yo Vida!
    You are just the type of person I am looking for.
    I don’t want any yes men but I do need to have some like-minded folks to run ideas by.
    Thanks for the words man!
    I am here if you want to talk.
    peace [/QUOTE]usaa…¬† living on a razor-blade here in rio.¬† for almost 10 years brasil has been a major part of my life.¬† music, adventure, romance, wife, kids, in-laws, visits, residence, family, friends, company, etc.¬† it will continue so for some time.¬† however, there are indisputable deep, nearly insurmountable divides between brazilian culture and every single other i have ever visited or lived…¬† which are several, more than 20 globally…¬† i have never seen anything like the behaviors we complain about, and i cannot understand for the life of me how brazilians tolerate it here, let alone us gringos/gringoes.¬† any of us knows this and some do love it.¬† i’ve ‘heard’ it said in this forum that gringos who love ‘slumming’ love brasil.¬† it makes sense UNLESS one lives in the confines of zona sul or rich sp neighborhoods.brazilians do things in the civic sphere i literally beg my carioca wife to explain to me; and she can’t.¬† she is actually the driving force for us moving back to the states before the end of this month!¬† she loves the organization we have there.¬† i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls.¬† education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.and behind it all looms the church/government monster waiting to gobble up everything in sight- the greed to which you so correctly referred.¬† they set the tone for this society, and the people know no better… and the linguistic island where they live prevents them from learning outside the globo filter.¬† the worst people i’ve met here have been crente.¬† there is beauty, but they sure don’t understand how to take care of it,
    let alone preserve it- at least in the cities.  jardin botanico in rio
    is amazing as is parque ibirapuera in sao paulo… but imho few examples
    outside those succeed in these two cities.¬† since brazil is sooo huge i really don’t know
    the hinterlands, although the “interiorrrrr de sao paulo” is stunning.so… we’re out as far as residence goes, at least until our girls finish high school.¬† however i like gringoes.com and am always up for a chat.¬† got some buddies on here too.¬† hope these weren’t too many words![/QUOTE]
    This guy is right on! This country has major problems that are seriously deep-rooted and aren’t being address in any fundamental way.
    I have found that if you really want to know about them just tell a Brazilian how much you love Brazil. If they don’t start bashing the country right off the bat just go all out with the love. Sooner or later they will tell you the truth.
    “education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here”
    I pointed this out to my mother when she was visiting. The poor behavior that is natural for children to have, although needs to be corrected by parents, never gets corrected. The pushy, “me-first”, loud-mouth attitudes, “I want it now!” carry right on into adulthood. Never have I seen so many 30 and 40 year olds with the mentality of teenagers. And these people work for multination corporations.
    This country is a hellhole. Plain and simple. The USA is not perfect and is going through hell right now but it still beats Brazil’s “boom”.

  • #239565
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    Coitado povo! Of course Brasil has many problems and is far from perfect. I just tire of self-centered whiners going on about it all the time. It’s as if you got problems, brasil’s got problems, and everything is sh*tty.
    …so endless complaining aparently eases your personal pain somehow.
    I have a lot of complaints about Brasil, and I also abhor whiners, whether expats or brasilians. Too much negativity without end.
    Here is for bringing frustrations. Vent them, then get a life and hopefully you will find happiness somewhere. My frustration is not only living in Brazil, it is also living with the continual bitching about it. Here is some more fuel for your fire of discontent, Use it wisely.
    good luck

  • #239573
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Mr. Montana] [QUOTE=usaalltheway]Looks like I found one of those Americans who love Brazil more that their own country. Let’s talk about that, shall we? I am going nowhere, so we might as well discuss it. USA>Brazil[/QUOTE]
    Yikes! Get ready for the USA Bashers Sven and gringo.floripa and sponge bob!!!!
    [/QUOTE]
    Transparent and suitable for framing, no?

  • #239589
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    ¬†¬† i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls.¬† education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.
    [/QUOTE]
    I feel you sooooooooooooooooooo much in these few sentences. I too fear for my daughter growing up here. And I work in a high end school for the Interior Elite AND YOU ARE SPOT ON on your assessment of the schools.
    THE PARENTS DON”T WANT US TO EDUCATE THEM!!!!!!!!!!!!1 They fight with us when we try to correct their HORRIBLE ANIMAL-LIKE behavior!!!!!!

  • #239595
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    rkearns
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] NEVER!!
    Looks like I found one of those Americans who love Brazil more that their own country.
    Let’s talk about that, shall we?
    I am going nowhere, so we might as well discuss it.
    USA>Brazil [/QUOTE]
    USA, I left the USSA because I was sick of:
    1) Living in a large city, driving 20+ miles to work every day.
    2) Terror Alerts on TV
    3) Typical Americans are nothing but sheeple who believe anything the government tells them
    I really don’t consider the US to be my “country”. The same for Brazil. I will live anywhere I like to. There’re pros and cons with anyplace.
    You are really nothing new here to these forums. Usually, it’s people like you who haven’t come to terms with living in Brazil. You’re frustrated. You either have a choice of green pill or red pill. Most I have met personally have taken the red pill and returned to whilst they came from. I’m sure it’s no regrets for either them or me.

  • #239597
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    I like the Matrix reference as it is so fitting for life here.
    See the dump that it is and accept it, deny deny deny and live in peace. I am between the two, working on making it work.
    TH your number 3 is TRUE but how is it different from Brazil? They believe everything the government tells them (AND expect the government to take care of them AND the piece of s*** Catholic Church. People believe angles watch them and take care of them!!!!! The devil is out to get them! They are sheeple too.

  • #239599
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    In the USofA there are many sheeple but there are also pockets of people doing a lot of thinking and going against the grain. Here in Brazzerland the people are sheeple and there really are not pockets of free thinkers. At least not that I have found.

  • #239600
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    nesne2-
    BINGO!

  • #239607

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    ¬†¬† i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls.¬† education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.
    [/QUOTE]
    I feel you sooooooooooooooooooo much in these few sentences. I too fear for my daughter growing up here. And I work in a high end school for the Interior Elite AND YOU ARE SPOT ON on your assessment of the schools.
    THE PARENTS DON”T WANT US TO EDUCATE THEM!!!!!!!!!!!!1 They fight with us when we try to correct their HORRIBLE ANIMAL-LIKE behavior!!!!!!
    [/QUOTE]
    you have no idea how it pleases me to read your post. while we are glad to get the girls out, we’ve met some wonderful, diligent parents through our daughters schoolmates. they are those who try to educate their children the best way they know. others- appalling. but this place has a strange allure. I find myself hoping, because of US neuroses/paranoia… that we’re doing the right thing.
    this is becoming a great discussion partly due to dissenting opinions, but I really can’t get those who complain about us complaining in the VENTING section of this forum. if it upsets you, GTF off this section. how hard can it be? you have no idea the richness or depth of any of our lives… WE ARE SHARING THIS WITH YOU. if the forum was comprised of only versions of you- we probably would, as you so eloquently put, “go away”.

  • #239608
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=nesne2] In the USofA there are many sheeple but there are also pockets of people doing a lot of thinking and going against the grain. Here in Brazzerland the people are sheeple and there really are not pockets of free thinkers. At least not that I have found. [/QUOTE]
    And that really is it. Sure, there are many Americans who are in the dark. But there is also a huge sector of Americans from all walks of life who don’t fit that stereotype. You can’t really say that about Brazilians.
    I find that the vast majority of Brazilians are quite simple-minded. They don’t read, they don’t learn outside of their limited schooling, they don’t question anything, they are overly focused on sex and soccer and soap operas and are extremely shallow. The men act like apes (that may be a little harsh on apes) and the women are selfish and greedy.
    Some Americans are like that as well, but most Brazilians are this way. That is the difference for me.
    Also, why live in a country where you pay more than First World prices for less then First World quality and conditions? That seems crazy to me.
    USA>Brazil

  • #239610
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo] [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    ¬†¬† i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls.¬† education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.
    [/QUOTE]
    I feel you sooooooooooooooooooo much in these few sentences. I too fear for my daughter growing up here. And I work in a high end school for the Interior Elite AND YOU ARE SPOT ON on your assessment of the schools.
    THE PARENTS DON”T WANT US TO EDUCATE THEM!!!!!!!!!!!!1 They fight with us when we try to correct their HORRIBLE ANIMAL-LIKE behavior!!!!!!
    [/QUOTE]
    you have no idea how it pleases me to read your post. while we are glad to get the girls out, we’ve met some wonderful, diligent parents through our daughters schoolmates. they are those who try to educate their children the best way they know. others- appalling. but this place has a strange allure. I find myself hoping, because of US neuroses/paranoia… that we’re doing the right thing.
    this is becoming a great discussion partly due to dissenting opinions, but I really can’t get those who complain about us complaining in the VENTING section of this forum. if it upsets you, GTF off this section. how hard can it be? you have no idea the richness or depth of any of our lives… WE ARE SHARING THIS WITH YOU. if the forum was comprised of only versions of you- we probably would, as you so eloquently put, “go away”.
    [/QUOTE]
    I teach here. Mainly to the upper-classes. About 90% of these kids have Iphones to better understand what I mean by upper-classes (If that doesn’t mean something do those reading this, then you don’t understand Brazil). Their attitudes towards school, learning and thinking in general is scary. I mean, Night of the Living Dead scary. The truly have no values other than farting, sex, money and gossip. They are clueless about their own history, geography and economics.
    As for their parents, it’s truly the root of the problem. They back up their kids terrible behavior instead of thanking us for trying to HELP THEM raise their kids.
    I would never raise children in Brazil. Why pay for the over-priced private schools that teach to tests when you can find excellent schools in the First World?
    I totally feel for you guys with daughters here. Keep the Brazilians away from them!!
    I am getting out soon. I hope you do the same.

  • #239614
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Liliqtozin
    Member

    Maybe some Brazilians resemble ‘lotus eaters’. But this seems to be a lifestyle idealized by the newbie gringo. Beer, beach, bbq, beautiful bodies … so what do you want?

  • #239615
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=jacare] Maybe some Brazilians resemble ‘lotus eaters’. But this seems to be a lifestyle idealized by the newbie gringo. Beer, beach, bbq, beautiful bodies … so what do you want?[/QUOTE]
    1) Their bodies aren’t that great. We have beautiful models in the US too. That doesn’t mean the general population looks the same way they do. It is total myth that Brazilians have great bodies. The women rarely workout.
    2) If you don’t like meat and the only beer is Skol how are BBQ’s great? At least in the USA you can bring your own food without getting “the look” and have access to great beer.
    3) The beach is great but you need find one that isn’t infested with idiots. I have been to them and yes they are amazing. But most of the time, the beaches are filthy and crawling with the worse of the worse of Brazilians.
    These myths need to be dispelled.

  • #239625
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    1. if you lived in BH or are famliar with it you know that is not true
    2. What look? True Brazzers dont usually grill veggies when they bbq but I have never had a problem grilling veggies at a bbq. There is a lot of good beer to be found in brazil. A lot more out there than Skol and Brahma
    3. Ever been to the south of Bahia? not crowded at all and very very nice.

  • #239651
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    rkearns
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    1) Their bodies aren’t that great. We have beautiful models in the US too. That doesn’t mean the general population looks the same way they do. It is total myth that Brazilians have great bodies. The women rarely workout.
    [/QUOTE]
    Americanporn actresses get 10/10 in my book. Most of all the Brazilian pornstars I’ve seen are a little ugly/trashy looking. I also hate silicone boobs too, which is common here, whether just seeing in a photo or touching first-hand.

  • #239668

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] T
    c) Fake Brazilian cleanliness. Just because you use a napkin to eat your sandwich don’t mean jack. In fact, once you get to know Brazilians personally and aren’t in a public setting where “status” counts, Brazilians are quite squalor. The best example is handling meat or eggs and then touching everything in the kitchen afterwards. Or how about washing with cold water. As I understand it, you MUST use hot water for soap to be effective.
    [/QUOTE]
    This one hit me the other day when I went out to a nicer restaurant with my husband, and if finally dawned on me that there are no bus boys.
    The waiters (of which there were an unecessary number) each cleared the tables (picking up the grimy silverware and wiping down the tables with the same iffy rag) with the SAME hand that they grabbed the clean silverware and my plate full of food 2 minutes later.
    Ok – you can argue that they grabbed the rim with their hand, but then, when you lay your knife down on the plate, it inevetibly touches the rim, and then touches your food.
    When if finally hit me how unlcleanly that is, compared to having one person deal with dirty dishes and another with the clean, I shot my husband a look and said `you can NEVER criticize me again for eating my hamburger without a napkin, after I thoroughly washed my hands.`
    This time…he agreed.

  • #239694
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185] [QUOTE=usaalltheway] T
    c) Fake Brazilian cleanliness. Just because you use a napkin to eat your sandwich don’t mean jack. In fact, once you get to know Brazilians personally and aren’t in a public setting where “status” counts, Brazilians are quite squalor. The best example is handling meat or eggs and then touching everything in the kitchen afterwards. Or how about washing with cold water. As I understand it, you MUST use hot water for soap to be effective.
    [/QUOTE]
    This one hit me the other day when I went out to a nicer restaurant with my husband, and if finally dawned on me that there are no bus boys.
    The waiters (of which there were an unecessary number) each cleared the tables (picking up the grimy silverware and wiping down the tables with the same iffy rag) with the SAME hand that they grabbed the clean silverware and my plate full of food 2 minutes later.
    Ok – you can argue that they grabbed the rim with their hand, but then, when you lay your knife down on the plate, it inevetibly touches the rim, and then touches your food.
    When if finally hit me how unlcleanly that is, compared to having one person deal with dirty dishes and another with the clean, I shot my husband a look and said `you can NEVER criticize me again for eating my hamburger without a napkin, after I thoroughly washed my hands.`
    This time…he agreed.[/QUOTE]

  • #239697
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=hpeak13] 1. if you lived in BH or are famliar with it you know that is not true
    2. What look? True Brazzers dont usually grill veggies when they bbq but I have never had a problem grilling veggies at a bbq. There is a lot of good beer to be found in brazil. A lot more out there than Skol and Brahma
    3. Ever been to the south of Bahia? not crowded at all and very very nice.
    [/QUOTE]
    As for the beer thing, I don’t buy it man. Name one brand of dark beer. Also, it can’t cost 20 reais a bottle. The beers in Brazil are Skol and Brahma with a few other look-alikes throw in to the mix. Beer in Brazil is terrible. No way around it. That is why I stopped drinking beer. Why spend all that money and time to get a gut when the beer is terrible?
    Brazilian women don’t workout. If they do go to the gym it’s what I call the “fake workout”. You need to have a sweat going to be working out. If your hair looks perfect after working out, you didn’t work out.

  • #239700
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    There are several…Xingu and Caracu are fairly common.
    Backer makes a fantastic line of beers under the Tres Lobos name…..there Bravo Tres Lobos is great.
    Amazon Beer in Belem makes a really great stout as well.
    Also in BH is Krug Bier which makes a dark beer as well i believe.

  • #239705
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    I have to agree with hpeak on this – there are some good beers in Brazil, some are state specific I guess. I don’t like Skol, Itapaiva, Bramha etc – I don’t really drink chop either, as it’s nearly always the nasty beer, with half a glass of foam (that alone deserves its own thread) for a stupid price. However, for bottled beers there are plenty available in Sao Paulo that hover between the R$10 ~ R$15 price range. Sure, at ¬£5 for a 640ml bottle, it’s expensive, but that just about sums Brazil up. If you want something half-decent, you have to expect to pay through the nose for it.
    Xingu and Petra are ‘normal’ priced dark beers that are ok and I think available nationwide.
    Demoiselle from Colorado beers is fantastic, and I am still waiting for the Ithaca Imperial Stout to be available in Sao Paulo…it looks nice though!

  • #239759
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=hpeak13] There are several…Xingu and Caracu are fairly common.
    Backer makes a fantastic line of beers under the Tres Lobos name…..there Bravo Tres Lobos is great.
    Amazon Beer in Belem makes a really great stout as well.
    Also in BH is Krug Bier which makes a dark beer as well i believe.[/QUOTE]
    So, I will have to take issue with your beer selections.
    When I say dark beer, I don’t just mean it’s color. It has much more to do with it than that. I am going to have to assume you don’t really drink good beer if you think that XIngu and Caracu count. Caracu is super sweet and gives one a headache after the second beer. Xingu is basically Skol with a dark color.
    Now those who know the Pacific Northwest or German beers will know what I mean.
    You can find dark beer in Brazil but it will cost you an arm and a leg. I found some in every major urban center. Curitiba was the best but it was still the exception not the rule.
    Beer selection in Brazil is terrible and the national drinks of Skol in company are garage. Why bother?

  • #239763

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    So, I will have to take issue with your beer selections.
    When I say dark beer, I don’t just mean it’s color. It has much more to do with it than that. I am going to have to assume you don’t really drink good beer if you think that XIngu and Caracu count. Caracu is super sweet and gives one a headache after the second beer. Xingu is basically Skol with a dark color.
    Now those who know the Pacific Northwest or German beers will know what I mean.
    You can find dark beer in Brazil but it will cost you an arm and a leg. I found some in every major urban center. Curitiba was the best but it was still the exception not the rule.
    Beer selection in Brazil is terrible and the national drinks of Skol in company are garage. Why bother? [/QUOTE]
    Strange, for an expert on Brasil, you obviously have never visited SC (and no, that’s not South Carolina, where you went to school). Some of the best Brasilian/German beers are brewed here in Santa Catarina. In fact, after Munich, the largest Oktoberfest celebration is held here in Blumenau.
    Gringo.Floripa2013-03-05 19:14:34

  • #239773
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=hpeak13] There are several…Xingu and Caracu are fairly common.
    Backer makes a fantastic line of beers under the Tres Lobos name…..there Bravo Tres Lobos is great.
    Amazon Beer in Belem makes a really great stout as well.
    Also in BH is Krug Bier which makes a dark beer as well i believe.[/QUOTE]
    So, I will have to take issue with your beer selections.
    When I say dark beer, I don’t just mean it’s color. It has much more to do with it than that. I am going to have to assume you don’t really drink good beer if you think that XIngu and Caracu count. Caracu is super sweet and gives one a headache after the second beer. Xingu is basically Skol with a dark color.
    Now those who know the Pacific Northwest or German beers will know what I mean.
    You can find dark beer in Brazil but it will cost you an arm and a leg. I found some in every major urban center. Curitiba was the best but it was still the exception not the rule.
    Beer selection in Brazil is terrible and the national drinks of Skol in company are garage. Why bother? [/QUOTE]
    the first two I listed I said were common…I didn’t speak to their taste or quality. The others that I mentioned taste great.
    no argument about skol or brahma…but drink a Tres Lobos then come back and talk to me

  • #239782
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=hpeak13] There are several…Xingu and Caracu are fairly common.
    Backer makes a fantastic line of beers under the Tres Lobos name…..there Bravo Tres Lobos is great.
    Amazon Beer in Belem makes a really great stout as well.
    Also in BH is Krug Bier which makes a dark beer as well i believe.[/QUOTE]
    So, I will have to take issue with your beer selections.
    When I say dark beer, I don’t just mean it’s color. It has much more to do with it than that. I am going to have to assume you don’t really drink good beer if you think that XIngu and Caracu count. Caracu is super sweet and gives one a headache after the second beer. Xingu is basically Skol with a dark color.
    Now those who know the Pacific Northwest or German beers will know what I mean.
    You can find dark beer in Brazil but it will cost you an arm and a leg. I found some in every major urban center. Curitiba was the best but it was still the exception not the rule.
    Beer selection in Brazil is terrible and the national drinks of Skol in company are garage. Why bother? [/QUOTE]
    the first two I listed I said were common…I didn’t speak to their taste or quality. The others that I mentioned taste great.
    no argument about skol or brahma…but drink a Tres Lobos then come back and talk to me

  • #239831
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil.
    Brazil has airplanes, roads, elevators, computers, cars, you would think with these modern technologies it should work like a developed, first world country.
    No. Brazilians will take one look at you and make assumptions as to where you fit in Brazilian society, and how they can take advantage of you. They will stare at you and examine if you are self-conscious, what clothes you’re wearing, if you have any weakness, any sense of being lost, looking or feeling out of place, like you don’t know where you are, who you’re with, or the social rules of the country. It starts at the airport, and it only gets worse the longer you stay in the country.
    Past the airport are dusty roads, air pollution, homeless people, fruit vendors everywhere, dogs everywhere, people hanging plastic grocery bags full of trash on tree branches, trash on the road, the sidewalk, the grass, everywhere. People whizzing in and out of lanes on their stupid little motorcycles with their stupid helmets. Its hot as hell, and dusty. Did I mention air pollution, exhaust from vehicles, the air is toxic. (Go home, blow your nose, and whats left on the tissue is all black.) The roads are like a jungle adventure, you dont know if you will make it out alive.
    Go to your accommodation. Rest a bit. The floors, if there are floors, are all cold tile. No carpet. No hardwoods. Its hot, no air conditioning. The windows are open. Yes, there are mosquitoes and a milieu of other bugs inside your place. No window screens. At night, in the stifling heat, if you have electricity, count yourself lucky to have a fan whirring all night if you want to sleep. Remember, no air conditioning here. And the mosquitoes. And the denque. And the yellow fever. And the malaria.
    Oh, but right next door is a bar. Assuming you can sleep if you have airconditioning, a bed, and the mosquitoes are kept out, there’s the music of the bar next door, that wonderful FUNK music, oooh the glory!! (Parapaparapapraprapapa. Nos com os alemao vamos se divertir.) ALL NIGHT!!!! And its loud, of course. And theres chatter, loud of course. Theres yelling. Screaming. And then the dogs. Yes, they bark all night. The whirring of cars and motorcycles with loud engines all night. And the occasional sound of gunshots. Or something that sounds like them.
    If you knew how to live, Brazilian style, you wouldnt even sleep at all. Nooo, just have fun and go down to the bar with them. You will sleep at 4 am. Oh yes, and theres sleeping too in the afternoon. Its the Brazilian siesta. Because when you want to get work done, when its normal hours and a normal business day, they’re always “out for lunch” until 2 pm. Theyve gone home to sleep. Remember, they were up all night at the bar. When theyre back to work at around 3 pm, the computers not working. (o sistema caiu) or, no, its not really their job, its someone elses, but they dont work today, theyre on vacation, out of town, they get off early, theyre on lunch break, theyve just been fired and a replacement hasnt been hired yet, or theyre new and being trained, or theyre home, in the hospital, or at the doctors office because they “pegou uma virose”. What takes a day in a normal, developed country, takes, if youre lucky, two weeks in Brazil. Normally, it takes about three weeks to get done, sometimes a month, sometimes more, sometimes it never gets done, and sometimes you give up and go back to Europe or North America.
    Oh no, but thats because youre a gringo and you dont know how things get done in Brazil. Nooo, in Brazil, see, you have to be someones friend to get it done. Take them out to lunch. To beer. To a bar. To a night club, or a strip club. Yes. Now things get rolling. They can even sleep with your wife too. And maybe your daughter. Show them the $$, thats when things really get rolling. Eh o jeitinho brasileiro. Then, theyll call their friends cousin, whose got a school friend who has a brother who knows a woman who has a sister whos friends with her divorced husband whose married to that one woman in Sao Paulo. Yes, then miraculously your problem gets solved. Yippee! Then you call in sick and go to the beach for 2 weeks. Very efficient, very organized, very methodical, very first world.
    Welcome to Brazil! The country of the future! Order and Progress! The greatest country on Earth!
    Obrigado por voar TAM.

  • #239862
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    [/QUOTE]
    Post of the day for me – made me laugh out loud! have shared that one with a few people!

  • #239891

    [QUOTE=Grantham]Brazil is a sh*thole….
    Welcome to Brazil! The country of the future! Order and Progress! The greatest country on Earth!
    Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]
    Oh my God, I was rolling on the floor after reading this one. Talk about hitting the nail on the head, this was the Mother of All PostsLOL

  • #239899
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=nesne2]
    Also, why live in a country where you pay more than First World prices for less then First World quality and conditions? That seems crazy to me.
    USA>Brazil [/QUOTE]
    AMEN!

  • #239902
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Ronin55
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham] Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil. Brazil has airplanes, roads, elevators, computers, cars, you would think with these modern technologies it should work like a developed, first world country. No. Brazilians will take one look at you and make assumptions as to where you fit in Brazilian society, and how they can take advantage of you. They will stare at you and examine if you are self-conscious, what clothes you’re wearing, if you have any weakness, any sense of being lost, looking or feeling out of place, like you don’t know where you are, who you’re with, or the social rules of the country. It starts at the airport, and it only gets worse the longer you stay in the country. Past the airport are dusty roads, air pollution, homeless people, fruit vendors everywhere, dogs everywhere, people hanging plastic grocery bags full of trash on tree branches, trash on the road, the sidewalk, the grass, everywhere. People whizzing in and out of lanes on their stupid little motorcycles with their stupid helmets. Its hot as hell, and dusty. Did I mention air pollution, exhaust from vehicles, the air is toxic. (Go home, blow your nose, and whats left on the tissue is all black.) The roads are like a jungle adventure, you dont know if you will make it out alive. Go to your accommodation. Rest a bit. The floors, if there are floors, are all cold tile. No carpet. No hardwoods. Its hot, no air conditioning. The windows are open. Yes, there are mosquitoes and a milieu of other bugs inside your place. No window screens. At night, in the stifling heat, if you have electricity, count yourself lucky to have a fan whirring all night if you want to sleep. Remember, no air conditioning here. And the mosquitoes. And the denque. And the yellow fever. And the malaria. Oh, but right next door is a bar. Assuming you can sleep if you have airconditioning, a bed, and the mosquitoes are kept out, there’s the music of the bar next door, that wonderful FUNK music, oooh the glory!! (Parapaparapapraprapapa. Nos com os alemao vamos se divertir.) ALL NIGHT!!!! And its loud, of course. And theres chatter, loud of course. Theres yelling. Screaming. And then the dogs. Yes, they bark all night. The whirring of cars and motorcycles with loud engines all night. And the occasional sound of gunshots. Or something that sounds like them. If you knew how to live, Brazilian style, you wouldnt even sleep at all. Nooo, just have fun and go down to the bar with them. You will sleep at 4 am. Oh yes, and theres sleeping too in the afternoon. Its the Brazilian siesta. Because when you want to get work done, when its normal hours and a normal business day, they’re always “out for lunch” until 2 pm. Theyve gone home to sleep. Remember, they were up all night at the bar. When theyre back to work at around 3 pm, the computers not working. (o sistema caiu) or, no, its not really their job, its someone elses, but they dont work today, theyre on vacation, out of town, they get off early, theyre on lunch break, theyve just been fired and a replacement hasnt been hired yet, or theyre new and being trained, or theyre home, in the hospital, or at the doctors office because they “pegou uma virose”. What takes a day in a normal, developed country, takes, if youre lucky, two weeks in Brazil. Normally, it takes about three weeks to get done, sometimes a month, sometimes more, sometimes it never gets done, and sometimes you give up and go back to Europe or North America. Oh no, but thats because youre a gringo and you dont know how things get done in Brazil. Nooo, in Brazil, see, you have to be someones friend to get it done. Take them out to lunch. To beer. To a bar. To a night club, or a strip club. Yes. Now things get rolling. They can even sleep with your wife too. And maybe your daughter. Show them the $$, thats when things really get rolling. Eh o jeitinho brasileiro. Then, theyll call their friends cousin, whose got a school friend who has a brother who knows a woman who has a sister whos friends with her divorced husband whose married to that one woman in Sao Paulo. Yes, then miraculously your problem gets solved. Yippee! Then you call in sick and go to the beach for 2 weeks. Very efficient, very organized, very methodical, very first world. Welcome to Brazil! The country of the future! Order and Progress! The greatest country on Earth! Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]
    You are my new hero!

