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  • #227615

    ellepasso
    Member

    I am a US citizen who wants to bring my Brazilian(Sao Paulo)Fiance to live with me in the US.
    Is the US fiance Visa the best/quickest option?
    What are the differences or options if we decide to get married in Brazil?
    I am currently only aware of the process of Fiance Visa (K-1) which takes ~6 months before approval. Any way to help make sure that gets approved?
    Thanks for any info you can provide!

  • #227886

    If marrying in Brazil is an option, it will save you some paperwork later with the K-3 visa. Neither is particularly faster than the other and she’ll be interviewing in Rio either way. If you’re already in Brazil, I’d probably marry there and file the K-3.

  • #227897

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=gringoGatinho]I am a US citizen who wants to bring my Brazilian(Sao Paulo)Fiance to live with me in the US.
    Is the US fiance Visa the best/quickest option?

    Fiancee or Spouse visa take about the same time, about 7 months from receipt of application to interview.

    Do note that there is a financial support requirement (job in the U.S. with sufficient income or someone to sign a guarantee for you) that may be hard to fulfill if you are in Brazil.
    What are the differences or options if we decide to get married in Brazil?

    Lots more paperwork to get married in Brazil, cost of Consular stamps and translations, wait time for appointment for ceremony.
    I am currently only aware of the process of Fiance Visa (K-1) which takes ~6 months before approval. Any way to help make sure that gets approved?

    Have lots of good supporting material to prove your relationship. Be prepared to be at the interview in Rio with your fiancee, on short notice.
    Thanks for any info you can provide![/QUOTE]

  • #227903

    doctorlili
    Member

    Here is what I would try. I wonder why nobody else ever suggests this:
    1. Get her a tourist visa, if it works for her it is very fast (15 days interview backlog in Rio) . She should not say you are fiance just say she got this trip for a present or something and she wants to visit the US to learn about this great country. If she speaks English it should be possible to argue that. Best is not to make a big deal of connection to you, perhaps a contact address of a responsible person is good, but you can give your friend’s addresses.
    2. Once in the US, you do a quick marriage, e.g., Las Vegas or a place much nicer, such as Reno or around Lake Tahoe (Lake Tahoe is awesome!)
    3. Apply for the visa/green card based on her being your spouse. Go to Brazil on honeymoon while you wait, or just let her go and wait the time you would have to wait for fiance visa. (The important thing for the US BCIS is they don’t like people coming in on tourist visa and stay with an immigrant petition. But if you leave the country while you wait, it’s not their concern.)
    My rationale: marriage in Brazil is a hassle with all the paperwork and red tape. Marriage in Nevada is so easy, people do it while drunk not even remembering that they did. But it is equally valid. You have no need to translate any documents for the US visa application.
    And as far as I understand, the US fiance visa is a long and complicated matter including background check, your background check, by the way, not so much hers. I think a spousal immigrant petition is processed