  • #239924

    [QUOTE=Grantham]Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil.

    Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]
    The looks I got laughing-out-loud in the Penha Caixa Economica were priceless.
    So when can we look forward to the United States of America analysis?
    Your last was “post of the year” imho.

  • #240032

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo][QUOTE=Grantham]Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil.

    Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]
    The looks I got laughing-out-loud in the Penha Caixa Economica were priceless.
    So when can we look forward to the United States of America analysis?
    Your last was “post of the year” imho.
    [/QUOTE]
    Why- no matter how the thread or topic started, do these conversations always come back to comparisons to the USA. Someone writes “Brazil is dirty and corrupt”, the next response is “yeah, well so is Alabama!” Who cares? We’re all living in Brazil, not America. If you want to move to America, you can complain about it there on some other online expat forum.

  • #240170
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham] Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil. Brazil has airplanes, roads, elevators, computers, cars, you would think with these modern technologies it should work like a developed, first world country. No. Brazilians will take one look at you and make assumptions as to where you fit in Brazilian society, and how they can take advantage of you. They will stare at you and examine if you are self-conscious, what clothes you’re wearing, if you have any weakness, any sense of being lost, looking or feeling out of place, like you don’t know where you are, who you’re with, or the social rules of the country. It starts at the airport, and it only gets worse the longer you stay in the country. Past the airport are dusty roads, air pollution, homeless people, fruit vendors everywhere, dogs everywhere, people hanging plastic grocery bags full of trash on tree branches, trash on the road, the sidewalk, the grass, everywhere. People whizzing in and out of lanes on their stupid little motorcycles with their stupid helmets. Its hot as hell, and dusty. Did I mention air pollution, exhaust from vehicles, the air is toxic. (Go home, blow your nose, and whats left on the tissue is all black.) The roads are like a jungle adventure, you dont know if you will make it out alive. Go to your accommodation. Rest a bit. The floors, if there are floors, are all cold tile. No carpet. No hardwoods. Its hot, no air conditioning. The windows are open. Yes, there are mosquitoes and a milieu of other bugs inside your place. No window screens. At night, in the stifling heat, if you have electricity, count yourself lucky to have a fan whirring all night if you want to sleep. Remember, no air conditioning here. And the mosquitoes. And the denque. And the yellow fever. And the malaria. Oh, but right next door is a bar. Assuming you can sleep if you have airconditioning, a bed, and the mosquitoes are kept out, there’s the music of the bar next door, that wonderful FUNK music, oooh the glory!! (Parapaparapapraprapapa. Nos com os alemao vamos se divertir.) ALL NIGHT!!!! And its loud, of course. And theres chatter, loud of course. Theres yelling. Screaming. And then the dogs. Yes, they bark all night. The whirring of cars and motorcycles with loud engines all night. And the occasional sound of gunshots. Or something that sounds like them. If you knew how to live, Brazilian style, you wouldnt even sleep at all. Nooo, just have fun and go down to the bar with them. You will sleep at 4 am. Oh yes, and theres sleeping too in the afternoon. Its the Brazilian siesta. Because when you want to get work done, when its normal hours and a normal business day, they’re always “out for lunch” until 2 pm. Theyve gone home to sleep. Remember, they were up all night at the bar. When theyre back to work at around 3 pm, the computers not working. (o sistema caiu) or, no, its not really their job, its someone elses, but they dont work today, theyre on vacation, out of town, they get off early, theyre on lunch break, theyve just been fired and a replacement hasnt been hired yet, or theyre new and being trained, or theyre home, in the hospital, or at the doctors office because they “pegou uma virose”. What takes a day in a normal, developed country, takes, if youre lucky, two weeks in Brazil. Normally, it takes about three weeks to get done, sometimes a month, sometimes more, sometimes it never gets done, and sometimes you give up and go back to Europe or North America. Oh no, but thats because youre a gringo and you dont know how things get done in Brazil. Nooo, in Brazil, see, you have to be someones friend to get it done. Take them out to lunch. To beer. To a bar. To a night club, or a strip club. Yes. Now things get rolling. They can even sleep with your wife too. And maybe your daughter. Show them the $$, thats when things really get rolling. Eh o jeitinho brasileiro. Then, theyll call their friends cousin, whose got a school friend who has a brother who knows a woman who has a sister whos friends with her divorced husband whose married to that one woman in Sao Paulo. Yes, then miraculously your problem gets solved. Yippee! Then you call in sick and go to the beach for 2 weeks. Very efficient, very organized, very methodical, very first world. Welcome to Brazil! The country of the future! Order and Progress! The greatest country on Earth! Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]
    This guy nailed it. I couldn’t have said it better myself. This is what every American needs to read before coming here.

  • #240173

    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    Why- no matter how the thread or topic started, do these conversations always come back to comparisons to the USA. Someone writes “Brazil is dirty and corrupt”, the next response is “yeah, well so is Alabama!” Who cares? We’re all living in Brazil, not America. If you want to move to America, you can complain about it there on some other online expat forum.
    [/QUOTE]
    Thumbs%20Down
    Again… once more… ad nauseum… “Vent Your Frustrations”…

  • #240174

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    This guy nailed it. I couldn’t have said it better myself. This is what every American needs to read before coming here. [/QUOTE]
    Then why don’t you carry the message backto them, and stop wasting your time here?!? As was suggested, go on Oprah. THAT is the audience you’ll appeal too!

  • #240266
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    …or theyre home, in the hospital, or at the doctors office because they “pegou uma virose”.
    [/QUOTE]
    This whole notion of “pegando uma virose” is something I hear nearly everyday. How can everyone be getting viruses all the time??
    Brazilians sense of dieases and health is quite ill-informed. You simply don’t get viruses out of nowhere.
    Once again, this post was amazing. Let’s hear the one about the States. You are currently living there I see. Or maybe you can do another about Brazil. usaalltheway2013-04-28 15:21:15

  • #240267
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]
    [QUOTE=donpelon415]
    Why- no matter how the thread or topic started, do these conversations always come back to comparisons to the USA. Someone writes “Brazil is dirty and corrupt”, the next response is “yeah, well so is Alabama!” Who cares? We’re all living in Brazil, not America. If you want to move to America, you can complain about it there on some other online expat forum. [/QUOTE]Thumbs%20DownAgain… once more… ad nauseum…¬† “Vent Your Frustrations”…[/QUOTE]
    Thank you!!
    If you don’t like reading our words, THEN DON’T. It’s just that simple.

  • #240272

    Hey hand puppet Grandham/GoUSSABrasilSucks/AlabamaBrasileira… the game’s up! It’s quite obvious now who you are.
    So I’m guessing that’s it’s Spring Break there in the USSA, and you have nothing better to do than to return here with your same rant/frustration/obsession/angst/psychosis of USSA superiority and Brasil inferiority.
    What happened, none of your classmates wanted to invite you to Cancun for the fun and frolic?!? LOL
    Gringo.Floripa2013-03-08 11:07:04

  • #240280
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    the classmates are all dirty icky sons of the middle class! eew, might get a virose…..

  • #240309
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=3casas]the classmates are all dirty icky sons of the middle class! eew, might get a virose…..[/QUOTE]
    Oh 3casas, you might wish so. Not at my college though. I can go to the local state university for that. All the most illustrious students go to them. The American state university is really a model of higher education for all the world! (NOT!)
    Seriously though, it seems like living in Brazil for long enough makes you pine for the USA in your head that never really existed in the first place. It’s like you exaggerate everything good about the USA and underestimate the extent and the potency of everything bad about it. It got worse with the Great Recession. I’m not saying the USA is the greatest country on earth, and Brazil is the worst, there are so many good things about each, but it seems like those things are increasingly exclusive and hard to get.
    Gosh, I could go on forever about how I think American mass culture is getting cheaper and baser every day and every year. What happened? I see that American education, once the model for the world, is now being surpassed by just about every country on earth, even Brazil. It’s really China and India leading the way, and Brazil and Europe aren’t too far behind them. It seems Brazilian children (the ones in the decent private schools) are learning a lot more and more valuable things than American children. Public american schools are in crisis. The private American school is consuming more and more resources, at the expense of the public schools. Their children are increasingly getting into the better schools. The only hope for public school children seems to be community college these days. (Granted, community colleges today are better than what they were a few years ago). And what about China and India? They’re robbing everything from manufacturing to high tech away from the USA. What is the rust belt to do? It seems american society is more polarized along global/national lines. Silicon Valley is dominating the world, but India isn’t too far behind. And what about the rust belt? All those jobs are now in China. It seems the American upper class is getting richer, the middle class is nonexistant, and instead the middle class exists in china and India and other emerging countries. So you have a super rich american upper class and an emerging global middle class, still at the expense of the global poor, but the difference is that now the american middle class and poor are right along there with the global poor. It’s the classic occupy movement 1 percent against 99 percent. I hope there will be at least some change and the USA will be able to recuperate it’s middle class soon.

  • #240311
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    Gosh, I could go on forever about how I think American mass culture is getting cheaper and baser every day and every year. What happened? I see that American education, once the model for the world, is now being surpassed by just about every country on earth, even Brazil. It’s really China and India leading the way, and Brazil and Europe aren’t too far behind them. It seems Brazilian children (the ones in the decent private schools) are learning a lot more and more valuable things than American children. Public american schools are in crisis. The private American school is consuming more and more resources, at the expense of the public schools. Their children are increasingly getting into the better schools. The only hope for public school children seems to be community college these days. (Granted, community colleges today are better than what they were a few years ago). And what about China and India? They’re robbing everything from manufacturing to high tech away from the USA. What is the rust belt to do? It seems american society is more polarized along global/national lines. Silicon Valley is dominating the world, but India isn’t too far behind. And what about the rust belt? All those jobs are now in China. It seems the American upper class is getting richer, the middle class is nonexistant, and instead the middle class exists in china and India and other emerging countries. So you have a super rich american upper class and an emerging global middle class, still at the expense of the global poor, but the difference is that now the american middle class and poor are right along there with the global poor. It’s the classic occupy movement 1 percent against 99 percent. I hope there will be at least some change and the USA will be able to recuperate it’s middle class soon. [/QUOTE]
    Wow to that paragraph. Well said.
    The only thing I do not agree with is that Brazilian schools are “catching up”. It may be true in the capital of São Paulo, but I work with a private school for the children of the elite in the interior of SP and I can tell you from inside experience, it isn’t even a good level of education let alone a great one. With that said, this paragraph is spot on.

  • #240312
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]
    Wow to that paragraph. Well said.
    The only thing I do not agree with is that Brazilian schools are “catching up”. It may be true in the capital of São Paulo, but I work with a private school for the children of the elite in the interior of SP and I can tell you from inside experience, it isn’t even a good level of education let alone a great one. With that said, this paragraph is spot on. [/QUOTE]
    It seems I have some illustrious moments and some terrible moments on this board. No in between. I still value education and culture over the do it yourself handyman kind of values. Argue with me all you want, you won’t get me to change my mind very easily. I just don’t equate good things with that. (I want to vomit every time I see the built ford tough ads on tv, or the “we own work” ads by ford on tv here that play all the time, for those of you who are connected to goings on in the usa. Disgusting really. And pickup trucks. Dont get me started.)
    Anyways, to those of us who are globally aware, whats happening right now is scary to be honest. I miss the 90s. It seems it was so peaceful and prosperous and times were good and it would go on forever. I mean, whats the hope for young americans now? We have massive student loans, massive debts, for what? The best we can hope for is the freaking peace corps or some non profit organization. It seems that life is being more scaled down everyday and we’re supposed to be happy with the small things, because we live in a post modern post industrial organic society. I mean, the best america has right now is silicon valley. And thats small compared to what there was in the 50s. The 50s were booming. It was huge. But now everything is so scaled down that we’re supposed to be glad we’re leaving a tiny carbon footprint and be glad to go local, go green, go organic and what not. But that seems so small compared to what the 90s were all about.
    I mean, its nice to eat organic food, buy local products, made in america, and drive electric cars. But there isn’t anything big anymore. It’s like it’s all been done before. The big things are happening in china, india, and brazil. Granted, once news gets out about the working conditions there, the massive footprint they leave with emissions, the lack of environmental laws, the dirty rivers, the deforestation, the poverty, the inequality, I think it will slow down considerably. And that’s what I hope will happen, so that the USA and maybe Europe and other countries can be the pioneers again in electronics and technology.
    Because, to be honest, what china does is sick. The pollution, environmental degradation, their salaries, the killing of infant girls, the abuse of women, the communism, censorship, their blatant ignorance of copyright laws, it won’t get them very far once people really start paying attention. Their reliance on cheap labor. The poor quality of their products, their fake ripoffs, their total disrespect of first world patents, their destruction of ecosystems and their leveling of entire mountains. They’re advancing but they’re causing a lot of destruction along the way. It’s very dirty. Oh, and their total lack of hygiene. They put plaster in milk. They put lead in the children’s toys they ship off to the USA. Clean food is a foreign concept to them. Plus, the eating of dogs, cats, insects, basically everything. There isn’t anything the chinese won’t eat. It’s disgusting. I know all Chinese aren’t like this, so I hope this disclaimer is enough to prevent me offending someone on here.
    This is not to say the USA is perfect, far from it, what I hope is that every culture, every country, can treat its citizens with equality, fairly, give them good healthcare, education, jobs, but at the same time do it with the long term in mind, and do it sustainably. I’m not saying the USA has never done any of what china does, or isn’t doing so right now, or is not guilty of the same crimes in the present and in the past, but what i see happening is that huge american companies are enabling the chinese to grow rich and dominant because of their dirty practices and lack of modern culture and law enforcement, and at the same time the americans who would be doing what the chinese factory workers do are unemployed and have no recourse at all to recover what they once had. And an improvement in education for these unemployed americans is impossible, they can’t go back to school and learn new skills because they don’t have the money for it, the affordable kind of education for that doesn’t exist, and afterwards there would be no incentive for them because the large industries simply do not exist in the usa anymore. It’s like they lost something irretrievable and are stuck in time to die poor. A whole generation and a whole class of people just stuck. Same goes for what happened to young people in the great recession. Irretrievable, lost.
    Grantham2013-03-08 15:06:14

  • #240319

    GrandHam… two tips.
    1) Graduate
    2) Then get a job!

  • #240320
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    GrandHam… two tips.
    1) Graduate
    2) Then get a job!
    [/QUOTE]
    ? What?
    It’s Grantham, with the “th” being pronounced as in three. I do plan to graduate, obviously, and I do plan on getting a job. I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness. Or work for an American company in another country. That would be great. With the world getting more globalized, I will be loathe to stay in the USA in this hypocritical culture while there are more important things going on outside its borders. Our foreign policy is also disgusting, talk about hypocrisy at its heights.
    Grantham2013-03-08 15:58:58

  • #240322

    [QUOTE=Grantham] I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here.[/QUOTE]
    I hear the best job forecasts for the Class of 2015 will be in China. A good place to get your feet wet, plus I hear the street food is exceptional, and cheap!
    Then, since you have an interest in politics and morals, come to Brasil in 2016. It should be quite a show!

  • #240451
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    ejboyd
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER] 57. Rampant, obnoxious patriotism. Wherever you are from, Brazilians will
    always be immediately upfront in telling you that it’s “better here”. They will
    be quick to tell you to your face all about how gringos don’t bathe and are
    ‚Äúcold‚Äù.ITS true: Brazilians take 3 showers a day on average. Try to enter a bus or tram in some European country and you will see the difference. Body odor that could kill.Sure that “latinos” are warmer people
    [/QUOTE]
    I like how Brazilians are so proud of that, but I’m from the Philippines…
    Brazilians take a shower 3x or more a day, but they only wash/shampoo their hair once a week, miracle if they do it twice/week
    some even let salon do it for them weekly

  • #240463

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    It’s Grantham, with the “th” being pronounced as in three. I do plan to graduate, obviously, and I do plan on getting a job. I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness. Or work for an American company in another country. That would be great. With the world getting more globalized, I will be loathe to stay in the USA in this hypocritical culture while there are more important things going on outside its borders. Our foreign policy is also disgusting, talk about hypocrisy at its heights.
    [/QUOTE]
    Grantham, you clearly have a very sharp mind. Thank you for sharing it with us here. But suddenly I imagine you as a rather na√Øve young person. You are spot on describing ‘effects’, but apparently miss ’causes’. You lament what was, what has passed, but you don’t understand WHY it passed. It’s the ‘why’ that matters- all else is fluff. What you’re sick of, “the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness.” My question to you is, why do you think they exist in their current form? Why do you think they persist? Why are they stillnecessary? Perhaps I mis-understood your statement, but to me it doesn’t jibe with what you’ve previously written.
    You seem to me stuck in the mindset of the country you lament. Exceptionalism so enamors you, you let the very folk who have your best interests least in mind run the show. The 1% are the “One Percent” because smart people like you didn’t complain at your families’ dinner tables to educate your mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and cousins that those sharp cats in fine suits were raping your future. It’s plain and simple. By convincing you all to “go get good jobs for American companies” you sold your ‘birthright’ to the highest bidder! Amazing! And it’s no accident China is king economically and countries such as India, the Philippines, Taiwan, S. Korea and here are doing better- it’s because AMERICAN executives like Mitt Romney cut the legs from the youth of the United States in a grand shell game! Capitalists capitalize! Wake tf up! And it’s left them rich, with most corporate operations “over there”, and your generation stuck with few options.
    You complain about affirmative action. Well, affirmative action is still badly needed in the US. You think brown people are your problem? What a joke. The US is becoming feudal behind that thinking. The battle has ALWAYS been socio-economic not racial, however it’s been so easy for ‘leadership’ to hoodwink certain demographics. The media further served to demonize those who make few fiscal decisions, who have little comparative power. Google “Professor Robert Jensen”, you may learn something.
    I’m going to step off my horse now. I really like what you write. Really. But you need to plug the holes letting us know you don’t truly understand what makes most humans you’ve ever met tick. Overwhelming greed, self-interest, “patriotism”, entitlement, careerism, American exceptionalism… I have a hard time understanding it myself, but it is truth.

  • #240507
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo][QUOTE=Grantham]
    It’s Grantham, with the “th” being pronounced as in three. I do plan to graduate, obviously, and I do plan on getting a job. I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness. Or work for an American company in another country. That would be great. With the world getting more globalized, I will be loathe to stay in the USA in this hypocritical culture while there are more important things going on outside its borders. Our foreign policy is also disgusting, talk about hypocrisy at its heights.
    [/QUOTE]
    Grantham, you clearly have a very sharp mind. Thank you for sharing it with us here. Thank you. But suddenly I imagine you as a rather na√Øve young person. You are spot on describing ‘effects’, but apparently miss ’causes’. You lament what was, what has passed, but you don’t understand WHY it passed. It’s the ‘why’ that matters- all else is fluff. What you’re sick of, “the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness.” My question to you is, why do you think they exist in their current form? Why do you think they persist? Why are they stillnecessary? Perhaps I mis-understood your statement, but to me it doesn’t jibe with what you’ve previously written.
    You seem to me stuck in the mindset of the country you lament. Exceptionalism so enamors you, you let the very folk who have your best interests least in mind run the show. Perhaps because I’m only waking up recently to the fact that the american middle class is getting raped by our own companies, our own politicians, and foreigner’s degrading habits of working for a lot less, with less education, less collective organization, in terrible working conditions, with questionable morals and ethics. The 1% are the “One Percent” because smart people like you didn’t complain at your families’ dinner tables to educate your mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and cousins that those sharp cats in fine suits were raping your future. Believe me, I have done just that, but my family does not want to hear it. It makes them uncomfortable. They already have an inkling of what’s going on, but to hear it coming from my mouth would sound “ungrateful” to them. Talking about it with my friends rapidly leaves me unpopular, because I’m the “party pooper” because I talk about what they want to ignore. I understand where they’re coming from, but ignoring the problems gets us nowhere. Unfortunately, both here and in Brazil, it’s next to impossible to find someone who will listen, and only in my dreams for the people who DO listen to get with me and DO something about it. Instead, I’m supposed to be a happy worker and a happy consumer, to take my mind off these “politics”. Isn’t that what alcohol’s for, what sex is for, the movies, consumerism, music, all these cheap thrills that distract us from our real lives. It’s plain and simple. By convincing you all to “go get good jobs for American companies” you sold your ‘birthright’ to the highest bidder! Amazing! I haven’t sold my birthright just yet. I will do so over my dead body. But unfortunately, treading your own path, both in Brazil and the USA, you get labelled a million and one different things, it puts you in the minority, and it leaves you drastically unpopular. I find myself biting my tongue each time someone wants to make small talk with me, because it’s just the same sh*t every single day. No one wants to wake up, or they have, are afraid of what they see, and go to sleep again, because staying awake is dangerous and gets you into trouble, you have to go to sleep “or else”. Yet the USA is the land of the brave, home of the free, we value independence, freedom, initiative, individualism, liberty, justice, and all those lies. It’s all lies. It’s hypocrisy. Use your brain and think for yourself and you’re on the path to the supermax federal prison. And it’s no accident China is king economically and countries such as India, the Philippines, Taiwan, S. Korea and here are doing better- it’s because AMERICAN executives like Mitt Romney cut the legs from the youth of the United States in a grand shell game! Capitalists capitalize! Wake tf up! I am f**king awake. You don’t think I see what’s happening? Unfortunately, the occupy movement gets labelled as lazy hippies, the media calls us scumbags worth sh*t, its a f**king uphill battle. A lot of them are hippies to be honest. If there were a perfect blend of the tea party and the occupy movement I would be the first to sign on. I haven’t found one yet. And I’m not in the position to start one. And it’s left them rich, with most corporate operations “over there”, and your generation stuck with few options. I know and it sucks. No one wants to talk about it though. If we do start a conversation, guess what happens. We’re out of the frat. We’re no longer class president. Our scholarship magically disappears. The police and school administration tags us as enemy number one.
    You complain about affirmative action. Well, affirmative action is still badly needed in the US. You think brown people are your problem? What a joke. The US is becoming feudal behind that thinking. The battle has ALWAYS been socio-economic not racial, however it’s been so easy for ‘leadership’ to hoodwink certain demographics. The media further served to demonize those who make few fiscal decisions, who have little comparative power. Google “Professor Robert Jensen”, you may learn something. Well, the problem is the patriarchy. We’re not all old, european, anglo saxon, white, heterosexual, rich men. That’s the problem. It’s the goddamn patriarchy. Guess what, if you’re gay (except in massachusetts), or nonwhite, or poor, or a woman (this has changed though), or young, you have to “prove” yourself to the man constantly, because to survive your face will be so brown at the end of the day you won’t know the smell of feces from the smell of air.
    I’m going to step off my horse now. I really like what you write. Really. But you need to plug the holes letting us know you don’t truly understand what makes most humans you’ve ever met tick. Overwhelming greed, self-interest, “patriotism”, entitlement, careerism, American exceptionalism… I have a hard time understanding it myself, but it is truth.
    Well thank you, I like writing on here. It’s a major distraction though, haha.
    [/QUOTE]

  • #240513

    [QUOTE=Grantham] It seems it was so peaceful and prosperous and times were good and it would go on forever. I mean, whats the hope for young americans now?
    But that seems so small compared to what the 90s were all about…. But there isn’t anything big anymore.[/QUOTE]
    Sweetie, you don`t miss the 90`s, you miss your childhood. Welcome to adult life. It sucks (comparatively).
    We always remember the past as a better, happier, safer time, no matter what the reality was.
    For a while, in the US, we did have an inflated sense of success and what was going on. Americans lost touch with reality and lived on credit, sold on the dream of tomorrow. After crashing into reality, they are dusting themselves off and trying to figure out HOW to adjust to the new economy.
    Still, things aren`t so bad. Though the dream has been shattered, reality, today`s really isn`t that much worse for 95% of the people. For the other 5%, I feel bad, and am hopeful that the US will find a way to help them, but still, compared to the rest of the globe (and even Brazil) 2013, in the US, isn`t as rough as Faux news and the rest would have you believe.

  • #240528
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kittenshake
    Member

    Thanks to you and all the others on this forum for brightening up my day. The comments you make are hilarious, often true and have made me realise I am not alone! I too was pestered into moving to Brazil by my other half, told that life is so much better over here. So here I am, four months in, stuck at home with our two small children in a small Brazilian town in the ‘interior’. Every day, my partner or other family member will comment that I haven’t made a typical 5 saucepan lunch/washed the floors the Brazilian way with water/done the laundry/ washing up etc etc. I left a wonderful close-knit family, many friends and a good, but stressful PR job in London to follow my husbands dream. Recently, I was all but ready to move back home, but on finding this forum, I realise I need to give things a chance, or else move back to a grey ‘nowhere’ town in the UK, as another member commented.

  • #240553

    [QUOTE=Grantham][QUOTE=VidaNascendo][QUOTE=Grantham]
    It’s Grantham, with the “th” being pronounced as in three. I do plan to graduate, obviously, and I do plan on getting a job. I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness. Or work for an American company in another country. That would be great. With the world getting more globalized, I will be loathe to stay in the USA in this hypocritical culture while there are more important things going on outside its borders. Our foreign policy is also disgusting, talk about hypocrisy at its heights.
    [/QUOTE]
    Grantham, you clearly have a very sharp mind. Thank you for sharing it with us here. Thank you. But suddenly I imagine you as a rather na√Øve young person. You are spot on describing ‘effects’, but apparently miss ’causes’. You lament what was, what has passed, but you don’t understand WHY it passed. It’s the ‘why’ that matters- all else is fluff. What you’re sick of, “the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness.” My question to you is, why do you think they exist in their current form? Why do you think they persist? Why are they stillnecessary? Perhaps I mis-understood your statement, but to me it doesn’t jibe with what you’ve previously written.
    You seem to me stuck in the mindset of the country you lament. Exceptionalism so enamors you, you let the very folk who have your best interests least in mind run the show. Perhaps because I’m only waking up recently to the fact that the american middle class is getting raped by our own companies, our own politicians, and foreigner’s degrading habits of working for a lot less, with less education, less collective organization, in terrible working conditions, with questionable morals and ethics. The 1% are the “One Percent” because smart people like you didn’t complain at your families’ dinner tables to educate your mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and cousins that those sharp cats in fine suits were raping your future. Believe me, I have done just that, but my family does not want to hear it. It makes them uncomfortable. They already have an inkling of what’s going on, but to hear it coming from my mouth would sound “ungrateful” to them. Talking about it with my friends rapidly leaves me unpopular, because I’m the “party pooper” because I talk about what they want to ignore. I understand where they’re coming from, but ignoring the problems gets us nowhere. Unfortunately, both here and in Brazil, it’s next to impossible to find someone who will listen, and only in my dreams for the people who DO listen to get with me and DO something about it. Instead, I’m supposed to be a happy worker and a happy consumer, to take my mind off these “politics”. Isn’t that what alcohol’s for, what sex is for, the movies, consumerism, music, all these cheap thrills that distract us from our real lives. It’s plain and simple. By convincing you all to “go get good jobs for American companies” you sold your ‘birthright’ to the highest bidder! Amazing! I haven’t sold my birthright just yet. I will do so over my dead body. But unfortunately, treading your own path, both in Brazil and the USA, you get labelled a million and one different things, it puts you in the minority, and it leaves you drastically unpopular. I find myself biting my tongue each time someone wants to make small talk with me, because it’s just the same sh*t every single day. No one wants to wake up, or they have, are afraid of what they see, and go to sleep again, because staying awake is dangerous and gets you into trouble, you have to go to sleep “or else”. Yet the USA is the land of the brave, home of the free, we value independence, freedom, initiative, individualism, liberty, justice, and all those lies. It’s all lies. It’s hypocrisy. Use your brain and think for yourself and you’re on the path to the supermax federal prison. And it’s no accident China is king economically and countries such as India, the Philippines, Taiwan, S. Korea and here are doing better- it’s because AMERICAN executives like Mitt Romney cut the legs from the youth of the United States in a grand shell game! Capitalists capitalize! Wake tf up! I am f**king awake. You don’t think I see what’s happening? Unfortunately, the occupy movement gets labelled as lazy hippies, the media calls us scumbags worth sh*t, its a f**king uphill battle. A lot of them are hippies to be honest. If there were a perfect blend of the tea party and the occupy movement I would be the first to sign on. I haven’t found one yet. And I’m not in the position to start one. And it’s left them rich, with most corporate operations “over there”, and your generation stuck with few options. I know and it sucks. No one wants to talk about it though. If we do start a conversation, guess what happens. We’re out of the frat. We’re no longer class president. Our scholarship magically disappears. The police and school administration tags us as enemy number one.
    You complain about affirmative action. Well, affirmative action is still badly needed in the US. You think brown people are your problem? What a joke. The US is becoming feudal behind that thinking. The battle has ALWAYS been socio-economic not racial, however it’s been so easy for ‘leadership’ to hoodwink certain demographics. The media further served to demonize those who make few fiscal decisions, who have little comparative power. Google “Professor Robert Jensen”, you may learn something. Well, the problem is the patriarchy. We’re not all old, european, anglo saxon, white, heterosexual, rich men. That’s the problem. It’s the goddamn patriarchy. Guess what, if you’re gay (except in massachusetts), or nonwhite, or poor, or a woman (this has changed though), or young, you have to “prove” yourself to the man constantly, because to survive your face will be so brown at the end of the day you won’t know the smell of feces from the smell of air.
    I’m going to step off my horse now. I really like what you write. Really. But you need to plug the holes letting us know you don’t truly understand what makes most humans you’ve ever met tick. Overwhelming greed, self-interest, “patriotism”, entitlement, careerism, American exceptionalism… I have a hard time understanding it myself, but it is truth.
    Well thank you, I like writing on here. It’s a major distraction though, haha.
    [/QUOTE][/QUOTE]
    Boom! This is awesome; I love what you’re saying here. Gonna read through it in greater detail later. But for now:
    Not wanting to divulge much about my own perspective I will say this.
    F*** being unpopular. Many of us have been (are?) unpopular.
    F*** being an outsider. Many of us live outside convention.
    F*** being “in the minority”. Many of us are perpetually there.
    Be courageous and accept those roles should they be bestowed upon you via your awareness. You mentioned big things earlier? Big things in the worldly sense are b.s.; what’s big is the consciousness growing in those who are waking up to the game, and how horribly skewed it really is.
    You express yourself amazingly. Use that and your audience will find you.

  • #240722
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]
    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo]
    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    It’s Grantham, with the “th” being pronounced as in three. I do plan to graduate, obviously, and I do plan on getting a job. I hope I can get a job outside the USA, I’m really fed up with the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness. Or work for an American company in another country. That would be great. With the world getting more globalized, I will be loathe to stay in the USA in this hypocritical culture while there are more important things going on outside its borders. Our foreign policy is also disgusting, talk about hypocrisy at its heights.
    [/QUOTE]Grantham, you clearly have a very sharp mind.¬† Thank you for sharing it with us here. Thank you. ¬† But suddenly I imagine you as a rather na√Øve young person.¬† You are spot on describing ‘effects’, but apparently miss ’causes’.¬† You lament what was, what has passed, but you don’t understand WHY it passed.¬† It’s the ‘why’ that matters- all else is fluff.¬† What you’re sick of, “the politics, morals, and systems here. The antisegregation, the affirmative action, the political correctness.”¬† My question to you is, why do you think they exist in their current form?¬† Why do you think they persist?¬† Why are they stillnecessary?¬† Perhaps I mis-understood your statement, but to me it doesn’t jibe with what you’ve previously written.You seem to me stuck in the mindset of the country you lament.¬† Exceptionalism so enamors you, you let the very folk who have your best interests least in mind run the show. Perhaps because I’m only waking up recently to the fact that the american middle class is getting raped by our own companies, our own politicians, and foreigner’s degrading habits of working for a lot less, with less education, less collective organization, in terrible working conditions, with questionable morals and ethics. The 1% are the “One Percent” because smart people like you didn’t complain at your families’ dinner tables to educate your mothers, fathers, aunts, uncles and cousins that those sharp cats in fine suits were raping your future.¬† Believe me, I have done just that, but my family does not want to hear it. It makes them uncomfortable. They already have an inkling of what’s going on, but to hear it coming from my mouth would sound “ungrateful” to them. Talking about it with my friends rapidly leaves me unpopular, because I’m the “party pooper” because I talk about what they want to ignore. I understand where they’re coming from, but ignoring the problems gets us nowhere. Unfortunately, both here and in Brazil, it’s next to impossible to find someone who will listen, and only in my dreams for the people who DO listen to get with me and DO something about it. Instead, I’m supposed to be a happy worker and a happy consumer, to take my mind off these “politics”. Isn’t that what alcohol’s for, what sex is for, the movies, consumerism, music, all these cheap thrills that distract us from our real lives. It’s plain and simple.¬† By convincing you all to “go get good jobs for American companies” you sold your ‘birthright’ to the highest bidder!¬† Amazing! I haven’t sold my birthright just yet. I will do so over my dead body. But unfortunately, treading your own path, both in Brazil and the USA, you get labelled a million and one different things, it puts you in the minority, and it leaves you drastically unpopular. I find myself biting my tongue each time someone wants to make small talk with me, because it’s just the same sh*t every single day. No one wants to wake up, or they have, are afraid of what they see, and go to sleep again, because staying awake is dangerous and gets you into trouble, you have to go to sleep “or else”. Yet the USA is the land of the brave, home of the free, we value independence, freedom, initiative, individualism, liberty, justice, and all those lies. It’s all lies. It’s hypocrisy. Use your brain and think for yourself and you’re on the path to the supermax federal prison.¬† ¬† ¬†¬† And it’s no accident China is king economically and countries such as India, the Philippines, Taiwan, S. Korea and here are doing better- it’s because AMERICAN executives like Mitt Romney cut the legs from the youth of the United States in a grand shell game!¬† Capitalists capitalize!¬† Wake tf up! I am f**king awake. You don’t think I see what’s happening? Unfortunately, the occupy movement gets labelled as lazy hippies, the media calls us scumbags worth sh*t, its a f**king uphill battle. A lot of them are hippies to be honest. If there were a perfect blend of the tea party and the occupy movement I would be the first to sign on. I haven’t found one yet. And I’m not in the position to start one. ¬† And it’s left them rich, with most corporate operations “over there”, and your generation stuck with few options.¬† I know and it sucks. No one wants to talk about it though. If we do start a conversation, guess what happens. We’re out of the frat. We’re no longer class president. Our scholarship magically disappears. The police and school administration tags us as enemy number one. You complain about affirmative action.¬† Well, affirmative action is still badly needed in the US.¬† You think brown people are your problem?¬† What a joke.¬† The US is becoming feudal behind that thinking.¬† The battle has ALWAYS been socio-economic not racial, however it’s been so easy for ‘leadership’ to hoodwink certain demographics.¬† The media further served to demonize those who make few fiscal decisions, who have little comparative power.¬† Google “Professor Robert Jensen”, you may learn something. Well, the problem is the patriarchy. We’re not all old, european, anglo saxon, white, heterosexual, rich men. That’s the problem. It’s the goddamn patriarchy. Guess what, if you’re gay (except in massachusetts), or nonwhite, or poor, or a woman (this has changed though), or young, you have to “prove” yourself to the man constantly, because to survive your face will be so brown at the end of the day you won’t know the smell of feces from the smell of air. I’m going to step off my horse now.¬† I really like what you write.¬† Really.¬† But you need to plug the holes letting us know you don’t truly understand what makes most humans you’ve ever met tick.¬† Overwhelming greed, self-interest, “patriotism”, entitlement, careerism, American exceptionalism…¬† I have a hard time understanding it myself, but it is truth.Well thank you, I like writing on here. It’s a major distraction though, haha. [/QUOTE]
    [/QUOTE]Boom!¬† This is awesome; I love what you’re saying here.¬† Gonna read through it in greater detail later.¬† But for now:Not wanting to divulge much about my own perspective I will say this.F*** being unpopular.¬† Many of us have been (are?) unpopular.F*** being an outsider.¬† Many of us live outside convention.F*** being “in the minority”.¬† Many of us are perpetually there.Be courageous and accept those roles should they be bestowed upon you via your awareness.¬† You mentioned big things earlier?¬† Big things in the worldly sense are b.s.; what’s big is the consciousness growing in those who are waking up to the game, and how horribly skewed it really is.¬† You express yourself amazingly.¬† Use that and your audience will find you.[/QUOTE]
    This is an excellent exchange. Thank you guys. It is like sitting with friends of mine discussing important issues of the day. I have several friends involved with Occupy and I feel powerless here. This type of conversation is what I miss most from back home.
    Rob Allen2013-03-11 19:17:34

  • #240732

    [QUOTE=Rob Allen]
    This is an excellent exchange. Thank you guys. It is like sitting with friends of mine discussing important issues of the day. I have several friends involved with Occupy and I feel powerless here. This type of conversation is what I miss most from back home.
    [/QUOTE]
    Rob, gringoes.com is like a box of chocolates… LOL
    Usually after posting something here one gets reamed a bit more or maybe something surprising comes up. Thanks for the surprise!
    Returning to our discussion details, a theme jumps out for me; Grantham, you cannot address your grievances until you let go. The very forces you recognize, hold you/us in their grasp due the very “repercussions” you indicate. Your duty is to decide where you stand. I respect the Occupy folks b/c what they do is necessary and different- and I’m not sure I have the capacity (even without wife/kids) to confront militarized power. There is an Occupy here in Rio. I think it’s tiny, but I can’t imagine their courage given the rotten, rotten power brokers here protecting their turf. But it has to start somewhere, with someone. Or it all remains the same. Money is still king in the “civilized” world, and won’t go down without a fight. So if you want any hope of that birthright shedding its price tag you’d better decide where you stand. That really goes for every one of us who falls outside the <quote> “upper” cohort.
    There are certainly a lot worse things than being “out of the frat”.
    Here’s some more news- the friggin’ tea party won’t help you. If you want to flush the country you recall so affectionately faster down the drain you’ll throw your fate with them. Heaven help us all if that group returns to the influence they had over some of the (more gullible, imho) populace 3 years ago. You laud intellect? You will not find it there. You seek a discerning vision? You definitely won’t find it there. You seem to seek inclusion? That crew is reactionary if I ever saw it. Go west, young… person!
    Another factor- look at what Anonymous has been able to accomplish. There are whole infra-structural sectors falling outside direct control of the Power Structure of which Anonymous have “torn off the lid”. This is what TERRIFIES them. (What do you think this dronebusiness is all about?) I would like to see Anonymous do more, really shaking things up in ways we can all see- thus far their actions have consisted of threats. Bradley Manning is another… These are people of your generation, I’d bet- and they have used technology to somewhat diminish the armor shielding of the deeply corrupt societies in which we live. Have they paid steep prices? Hell yes. Do they deserve it? I say we’re all out of balance. Those g**d**n bankers should be rotting in prisons all through the US and Europe. But they won’t yet. They get passes now, like Brazilian politicians.
    Although that can’t last forever.

  • #244913
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    2. Blame: it’s always the Portuguese’s fault for “chaos” or “bureaucracy”, or British financiers in the mid-19th Century, or America, or the IMF or whoever. Never the Brazilian’s fault for their own problems. But, we’re a young country they say, only 500 years old!! I don’t know, Italy and Germany only came into being as countries in the later half of the 1800’s, Canada and Australia are about 100yrs old. Israel, Taiwan and South Korea have only existed for a little more than 60. If they can get it together, why can’t the Brazilians??
    I agree that Brazilians are to blame for their own problems too, but it’s precisely because of the country’s age that is so hard to change it’s ways. Whose behaviour do you think is easier to modify, a 20-year-old or a 70? Countries are like people, after a while it gets really hard to change their bad habits.

  • #244917

    Hello,
    i’m new to this forum, yet I’ve always been curious as to what exactly foreigners think about my country. Brazil’s “public face” as seen on the media (both home and abroad) is incredibly unrealistic. I’m a 24 y/o lawyer from RS. I consider myself to be a rational person, open to criticism (and keen on criticizing). With that said, here is what I think about this list:
    1-5: so very true.
    6: I’m actually quite surprised about this. I thought “jumping the fence” was commonplace everywhere. Very surprising to see that “gringoes” find infidelity in Brazil to be more common than elsewhere.
    7: This strikes so close to home, though I believe there is a difference between constructive criticism and just saying “X sucks”.
    8-13: true. In fact, I loved 12 and 13. When I was applying for my lawyer’s license I was, apparently, the only person who thought a 45-60 days delay AFTER a crapton of bureaucracy was simply outrageous. 13 is also lovely, I remember when my brother and I were shopping electronics in New York and we were like “OMG, it’s almost FREE!”
    14-17: Can’t really tell if these are accurate or not. Seems like a matter of opinion, though I agree with 17.
    18: IMO the sadest truth of the list. 😛
    19-21: Huh?
    21(again)-34: I agree.
    35: FINALLY! I’ve struggled against other people all my life stating this simple fact. Brazilians are raised to believe that there is no scientific way to compare countries. “Oh, there’s corruption everywhere!” and “there is poverty in the US, too!”. They fail to realize that everything is a matter of proportion or, in other words, that crime, corruption, poverty etc. can be measured and compared. And that Brazil is, comparatively, a really crappy country.
    36: Same as 12-13.
    37: Well, now you’re overdoing it. Whoever wrote this is either very homesick or very narrow minded. Brazilian restaurants offer a great amount of variety for a pretty affordable price. The same cannot be said about NY, where affordable food is always the same “burger-rice-fries” and its variants.
    38-40: Indeed…
    41: I once argued with a coworker because of this. She thought it was perfectly normal to throw fireworks at 1 AM because her football team had won some important game (I don’t remember and I don’t care which game).
    42: OH I see what you mean. At 2 AM on Times Square the streets are full of people with cameras and notebooks enjoying their time in NY. If that were to happen in São Paulo, well…let’s just say the criminals would love the idea.
    43-44: ?
    45-56: For the most part I agree.
    57: This is inaccurate. “Patriotism” is loving your own country. I remember seeing lots of american flags and other symbols in private buildings on the US. Americans are very patriotic in general. If you see a building with a Brazilian flag you can be sure that is a public building. Brazilians, even those from the educated classes, harbor an insane amount of negative stereotypes regarding foreigners. Germans are closet nazis, americans are racist selfish jerks, asians are “bitolados” and so on. Xenophobic is the correct term, not “patriot”.
    58: Joke is on you, Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn. This is not just my opinion, i’m supported by linguists and other foreigners I’ve come to know, including a guy who could speak German, English and Russian, but could only speak “basic Portuguese” despite living 10 years in Brazil. Also, the language spoken by the people, specially poor people, differs a lot from the Grammar. There is also the matter of regional dialects, mannerisms etc.
    59: YES. And if you complain about it you’re a “fresco” (homosexual).
    60: You forgot “soup operas”.
    61: True.
    62: Ahn…what?
    63: That’s because “HUEHUEHUEHUEHUEHUE, 5 world cups, Brazil #11111111111111111111111111111!!!!!!!!!!!!1111111111111”
    64: We should make a convention about ass wiping technologies around the world.
    65: Your friends are douchebags. Try befriending people less full of sh**.
    66: I had people look at me with suspicion when I dodged my umbrella from their faces. It’s almost as if they are EXPECTING to be poked. 😛
    Anyway:
    -nice post
    -nice website
    -best of luck in your travels
    -forgive my poor English.
    -cheers! 😀

  • #244936
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    [QUOTE=VidaNascendo] brazilians do things in the civic sphere i literally beg my carioca wife to explain to me; and she can’t.¬† she is actually the driving force for us moving back to the states before the end of this month!¬† she loves the organization we have there.¬† i’m dying to leave mainly because of my very young daughters- what brazil teaches its women when they are young is notwhat i want in the heads of my girls.¬† education is abyssmal.¬† and brazilian children, boys mainly, get no semblance of training with regard to how to treat others.¬† if they don’t get discipline at home, they certainly don’t get it in the schools, both public and private.¬† wait in line?¬† forget it.¬† obey the teacher?¬† you must be joking?¬† do your homework?¬† maybe tomorrow…¬† all the priorities are wrong, and they grow up to become the adults we complain about here.and behind it all looms the church/government monster waiting to gobble up everything in sight- the greed to which you so correctly referred.¬† they set the tone for this society, and the people know no better… and the linguistic island where they live prevents them from learning outside the globo filter.¬† the worst people i’ve met here have been crente.[/QUOTE]
    Very true!
    There is an explanation to all the nonsense in our civic sphere, but unfortunately it seems beyond help. You pointed the origin of all problems yourself: lack of education. And, of course, the government is interested in keeping the population in the dark. It is in their best interest that we only discuss soccer, soup operas and Big Brother. Information and proper education are dangerous for the ones in power, for an educated and well informed people would not be easily cheated and f***ed over.
    And though it’s a sad situation, we too vent our frustrations…
    http://youtu.be/WFd5_YtbScsAndieTravassos2013-04-08 16:19:32

  • #245065
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    gringodr
    Member

    56. Giant Red Cockroaches. Tip out your shoe, open a cabinet, why- it’s Cockroach Surprise!
    Lolz

  • #245066
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    gringodr
    Member

    64. Don’t forget that stinky garbage can of excrement-stained tissue right next to the toilet
    Lolz

  • #245070
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    69. Gringos who blame (gringo) rape victims for trusting that Brazilians won’t rape them in a van.

  • #245103
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    0

  • #245105
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    CoolNICE CLIMATE IN BAHIA

  • #245197
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Suiço
    Member

    [QUOTE=W1seguy]
    58: Joke is on you, Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn. This is not just my opinion, i’m supported by linguists and other foreigners I’ve come to know, including a guy who could speak German, English and Russian, but could only speak “basic Portuguese” despite living 10 years in Brazil. Also, the language spoken by the people, specially poor people, differs a lot from the Grammar. There is also the matter of regional dialects, mannerisms etc.
    -cheers! :D[/QUOTE]
    Yet another myth spread around by the uneducated elders that all Brazilians seem to believe. I don’t know why Brazilians repeat this crap. You don’t hear the Chinese or Arabs going around repeating the same nonsense.
    I used to put up with this but now when my security guy or taxi driver tells me “Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn” I tell them they need to travel more.

  • #245204
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=shinrai]
    [QUOTE=W1seguy]58: Joke is on you, Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn. This is not just my opinion, i’m supported by linguists and other foreigners I’ve come to know, including a guy who could speak German, English and Russian, but could only speak “basic Portuguese” despite living 10 years in Brazil. Also, the language spoken by the people, specially poor people, differs a lot from the Grammar. There is also the matter of regional dialects, mannerisms etc.
    -cheers! :D[/QUOTE]Yet another myth spread around by the uneducated elders that all Brazilians seem to believe.¬† I don’t know why Brazilians repeat this crap.¬† You don’t hear the Chinese or Arabs going around repeating the same nonsense.I used to put up with this but now when my security guy or taxi driver tells me “Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn” I tell them they need to travel more. [/QUOTE]
    Hey Sponge Bob, I was asleep at 2:02 in the morning.

  • #246766
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    wayne7639
    Member

    There is a lot of truth to what you say. Particularly the ones about people taking advantage of you when they can (Jeitinho Brasileiro) or stopping suddenly in the middle of the road when walking or littering. I’ve realised many Brazilians(of course not all) are selfish and only concerned about themselves than the greater good – as they say survival of the fittest. If you leave a gap between you and where platform ends, don’t be surprised if someone pushes in in front of you. They won’t think that they are being impolite, rather that you were the silly one to leave the gap in the first place!
    I think one of the things that most affected me after living here for one year was when a female friend of mine was assaulted by a group of young men and her purse stolen, but not a single person came to assist her AFTER the attack Рeven though she was in a public place during the day (at 25 de Março, SP). How can I feel safe living here, knowing this?
    It’s tragic that the cultural & political history of Brazil has diminished the potential of this country and its people. It could have been such a greater place and easily a 1st World Country especially considering the abundance of its natural resources. (In case, you’re wondering most of my family is Brazilian & I myself was born here but left to live overseas when I was a child – so am not a complete “gringo”).
    I occasionally check the local TV channels and can’t find a single quality or informative program. When I’ve asked my Brazilian friends about this – their reply was that the government want to intentionally “dumb down” the audience. This also relates to the low quality of education here.
    Due to this and other reasons, I’ve decided to leave Brazil. I discovered many sad things while living here about the nature of some of its people and for me, it’s not a place I feel at ease in completely. I want to live in a place where the people (& its government) genuinely care and look out for each other and want to improve the lives of all rather than just for their own circle. As the world gets smaller and people have less children we are relying more and more on each other than ever before and so I want to live in a community where I can feel safe and people treat each other with respect and look out for one another. Where people put the greater good above the individual one.
    (I hope no one is offended by any of my remarks but this is my opinion from the experiences I’ve had here & of course I can understand, some points are very generalised but for me are very true too)

  • #246767
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    wayne7639
    Member

    You don’t hear the Chinese or Arabs going around repeating the same nonsense.I used to put up with this but now when my security guy or taxi driver tells me “Portuguese is one of the hardest languages to learn” I tell them they need to travel more. [/QUOTE]
    I love this answer !!

  • #246768
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    wayne7639
    Member

    And though it’s a sad situation, we too vent our frustrations…
    http://youtu.be/WFd5_YtbScs%5B/QUOTE%5D
    Yes this video describes the situation in Brazil perfectly (and sadly too). Portas dos Fundos are brilliant!

  • #246772
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Sydneysider]And though it’s a sad situation, we too vent our frustrations…
    http://youtu.be/WFd5_YtbScs%5B/QUOTE%5D
    Yes this video describes the situation in Brazil perfectly (and sadly too). Portas dos Fundos are brilliant![/QUOTE]

    Serpico
  • #246838
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    gringodr
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    I see that American education, once the model for the world, is now being surpassed
    Brazil and Europe aren’t too far behind them.[/QUOTE]
    eh/?

  • #246857
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    I feel ashamed to admit much is true.
    Brazil annoyed me most of tens of countries I visited.
    Still I manage to see the good things and trying to get the max out of it.
    But to be honest I doubt I will live for ever in Brazil.
    It’s nice for holiday but to live, work and to improve quality of life is really a totally different thing…
    But Brazil is changing too.
    Don’t forget it was a former colonial state and failed dictatorship.
    Almost each decennial the currency collapsed.
    That is what you see on top of the colonial remnants and in the people’s survival strategies.
    If one understands why we can also accept and respect.

  • #246858
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    Oops, I did not realise there were 26 pages with comments already… Shocked

  • #246859
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] I feel ashamed to admit much is true.Brazil annoyed me most of tens of countries I visited.Still I manage to see the good things and trying to get the max out of it.But to be honest I doubt I will live for ever in Brazil.It’s nice for holiday but to live, work and to improve quality of life is really a totally different thing…But Brazil is changing too.Don’t forget it was a former colonial state and failed dictatorship.Almost each decennial the currency collapsed.That is what you see on top of the colonial remnants and in the people’s survival strategies.If one understands why we can also accept and respect.
    [/QUOTE]
    Very well put my friend!
    Brazil is a very hard place to live in, no doubt about it. Brazil is changing, although not as much as it needs to get past it’s enormity of problems and social-ills.
    Where in Brazil do you live?

  • #246861
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    Thank you! 🙂
    I bought a small house between Piabeta and Mage RJ.
    Right now I am in the Netherlands but I will travel soon and hope to renovate my house with some help.
    I am also preparing to earn my living. But that is a seven year old process already in which I still did not succeed…
    Where do you live?

  • #246865
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan]…But Brazil is changing too.Don’t forget it was a former colonial state and failed dictatorship.Almost each decennial the currency collapsed.That is what you see on top of the colonial remnants and in the people’s survival strategies.If one understands why we can also accept and respect.
    [/QUOTE]
    Ok – everyone has a downer on dictatorships these days, but with ‘democracy’, when the populace is given the right and obligation to vote, without the education or wherewithal to understand what they are doing themselves, and without a social structure where morals and ethics are valued, it’s a recipe for disaster. Much of Brazil’s crumbling infrastructure was built during the times of the dictatorship – I can’t think of any democratically elected government that has achieved as much since. Sure, they did some disappearing and torture – all the best dictatorships do, but they managed law and order better, and clearly had a better vision of the infrastructure a country the size of Brazil needs. I don’t see thishaving worked out very well in the Socialist Republic Of Lulaland to date.
    Colonialism is also viewed in a very dim light today, yet arguably it is the absence of colonialism that causes the issues, when the colonised people finally realise that actually they never had what it takes to be able to run their own countries, and had they not seen the possibilities when someone else took over, albeit for a short period of time, they would be blissfully unaware, and living with their own inadequacy quite happily. That said, I don’t think anyone would argue that the Portuguese were any good at Colonisation, although perhaps Brazil worked out better than Angola..

  • #246866
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    Sarcasm to say Brazil better stayed colony or dictatorship.
    Sometimes I express this opinion.
    On the other hand you must give Brazil the chance.
    Other Latin American countries also proved to be good democracies.
    Brazil definitely walks the right path but needless to say they are not even halfway…

  • #246869
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Sarcasm to say Brazil better stayed colony or dictatorship.Sometimes I express this opinion.On the other hand you must give Brazil the chance.Other Latin American countries also proved to be good democracies.Brazil definitely walks the right path but needless to say they are not even halfway… [/QUOTE] It is too easy to say democracy is best. It does not work in many societies, no matter how many guns and bombs we use to try and enforce this ‘Freedom’. Dictatorships have a bad image, for many very good reasons, however, having people who know what they are doing controlling people is not actually a strange concept to any of us.
    The family structure is generally a dictatorship, with the family elders telling the younger members what to do, based on their experience and their desire to see the younger family members benefit from their experience.
    Schools are similarly based on people in charge telling the pupils what to do – or what to learn in the case of a school. There is no touchy-feely ‘what would you like to learn today?’ and ‘who would you like to teach it to you?’ approach.
    The workplace is rarely democratic. The boss tells the workers what to do, and the boss is there for the good of the shareholders.
    Why do we therefore assume that society cannot have a benevolent dictatorship, without the need to dress it up as something we all have a say in. We don’t have a say in it. We elect the people that make the decisions for us – we are rarely consulted on the decisions themselves. we elect people based on their campaigns and media spin, not based on their ability to make the right decisions for the populace in any given area. This is often where a dictatorship does it better.
    So – while in reality, I do not support the thought of a dictatorship at all, I do feel they get a bad press without due consideration being given to their potential value, and how we we generally all participate on our own small-scale dictatorships.

  • #246870
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    I wonder if the Spanish and the Portuguese that had dictatorships for much longer than Brazzerland blame their dictatorships for their current failings. Brazzerland was a mess before the dictatorship and it is a mess after.nesne22013-04-29 13:36:33

  • #246871
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    @nesne2
    I was shocked to see a proper Fortaleza in the exhibition Fortaleza em fotografia 1880 – 1950 !!
    It surely didn’t look like a mess but rather an average European city!
    @finrudd
    In general I can only agree!

  • #246873
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    hello toolio, i live on the island of itaparica, so am close to salvador, and would really appreciate any info you can give me regarding where i can buy proper netting to make my own mosquito screens…at the moment i have nylon netting up against all my windows, but want to make proper fitted ones…and want to make screen doors, but with dogs they will just break the nylon in one day!!!! thank you, robyn

  • #246874
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    really enjoyed your post….made me smile

  • #246875
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    Mosquito nets are laying around for centuries. Someone telling me they hardly available in Brazil? I smell a business opportunity again…

  • #246876

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Sarcasm to say Brazil better stayed colony or dictatorship.Sometimes I express this opinion.On the other hand you must give Brazil the chance.Other Latin American countries also proved to be good democracies.Brazil definitely walks the right path but needless to say they are not even halfway… [/QUOTE] It is too easy to say democracy is best. It does not work in many societies, no matter how many guns and bombs we use to try and enforce this ‘Freedom’. Dictatorships have a bad image, for many very good reasons, however, having people who know what they are doing controlling people is not actually a strange concept to any of us.
    The family structure is generally a dictatorship, with the family elders telling the younger members what to do, based on their experience and their desire to see the younger family members benefit from their experience.
    Schools are similarly based on people in charge telling the pupils what to do – or what to learn in the case of a school. There is no touchy-feely ‘what would you like to learn today?’ and ‘who would you like to teach it to you?’ approach.
    The workplace is rarely democratic. The boss tells the workers what to do, and the boss is there for the good of the shareholders.
    Why do we therefore assume that society cannot have a benevolent dictatorship, without the need to dress it up as something we all have a say in. We don’t have a say in it. We elect the people that make the decisions for us – we are rarely consulted on the decisions themselves. we elect people based on their campaigns and media spin, not based on their ability to make the right decisions for the populace in any given area. This is often where a dictatorship does it better.
    So – while in reality, I do not support the thought of a dictatorship at all, I do feel they get a bad press without due consideration being given to their potential value, and how we we generally all participate on our own small-scale dictatorships.[/QUOTE]
    Those Facists sho’ do make the trains run on time!

  • #246877
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Grantham] Brazil is a sh*thole. But then again, so is the USA, if you aren’t super rich. I can go on and on and on and on about both countries. Let me start with Brazil. Brazil has airplanes, roads, elevators, computers, cars, you would think with these modern technologies it should work like a developed, first world country. No. Brazilians will take one look at you and make assumptions as to where you fit in Brazilian society, and how they can take advantage of you. They will stare at you and examine if you are self-conscious, what clothes you’re wearing, if you have any weakness, any sense of being lost, looking or feeling out of place, like you don’t know where you are, who you’re with, or the social rules of the country. It starts at the airport, and it only gets worse the longer you stay in the country. Past the airport are dusty roads, air pollution, homeless people, fruit vendors everywhere, dogs everywhere, people hanging plastic grocery bags full of trash on tree branches, trash on the road, the sidewalk, the grass, everywhere. People whizzing in and out of lanes on their stupid little motorcycles with their stupid helmets. Its hot as hell, and dusty. Did I mention air pollution, exhaust from vehicles, the air is toxic. (Go home, blow your nose, and whats left on the tissue is all black.) The roads are like a jungle adventure, you dont know if you will make it out alive. Go to your accommodation. Rest a bit. The floors, if there are floors, are all cold tile. No carpet. No hardwoods. Its hot, no air conditioning. The windows are open. Yes, there are mosquitoes and a milieu of other bugs inside your place. No window screens. At night, in the stifling heat, if you have electricity, count yourself lucky to have a fan whirring all night if you want to sleep. Remember, no air conditioning here. And the mosquitoes. And the denque. And the yellow fever. And the malaria. Oh, but right next door is a bar. Assuming you can sleep if you have airconditioning, a bed, and the mosquitoes are kept out, there’s the music of the bar next door, that wonderful FUNK music, oooh the glory!! (Parapaparapapraprapapa. Nos com os alemao vamos se divertir.) ALL NIGHT!!!! And its loud, of course. And theres chatter, loud of course. Theres yelling. Screaming. And then the dogs. Yes, they bark all night. The whirring of cars and motorcycles with loud engines all night. And the occasional sound of gunshots. Or something that sounds like them. If you knew how to live, Brazilian style, you wouldnt even sleep at all. Nooo, just have fun and go down to the bar with them. You will sleep at 4 am. Oh yes, and theres sleeping too in the afternoon. Its the Brazilian siesta. Because when you want to get work done, when its normal hours and a normal business day, they’re always “out for lunch” until 2 pm. Theyve gone home to sleep. Remember, they were up all night at the bar. When theyre back to work at around 3 pm, the computers not working. (o sistema caiu) or, no, its not really their job, its someone elses, but they dont work today, theyre on vacation, out of town, they get off early, theyre on lunch break, theyve just been fired and a replacement hasnt been hired yet, or theyre new and being trained, or theyre home, in the hospital, or at the doctors office because they “pegou uma virose”. What takes a day in a normal, developed country, takes, if youre lucky, two weeks in Brazil. Normally, it takes about three weeks to get done, sometimes a month, sometimes more, sometimes it never gets done, and sometimes you give up and go back to Europe or North America. Oh no, but thats because youre a gringo and you dont know how things get done in Brazil. Nooo, in Brazil, see, you have to be someones friend to get it done. Take them out to lunch. To beer. To a bar. To a night club, or a strip club. Yes. Now things get rolling. They can even sleep with your wife too. And maybe your daughter. Show them the $$, thats when things really get rolling. Eh o jeitinho brasileiro. Then, theyll call their friends cousin, whose got a school friend who has a brother who knows a woman who has a sister whos friends with her divorced husband whose married to that one woman in Sao Paulo. Yes, then miraculously your problem gets solved. Yippee! Then you call in sick and go to the beach for 2 weeks. Very efficient, very organized, very methodical, very first world. Welcome to Brazil! The country of the future! Order and Progress! The greatest country on Earth! Obrigado por voar TAM.
    [/QUOTE]

  • #246878
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    ha ha!!!!!!!!!! loved reading this one…thanks for a good laugh!!

  • #246880
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Thank you! :-)I bought a small house between Piabeta and Mage RJ.Right now I am in the Netherlands but I will travel soon and hope to renovate my house with some help.I am also preparing to earn my living. But that is a seven year old process already in which I still did not succeed…Where do you live?
    [/QUOTE]
    I currently live in the state of Minas Gerais. Cowboy land!
    I have been here for over three years. It’s quite an experience living here. Lots of ups and downs.
    What kind of work do you do? You might be able to find work here in Brazil if you have a decent command of Portuguese.

  • #246881
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan]…But Brazil is changing too.Don’t forget it was a former colonial state and failed dictatorship.Almost each decennial the currency collapsed.That is what you see on top of the colonial remnants and in the people’s survival strategies.If one understands why we can also accept and respect.
    [/QUOTE]
    Ok – everyone has a downer on dictatorships these days, but with ‘democracy’, when the populace is given the right and obligation to vote, without the education or wherewithal to understand what they are doing themselves, and without a social structure where morals and ethics are valued, it’s a recipe for disaster. Much of Brazil’s crumbling infrastructure was built during the times of the dictatorship – I can’t think of any democratically elected government that has achieved as much since. Sure, they did some disappearing and torture – all the best dictatorships do, but they managed law and order better, and clearly had a better vision of the infrastructure a country the size of Brazil needs. I don’t see thishaving worked out very well in the Socialist Republic Of Lulaland to date.
    Colonialism is also viewed in a very dim light today, yet arguably it is the absence of colonialism that causes the issues, when the colonised people finally realise that actually they never had what it takes to be able to run their own countries, and had they not seen the possibilities when someone else took over, albeit for a short period of time, they would be blissfully unaware, and living with their own inadequacy quite happily. That said, I don’t think anyone would argue that the Portuguese were any good at Colonisation, although perhaps Brazil worked out better than Angola..[/QUOTE]
    This is quite interesting. Many arguements have been made about economic activity and democracy. Many economists from the States argue that democracy and free markets do not make the best combination for economic progress. They are usually right-wing idealogues, but their point is well-taken in my opinion.
    Many older Brazilians who lived under the dictorship joke how things used to run “better”. You may not have had “freedom” but things worked better. I have read similar opinions from Brazilians living in China.
    I personally don’t care for living under a dictatorship but I do enjoy the exchange of ideas.
    The real issue is the culture. Brazilians don’t follow rules, regulations or laws. They always try and find a way around them. It’s in their nature. Until that changes, we shouldn’t expect anything more or anything less. Jeitinho for everyone!!!!

  • #246882
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Mosquito nets are laying around for centuries. Someone telling me they hardly available in Brazil? I smell a business opportunity again…
    [/QUOTE]
    Very interesting…indeed, very interesting.

  • #246885
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] I personally don’t care for living under a dictatorship but I do enjoy the exchange of ideas. [/QUOTE] I have never tried it, and hope not to.
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] The real issue is the culture. Brazilians don’t follow rules, regulations or laws. They always try and find a way around them. It’s in their nature. Until that changes, we shouldn’t expect anything more or anything less. Jeitinho for everyone!!!! [/QUOTE]
    You hit the nail on the head here – this Jetinho is the cause of the rot in Brazil – the dirty, dank and festering core that ensures most Brazilians reap exactlywhat they sow.

  • #246886
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] @nesne2I was shocked to see a proper Fortaleza in the exhibition Fortaleza em fotografia 1880 – 1950 !!It surely didn’t look like a mess but rather an average European city!@finruddIn general I can only agree! [/QUOTE]
    This is a very valid point – from what I can see, Brazil was a more ‘developed’ country at the turn of the last century when compared with it’s European peers than it is now. Certainly cities like Sao Paulo and Rio seem to have declined since a given point in the 1900’s rather than prospered – I don’t know if that is since the 1960’s, 70’s or 80’s? Somewhere along the line it seems to have gone badly wrong. This ‘undevelopment’ or ‘disdevelopment’ (we don’t even appear to have a word for backwards development, as I suppose it’s an oxymoron?) is also seen in more evidence in the ex-Belgium colony of Congo/Zaire, where the jungle is literally reclaiming paved roads and ornate European style boulevards that were actively maintained until some point at the end of the 60’s. Think of Fordlandia in the Amazon, and that happening on a larger scale to cities like SP and Rio…therefore I can well believe that Recife is another city that has had it’s heyday.

  • #246887
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Mosquito nets are laying around for centuries. Someone telling me they hardly available in Brazil? I smell a business opportunity again…
    [/QUOTE]
    Very interesting…indeed, very interesting.
    [/QUOTE]
    What is this about Mosquito nets on windows? They are everywhere!! You can walk into a Leroy Merlin and buy windows off-the shelf that have the glazed part on a sash system, a sliding section where the mosquito net can be fitted and the outside shutters. So, you can leave the glass open and just have the mosquito net in place, with shutters opened or closed.
    All the shops selling windows around Butanta have them, as do all the shops selling windows in Raposo Tavares and Bunjiro Nakao (on the way to Ibiuna).

  • #246888

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=usaalltheway] I personally don’t care for living under a dictatorship but I do enjoy the exchange of ideas. [/QUOTE] I have never tried it, and hope not to.
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] The real issue is the culture. Brazilians don’t follow rules, regulations or laws. They always try and find a way around them. It’s in their nature. Until that changes, we shouldn’t expect anything more or anything less. Jeitinho for everyone!!!! [/QUOTE]
    You hit the nail on the head here – this Jetinho is the cause of the rot in Brazil – the dirty, dank and festering core that ensures most Brazilians reap exactlywhat they sow. [/QUOTE]
    Yeah- this speaks volumes… I think it really can be cultural, and not all cultures are created equal. Some cultures do have a notion of “Doing The Right Thing”: i.e. not throwing your trash on the street, doing a good job at work, being a good neighbor etc… Some countries (Japan, Switzerland) do have a strong notion of “doing the right thing”. They don’t need police forcing them to obey societal standards, they just do it anyway because there is a shared conciousness about being a participant in a larger societal unit. I’m not saying these countries don’t have problems, but people do seem to “get it” on the whole. As countries develop economically, does people’s behavior change for the better also, or is the culture just too ingrained and nothing ever changes in the long-run?
    I remember a NY Times journalist talking about visiting Greece and how everyone just parks on the sidewalk or barrels the wrong way down a one-way street if nobody is looking. He then questioned as to how can a country function if nobody obeys the rules or the rules don’t exist at all- hence Greece’s current Fkd-Uppredicament. A telling observation and can easily be applied to Brazil as well. How long until they become the next Greece(?)

  • #246889
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    good luck priya and ten points for your perseverence, i am a south african, been here for 6 years and really enjoy living here…just be yourself, accept what you cannot change, adapt and be creative and take it all with a pinch of salt!!!!!

  • #246891
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] Mosquito nets are laying around for centuries. Someone telling me they hardly available in Brazil? I smell a business opportunity again…
    [/QUOTE]
    First you have to convince people they actually need them.
    Beside those that live in gated apartments, most Brazilians live their lives outside, or with all windows closed and the airconditioning on.
    In apartments you generally don’t need screens, as most bugs are to lazy to go up to the 5th floor.
    If you live outside, you’d have to screen your whole garden.
    If you live in a house with the airco on, you obviously don’t need screening.

  • #246892
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd]
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] The real issue is the culture. Brazilians don’t follow rules, regulations or laws. They always try and find a way around them. It’s in their nature. Until that changes, we shouldn’t expect anything more or anything less. Jeitinho for everyone!!!! [/QUOTE]
    You hit the nail on the head here – this Jetinho is the cause of the rot in Brazil – the dirty, dank and festering core that ensures most Brazilians reap exactlywhat they sow. [/QUOTE]
    The funny thing is that those same brazilians complain about corrupt politicians.
    On the one hand they are totally prepared to bribe the police or whomever, but when it’s someone else that does the bribing, it’s a bad thing.

  • #246894
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    Dear usaalltheway,
    I speak Portuguese pretty well, had 5 years private lessons on a weekly basis.
    My former teacher came from MG but yesterday I learned from a fellow student she passed away last September.
    My area is Sales & IT.
    I made some cases e.g.:
    – Teacher English, Dutch, website design.
    – Website design, computer repair & maintenance.
    – Odd jobs, construction / renovation / painting; put employees to work.
    – Real Estate Agent for Brazil as a whole and in both Portuguese & English.
    I can network through:
    – LinkedIn,
    – websites plus high google pagerank,
    – Adds on market places like OLX, Vivastreet but also in local papers,
    – Through local expat communities and foreign representation of my home country (Dutch Consulate).
    Since too many comments made me unsubscribe the notification of replies, I suggest you to email me on jeroenhaan@yahoo.com .
    Of course any other reader is welcome to contact me too.
    See also
    http://www.haan.net
    and
    http://www.linkedin.com/in/jeroenhaan
    Cordially,
    Jeroen Haan

  • #246904
    Profile photo of agri2001
    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=Jeroen Haan] @nesne2I was shocked to see a proper Fortaleza in the exhibition Fortaleza em fotografia 1880 – 1950 !!It surely didn’t look like a mess but rather an average European city!@finruddIn general I can only agree! [/QUOTE]
    This is a very valid point – from what I can see, Brazil was a more ‘developed’ country at the turn of the last century when compared with it’s European peers than it is now. Certainly cities like Sao Paulo and Rio seem to have declined since a given point in the 1900’s rather than prospered – I don’t know if that is since the 1960’s, 70’s or 80’s? Somewhere along the line it seems to have gone badly wrong. This ‘undevelopment’ or ‘disdevelopment’ (we don’t even appear to have a word for backwards development, as I suppose it’s an oxymoron?) is also seen in more evidence in the ex-Belgium colony of Congo/Zaire, where the jungle is literally reclaiming paved roads and ornate European style boulevards that were actively maintained until some point at the end of the 60’s. Think of Fordlandia in the Amazon, and that happening on a larger scale to cities like SP and Rio…therefore I can well believe that Recife is another city that has had it’s heyday. [/QUOTE]
    Some of these countries just cant seem to function in an orderly way without the boot up their a$$.
    I have traveled extensively in South America and in conversations that I have had with many people that lived in those times ( under dictatorships ) most all have said that things functioned and crime barely existed, and some even wish that those days come back.
    Also visited Greece a few years ago and the same thing was voiced about the dictatorship they had there.
    So there is something to be said about “forced law and order”

  • #246909
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Loukitos
    Member

    I can’t compare since I never have lived under a dictatorship.
    But friends who lived under Brezhnev and Tito told me they were better off in those times… One was a high ranking officer with the KGB and the other son of the Yugoslav Ambassador. My mums friend who emigrated to Mallorca and lived under Franco told me similar stories. I can only take these memoirs for granted…

  • #246959
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=finrudd]
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] The real issue is the culture. Brazilians don’t follow rules, regulations or laws. They always try and find a way around them. It’s in their nature. Until that changes, we shouldn’t expect anything more or anything less. Jeitinho for everyone!!!! [/QUOTE]
    You hit the nail on the head here – this Jetinho is the cause of the rot in Brazil – the dirty, dank and festering core that ensures most Brazilians reap exactlywhat they sow. [/QUOTE]
    The funny thing is that those same brazilians complain about corrupt politicians.
    On the one hand they are totally prepared to bribe the police or whomever, but when it’s someone else that does the bribing, it’s a bad thing.[/QUOTE]
    Bingo!
    Here is one that I find funny. Brazilians, for the most part, HATE Lula. I have heard many people compare him to some of the most despicable historic figures. Then they do a complete about face and praise Obama.
    Really? How is that so?
    If you tell them about the things Obama is ACTUALLY doing (drones, wars, corporate bailouts, etc.) they just give you the “look” and the conversation ends unless you want to get into a argument with an irate, ill-informed Brazilian. You know the look I mean: it says they really haven’t done any real reading or looking into the subject but they have formed a complete and unwavering opinion on the matter.
    When it’s myself, it’s okay. When it’s others, it’s wrong.
    Brazilians are crazy bunch!

  • #246960
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    Yeah- this speaks volumes… I think it really can be cultural, and not all cultures are created equal. Some cultures do have a notion of “Doing The Right Thing”: i.e. not throwing your trash on the street, doing a good job at work, being a good neighbor etc… Some countries (Japan, Switzerland) do have a strong notion of “doing the right thing”. They don’t need police forcing them to obey societal standards, they just do it anyway because there is a shared conciousness about being a participant in a larger societal unit. I’m not saying these countries don’t have problems, but people do seem to “get it” on the whole. As countries develop economically, does people’s behavior change for the better also, or is the culture just too ingrained and nothing ever changes in the long-run?I remember a NY Times journalist talking about visiting Greece and how everyone just parks on the sidewalk or barrels the wrong way down a one-way street if nobody is looking. He then questioned as to how can a country function if nobody obeys the rules or the rules don’t exist at all- hence Greece’s current Fkd-Uppredicament. A telling observation and can easily be applied to Brazil as well. How long until they become the next Greece(?)[/QUOTE]
    And that is truly the it, isn’t it? If you really need someone over your shoulder 24/7 to make you sure are doing it correctly, then you can’t bitch and whine when others do it to you.
    And, just for fun, go and tell this to your closest Brazilian friend. I bet you won’t be friend for much longer…

  • #246993
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] Yeah- this speaks volumes… I think it really can be cultural, and not all cultures are created equal. Some cultures do have a notion of “Doing The Right Thing”: i.e. not throwing your trash on the street, doing a good job at work, being a good neighbor etc… Some countries (Japan, Switzerland) do have a strong notion of “doing the right thing”. They don’t need police forcing them to obey societal standards, they just do it anyway because there is a shared conciousness about being a participant in a larger societal unit. I’m not saying these countries don’t have problems, but people do seem to “get it” on the whole. As countries develop economically, does people’s behavior change for the better also, or is the culture just too ingrained and nothing ever changes in the long-run?I remember a NY Times journalist talking about visiting Greece and how everyone just parks on the sidewalk or barrels the wrong way down a one-way street if nobody is looking. He then questioned as to how can a country function if nobody obeys the rules or the rules don’t exist at all- hence Greece’s current Fkd-Uppredicament. A telling observation and can easily be applied to Brazil as well. How long until they become the next Greece(?)[/QUOTE]
    And that is truly the it, isn’t it? If you really need someone over your shoulder 24/7 to make you sure are doing it correctly, then you can’t bitch and whine when others do it to you.
    And, just for fun, go and tell this to your closest Brazilian friend. I bet you won’t be friend for much longer…[/QUOTE]
    1900 – São Paulo had a minute population and only student and emerging coffee braons lived here.
    1920’s – 1930’s – revolution, political problems
    1960’s – Coup/dictatorship
    1970’s – 1980’s – huge droughts in the NE, cities like SP and Rio were taken over by people looking for work – I mean massive influx of people that nobody could plan or take care of.
    1980’s – end of dictatorship, lots of things were crappy, economic & political freedom is abused.
    In the 1980’s and beginning of 1990’s there were no speed limits. As soon as I got my drivers license, I used to barrel down the marginal Pinheiros at 150 km per hour for fun. You could drive from SP to Rio in 4 hours because a lot of the time you were going at 180 km/hour… no seatbelts.
    People here used to park on the sidewalk too and barrel down one-way streets.
    Throwing things on the floor? Has gotten better. I’ve seen sofás floating in the middle of the marginal pinheiros because someone just dumped it there on the side of the road and then came the rains.
    It’s education that makes the difference.
    You think New York, Switzerland or UK was this way 100 years ago? It takes some time, but it’s happening.

  • #246995
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=HalfGringa]
    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] Yeah- this speaks volumes… I think it really can be cultural, and not all cultures are created equal. Some cultures do have a notion of “Doing The Right Thing”: i.e. not throwing your trash on the street, doing a good job at work, being a good neighbor etc… Some countries (Japan, Switzerland) do have a strong notion of “doing the right thing”. They don’t need police forcing them to obey societal standards, they just do it anyway because there is a shared conciousness about being a participant in a larger societal unit. I’m not saying these countries don’t have problems, but people do seem to “get it” on the whole. As countries develop economically, does people’s behavior change for the better also, or is the culture just too ingrained and nothing ever changes in the long-run?I remember a NY Times journalist talking about visiting Greece and how everyone just parks on the sidewalk or barrels the wrong way down a one-way street if nobody is looking. He then questioned as to how can a country function if nobody obeys the rules or the rules don’t exist at all- hence Greece’s current Fkd-Uppredicament. A telling observation and can easily be applied to Brazil as well. How long until they become the next Greece(?)[/QUOTE]
    And that is truly the it, isn’t it? If you really need someone over your shoulder 24/7 to make you sure are doing it correctly, then you can’t bitch and whine when others do it to you.
    And, just for fun, go and tell this to your closest Brazilian friend. I bet you won’t be friend for much longer…[/QUOTE]1900 – São Paulo had a minute population and only student and emerging coffee braons lived here.1920’s – 1930’s – revolution, political problems1960’s – Coup/dictatorship1970’s – 1980’s – huge droughts in the NE, cities like SP and Rio were taken over by people looking for work – I mean massive influx of people that nobody could plan or take care of.1980’s – end of dictatorship, lots of things were crappy, economic & political freedom is abused.In the 1980’s and beginning of 1990’s there were no speed limits. As soon as I got my drivers license, I used to barrel down the marginal Pinheiros at 150 km per hour for fun. You could drive from SP to Rio in 4 hours because a lot of the time you were going at 180 km/hour… no seatbelts.People here used to park on the sidewalk too and barrel down one-way streets.Throwing things on the floor? Has gotten better. I’ve seen sofás floating in the middle of the marginal pinheiros because someone just dumped it there on the side of the road and then came the rains.It’s education that makes the difference.You think New York, Switzerland or UK was this way 100 years ago? It takes some time, but it’s happening.[/QUOTE]
    As always…you are right on, B

  • #247049
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    Today at work my Brazilian co-workers who have experience with foreign countries, attitudes, cultures, etc. where saying basically that Brazil is a hellhole and is lightyears behind the rest of the world. Remember, that was THEIR opinion after having visit the US and Europe. They were saying things that were basically things I have been crucified for writing on this site.
    Brazil is getting better but that still doesn’t make up for the fact that things here are so backwards. I think it behoves us to get real about Brazil and stop making excuses for it. There are plenty of people already doing that. usaalltheway2013-04-30 20:27:22

  • #247058
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]Today at work my Brazilian co-workers who have experience with foreign countries, attitudes, cultures, etc. where saying basically that Brazil is a hellhole and is lightyears behind the rest of the world. Remember, that was THEIR opinion after having visit the US and Europe. They were saying things that were basically things I have been crucified for writing on this site.
    Brazil is getting better but that still doesn’t make up for the fact that things here are so backwards. I think it behoves us to get real about Brazil and stop making excuses for it. There are plenty of people already doing that. [/QUOTE]
    I think the point is you are like the adult who berates the child who is behind in his class. He will grow up, he may not become president, he may not be the smartest in the bunch, but you’re considered in the wrong for pointing out his flaws.
    What part of developingcountry do some people not understand? Yes it’s light-years behind several countries… that’s the point. That’s why it’s a developing country. Not all countries develop the same.
    Nobody is making excuses, we’re trying to explain why its crazy for you to expect it to be like Switzerland.

  • #247077
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=HalfGringa]What part of developingcountry do some people not understand? Yes it’s light-years behind several countries… that’s the point. That’s why it’s a developing country. Not all countries develop the same.
    Nobody is making excuses, we’re trying to explain why its crazy for you to expect it to be like Switzerland.
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t agree with this – it is reasonable to expect development to be like a snow-ball effect once the initial pioneering development has been done somewhere else, and found to work or be a success. Sure, this does not guarantee that it will work somewhere else, but it’s a starting point. No one is asking Brazil to go out and invent the wheel or electricity – luckily someone did all those great things for them, but what has been achieved since the early 1900’s seems fairly poor in comparison to other countries with similar starting points.
    When I say similar, of course, there are differences. Brazil is vast, which is a starting issue, but from that comes the potential for vast wealth, which has been achieved, only with a total failure to re-invest that wealth for the common good through sensible taxation and public spending, and a failure to have even a stab at fair distribution of that wealth too.
    Brazil is not a country that has much in the way of natural disaster aside from drought (which only impacts some of the country), and mostly the country is suited for both arable and livestock farming. There has been little in the way of war (Triple Alliance possibly the only major war?) and certainly nothing much to speak of in the 20th century. Brazil didn’t even get off the fence about WWII until virtually the end of the war, so generally it has not been held back by war damage, economically, socially or structurally.
    The demographic origins of the people here would have lent towards making more of a success of the past 100 years too, I would have thought? Europeans & Japanese settlers bringing with them a recent experience of economic growth, of new thinking, new developments – this thinking seemed to have died on arrival in Brazil, although it’s not clear why? So – looking at demographics, did slavery actually cause Brazil a major problem? At one point the ratio of slaves to owners was alarming, and while other countries heavily populated with slavery and colonial farms have also struggled to do well, they are generally small islands without the natural wealth that Brazil still has to this day. The US of course also had a massive slave population, which perhaps dispels the possibility that a large country over-populated with a hostile people, held there against their will is a bad start for a country wanting to develop afterwards.
    So – is it really unreasonable to expect more from Brazil, and perhaps feel ‘Brazilians’ are to blame for Brazil? I don’t think so – I don’t expect or want Brazil to be like Switzerland or Singapore, or London or Berlin, but I can’t help but feel that Brazil has the potential to achieve greatness, but lacks the population to achieve this greatness. I see decades and decades of failure here still to come, with lots of personal wealth being generated, which in turn exasperates the overall problem. I see future generations arguing about Brazil being the country of the future. The trickiest part is actually putting your finger on what is the cause of the failings.

  • #247088
    Profile photo of Ron
    Ron
    Participant

    [QUOTE = finrudd]
    “The US of course also had a massive slave population, which perhaps dispels the possibility that a large country over-populated with a hostile people, held there against their will is a bad start for a country wanting to develop afterwards.”
    _____________________________________________
    Australia and New Zealand both started as penal colonies with the majority of the population hostile and held against their will. Now first world countries. In both countries the indigenous population is still hostile.
    Brazil has had over 500 years of European influence against Australia and NZ 250.
    Just look at Portugal and Spain today and you may come to some conclusions. Could it be a Latino thing? How many latino countries are there – how many are first world?
    Is anyone seriously a believer of the statement that “All men were created equal.”?

  • #247093
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Good point about the penal colonies Captain Ron. I was also thinking about how the Spanish and Portuguese didn’t seem to do that well with their Colonies – but in reality very few colonies can actually say ‘Woo! Look at us now!’ Australia, US and NZ the exceptions.
    Now, without reading anything into this, one of the main differences with these three is that the imported population of white Caucasians (as I believe they are known correctly) subdued the native population in a relatively short period of time and replaced them as the predominant people, and after imposing their culture and beliefs, the country developed over the decades into what they are today.
    This did not happen in African or Asian colonies anywhere, where relatively small numbers of colonists arrived, did their thing, and then left as colonisation fell out of favour, and the countries mostly reverted back to what they were before, and resumed their own cultures and beliefs, with perhaps an influence from the departed visitors only.
    The South American colonies of Spain and Portugal are interesting therefore, in that the native population of Indian people died in fairly large numbers from disease and exploitation, and the colonies therefore imported slave labour from other colonies, making a massive melting pot of cultures and beliefs. The colonial powers never really left here either, as they did in much of Africa, Asia and the Indian sub-continent – they simply ‘went native’ themselves and stayed. This is more akin to Australia, US and NZ where the colonists stayed and went native, so how come it worked there, and did not in say, Brazil?
    The similarities are as remarkable between the US and Brazil as the differences are startling. Originally colonies, both imported large slave populations, both gained independence from the old colonial masters. One has become a leading world power, a position that looks likely to continue, and one languishes in the background with an eternal title of ‘developing’. Both countries were settled by Christians – one by Protestants and one by Catholics. What role has the church played in their development and how much can the differences between these two be attributed to their differences in development? Then if we look at the settlers themselves – the US were British, Dutch & German (Sorry – I am hazy on the details here) but also Italians and no doubt a bunch of others. Brazil was Portuguese, Italian, and to a lesser extent Japanese and Ukrainians (?).
    So, it would be too easy to blame the ‘Latin’ folk of Portuguese and Italians for making a mess of Brazil (and the Spanish for other South American developing countries), as the Italians have a pretty big claim to American heritage too I assume? Is it that the US had already developed sufficiently by the time the Italians arrived, and developed its own culture and beliefs, that any ‘negative’ impact they might have had was diluted?
    Lastly – language. Did having the English language make a difference in the early days of development, similar say to speaking Chinese might have today with any nation wanting to develop? Did having the Portuguese language actually hold back development?

  • #247101
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    celso
    Member

    Please run to your local bookstore and get a copy of 1822. Amazing history of early Brazil. I read 40 pages or so day. Hard to put down. The author clearly details how backward Brazil was with the Portuguese to blame for nearly 100% illiteracqy rate. Lots of censureship, laes that wete made to make money for Portugal and keep Brazil a dependant colony providing basic goods. Big changes come after 1810 with arrival of Joao. VI.GreatBallsoFire2013-05-01 11:09:08

  • #247110
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire]Please run to your local bookstore and get a copy of 1822. Amazing history of early Brazil. I read 40 pages or so day. Hard to put down. The author clearly details how backward Brazil was with the Portuguese to blame for nearly 100% illiteracqy rate. Lots of censureship, laes that wete made to make money for Portugal and keep Brazil a dependant colony providing basic goods. Big changes come after 1810 with arrival of Joao. VI.[/QUOTE]
    I will add this onto my Amazon Wishlist – sounds good. However, it doesn’t explain the lack of development since 1900, a fairly enlightened time for most of the world in terms of changes that impacted the world. Mechanisation really taking off, the arrival of the motorcar, TV, commercial radio etc. Ok, so Brazil had a rough start from the Portuguese, but once they shook off those shackles what was the next thing that held them back?
    Edit. GBOF – who is the author please? I can’t find it..
    finrudd2013-05-01 11:58:41

  • #247112
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire]Plesae run to your local bookstore and get a copy of 1822. Amazing history of early Brazil. I read 40 pages or so day. Hard to put down. The author clearly details how backward Brazil was with the Portuguese to blame for nearly 100% illis of cesteracy rate. Lots of censureship, laes that wete made to make money for Portugal and keep Brazil a dependant colony providing basic goods. Big changes come after 1810 with arrival of Joao. VI.q[/QUOTE]
    Yes. There are dozens of books and theories all attempting to answer the same question – since Brazil’s history is so similar to the US, why the difference?
    There are so many points… but the tops ones are:
    – The settlers that came to Brazil from 1500 to 1800 approx, were not here to settle and build a country, but to take away its natural resources. We had no Pilgrims escaping to a land where they would have religious freedom, the opportunity to build something and welcome foreigners. Nobody that came to Brazil was going to actually stay back then;
    – Differences between Protestant (we are going to work and praise God (bottom up) and catholic (starting from when the pope divided South America down the middle for Portugal and Spain and meddled always – top down);
    – The division of land that occurred at the beginning and subsequent problems with expanding west, away from the coastline;
    – Later on, in 20th century, influence from foreign governments to lead the country either into and/or away from communism (revolution, coups, dictatorship, etc…)
    – Hyperinflation – if you haven’t lived through it, you don’t know how destructive it can be.
    – Our recent politics & constitution – just poorly done and a product of previous dictatorship and recent history.
    Tons of books on the subject. The one GBOF recommended is great, so are:
    РBrasil e EUA: O que Fez a Diferença, Ricardo Lessa
    – Empire Adrift: The Portuguese Court in Rio de Janeiro, Patrick Wilcken – Good read- in English
    The Accidental President of Brazil: A Memoiris a great read in English for more recent history , Fernando Henrique Cardoso
    If you’re planning to stay here, I suggest you get familiar with the history.
    Every developing country has it’s own history of invaders, colonizers, wars, issues, weaknesses and strengths that led it to where it is today.

  • #247114
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Some of the contemporary literature also gives good insight into Brazil, why it is what it is – of course, opinions:
    Futebol – The Brazilian Way of Life by Alex Bellos.
    A Death in Brazil, by Peter Robb
    Brazil: Life, Blood, Soul by John Malathronas
    I found all three quite insightful, with some interesting views on more recent Brazil and what shapes it.

  • #247115
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    @finrudd
    I don’t know about Ukrainians in Brazil, but in the early years of colonization we did have a majority of Portuguese, some Spanish in the south and Dutch in the northeast region.
    As mentioned, Portuguese and Spanish didn’t do a good job with their colonies, actually setting back their development. And I don’t think Spain or Portugal are deemed today as models for other countries.
    Now, who colonized the countries that are considered an example of development?
    Brazil is never going to be like the US, NZ or Australia, for it was not created equal.
    I’m not trying to find excuses for Brazil or Brazilians, as many complain here, but I do think that is simplistic to say that “Brazilians are to blame for Brazil”. And if we are going to point fingers, who is to blame for Brazilians?
    But that doesn’t even matter. The problem is in trying to compare countries from different backgrounds and levels of development and expecting them to be the same. It reminds me of an example I was given in a class where almost 90% of the students were college students or already had a college degree. The teacher then explained that we who had a higher level of education tended to believe everyone else was the same because the majority of our friends and acquaintances also had college degrees . That is a false perception. In Brazil less than 5% of the population goes to college.
    The thing is, when we are sorrounded by people (countries) that are as developed as we are (or more than), we tend to think that this is the reality of the rest of the world, but it is not. Not everybody had or has the same opportunities we have, so it is really unfair to expect them to be in the same level.

  • #247116
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    A total failure in the education system is a recurring theme as a root cause, and is a common factor in many developing countries. So, if it were about appointing blame, where does the problem with education lie? Ignore the rural poor, as everyone else has done for 500 years – the urban poor, middle class and even wealthy seem to have the same struggle with education. Why don’t Brazilians do a whole day of schooling? Surely a half-day gives half an education, and leads to the strange situation where the adult population spends so much of their adult life still in school, trying to get qualifications.
    So – teachers not being paid enough, the tax paying public not demanding enough, or just not a culture where education is really valued?

  • #247117

    A good example of development is S. Korea (another colonized, exploited, backwards country):
    At the end of the Korean War in 1953, they had lost millions of people to starvation, disease, battle etc. Their cities had been obliterated. Korea’s literacy and economic development rates were on par with Ghana or Nigeria during those years. They had hardly any natural resources (gold, oil, diamonds) and hardly any arable land…
    And yet,within 2 generations Korea has transformed itself into one of the world’s top 10 economies, with one of the highest standards of living in the world!This How did they do this? MASSIVE INVESTMENT in education and infrastructure. The production of MANUFACTURED GOODS (TV’s, Electronics, Cars etc.) and the EXPORTATION of these products to the outside world. This has led to an incredible rate of economic development and rising living standards. We can see China today following (I think correctly) this model. Simply by building factories and ports to export their products they are creating a bright future for themselves…
    Has dictatorship played a large role in the history of these two countries? The answer is yes, but it was/is still needed, but Korea (and I hope China as well one day) has transitioned to a middle-class civilian democracy today.
    Unfortunately, I do not see Brazil following this model of development- they remain an exporter of natural resources, with no investment in infrastructure, education or manufacture and development of industrial products: Brazil still is the classic example of the stereotypical “Banana Republic”. Natural resources, whether coffee, beef or oil, have extremely volatile highs and lows, Brazil has ridden the boom the past 10 years, but as will probably happen, the bust will occur sooner or later. Only exporting/industrial countries are guaranteed more stable economies…
    Take Argentina for example: in the beginning of the 20th Century, Argentina was one of the richest countries on earth, with one of the biggest middle-classes and one of the the highest per capita GDP’s. Unfortunately, their economy continued to remain an exporter of Beef, Corn and other agricultural products. Subsequent busts ensued, along with the resultant political instability and ineptitude. Argentina is a case study in how a country can actually REGRESS, from a quite developed economy to a much poorer, unstable, undeveloped one.
    Dilma is an economist, she should know this, she should understand these historical lessons. Yet, I see no investment in Brazil’s future based on some very real and successful economic models. The current good times may become rather messy, I’m afraid…

  • #247118
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    @finrudd
    Yes, failure in the education system is the main cause of Brazil’s problems.
    Teachers are not paid enough, that’s for sure. The tax paying public really does not demand enough, mostly because people in Brazil usually do not pursue their rights believing it’s a lost cause, thus a waste of time and energy to achieve nothing. That is the other problem: we as a people are accommodated, and in face of all the corruption we tend to give up before even starting.
    I don’t believe that we do not value education, but that there is an interest in providing education only to a small portion of the population.

  • #247120
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    @donpelon415
    I completely agree with you. Brazil should invest more in education and infrastructure. But I don’t think that it goes very well with the political agenda. People here tend to think only of themselves and their immediate gain.
    When/If we as a people start thinking as a people, not as indivuals who happen to live in the same country, Brazil may see real improvement and development.

  • #247123
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd]… However, it doesn’t explain the lack of development since 1900, a fairly enlightened time for most of the world in terms of changes that impacted the world. Mechanisation really taking off, the arrival of the motorcar, TV, commercial radio etc. Ok, so Brazil had a rough start from the Portuguese, but once they shook off those shackles what was the next thing that held them back?
    [/QUOTE]
    There are so many factors and differences and they start before 1900. The idea of Brazil as a big farm/resource for Europe continued after independence and throughout 1900. We were ruled for most of this time by either kings or dictators. By 1920, 70% of exports were coffee – coffee barons ruled, political system was controlled by coffee industry, revolution, 1929 stock exchange bomb, then another revolution – Imagine if the New Deal had been put into place and a part of US had revolted against Roosevelt, Imagine then that Roosevelt squashed the revolt and stayed in power for 15 years – it’s very simplistic, but a way of looking at it – tons of governments (Germany, US) trying to control what happens in politics and economy. Socialist government, political unrest, changes and changes in politics, coup, another dictatorship which had the right ideas, but spent too much money trying to catch up in infrastructure, leading to influx of migrants, inflation, economic instability….
    We got cars, TV, Radios, technology at the same time or soon after developed countries did – what we lacked was stability.

  • #247124
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    The life in Rio was clearly better in the 60s, 70s and 80s. Back then no Bars in front of buildings, small VW cars not mammoth sized buses speeding thru town. Noise level back in he 80s were much lower. Crime was much less. Every Rio local I talk to who is over 50 years of age admits life in Rio in the 70s and 80s was much better, less crime, way less noise and people would say hello in the streets, strangers were friends you did not know. I would give my left nut to be living in Rio in 1978 !!

  • #247125
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    wayne7639
    Member

    A lot of valid points are made here especially the ones regarding the lack of education here & I agree that the high value Sth Korea, Taiwan, China etc places on education has helped their country grow in leaps & bounds. It’s interesting to note that my grandfather originally came here from Taiwan in the early 1960s seeking a better life for his family (In 1962, Taiwan had a nominal per-capita GNP of $170, placing its economy on a par with those of Zaire and Congo). But now 50 years later, when you compare the living standard of an average Taiwanese compared to an average Brazilian and their access to good quality (public) education, health services, social safety and skilled jobs – there is one clear winner. Taiwan wins hands down. Even though my relatives here have done well for themselves; in terms of what they get in return for their tax dollar compared to the average Taiwanese – I would want my money back! Many Brazilians (who are well educated and well travelled) have told me that they are not sure if they even want to raise a baby here. I think this alone says how much confidence they have in their own country.
    It’s also interesting when you take a look at the Corruption Index: http://cpi.transparency.org/cpi2012/results/
    you can see that there are no Latin or African countries in the top (Least Corrupt) until Chile at number 20. Many at the top are either Scandinavian countries or those who are part of the British Commonwealth. Can we then make assumptions on the rule of law and culture and its influences on corruption?
    Brazil has been blessed with more than its fair share of natural resources but what is tragic, is that the country thinks that it doesnt need to work hard to sustain those resources and reinvest in other areas too. It’s like a child being born with a silver spoon. It’s been so spoiled at the start that it doesn’t know how to work for its keep!
    I grew up in Brazil, Australia & Taiwan, and what strikes me most is the selfishness Brazilians have in their everyday life. They litter, create noise, stand in the way & take advantage of people, break appointments often, don’t carry out what they promised, don’t give way at crossings etc with no care for others. I know this all relates to the “Jeitinho Brasileiro” but in a way this has become a badge for them, something they are proud to be … What I dislike most is the behaviour of commuters especially during peak hours: when did pushing in before allowing others to exit the metro/train/bus ever make sense??
    At the same time, Brazil is full of contrasts. It’s the most Catholic country in the world, yet you wouldn’t believe it if you had been to one of their Carnivals or beaches. A great part of its population are also homophobic which shock many foreigners as Brazil’s Gay Parade are known around the world. People here are very family oriented yet they have a very “me” culture too.
    They are physically a multiculturally diverse range of people, yet only a small percentage of Brazilians speak a second language or follow a second culture at home. Compared to Australia, I feel there is a lesser connection (or pride) of people with their migrant roots. At the same time, I’ve seen quite a few Brazilians making fun of people with “olhos puxado” or Asian eyes by stretching their eyes with their fingers (it seems like this action is not seen as racist at all here unlike in other countries. One Brazilian teacher I know, even made the move when talking about his Japanese boyfriend)
    All in all, Brazil is a crazy anomaly of many things which partly accounts for this lack of direction and stability, which has allowed the country to regress. So much for the motto on its flag: Order & Progress …

  • #247133
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    “Many Brazilians will not acknowledge the horrors of Brazil unless they move abroad, which is when many of them notice the astounding differences. There are many things wrong with Brazil, and ignoring it is just living in denial, which is what most Brazilians do, hence the lack of progress.” – someone else from another site about Brazil

  • #247134
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Sydneysider]
    Brazil has been blessed with more than its fair share of natural resources but what is tragic, is that the country thinks that it doesnt need to work hard to sustain those resources and reinvest in other areas too. It’s like a child being born with a silver spoon. It’s been so spoiled at the start that it doesn’t know how to work for its keep!
    So much for the motto on its flag: Order & Progress …[/QUOTE]
    There is a saying in Brazil about how the grandfather is rich, the son just sits around and lives off his dad’s wealth and then the grandson goes hungry. That actually happened to my father.
    Brazilians are very selfish people indeed and you see it with how the rich behavior and treat others, especially the poor. The “me” culture is strong. I see it in my students. They always want it just done for them. If then actually have to do even 1% of the work themselves, it’s like pulling teeth.
    You post was fantastic. Keep writing!

  • #247159
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    I understand the need of venting frustrations, especially when things don’t make sense and you know they could be different, better, and I also agree with many of the complaints here. What I cannot accept is the arrogance of some people here that critize Brazil and its people, talking like their country and people were absolutely perfect.
    Of course everyone is entitled to have an opinion, but some of the things I’ve read here are just wrong.
    Is like being invited to live in someone else’s housefor a while and then start critizing them and the way they do things, telling them how to run their house and family. It is not just rude, it is absurd.
    I do not think my country is perfect and I acknoledge its faults and all the social, political, economical and cultural problems, but I also have never known anyone who came from a perfect country and had perfect citizens. Ok, maybe Switzerland or Finland, but they at least are polite enough not to come here and say that Brazil would be better off without Brazilians. That is the ultimate insult: moving into someone else’s house and deciding that the place is too nice for them, they are spoiling it, so the solution is to get rid of them. And then what? Occupy it? Because from what I’ve read, many believe they would run a much better household. Is that it?
    Not to mention the comparisons of Brazil/Brazilian to children that do not know what is best for them. It seems that a large number of people believe that they should make the decisions for their children instead of letting them learn to do it on their own. Not the kind of parenting I believe in…
    Children, they will learn or not, the most parents can do is to give them the opportunities and the skills to make their own decision. If they are good or bad, they are going to have to live with them. It’s their life, isn’t it?
    I believe that countries are like people (and its people), each has its qualities and defects and all can improve, it just takes more time for some than for others. AndieTravassos2013-05-01 20:37:49

  • #247160
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    [QUOTE=Sydneysider] A lot of valid points are made here especially the ones regarding the lack of education here & I agree that the high value Sth Korea, Taiwan, China etc places on education has helped their country grow in leaps & bounds. It’s interesting to note that my grandfather originally came here from Taiwan in the early 1960s seeking a better life for his family (In 1962, Taiwan had a nominal per-capita GNP of $170, placing its economy on a par with those of Zaire and Congo). But now 50 years later, when you compare the living standard of an average Taiwanese compared to an average Brazilian and their access to good quality (public) education, health services, social safety and skilled jobs – there is one clear winner. Taiwan wins hands down. Even though my relatives here have done well for themselves; in terms of what they get in return for their tax dollar compared to the average Taiwanese – I would want my money back! Many Brazilians (who are well educated and well travelled) have told me that they are not sure if they even want to raise a baby here. I think this alone says how much confidence they have in their own country.
    It’s also interesting when you take a look at the Corruption Index: http://cpi.transparency.org/cpi2012/results/
    you can see that there are no Latin or African countries in the top (Least Corrupt) until Chile at number 20. Many at the top are either Scandinavian countries or those who are part of the British Commonwealth. Can we then make assumptions on the rule of law and culture and its influences on corruption?
    Brazil has been blessed with more than its fair share of natural resources but what is tragic, is that the country thinks that it doesnt need to work hard to sustain those resources and reinvest in other areas too. It’s like a child being born with a silver spoon. It’s been so spoiled at the start that it doesn’t know how to work for its keep!
    I grew up in Brazil, Australia & Taiwan, and what strikes me most is the selfishness Brazilians have in their everyday life. They litter, create noise, stand in the way & take advantage of people, break appointments often, don’t carry out what they promised, don’t give way at crossings etc with no care for others. I know this all relates to the “Jeitinho Brasileiro” but in a way this has become a badge for them, something they are proud to be … What I dislike most is the behaviour of commuters especially during peak hours: when did pushing in before allowing others to exit the metro/train/bus ever make sense??
    At the same time, Brazil is full of contrasts. It’s the most Catholic country in the world, yet you wouldn’t believe it if you had been to one of their Carnivals or beaches. A great part of its population are also homophobic which shock many foreigners as Brazil’s Gay Parade are known around the world. People here are very family oriented yet they have a very “me” culture too.
    They are physically a multiculturally diverse range of people, yet only a small percentage of Brazilians speak a second language or follow a second culture at home. Compared to Australia, I feel there is a lesser connection (or pride) of people with their migrant roots. At the same time, I’ve seen quite a few Brazilians making fun of people with “olhos puxado” or Asian eyes by stretching their eyes with their fingers (it seems like this action is not seen as racist at all here unlike in other countries. One Brazilian teacher I know, even made the move when talking about his Japanese boyfriend)
    All in all, Brazil is a crazy anomaly of many things which partly accounts for this lack of direction and stability, which has allowed the country to regress. So much for the motto on its flag: Order & Progress …[/QUOTE]
    Very True and Very Sad.
    Complaining, I could all day long but as a retiree who chose Brasil to live, after 3 years my life here my daily life is not easy. Regretfully, I have decided to prepare for a possible move, maybe out of Brasil. But hoping things will get better for me. I rent in Zona Sul and pay thru the nose. Because of this I am researching possible move to a nearby cheaper such as Niteroi or Recreio.
    Lars Rubensburg2013-05-01 20:49:23

  • #247162
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    [QUOTE=AndieTravassos]What I cannot accept is the arrogance of some people here that critize Brazil and its people, talking like their country and people were absolutely perfect.[/QUOTE]
    Take it easy bud.
    I don’t see any berating or chastising.
    I see educated opinions and justifiable complaints.

  • #247167
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eni
    Member

    @lars Rubensburg
    So you haven’t read it all.
    As I said, there are educated opinions and justifiable complaints that I agree with, but regrettably there are also other kinds of posts.
    I believe that any reasonable person will accept constructive criticsm, but no one with self esteem will stand being uncerimoniously trashed.
    ps: And “take easy bud” is a little patronizing, don’t you think?AndieTravassos2013-05-01 21:15:42

  • #247176
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    Mr. Travassos:
    I feel you, really I do but I’m a newbie.
    If you want to hit back, be my guest because you have all the right because this website anything goes and people trash each other for no reason than just to be cruel.
    I hope I disagree only and not condemn or trash another.
    Boa Noite Amigo !!
    🙂
    Lars Rubensburg2013-05-01 21:42:50

  • #247177
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    wayne7639
    Member

    Thanks @usaalltheway & @lars Rubensburg for the support – it’s been a relief to vent & I’ve been holding it in for all so long!! It’s been good to read your posts and others of similar minds – nice to know that I’m not alone in my “madness”. @andietravassos – I’m Brazilian too, albeit not one that has lived their whole life here & I respect what you say and you have right to say it as we do too. I think we are all trying to better understand the society we are living in and I wish to do it without any malice or ill-will intended.
    Firstly I want to say that I came back to Brazil liking Brazil & was even prepared to make it a permanent home (I was born here but left when I was younger to grow up mainly in Australia). Sadly the longer I’ve stayed, the more I’ve decided to leave. Brazil has been a nice place to holiday in or visit (especially if you have family like I do here) but otherwise it’s not a place I can spend a long time in.
    One of the first pieces of advice I received from a relative when I returned was, “trust no one”. Growing up overseas of course we’ve been taught about stranger danger but it was always with the notion that 1 out of 10 was someone untrustworthy, never with the idea here that only 1 in 10 you could possibly come near to trusting. All of my previous notions of basic human behaviour and looking out for one another had to go out the window. That was a hard realisation for me (also having to be constantly aware of my surroundings). Likewise, hearing from a friend that when she was assaulted in daylight in public in SP that no one came to her assistance AFTER the attack, really made me question the behavior of people here (although I have to admit I was a witness to another assault where people did come to the aid of the victim).
    I know that there are worse places to live in the world, but I think I just considered that Brazil at the beginning was a much better place that it really is (more civilised, more organised, more welcoming just more). Hence the disappointment. And also it relates to another point someone else made here that people have this “other” expectation of what a Brazilian is – someone who is open-minded, friendly and generous. But sadly, I’ve had to debunk that idea too. I find that many Brazilians say one thing but never mean it, promise one thing but never fulfil it. I’ve grown more cautious of people in general now since I’ve lived here and I don’t like it.
    The crazy thing is that many Brazilians (those who have traveled) criticise their own country just as much, if not more. Yet there are others (even in my own family) who see Brazil through rose-coloured glasses and proudly state that Brazil is the 6th biggest economy in the world. I think for some, it seems to translate that it’s the 6th BEST country in the world too!
    I don’t know whether the next World Cup & the Olympics in 2016 will go smoothly but when I ask locals here – their opinion has mostly been negative too. I have many friends who are thinking to come then, but I’ve warned them that the country is underprepared & underequipped. I sincerely hope that things aren’t as bad as I imagine they may be … but time will tell. Even though people living overseas have a more positive view of Brazil and its people, I still wouldn’t want the country to lose this image, once the World Cup and Olympics come around.
    On a side note, I once asked a local about doing some volunteering here and the reply I got was: don’t you even bother because they will take advantage of you and misuse you, that you will regret even trying in the first place. Now does this explain why there is such a lack of community spirit around?
    One positive point I can find, is that the experience I had of voting here for the first time, was the easiest and fastest one I’ve ever had. No queueing too! It was all electronic. In fact I read that Brazil was the first country to have a full electronic voting system in 2000. When I discussed this with a friend who was a judge, she said to me – that works so well because it benefits the government so of course they invested funds into it.
    I can say honestly that my opinions are biased and that are from someone that has lived in the West (or what we consider a First World Country) and even though I know no one personally from this forum I can assume that most of us come from this same mindset, hence the comments we make. But I believe too, that most of us are sharing our opinions to try to understand Brazil and in a way alleviate our confusion about its ways. I know that a lot of what people have said respectfully and honestly here has helped me too.

  • #247178
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    Well said, Sydney.

  • #247196
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=AndieTravassos]
    Is like being invited to live in someone else’s housefor a while and then start critizing them and the way they do things, telling them how to run their house and family. It is not just rude, it is absurd. …. [/QUOTE]
    Andie – it’s not like living in someone’s house and criticising them at all. For many here, I suspect itt is much more like having visited someone’s house as a paying lodger for a short-period, and seen that your hosts were warm, friendly and keen to show you around. Based on this, rightly or wrongly you decide to move to that person’s house, expecting to pay your own way, for a more permanent move. Upon arrival, the hosts are not as warm and friendly, and while they are happy to take the your money as a lodger, things are not quite as smooth as they seemed during the two week stay. The parents of the household produce a huge amount of confusing and contradicting house rules that must be obeyed. There are unexpected increases in the rent, for spurious reasons, and payments made for work that never gets done. The children of the house run wild, with no control – you have to put extra locks on your room door to stop your belongings being ‘borrowed’. You dare not complain in the open, because when you raise what in your view are valid complaints, the family turns on you, presenting excuse after excuse to show that you are wrong, and they are right…meanwhile your rent goes up again and again, for reasons you cannot understand and are powerless to do anything about. After a while you get used to it or you leave, but you rarely view that family in the same light as you did when you first arrived. Those of us that have stayed have probably done so in the most part because we have gone native (learned to steal the food from the fridge and bypass the coin-operated electrical meter), accepted the rough with the smooth, or cannot leave because we sunk our life savings into the country thinking it would be different and are now trapped.
    [QUOTE=AndieTravassos]Not to mention the comparisons of Brazil/Brazilian to children that do not know what is best for them. It seems that a large number of people believe that they should make the decisions for their children instead of letting them learn to do it on their own. Not the kind of parenting I believe in…
    Children, they will learn or not, the most parents can do is to give them the opportunities and the skills to make their own decision. If they are good or bad, they are going to have to live with them. It’s their life, isn’t it?
    I believe that countries are like people (and its people), each has its qualities and defects and all can improve, it just takes more time for some than for others. [/QUOTE]
    I do feel Brazilians are like children that do not know what is best for them – as is widely recognised the educational level of most Brazilians is equivalent to that of young children, so perhaps their ability to rationalise, evaluate and think is limited, like it is with small children. The government adopts a paternalistic approach here too – ‘you do not need to think, we do it for you. Just Watch Globo for your instructions on how to feel.’. I fundamentally disagree with your approach to parenting too – I believe adults have a duty of care towards their children to nurture and educate them, and NOT simply leave them to make their own mistakes.
    ‘I do not agree with what you have to say, but I’ll defend to the death your right to say it.’ Voltaire.

  • #247203

    [QUOTE=finrudd]
    Andie – it’s not like living in someone’s house and criticising them at all. For many here, I suspect it is much more like having visited someone’s house as a paying lodgerfor a short-period, and seen that your hosts were warm, friendly and keen to show you around. Based on this, rightly or wrongly you decide to move to that person’s house, expecting to pay your own way, for a more permanent move. Upon arrival, the hosts are not as warm and friendly, and while they are happy to take the your money as a lodger, things are not quite as smooth as they seemed during the two week stay.
    The parents of the household produce a huge amount of confusing and contradicting house rules that must be obeyed. There are unexpected increases in the rent, for spurious reasons, and payments made for work that never gets done. The children of the house run wild, with no control – you have to put extra locks on your room door to stop your belongings being ‘borrowed’. You dare not complain in the open, because when you raise what in your view are valid complaints, the family turns on you, presenting excuse after excuse to show that you are wrong, and they are right…meanwhile your rent goes up again and again, for reasons you cannot understand and are powerless to do anything about.
    After a while you get used to it or you leave, but you rarely view that family in the same light as you did when you first arrived. Those of us that have stayed have probably done so in the most part because we have gone native (learned to steal the food from the fridge and bypass the coin-operated electrical meter), accepted the rough with the smooth, or cannot leave because we sunk our life savings into the country thinking it would be different and are now trapped.[/QUOTE]
    EXCELLENT analogy Finrudd! Clap
    Yet I might add, for those that have ‘sunk’ their life savings here and now feel trapped, there are always options. With Brasil headed to strike it’s high note for Copa and Olympics, if one is to ‘cash out’, then move out, now’s the time!
    Yet for anyone who truly prescribes to any of the notions in this thread of why they hate living in Brasil (and I’m not referring to those merely engaging in sock puppet theater… we all know who they are), no one is forcing them to stay, be they heavily invested, or not. They are free to leave, just as they freely arrived. Now boarding, Zones 1-3….
    [QUOTE=finrudd]The government adopts a paternalistic approach here too – ‘you do not need to think, we do it for you. Just Watch Globo for your instructions on how to feel.'[/QUOTE]
    No different than the EUA really. Fox Network is MUCH WORSE than Globo!
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 09:22:51

  • #247208
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    No different than the EUA really. Fox Network is MUCH WORSE than Globo!
    [/QUOTE]
    TV is Opium For The Masses I think someone said…I don’t know Fox, but I have certainly heard of similar criticisms of it, although it did give the world The Simpsons. My issue with Brazilian TV is the feeling of a total lack of anything of intellectual value. Switching on the TV on a Sunday and seeing Fastao (who looks like he is heavily sedated himself) surrounded by go-go dancers and Gu Gu, knocking down shacks for poor folks, only to build a new shack with a shiny TV in every room, and stuffed with cheap and nasty toys from his own company, makes me feel sorry for Brazilians.
    TV in the UK has got worse, of course, but there are investigative TV journalism programs of merit, like Panorama and Dispatches, and Channel 4, E4, BBC and ITV have produced some fantastic comedy, political satire, nature programs and documentaries that I really miss, and shown at times when people can watch them. Of course you can zone-out to the soap operas and Britain’s-Got-Talented-Big-Brothers style shows that are simply dire shat for the twittering classes Big%20smile.

  • #247213

    [QUOTE=finrudd][QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    No different than the EUA really. Fox Network is MUCH WORSE than Globo!
    [/QUOTE]TV is Opium For The Masses I think someone said…I don’t know Fox, but I have certainly heard of similar criticisms of it, although it did give the world The Simpsons. My issue with Brazilian TV is the feeling of a total lack of anything of intellectual value. [/QUOTE]
    My reference was more towards Faux, er, Fox News, and all the assorted political pundit spin off programs one finds on that channel, which attempt to provide ‘intellectual value’, but in reality are espousing Rupert Murdoch’s ultra-conservative ‘agenda’.

  • #247216
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]My reference was more towards Faux, er, Fox News, and all the assorted political pundit spin off programs one finds on that channel, which attempt to provide ‘intellectual value’, but in reality are espousing Rupert Murdoch’s ultra-conservative ‘agenda’.[/QUOTE]
    Aha – the Dirty Digger..yes, totally agree about him and his ilk, and I had read about Faux news and in particular their war coverage that was somewhat, er, misleading/fake..Dirty Digger, as Private Eye calls him, has a nasty strangle-hold on the UK media too, although happily his phone-hacking scandal has shaken this somewhat of late.

  • #247220

    [QUOTE=finrudd]I had read about Faux news and in particular their war coverage that was somewhat, er, misleading/fake…[/QUOTE]
    If you can find a copy, I heartily recommend the film Outfoxed.
    Yes, because of Fox News’ “We report, you decide”, “Fair and balanced” ad nauseum mantras, there are STILL people in the US who believe to this day that the US-led invasion of Iraq was because of the Iraq’s involvement in the World Trade Center attack on Sept 11, 2001. Confused

  • #247222
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Sydneysider] Thanks @usaalltheway & @lars Rubensburg for the support – it’s been a relief to vent & I’ve been holding it in for all so long!! It’s been good to read your posts and others of similar minds – nice to know that I’m not alone in my “madness”. @andietravassos – I’m Brazilian too, albeit not one that has lived their whole life here & I respect what you say and you have right to say it as we do too. I think we are all trying to better understand the society we are living in and I wish to do it without any malice or ill-will intended.
    Firstly I want to say that I came back to Brazil liking Brazil & was even prepared to make it a permanent home (I was born here but left when I was younger to grow up mainly in Australia). Sadly the longer I’ve stayed, the more I’ve decided to leave. Brazil has been a nice place to holiday in or visit (especially if you have family like I do here) but otherwise it’s not a place I can spend a long time in.
    One of the first pieces of advice I received from a relative when I returned was, “trust no one”. Growing up overseas of course we’ve been taught about stranger danger but it was always with the notion that 1 out of 10 was someone untrustworthy, never with the idea here that only 1 in 10 you could possibly come near to trusting. All of my previous notions of basic human behaviour and looking out for one another had to go out the window. That was a hard realisation for me (also having to be constantly aware of my surroundings). Likewise, hearing from a friend that when she was assaulted in daylight in public in SP that no one came to her assistance AFTER the attack, really made me question the behavior of people here (although I have to admit I was a witness to another assault where people did come to the aid of the victim).
    I know that there are worse places to live in the world, but I think I just considered that Brazil at the beginning was a much better place that it really is (more civilised, more organised, more welcoming just more). Hence the disappointment. And also it relates to another point someone else made here that people have this “other” expectation of what a Brazilian is – someone who is open-minded, friendly and generous. But sadly, I’ve had to debunk that idea too. I find that many Brazilians say one thing but never mean it, promise one thing but never fulfil it. I’ve grown more cautious of people in general now since I’ve lived here and I don’t like it.
    The crazy thing is that many Brazilians (those who have traveled) criticise their own country just as much, if not more. Yet there are others (even in my own family) who see Brazil through rose-coloured glasses and proudly state that Brazil is the 6th biggest economy in the world. I think for some, it seems to translate that it’s the 6th BEST country in the world too!
    I don’t know whether the next World Cup & the Olympics in 2016 will go smoothly but when I ask locals here – their opinion has mostly been negative too. I have many friends who are thinking to come then, but I’ve warned them that the country is underprepared & underequipped. I sincerely hope that things aren’t as bad as I imagine they may be … but time will tell. Even though people living overseas have a more positive view of Brazil and its people, I still wouldn’t want the country to lose this image, once the World Cup and Olympics come around.
    On a side note, I once asked a local about doing some volunteering here and the reply I got was: don’t you even bother because they will take advantage of you and misuse you, that you will regret even trying in the first place. Now does this explain why there is such a lack of community spirit around?
    One positive point I can find, is that the experience I had of voting here for the first time, was the easiest and fastest one I’ve ever had. No queueing too! It was all electronic. In fact I read that Brazil was the first country to have a full electronic voting system in 2000. When I discussed this with a friend who was a judge, she said to me – that works so well because it benefits the government so of course they invested funds into it.
    I can say honestly that my opinions are biased and that are from someone that has lived in the West (or what we consider a First World Country) and even though I know no one personally from this forum I can assume that most of us come from this same mindset, hence the comments we make. But I believe too, that most of us are sharing our opinions to try to understand Brazil and in a way alleviate our confusion about its ways. I know that a lot of what people have said respectfully and honestly here has helped me too. [/QUOTE]
    Simply fantastic!
    Brazil is truly a huge letdown for most. It’s painted to be one thing and when you spend some time living and working here you find that it isn’t.
    The people are simple-minded and materialistic. The attitudes are short-sighted and ill-informed. The values are archaic and in many ways downright repugnant. Work is hard to come by and you usually are grossly underpaid. The opportunities are highly concentrated and navigating them requires a highly nuanced understanding of customs and norms which are usually much more difficult and complex to understand when compared with other countries.
    As you pointed out, those Brazilians that have traveled are usually much more in-tuned to the “real” Brazil; corrupt, lazy, untrustworthy, dishonest and fake. However, getting Brazilians to admit or recognize this reality requires a bit of the jeitinho, so to speak. Like I pointed out before, those Brazilians that know the first world and it’s positive qualities will be able to confirm your conclusions of the “real” Brazil but they usually don’t like hearing them from foreigners. That is what I experience two days ago at work. Two co-workers of mine were tearing Brazil a new ahole. They were saying things that I have written on this site and been crucified for daring to mention. The truth is out there, you just have to know how to look for it.
    Brazil has certain qualities that are enjoyable but the overall picture isn’t good. It’s really about learning to maximize the good and reduce the rest. It is very difficult to do but it is possible.
    I am glad that you found this site and it has helped you. That is the best thing any of us can do here: write about our experiences and see if they resonant with others out there. Usually they do and usually them come as a God-send. I know I have read many people’s comments on here confirming just that.
    Good luck with the rest of your time in Brazil! Keep writing and letting us know how things are coming along.

  • #247223
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg] [QUOTE=AndieTravassos]What I cannot accept is the arrogance of some people here that critize Brazil and its people, talking like their country and people were absolutely perfect.[/QUOTE]
    Take it easy bud.
    I don’t see any berating or chastising.
    I see educated opinions and justifiable complaints.[/QUOTE]

  • #247229

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg] [QUOTE=AndieTravassos]What I cannot accept is the arrogance of some people here that critize Brazil and its people, talking like their country and people were absolutely perfect.[/QUOTE]
    Take it easy bud.
    I don’t see any berating or chastising.
    I see educated opinions and justifiable complaints.[/QUOTE]
    [/QUOTE]
    LOLLOLLOLLOLLOL

  • #247232

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    Brazil is truly a huge letdown for most. It’s painted to be one thing and when you spend some time living and working here you find that it isn’t. [/QUOTE]
    Now boarding, Zones 1-3….

  • #247233
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kittenshake
    Member

    Ive been following this thread with fascination. I love all the historical information you’ve all been sharing and definitely am inspired to do some further reading.
    @ sydneysider: I thought your posts were brilliant, brilliant, brilliant on so many levels. I particularly took note of what you said about accepted levels of racism. I think the political correctness re racism that we have in places such as the UK and Australia just hasn’t reached here yet. It’s more like the UK was in the 70s. Things that shocked me at first were people doing the slanting eyes and mock Asian accents when talking about anyone of Japanese descent and making monkey and banana jokes about people of African descent. But it’s not meant maliciously, as you see it on TV, so it’s obviously not considered offensive. TV personalities putting on brown facepaint and funny noses, pretending to be black appear to constitute comedy and I saw an interviewer finding it hysterical to make up a fake Asian language when interviewing the Korean musician Psy (of gangam style fame), who looked really put out.
    @andietravassos. No hard feelings, but think you are missing the point of a ‘vent your frustrations ‘ section. Yes, there are lots of great and amazing qualities about Brazil and that’s why we all came. But expat life can be hard and sometimes we need a place to talk about it, when we’ve got no-one else who understands quite like the other expats. People complain about my country, the UK all the time, foreigners and Brits included, especially me! It’s human nature! What’s odd here is that Brazilians don’t seem to like us saying anything against Brazil, however true it might be. They keep trying to convince me (or maybe themselves) that life is much better here than where I’m from and seem surprised when I say for example that we do have good food back home, quality of life etc.

  • #247250
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    mitaczkafoto
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd]Good point about the penal colonies Captain Ron. I was also thinking about how the Spanish and Portuguese didn’t seem to do that well with their Colonies – but in reality very few colonies can actually say ‘Woo! Look at us now!’ Australia, US and NZ the exceptions.
    Now, without reading anything into this, one of the main differences with these three is that the imported population of white Caucasians (as I believe they are known correctly) subdued the native population in a relatively short period of time and replaced them as the predominant people, and after imposing their culture and beliefs, the country developed over the decades into what they are today.
    This did not happen in African or Asian colonies anywhere, where relatively small numbers of colonists arrived, did their thing, and then left as colonisation fell out of favour, and the countries mostly reverted back to what they were before, and resumed their own cultures and beliefs, with perhaps an influence from the departed visitors only.
    The South American colonies of Spain and Portugal are interesting therefore, in that the native population of Indian people died in fairly large numbers from disease and exploitation, and the colonies therefore imported slave labour from other colonies, making a massive melting pot of cultures and beliefs. The colonial powers never really left here either, as they did in much of Africa, Asia and the Indian sub-continent – they simply ‘went native’ themselves and stayed. This is more akin to Australia, US and NZ where the colonists stayed and went native, so how come it worked there, and did not in say, Brazil?
    The similarities are as remarkable between the US and Brazil as the differences are startling. Originally colonies, both imported large slave populations, both gained independence from the old colonial masters. One has become a leading world power, a position that looks likely to continue, and one languishes in the background with an eternal title of ‘developing’. Both countries were settled by Christians – one by Protestants and one by Catholics. What role has the church played in their development and how much can the differences between these two be attributed to their differences in development? Then if we look at the settlers themselves – the US were British, Dutch & German (Sorry – I am hazy on the details here) but also Italians and no doubt a bunch of others. Brazil was Portuguese, Italian, and to a lesser extent Japanese and Ukrainians (?).
    So, it would be too easy to blame the ‘Latin’ folk of Portuguese and Italians for making a mess of Brazil (and the Spanish for other South American developing countries), as the Italians have a pretty big claim to American heritage too I assume? Is it that the US had already developed sufficiently by the time the Italians arrived, and developed its own culture and beliefs, that any ‘negative’ impact they might have had was diluted?
    Lastly – language. Did having the English language make a difference in the early days of development, similar say to speaking Chinese might have today with any nation wanting to develop? Did having the Portuguese language actually hold back development?
    [/QUOTE]

    Could it not be that the main difference is whether there are natural resources or not? Where does the money flow to? In the examples of the USA, Australia and New Zealand it mostly stayed there as opposed to allmost every other colonie (if not all) it left the country.
  • #247253
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    Yeah – education is key.
    Most Brazilians just don’t know any better, guys. They haven’t experienced any better. That’s why those who travel might even agree with you and complain about the country.
    OTOH, i think those who have traveled even more realize that there is no perfect country… each has it’s problems.
    Brazil missed the boat with education and will only catch it when a tipping point of the population is educated. The Asian Tigers invested in education decades ago and are reaping the benefits now. Brazil did not.
    On the subject of racism…
    Not sure the way the UK, US and others of trying to be ultra-political-correct is the way to go either.
    You know that people are taking the mickey out of most of you for being so white too, right? Ever been called “branquelo”, “alemão”, or told you should get out in the sun more? I have. LOL
    Again.. all to do with education.
    It’ll happen. It will just take time.

  • #247256

    [QUOTE=HalfGringa]Most Brazilians just don’t know any better, guys. They haven’t experienced any better. That’s why those who travel might even agree with you and complain about the country. OTOH, I think those who have traveled even more realize that there is no perfect country… each has it’s problems.[/QUOTE]
    “...nothing so liberalizes a man(or woman)and expands the kindly instincts that nature put in him (or her)as travel and contact with many kinds of people.”
    ~Mark Twain~
    I think those that bitch and moan the loudest about how much they hate living in Brasil, probably have a limited experience/exposure to the world at large.
    EDIT: Another excellent Mark Twain quote… “The gentle reader will never, never know what a consummate ass he can become until he goes abroad. I speak now, of course, in the supposition that the gentle reader has not been abroad, and therefore is not already a consummate ass.LOL
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 13:55:19

  • #247257
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    What’s your point gringo Floripa?

  • #247259
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg] What’s your point gringo Floripa?[/QUOTE]
    He doesn’t have one.
    It’s a tactic. Instead of addressing the complaints, he simply attacks you personally or side-steps thems with non-sequiturs.
    There a few of them on this site. They tend to push the others out. I have been IM personally about not getting into it with them. It’s like trying to teach a pig to sing: it makes you look stupid and annoys the pig.
    I just try to ignore them although at times I have to confront them about their BS. It’s very frustrating really. If someone doesn’t like reading our thoughts and comments then they could simply choose not to. Yet, do they do so? You must already know the answer…usaalltheway2013-05-02 14:32:48

  • #247262

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] If someone doesn’t like reading ourthoughts and comments then they could simply choose not to.[/QUOTE]
    Surely you welcome counter-points to your premise that life in Brasil sucks? Otherwise, it becomes a one-sided conversation, with only sock puppets patting each other on the back.
    Sock #1: “Living in Brasil sucks.”
    Sock #2: “I agree. Couldn’t have put it better.”
    Sock #3: “Well said!”
    Sock #1: “Thank you.”
    Sock #2: “You’re welcome.”
    repeat, ad infinitum…. Confused
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 15:21:23

  • #247265
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Timmanaus
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd] TV is Opium For The Masses I think someone said…I don’t know Fox, but I have certainly heard of similar criticisms of it, although it did give the world The Simpsons. My issue with Brazilian TV is the feeling of a total lack of anything of intellectual value. Switching on the TV on a Sunday and seeing Fastao (who looks like he is heavily sedated himself) surrounded by go-go dancers and Gu Gu, knocking down shacks for poor folks, only to build a new shack with a shiny TV in every room, and stuffed with cheap and nasty toys from his own company, makes me feel sorry for Brazilians.TV in the UK has got worse, of course, but there are investigative TV journalism programs of merit, like Panorama and Dispatches, and Channel 4, E4, BBC and ITV have produced some fantastic comedy, political satire, nature programs and documentaries that I really miss, and shown at times when people can watch them. Of course you can zone-out to the soap operas and Britain’s-Got-Talented-Big-Brothers style shows that are simply dire shat for the twittering classes Big%20smile.
    [/QUOTE]
    People get the TV programmes they enjoy watching.

  • #247281
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd] My issue with Brazilian TV is the feeling of a total lack of anything of intellectual value.[/QUOTE]
    Two words, ‘Duck Dynasty’.

  • #247286
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    Gringo Floripa,
    Calling some of us ” Sock Puppets ” because we are not all fuzzy and cherry about Brasil ?
    Some of us do not think life in Brasil is what we thought when we retired here, so that makes us lesser than, or targets of evil?
    I joined this forum in hopes of sharing information, some good and some bad.
    Much appreciated.Lars Rubensburg2013-05-02 18:41:36

  • #247287

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg]
    Some of us do not think life in Brasil is what we thought when we retired here, so that makes us lesser than, or targets of evil? I joined this forum in hopes of sharing information, some good and some bad.[/QUOTE]
    Exactly. And ‘sharing information’ involves negative points of view (from both sides of the topic). Yet USAalltheway loves to include a caveat in the threads he creates that NO negative comments are welcome. That’s nothing more than a feeble attempt at censorship.
    Last time I looked, this is a ‘forum’, which means “a public meeting place for open discussion”. Key words: ‘public’ and ‘open’. Meaning, counter-points are not only welcome, but also encouraged. You have a right to ‘vent’ how much you might hate living in Brasil, just as I have a similar right to state I think it’s not all so bad, and some people make it out to be worse than it really is. For the record: I actually LOVE living here!
    Yet I see Lars that you only joined about one week ago. Just prior to your joining, this forum happened to have a plague of sock puppets, trolls, and assorted malcontents blow through here like a dust storm in the Sahara. This happens from time to time. There are no ‘targets of evil’ (quite a dramatic label, don’t you think?), just annoyances, like pesky mosquitoes… best squashed when their buzzing gets too loud in your ear.
    So Brasil didn’t turn out to be your retirement dream? Sorry to hear that. Truly. Vent on my brother! And I will continue to interject from time to time, my counter-point, and even my encouragement to make a change if happiness is elusive here. Life is short. Seize the day.
    Much appreciated. Wink
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 19:36:27

  • #247292

    @lars: There is ‘venting’, and then there is ‘bashing’. If you peruse the threads in the Vent category Lars, it’s quite easy to discern who are the bashers, the haters, and who are the legitimate expats actually living in Brasil that might be having a bad day, and merely need to let off some steam. Therein lies the divide….
    EDIT: @USAwhatever: WTF was THAT you just posted?!? ConfusedLOL
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 19:39:58

  • #247293
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Bella 777
    Member

    [QUOTE=jacare][QUOTE=finrudd] My issue with Brazilian TV is the feeling of a total lack of anything of intellectual value.[/QUOTE]
    Two words, ‘Duck Dynasty’.
    [/QUOTE]
    I’ll take your Duck Dynasty and raise you Honey Booboo! LOL
    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    “...nothing so liberalizes a man(or woman)and expands the kindly instincts that nature put in him (or her)as travel and contact with many kinds of people.”
    ~Mark Twain~
    [/QUOTE]
    Exactly. Thumbs%20Up

  • #247294
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    above another usaalltheway post…he has previously assured everyone that he just doesn’t want any part of BS on the forum. He is, by his own admission, really a nice guy. Get him away from the internet, and he probably is.

  • #247296
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    We have gotten a nod on Huffington Post! Check it out! [/QUOTE]
    Was it for the world’s longest ever Forum quote?

  • #247297

    [QUOTE=Grads]He is, by his own admission, really a nice guy. Get him away from the internet, and he probably is.[/QUOTE]
    And aren’t we all Grads?!?
    @halfgringa: Honeybooboo + FOX NEWS = torture! Dead

  • #247299
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=HalfGringa]
    I’ll take your Duck Dynasty and raise you Honey Booboo! LOL
    [/QUOTE]
    Honey Booboo – now that, is quite something. I was actually quite amazed to watch some of that show only a few weeks ago. Truly jaw-droppingly awe-stuff.
    btw – sorry, no idea who raised the Ducky Dynasty to a Honey Booboo, what I am credited HalfGringa with this one!

  • #247301

    [QUOTE=finrudd]Honey Booboo – now that, is quite something. I was actually quite amazed to watch some of that show only a few weeks ago. Truly jaw-droppingly awe-stuff.[/QUOTE]
    You’re being too proper and politely British Finrudd. Say what’s really on your mind….

    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 20:00:50

  • #247302
    Profile photo of agri2001
    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    @lars:¬† There is ‘venting’, and then there is ‘bashing’.¬† If you
    peruse the threads in the Vent category Lars, it’s quite easy to discern
    who are the bashers, the haters, and who are the legitimate expats
    actually living in Brasil that might be having a bad day, and merely
    need to let off some steam.¬† Therein lies the divide….EDIT: @USAwhatever: WTF was THAT you just posted?!?¬† Confused¬†¬† LOL
    [/QUOTE]
    I think he is listing all the reasons why his life is so screwed up being forced to live in Brazil.
    But of course I could be wrong.

  • #247305

    [QUOTE=agri2001] I think he is listing all the reasons why his life is so screwed up being forced to live in Brazil.[/QUOTE]
    Well, Grandham, er, I mean USAwhatever, doesn’t live in Brasil (now). He’s in college in the USofA. He’s yet to enter the adult workforce, where he will have (at least yearly) critiques by his superiors, and most likely by his peers too. God forbid if any of them have anything ‘negative’ to say! Might hurt his feelings…. Cry
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-02 20:08:52

  • #247306
    Profile photo of agri2001
    agri2001
    Participant

    Oh don’t fret, as he would be here on this board, tr√®s vite, telling us how unjust life is/was/has been to him.

  • #247308
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

    Ok. I am going to go on a beer fueled, don’t have to get up early cause class got cancelled, girlfriend is visiting her relatives halfway tongue in cheek rant…….Godammit Gringo.Floripa you don’t live in Brazil you live in Floripa where the people are civilized and almost normal and the biggest complaint is all the class A jackasses buying the place up. I am sick of you guys from the south complaining. I leave my apartment in the morning to be greeted by a woman who craps like clockwork between two cars. Between the honking of the horns and the screaming in the street I am half deaf and wholly crazy. I am the only person I know who hasn’t been robbed and when people ask me what I would suggest for them not to be robbed the only thing I can come up with is be born big (I am 6’1″ 235 lbs). You guys live in paradise compared to us……..nesne22013-05-02 20:53:48

  • #247309
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=agri2001] Oh don’t fret, as he would be here on this board, tr√®s vite, telling us how unjust life is/was/has been to him.[/QUOTE]
    …merely winding the watch of his wit; by and by it may strike.

  • #247313
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member

    [QUOTE=nesne2]Ok. I am going to go on a beer fueled, don’t have to get up early cause class got cancelled, girlfriend is visiting her relatives halfway tongue in cheek rant…….Godammit Gringo.Floripa you don’t live in Brazil you live in Floripa where the people are civilized and almost normal and the biggest complaint is all the class A jackasses buying the place up. I am sick of you guys from the south complaining. I leave my apartment in the morning to be greeted by a woman who craps like clockwork between two cars. Between the honking of the horns and the screaming in the street I am half deaf and wholly crazy. I am the only person I know who hasn’t been robbed and when people ask me what I would suggest for them not to be robbed the only thing I can come up with is be born big (I am 6’1″ 235 lbs). You guys live in paradise compared to us……..[/QUOTE]

    Nesne – many of this gang of childish bullies dont even live in Brazil, I doubt if the one you are talking about does either, which is why they are this way.
    I also i think they could be on the payrol of the site in order to try to keep it balanced and in place, abit like afew bullies being given extra sweets by the schoolmaster for keeping an eye on things.
    Which is why others just get kicked off for daring to despute what they say or stand upto their incessant bullying tactics which is all done through PM’ing each other with, Lets get so and so.
    Whilst the”rat’ looks and on and says things like, Look i really must insist, try to calm down, this is your second to last warning. I really must insist now, please. Whilst others just get booted off regardless.
    One rule for them another for everyone else.
  • #247314

    “Gringo.Europia” eh? LOLLOLLOL
    As the saying goes, “Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery”. But truly T_2/Ta-douche (your syntax is quite distinguishable), even your pathetic imitation isn’t flattering.
    Received a message from the liberated Sra A. the other day. Quite enlightening!

  • #247315
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member
    I’m not with you at all, what are you talking about? Wackoi’m new here but i have read afew of the bullying posts, very sad state of affairs indeed.
    I dont understand your phrase, you bark but you dont bite, dont you mean ‘cant’ bite, easy to bark isnt it, especially when your on extra sweety rations patrol.
  • #247342
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    this went from funny, to WTF, to grab the eyewash [GF that is the second time you have posted that catastrophe and OH MY EYES], to WTF again.

  • #247346

    I know Tr√™s, if it wasn’t so pathetic, it would be comical. Funny how someone who’s “new here” possesses such insight into the (supposed) internal politics of this site.
    The only thing that is indeed “a very sad state of affairs” is how a few individuals keep creating multiple user accounts. Maybe he couldn’t remember the passwords of the other accounts? Bless his heart!
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-03 07:48:09

  • #247358
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member
    Bless your hearts.
  • #247389
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    This is so comical, what a joke.

    Firstly, the assumption that the newbie is masquerading as T_2 is absurd, a blind man could see the syntax is nowhere near comparable. It may come as a surprise to GF that there are multiple (that means more than one) members of this forum who despise his condescending attitude and bullying, so good on the new fellow (although we all know he’s been here before, but who is he?)

    Secondly, also side-splitting, 3Casas was clearly making reference to the Boo Boo post (which has been posted twice), a simpleton with half a brain could see that but GF is blinded by paranoia and thinks otherwise, he gets it wrong again.

    3Casas is a genuinely nice person and would not get involved with personal attacks such as exhibited by GF who is continuously attempting to convince all and sundry how they should post which in itself is a form of bullying, although he’s far from superior. Then there’s the childish signature which we are supposed to believe is intimidating, another joke.

    Well. I’m a newcomer as well so bring on the accusations and start the guessing games, we could all use a good laugh.

  • #247437
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    Everything revolves around where you live.
    If what GF says is true then he lives on the island of Floripa.
    A place with almost no homeless, high class people, very clean in all forms. No beefs or complaints.
    What if GF lived in Gloria? Recife? Lapa?
    This is my point.
    Where one lives and his/her financial status is everything.

  • #247443
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg] Everything revolves around where you live.
    If what GF says is true then he lives on the island of Floripa.
    A place with almost no homeless, high class people, very clean in all forms. No beefs or complaints.
    What if GF lived in Gloria? Recife? Lapa?
    This is my point.
    Where one lives and his/her financial status is everything.
    [/QUOTE]
    It’s not location I don’t think – it’s lifestyle. I was in Floripa just recently, and trying to get off the island on a Friday in rush hour is every bit as painful as Sao Paulo rush hour. While I sat in the polluted tail backs, I had a good chance to look at the place, and it suffers the same issues as all of Brazil – an uncontrolled sprawl of ugly. The south does have some good bits to it (my father-in-law lives in SC on the coast, so I’ve been going there since ’98) but Sudestinho’s and Nordestinho’s – half a dozen of one, six of another…Now, GF seems to have a nice lifestyle, and gets to kick-back and relax at the end of the day – that sounds quite good, and probably makes for a happier camper than a wage slave in Sao Paulo, or an English teacher just about anywhere (that could be just me, but it sounds like English teachers are comparable to Chimney Sweeps of 18th Century London).

  • #247448
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JPsoon
    Member

    I just wanted to say that I love living in this hell hole. rs
    this place has its f*ckin ups and downs, many times extreme, but that’s what makes it what it is

  • #247541
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Verdadeiro] It may come as a surprise to GF that there are multiple (that means more than one) members of this forum who despise his condescending attitude and bullying
    [/QUOTE]
    Hear hear! Thanks for pointing it out.
    Now wait for it…keep waiting…it’s coming…and…he will call you….
    A TROLL! Or maybe a sock puppet (to which I still don’t know what that is).
    Nevertheless, it’s truth. GF is a real pain. Yet, that is the reality of posting on this site. Along with his pussycat friend.
    Please continue to point that out and let’s hope others do the same. Maybe we can get him pushed out instead of having him push others out.

  • #247543
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Verdadeiro] 3Casas is a genuinely nice person and would not get involved with personal attacks such as exhibited by GF who is continuously attempting to convince all and sundry how they should post which in itself is a form of bullying, although he’s far from superior. Then there’s the childish signature which we are supposed to believe is intimidating, another joke.[/QUOTE]
    3casas is in fact a great guy. Very friendly and helpful. All newbies should be grateful to have him as a resource. He has been very helpful and kind with me.
    And like I have already stated, GF is a pain. Zero dialogue. He is a bully through and through. Self-rigtheous jerk who needs to get over what others think of Brazil and live his life.

  • #247552
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=Verdadeiro] It may come as a surprise to GF that there are multiple (that means more than one) members of this forum who despise his condescending attitude and bullying
    [/QUOTE]
    Hear hear! Thanks for pointing it out.
    Now wait for it…keep waiting…it’s coming…and…he will call you….
    A TROLL! Or maybe a sock puppet (to which I still don’t know what that is).
    Nevertheless, it’s truth. GF is a real pain. Yet, that is the reality of posting on this site. Along with his pussycat friend.
    Please continue to point that out and let’s hope others do the same. Maybe we can get him pushed out instead of having him push others out.[/QUOTE]
    Pussycat friend? Is that me because of my bagpuss avatar or kitten? I haven’t had any online friends before but I am quite excited to be included in the Gringos War. Am I on the Sock Puppets or Cyber Bullies side?

  • #247554
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] GF is a real pain. Yet, that is the reality of posting on this site. Along with his pussycat friend. Please continue to point that out and let’s hope others do the same. Maybe we can get him pushed out instead of having him push others out.[/QUOTE]
    / / + 25
    Lars Rubensburg2013-05-04 14:38:28

  • #247565

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    And like I have already stated, GF is a pain. Zero dialogue. He is a bully through and through. Self-rigtheous jerk who needs to get over what others think of Brazil and live his life. [/QUOTE]
    Sounds like great advice! Why don’t you follow it? Life in the land of Fox News and Honey Booboo is great for you. I’m happy for you. Life in the land of futeball, cerveja and praia is great for me. Be happy for me. It’s a win-win, so stop your bitching and moaning about how Brasil sucks. Send me a pm when you’ve finally reached puberty cry baby.
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-04 17:49:47

  • #247572
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]

    Life in the land of futeball, cerveja and praia is great for me.
    [/QUOTE]

    You forgot Pot, clearly the main ingredient. LOL
  • #247578
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] 3casas is in fact a great guy. Very friendly and helpful. All newbies should be grateful to have him as a resource. He has been very helpful and kind with me. [/QUOTE] “He” is a “she”. Confused

  • #247584
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    I agree, 3casas feels like a big sister here among all us immature boys wrestling, arguing and horse playing.

  • #247586
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    Dear Optimists, Pessimists and Realists,
    While you guys were busy arguing about the glass of water, we drank it.
    The OpportunistsGrads2013-05-04 16:04:57

  • #247590
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Squiddie] I agree, 3casas feels like a big sister here among all us immature boys wrestling, arguing and horse playing.[/QUOTE] meh. the big sister gets to smack folks around every once in a while, and i’m done with that business.
    it’s just too bad that we finally make the Huffpo and all that’s here for new visitors to see is three drunk guys and a couple pairs of socks.
    but what do i care, it ain’t my forum, and i have crap to get done today. which is why i’ll leave you to your ball squeezing and accusations. i only have about 100 more reports to write today and it’s already technically miller time. [report quality about to go waaaaay downhill]3casas2013-05-04 16:11:40

  • #247593
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Timmanaus
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd] I haven’t had any online friends before but I am quite excited to be included in the Gringos War. Am I on the Sock Puppets or Cyber Bullies side? [/QUOTE]
    Gringoes.com…..

  • #247600
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas] it’s just too bad that we finally make the Huffpo and all that’s here for new visitors to see is three drunk guys and a couple pairs of socks.
    but what do i care, it ain’t my forum, … [/QUOTE]
    Yeah it’s embarrassing. All the name calling gets me down.

  • #247605
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Well, I have made so many suggestions to clean up the forum of Spam and Sock-Puppeteering, but if the admins don’t listen or care, its just the way it is.
    What’s that Huffpo article about? Have a link? Sorry I missed it.

  • #247611
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member
    Me too Heydenia, Oh i mean er, mm, er, Squiddie.
  • #247618

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]What’s that Huffpo article about? Have a link? Sorry I missed it.[/QUOTE]
    Squid, I believe this is the article 3casas was referring to: No HP Sauce, Endless Red Tape: Would You Want to Live in Brazil?
    The following words are that of the author of the article, not mine. The bold emphasis is mine. USAwhatever, are you listening?
    “In the past few days there has been an enormous argument raging on the Facebook group because one foreigner wrote a list of dozens and dozens of reasons why he hates living in Brazil. Every foreign person living far from home has some reason to miss home, but for someone to sit and write a list of 66 – yes 66 – reasons he hates being in Brazil leaves me feeling rather incredulous. This is surely a hatred bordering on obsession….”

    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-04 18:02:48

  • #247619
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    SFO Murphy
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas] It’s just too bad that we finally make the Huffpo and all that’s here for new visitors to see is three drunk guys and a couple pairs of socks.[report quality about to go waaaaay downhill][/QUOTE]
    I think SteelRat ought to change the site’s motto to that. “Three Drunk Guys and a Couple Pairs of Socks.”

  • #247620
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano] [QUOTE=usaalltheway] 3casas is in fact a great guy. Very friendly and helpful. All newbies should be grateful to have him as a resource. He has been very helpful and kind with me.  [/QUOTE]

    “He” is a “she”. Confused¬†¬†[/QUOTE]
    I just found that out. Oh well. No hard feelings.

  • #247644
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    doctorlili
    Member

    Thanks for the link. Hm, he’s pretty happy, even with the taxes. If my main client wasn’t dependent on me being a US firm, I would consider a move of company HQ to Brazil.
    Toucans and Parrots. That’s my next project in my place. I want to settle them there. I want birds as in the Rio cartoon movie. What does it take to settle toucans and parrots? I need to seed out the right food plants, right?

  • #247879
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    I think most of the major problems, complaints, concerns, frustrations, aggravations and whatnot where expressed in this list.
    Yet, it really is a thing of beauty. I read it at least one a week. It helps remind me that Brazil is a crazy place and after I read it I remember that things could be much, much worse. They could be better but at least we don’t live in Iraq or the southern part of the United States.

  • #247881

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] at least we don’t live in Iraq or the southern part of the United States. [/QUOTE]
    Bless your precious heart! LOL
    North Korea is always an option for ya. Just sayin…. Wink

  • #247891
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] I think most of the major problems, complaints, concerns, frustrations, aggravations and whatnot where expressed in this list.
    Yet, it really is a thing of beauty. I read it at least one a week. It helps remind me that Brazil is a crazy place and after I read it I remember that things could be much, much worse. They could be better but at least we don’t live in Iraq or the southern part of the United States. [/QUOTE]
    If you would like to remind yourself where the problem lies, I suggest you dwell on your own statement here. Study it everyday and learn what is wrong with it. Calling a hate list “a thing of beauty” is just twisted, dude.
    If you already live in Brasil…live here, why you jack this hate list all the time in your private life and in public forum? It is herein already said, copied, commented and ad nauseum celebrated.
    The bitch is worn out. Calling it “a thing of beauty” is a screwed-up compliment. Overuse has made this a limp assault, which even excited whiners need to fantasize hard to get an annoyed reserection for twisted pleasure, IMO.
    Strain, man. The thing of beauty – objective criticsx – lost is waxed.Grads2013-05-06 21:28:06

  • #248313
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eliana FB
    Member

    I could probably add another 66 points of interest to that list !
    Brazil really does have issues on so many levels. I can for-see serious social disorder in the future, I really can.

  • #248315
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    # 1 problem people get trapped ?
    Why be unhappy, you can’t even move ?
    Coming and going, be free, best way ?
    So many gringoes marry, make munchkins.
    75% divorce, munchkins suffer broken home.
    Common sense ……
    So people are kinda not so intelligent ?
    Lars Rubensburg2013-05-11 17:14:55

  • #248318
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Eliana FB
    Member

    Lars I think many of us blokes fall for these pretty brasilian girls when we dont havnt really grasped the language or the mind-set of Brasilian people. We wrongly assume that they are rational, reasonable, able to withstand adversity with a team-work like “we can do it” attitude, like-minded enlightened people with similarities that out-weigh differences and that problems or differences can be discussed, resolved and made stronger through grown-up mutual understanding discourse.
    How wrong we are.

  • #248341
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    [QUOTE=playedwell] Lars I think many of us blokes fall for these pretty brasilian girls when we dont havnt really grasped the language or the mind-set of Brasilian people. We wrongly assume that they are rational, reasonable, able to withstand adversity with a team-work like “we can do it” attitude, like-minded enlightened people with similarities that out-weigh differences and that problems or differences can be discussed, resolved and made stronger through grown-up mutual understanding discourse.
    How wrong we are.[/QUOTE]
    Man who admits he was screwed over (thumbs up).
    You have my sympathy and RESPECT.
    Life goes on.
    Make lemons of lemonade ?
    Hang on buddy.
    Never trust a woman, only your dear Mother !!

  • #248396
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=playedwell] Lars I think many of us blokes fall for these pretty brasilian girls when we dont havnt really grasped the language or the mind-set of Brasilian people. We wrongly assume that they are rational, reasonable, able to withstand adversity with a team-work like “we can do it” attitude, like-minded enlightened people with similarities that out-weigh differences and that problems or differences can be discussed, resolved and made stronger through grown-up mutual understanding discourse.
    How wrong we are. [/QUOTE]
    You said it man!
    One must learn the cultural realities in great detail before getting too involved with Brazil and Brazilians. Unlike the rest of the Western world, one cannot simply come here, hustle, work hard, pay your dues and move up in life. Brazil doesn’t work on those terms. It is a highly polarized, unequal and xenophobic society and many on this forum do not want those realities being discussed. LIke Brazilians, they too are hyper-sensitive, child-like individuals who can only resort to name-calling and personal attacks to feel better.
    Beware to all the newbies; Brazil requires big balls and a warrior’s spirit. If you haven’t got these things or can learn to form them, get out now! You will be better off in the the long run. Also, don’t post of this site unless you can take being the butt-end of personal attacks.

  • #248400
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Crybeaddy
    Member

    Did you ever look op the word “xenophobic” ?

  • #248409
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=playedwell] Lars I think many of us blokes fall for these pretty brasilian girls when we dont havnt really grasped the language or the mind-set of Brasilian people. We wrongly assume that they are rational, reasonable, able to withstand adversity with a team-work like “we can do it” attitude, like-minded enlightened people with similarities that out-weigh differences and that problems or differences can be discussed, resolved and made stronger through grown-up mutual understanding discourse.
    How wrong we are. [/QUOTE]
    You said it man!
    One must learn the cultural realities in great detail before getting too involved with Brazil and Brazilians. Unlike the rest of the Western world, one cannot simply come here, hustle, work hard, pay your dues and move up in life. Brazil doesn’t work on those terms. It is a highly polarized, unequal and xenophobic society and many on this forum do not want those realities being discussed. LIke Brazilians, they too are hyper-sensitive, child-like individuals who can only resort to name-calling and personal attacks to feel better.
    Beware to all the newbies; Brazil requires big balls and a warrior’s spirit. If you haven’t got these things or can learn to form them, get out now! You will be better off in the the long run. Also, don’t post of this site unless you can take being the butt-end of personal attacks. [/QUOTE]
    Clear revelations and warning to gringos: Duh! Watch out for women, especially Brasilians, they are all immature. Guys, be careful, ok? Here is Brasil and romance is different. Oh please
    @ USA…following your advice to “learn the cultural realities in great detail before getting too involved with Brasil and Brasilians” is a little like trying to tell people to learn to swim without getting in the water.
    And further, where in the world can anyone go and have everything handed to them with out learning and earning it? Brasil is indeed challenging, and the foibles and problems in living here are mentioned on this forum almost every day. If you consider this a personal attack, rather than opinion, then don’t post such pendantic pontifications.
    In my experience, it is mostly the disaffected posters here who adamently have a continual problem. Brasilians, on the other hand, are a rather contented lot. The irritations of living in Brasil are shared by all…not just gringos.
    So to all who are are considering or new in Brasil, making a life here is challenging and may not be for everyone…especially if you think the country should meet your personal standards…you will find adaptation very difficult.
    Grads2013-05-12 16:38:05

  • #248414
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten] Did you ever look op¬† the word “xenophobic” ?[/QUOTE]
    Maarten,
    Did you ever look up the word “annoying euro” ?

  • #248417
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Lars v Maarten! Is this going to be an epic Northern European bun-fight, edging into territories such as which country has better social-services for the over 70’s and environmentally friendly heating systems? Or will it center around who has the lower suicide rate in the under 30’s? I am on the edge of my seat!

  • #248418
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Crybeaddy
    Member

    So you did not, you are just using words you picked up from someone, they sounded nice and knowledgeable , but alas, in the way you were using it it was rather stupid.
    I know what euro is, its a coin. Annoying euro must be your own invention.
    Wikipedia knows about everything.

  • #248419
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Crybeaddy
    Member

    Finnrud:
    I am not going to discuss all these things, as Lars has ONLY a name that points to Sweden (or Denmark) but having been there a number of times, NOT the way of life and general education one would expect from countries with one of the highests standards.

  • #248429
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    SFO Murphy
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten] Lars has ONLY a name that points to Sweden (or Denmark)[/QUOTE]
    I doubt that the person behind this puppet character has ever been to either country. Indeed, I think the many profiles he has created only point to the fact that he is SEM LAR.

  • #248434
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    I no have prppblems.
    This bloke, Martin appears agitated ??
    Perhaps me touched a nerve ?
    Ta bom !!
    Cheers.

  • #248437
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    Blokes agitated are not acceptance at anything negative about Brasil.
    Like bloke Martin.
    If one criticizes Brasil then you condemn our Regulars, oh my goodness !!
    Brasil have good, have bad, ok ??
    I still be here, Bahamas yea, Brasil, vise versa !!
    Life so good, for me !!
    Cheers.

  • #248448

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg]Blokes agitated are not acceptance at anything negative about Brasil…. If one criticizes Brasil then you condemn our Regulars, oh my goodness !! [/QUOTE]
    Sem Lar, if you’ll read all the posts in the Vent thread, you’ll see quite a few ‘Regulars’ venting about quite a variety of irritations here in the land of Ordem e Caos.
    Interesting how you use ‘criticize’ and ‘condemn’ in the same sentence. Is it not you, and your ilk, who are condemning of any and all things Brasilian?! Is it not you, and your ilk, who cry “negativity” when your opinionis criticized?! I think it’s true that you’re nothing more than an EUA propaganda sock puppet. IRL, you’ve probably never been further south of the border than Tijuana.
    And if I’m wrong, don’t worry mahn, be happy mahn, allz good der in da Bah-hamas…. Put the lime in the coconut, and please don’t call me in the morning! LOL
    Gringo.Floripa2013-05-12 19:18:10

  • #248475
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Crybeaddy
    Member

    Where is the like button when you really need it?
    Thumbs%20Up

  • #248482
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    JessyMac11
    Member

    AA, Mr. R ??

  • #248485
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    my stars!!! now it’s a pesky wabbit…probably complete with a hole.Grads2013-05-13 08:54:26

  • #249710
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    This made me chuckle and smile, for it truly is very accurate!! I was on a training course recently and struggled with a technical word, which ultimately meant reverting to English. Only Brazilian colleague kindly interrupted with “if you speak in English I’m leaving the room!”. The level of rudeness just beggars belief…

  • #249712
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    kimbo
    Member

    MrRabbit – Another gringo who doesnt live here, telling everyone how great it is to live here..Hmm Ermmand yet doesnt live here. your arrogance is mind blowing to me. And the ones that do live here and like it, are more than often living off their investments and pensions from overseas, so hardly iving here are they, existing or surviving with outside assistance would be a good way to describle them.

    Cut those ties and see how they do.
  • #249713
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Europia]

    MrRabbit РAnother gringo who doesnt live here,  telling everyone how great it is to live here..Hmm Ermm and yet doesnt live here. your arrogance is mind blowing to me. And the ones that do live here and like it, are more than often living off their investments and pensions from overseas, so hardly iving here are they, existing or surviving with outside assistance would be a good way to describle them.

    Cut those ties and see how they do.
     
     

    [/QUOTE]
    many of us do quite fine

  • #249714
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    +1
    It’s the weekend and I am doing fine thanks* – just opened a Vixnu from Clorado Beers in Riberao Preto, and enjoying the sunshine 🙂
    *all from the sweat of my own brow here in Brazil…

  • #249839
    Profile photo of Kathy2012
    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Europia]Cut those ties and see how they do.[/QUOTE]
    I should erase all the labor I performed in the past? WHy would I do that? I worked hard for my money, why should I not, in the prime of my life, live off my investments? Jealous much?

  • #249865
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN] [QUOTE=Gringo.Europia]Cut those ties and see how they do.[/QUOTE]
    I should erase all the labor I performed in the past? WHy would I do that? I worked hard for my money, why should I not, in the prime of my life, live off my investments? Jealous much?[/QUOTE]
    Prime of your life? Who decides that? The prime of my life is today, this week, this month, not when I’m 60 and retired. I don’t consider balding, having white hair, wrinkles, arthritis, losing my memory, and having worked for so many years just to retire to be the “prime” of my life. Why can’t I fully enjoy myself now with the money and security and peace of mind and the prime of youthfulness right now in my mid 20s? THIS is the PRIME of MY life, and I want to enjoy it just like the retirees are doing. Why do I have to wait and work for decades before retiring and getting to enjoy the “prime” of my life like so many call it?
    The prime is NOW, not in the balding, greying, future of my old age. What if Gringo.Europia is jealous? So what? That doesn’t make his argument any less valid. Is he, or she, supposed to be a cold heartless robot and be devoid of any feeling?
    What Gringo.Europia is trying to say is that these retirees in Brazil have the really good life and really don’t know what it’s like to be a gringo and have to actually WORK IN BRAZIL. Because they are retired and are living off that in Brazil. I would also like to see how they would do if that money was all gone. They wouldn’t be calmly enjoying life in Brazil saying it’s all good and commenting on this forum “Just relax, I really don’t see what your problem is with Brazil, it’s a wonderful country, I’m enjoying myself here” to everyone who comments on here that Brazil is any less than what these retirees are experiencing, and who actually have to WORK and do BUSINESS in this inefficient country.
    Working in Brazil sucks. Retiring there is great. That’s Brazil’s fault. Too bad for Brazil, because if they had better companies and working conditions, maybe gringoes who work there would enjoy it more.

  • #249874
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham] [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN] [QUOTE=Gringo.Europia]Cut those ties and see how they do.[/QUOTE]
    I should erase all the labor I performed in the past? WHy would I do that? I worked hard for my money, why should I not, in the prime of my life, live off my investments? Jealous much?[/QUOTE]
    Prime of your life? Who decides that? The prime of my life is today, this week, this month, not when I’m 60 and retired. I don’t consider balding, having white hair, wrinkles, arthritis, losing my memory, and having worked for so many years just to retire to be the “prime” of my life. Why can’t I fully enjoy myself now with the money and security and peace of mind and the prime of youthfulness right now in my mid 20s? THIS is the PRIME of MY life, and I want to enjoy it just like the retirees are doing. Why do I have to wait and work for decades before retiring and getting to enjoy the “prime” of my life like so many call it?
    The prime is NOW, not in the balding, greying, future of my old age. What if Gringo.Europia is jealous? So what? That doesn’t make his argument any less valid. Is he, or she, supposed to be a cold heartless robot and be devoid of any feeling?
    What Gringo.Europia is trying to say is that these retirees in Brazil have the really good life and really don’t know what it’s like to be a gringo and have to actually WORK IN BRAZIL. Because they are retired and are living off that in Brazil. I would also like to see how they would do if that money was all gone. They wouldn’t be calmly enjoying life in Brazil saying it’s all good and commenting on this forum “Just relax, I really don’t see what your problem is with Brazil, it’s a wonderful country, I’m enjoying myself here” to everyone who comments on here that Brazil is any less than what these retirees are experiencing, and who actually have to WORK and do BUSINESS in this inefficient country.
    Working in Brazil sucks. Retiring there is great. That’s Brazil’s fault. Too bad for Brazil, because if they had better companies and working conditions, maybe gringoes who work there would enjoy it more. [/QUOTE]
    Gratham,
    Brazil is a boom bust economy. The bust is coming. So go back to the land of milk and honey, save up a boatload of money, than come back during the next crash and you’ll be fine. Life is not easy. Brazil is not easy. Right now with the inflated real estate and overvalued currency, Brazil is a difficult place for young gringoes without deep pockets.

  • #249880
    Profile photo of Finrudd
    Finrudd
    Participant

    Working in Brazil is a pain in the ass, but for some people they are paid comparitvely more than they would be elsewhere in the world, affording them a lifestyle they would not have at home. This is generally what Ex-Pats do – they even used to be paid ‘hardship’ fees depending on how horrible the place they were asked to work was – the more deprived and miserable the country, the more likely the chances of death on the road, or from crime or disease, the higher the compensation.
    That said, there are plenty of people who are paid well in Brazil who are not ex-pats, which goes some way to make up for the pain-in-the-ass factor.
    I totally agree about not wanting to waste my youthful years working my a$$ off, only to find I am too worn out to enjoy my retirement. That is why some people retire to places like Brazil, as in times gone by when it was cheap here, they could retire at an earlier age than they could imagine back home, because cost of living was so much lower.

  • #249882
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    even used to be paid ‘hardship’ fees depending on how horrible the place they were asked to work was – the more deprived and miserable the country, the more likely the chances of death on the road, or from crime or disease, the higher the compensation
    or if you live in Pará

  • #249883
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=finrudd] Working in Brazil is a pain in the ass, but for some people they are paid comparitvely more than they would be elsewhere in the world, affording them a lifestyle they would not have at home. This is generally what Ex-Pats do – they even used to be paid ‘hardship’ fees depending on how horrible the place they were asked to work was – the more deprived and miserable the country, the more likely the chances of death on the road, or from crime or disease, the higher the compensation.
    That said, there are plenty of people who are paid well in Brazil who are not ex-pats, which goes some way to make up for the pain-in-the-ass factor.
    I totally agree about not wanting to waste my youthful years working my a$$ off, only to find I am too worn out to enjoy my retirement. That is why some people retire to places like Brazil, as in times gone by when it was cheap here, they could retire at an earlier age than they could imagine back home, because cost of living was so much lower.[/QUOTE]
    I don’t want to shoot the messenger, but where does that leave me? I certainly didn’t get paid “more” in Brazil than in the USA. In fact, I got paid less. I had to count myself lucky (actually, I constantly got told to “count myself lucky” by others, in fact, I counted myself truly cursed) to teach english on 11 reais an hour, to even have a job, with carteira assinada, to go to a college I hated, to live in a “developed” city (curitiba), to have even gone to school, but I kept getting compared to favela inhabitants, being told I shouldn’t complain because at least I don’t have to beg.
    Where were the hardship fees that should’ve been paid to me? Where were the lost identity fees? Where were the language barrier fees? Where were the assalto and getting a gun to the head fees? Where were the all the days I spent crying fees? Where were the not being able to understand why everyone was laughing at something I didn’t understand fees? Where was the money for me to go the beach which was only 2 hours away? I never saw any of that money. Where was the sexual orientation discrimination and prejudice and homophobia fees? Where were the fees to buy my favorite clothes, that I couldn’t in Brazil?
    I mean, for me life was SOOO much worse in Brazil than the USA. Yet everywhere I turned, if I wanted to return to the USA, doors kept slamming in my face, and I basically got the message “Sorry, you’re on your own”. How does one stay sane? How is there love and abundance in the world? How does one not feel abandoned? Shoved out and discarded?. And yet they say that those years are the best in your life. Not for me. People don’t even know what they’re talking about. Some people say its your childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, parenthood, midlife, old age, seniority. Prime of life is different for everyone I suppose.
    Then I come back to the USA and find this country in a recession caused by banks and major corporations that it can’t recover from. And Americans are mostly a waste of time.

  • #249885

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    I don’t want to shoot the messenger, but where does that leave me? I certainly didn’t get paid “more” in Brazil than in the USA. In fact, I got paid less. I had to count myself lucky (actually, I constantly got told to “count myself lucky” by others, in fact, I counted myself truly cursed) to teach english on 11 reais an hour, to even have a job, with carteira assinada, to go to a college I hated, to live in a “developed” city (curitiba), to have even gone to school, but I kept getting compared to favela inhabitants, being told I shouldn’t complain because at least I don’t have to beg.
    Where were the hardship fees that should’ve been paid to me? Where were the lost identity fees? Where were the language barrier fees? Where were the assalto and getting a gun to the head fees? Where were the all the days I spent crying fees? Where were the not being able to understand why everyone was laughing at something I didn’t understand fees? Where was the money for me to go the beach which was only 2 hours away? I never saw any of that money. Where was the sexual orientation discrimination and prejudice and homophobia fees? Where were the fees to buy my favorite clothes, that I couldn’t in Brazil?
    I mean, for me life was SOOO much worse in Brazil than the USA. Yet everywhere I turned, if I wanted to return to the USA, doors kept slamming in my face, and I basically got the message “Sorry, you’re on your own”. How does one stay sane? How is there love and abundance in the world? How does one not feel abandoned? Shoved out and discarded?. And yet they say that those years are the best in your life. Not for me. People don’t even know what they’re talking about. Some people say its your childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, parenthood, midlife, old age, seniority. Prime of life is different for everyone I suppose.
    Then I come back to the USA and find this country in a recession caused by banks and major corporations that it can’t recover from. And Americans are mostly a waste of time.
    [/QUOTE]

    Thisis an extremely well written suicide note – apart from lacking the usual, Farewell cruel world. Confused

  • #249890
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham]
    I don’t want to shoot the messenger, but where does that leave me? I certainly didn’t get paid “more” in Brazil than in the USA. In fact, I got paid less. I had to count myself lucky (actually, I constantly got told to “count myself lucky” by others, in fact, I counted myself truly cursed) to teach english on 11 reais an hour, to even have a job, with carteira assinada, to go to a college I hated, to live in a “developed” city (curitiba), to have even gone to school, but I kept getting compared to favela inhabitants, being told I shouldn’t complain because at least I don’t have to beg.
    Where were the hardship fees that should’ve been paid to me? Where were the lost identity fees? Where were the language barrier fees? Where were the assalto and getting a gun to the head fees? Where were the all the days I spent crying fees? Where were the not being able to understand why everyone was laughing at something I didn’t understand fees? Where was the money for me to go the beach which was only 2 hours away? I never saw any of that money. Where was the sexual orientation discrimination and prejudice and homophobia fees? Where were the fees to buy my favorite clothes, that I couldn’t in Brazil?
    I mean, for me life was SOOO much worse in Brazil than the USA. Yet everywhere I turned, if I wanted to return to the USA, doors kept slamming in my face, and I basically got the message “Sorry, you’re on your own”. How does one stay sane? How is there love and abundance in the world? How does one not feel abandoned? Shoved out and discarded?. And yet they say that those years are the best in your life. Not for me. People don’t even know what they’re talking about. Some people say its your childhood, adolescence, young adulthood, parenthood, midlife, old age, seniority. Prime of life is different for everyone I suppose.
    Then I come back to the USA and find this country in a recession caused by banks and major corporations that it can’t recover from. And Americans are mostly a waste of time.
    [/QUOTE]

  • #249913
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    SFO Murphy
    Member

    Hang in there dude. Help is on the way!

  • #249917
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    jaenicoll
    Member

  • #249924

    Life really sucks when you’re a whiner, ‘ne Grand-ham, EuroGringo, USAgoaway, et al? Just a bunch of victims, blaming others for their woes and miseries.
    Nothing to add here, that hasn’t already been said…
    Chora, chora…. Cry

  • #249930
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    lynchem
    Member

    The instability of this troll or these trolls is astonishing because I cannot gather the real instability that happens in their day-to-day life(ves)…

  • #249984
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Kitten]
    Hang in there dude. Help is on the way!

    [/QUOTE]
    GODDAMN! LOLZ!!!!!

  • #252265
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    I’ve been living in Sao Paulo for 1 year and I couldnt agree more with donpelon415 , Brazil is sucks a sh*t home,the population is retrograde not a place to raise a family.
    Shame on you Brazilians, you are the best example of where leads a lack of education and civicism : a total chaos.
    Charles de Gaulle was right with his wry remark
    “Brazil is the country of the future ‚Äì and always will be”
    I can’t wait to get the f**k out of here.

  • #252373
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=TAHITIBOB] I’ve been living in Sao Paulo for 1 year and I couldnt agree more with donpelon415 , Brazil is sucks a sh*t home,the population is retrograde not a place to raise a family.
    Shame on you Brazilians, you are the best example of where leads a lack of education and civicism : a total chaos.
    Charles de Gaulle was right with his wry remark
    “Brazil is the country of the future ‚Äì and always will be”
    I can’t wait to get the f**k out of here.
    [/QUOTE]
    Welcome to Brazil!
    Have you been throughly attacked yet for this post?
    You are a newbie to Brazil. It can get better with time.
    If you can leave, I would suggested it. If you need to stay for the long-haul, writing on here is real hit or miss. There exist many “trolls” on here (hint: you can tell they are trolls because they call you that whenever you say anything they don’t like) so be aware. They are also many cool people, although they tend to be less vocal due to the trolls policing the site for anything they deem to be “troll-worthy”.
    Feel free to write and do so regularly. It will help reduce stress. Just avoid getting into it with the aforementioned “trolls”, as they love to fight.
    peace

  • #252375
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=atux] This made me chuckle and smile, for it truly is very accurate!! I was on a training course recently and struggled with a technical word, which ultimately meant reverting to English. Only Brazilian colleague kindly interrupted with “if you speak in English I’m leaving the room!”. The level of rudeness just beggars belief… [/QUOTE]
    Again, Brazilians are in fact rude. Very rude. It’s they opposite of the stereotype that is afforded them. After my nearly four years here I am convinced that Brazilians have to be some of the rudest people on Earth. If you are not their close personal friend, they tend to revert to this “kill or be killed” mentality, even for the most simple of things, like a spot in line or a parking place. It’s worthy of a doctoral dissertation.
    I guess that is part of the fun. Learning how to deal with it, look for it and knowing the correct way to respond. It’s like a game. Just make sure you don’t lose.

  • #252376
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Lars Rubensburg] [QUOTE=maarten] Did you ever look op¬† the word “xenophobic” ?[/QUOTE]
    Maarten,
    Did you ever look up the word “annoying euro” ?
    [/QUOTE]
    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAA

  • #252377
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway]
    Welcome to Brazil!
    Have you been throughly attacked yet for this post?
    You are a newbie to Brazil. It can get better with time.
    If you can leave, I would suggested it. If you need to stay for the long-haul, writing on here is real hit or miss. There exist many “trolls” on here (hint: you can tell they are trolls because they call you that whenever you say anything they don’t like) so be aware. They are also many cool people, although they tend to be less vocal due to the trolls policing the site for anything they deem to be “troll-worthy”.
    Feel free to write and do so regularly. It will help reduce stress. Just avoid getting into it with the aforementioned “trolls”, as they love to fight.
    peace [/QUOTE]
    ?

  • #252378
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    checkmate886
    Member

    Gosh! Why to stay in Brazil? Just leave the place! Why to bother venting your thousand reasons telling us why you hate the country? Just go… and be happy!
    Take care.
    Stay well.

  • #252452
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    beaumont_k
    Member

    Hi Donpelon415.
    I just loved your topic on Gringoes. Because you synthesized everything I’ve been always saying about this country that I hate – Brazil. You couldn’t have been clearer and more specific about the real Brazil and its people. I would really like to chat and make friends with you, because I say it again, you said everything (!) I’ve been always saying. And I’ve been looking for someone who shared my opinion and you not only share but you understand and say exactly what I say.
    Thank you very much!

  • #252467
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    oweng
    Member

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=Kitten]
    Hang in there dude. Help is on the way!

    [/QUOTE]
    GODDAMN! LOLZ!!!!! [/QUOTE]
    Anderson, three more just signed up again all at once. Welcome Donpelon415, Marcos123 and Tahitibob into your family of crybabies!

  • #252536
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=Marcos123] Hi Donpelon415.
    I just loved your topic on Gringoes. Because you synthesized everything I’ve been always saying about this country that I hate – Brazil. You couldn’t have been clearer and more specific about the real Brazil and its people. I would really like to chat and make friends with you, because I say it again, you said everything (!) I’ve been always saying. And I’ve been looking for someone who shared my opinion and you not only share but you understand and say exactly what I say.
    Thank you very much![/QUOTE]
    You have found a friend with me. I totally agree with you and you are not wrong, as some might wish you to believe.
    Feel free to message me whenever you feel like a chat. It’s better to do it that way then on the forum. If you haven’t caught on yet, you soon will.
    Keep your head up!

  • #252537

    [QUOTE=usaalltheway] [QUOTE=Marcos123] Hi Donpelon415.
    I just loved your topic on Gringoes. Because you synthesized everything I’ve been always saying about this country that I hate – Brazil. You couldn’t have been clearer and more specific about the real Brazil and its people. I would really like to chat and make friends with you, because I say it again, you said everything (!) I’ve been always saying. And I’ve been looking for someone who shared my opinion and you not only share but you understand and say exactly what I say.[/QUOTE]
    You have found a friend with me. I totally agree with you and you are not wrong, as some might wish you to believe. Feel free to message me whenever you feel like a chat. It’s better to do it that way then on the forum. If you haven’t caught on yet, you soon will. [/QUOTE]
    Perhaps you three guys should have a sleep-over? Wink
    Gringo.Floripa2013-06-28 00:07:30

  • #253693
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    MCinBrazil
    Member

    I have been living in Recife Brazil for the last 2.5 years. What bothers me about living here besides agreeing with many of the comments posted here is that it seems like this part of Brazil doesn’t seem to exist. I can find websites for expats and they will all talk about Sao Paulo and Rio but then barely even mention this region.

  • #253697
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    It’s not only Recife that does not exist. It seems expats live in: (not necessarily in this order)

    – São Paulo
    – Rio
    – Florianopolis
    – Curitiba
    – Belho Horizonte
    РMacaé
    – Brazilia
    – Fortaleza
    – João Pessoa
    – Manaus
    and that’s about it.
  • #253700
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] It’s not only Recife that does not exist. It seems expats live in: (not necessarily in this order)

    – São Paulo
    – Rio
    – Florianopolis
    – Curitiba
    – Belho Horizonte
    РMacaé
    – Brazilia
    – Fortaleza
    – João Pessoa
    – Manaus
    and that’s about it.

    [/QUOTE]
    You forgot the island of Itaparica. Lots of Gringoes here.

  • #253702

    Theubiquitous gringo, in common with STDs, can be found everywhere. < ?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

  • #253711
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    tech-spec
    Member

    Lived my first 20 years here without contact with, or knowing “gringoes”.
    Even working in factories with up to 1500 employees, I was the only gringo.
    Internet didn’t exist.
    I don’t think I missed anything.oil&gas2013-07-19 14:42:20

  • #253722
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Liliqtozin
    Member

    There is a strange assumption on this forum, that if someone is a gringo, that you will enjoy his company.

  • #253726
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Drewski
    Member

    [QUOTE=jacare]There is a strange assumption on this forum, that if someone is a gringo, that you will enjoy his company.
    [/QUOTE]

    ClapClapClapClap
    Excellent point. I usually can’t stand foreigners in Brazil. They know so little of the culture and reality and it makes it hard to be around them. Like many on this forum….
  • #253727
    Profile photo of graham
    graham
    Participant

    Whether one is a foreigner or native has little to do with their genuine character. It is merely the quality of the person which gives meaning to the encounter…and then there is always this Clap.

  • #253729
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    lol….really?

  • #253731
    Profile photo of kevin owen
    kevin owen
    Participant

    Really usa…
    You make some decent posts and then this. Grow up.
    You want to have a fight ??? Cu#t

  • #253732
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    [QUOTE=kevbo]Really usa…
    You make some decent posts and then this. Grow up.
    You want to have a fight ??? Cu#t[/QUOTE]

    Clap
  • #253735
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    sahara
    Member

    usaalltheway: account suspended for abusive posts.

  • #253746
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=jacare]There is a strange assumption on this forum, that if someone is a gringo, that you will enjoy his company.
    [/QUOTE]

    That’s funny. LOL
    It’s not just on this forum though. Sometimes people go out of their way to introduce me to their other gringo acquaintances. They must figure that since both people are not from here, surely they will get along famously. LOLI guess that’s how those panda bears feel that zoos around the world are always trying to get to mate unsuccessfully.
  • #253765
    Profile photo of sven van 't Veer
    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

  • #253879
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    oweng
    Member

    Tongue

  • #259762
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    While I agree with most of what he said, he still sound bitter. If you are in any country you need to understand and appreciate the differences in culture and development. Don’t like it, can’t understand or adapt, better live than write a rant, like a big baby pitching a tantrum!! To complain about fresh food? To say all the cities there are ugly? Clearly, a big baby…booohooo!!

  • #259766
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    myrna
    Member

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=jacare]There is a strange assumption on this forum, that if someone is a gringo, that you will enjoy his company.
    [/QUOTE]

    That’s funny. LOL
    It’s not just on this forum though. Sometimes people go out of their way to introduce me to their other gringo acquaintances. They must figure that since both people are not from here, surely they will get along famously. LOLI guess that’s how those panda bears feel that zoos around the world are always trying to get to mate unsuccessfully.

    [/QUOTE]
    Reminds me of a conversation I had with the landlord of the Republica I lived in when I arrived in Brazil:
    Me: Hey Landlord, did you fix the microwave yet? It’s been almost a week.
    Him: Hey!!! Good news man, an AMERICAN guy is moving in!! You can hang out with him.
    me: OK, but what about the microwave, is it fixed?
    Him: What? You don’t care that an American guy is coming? You should be excited!!
    Me: Is he going to prepare my food for me? Fix the microwave please.
    Him: Confused

  • #259767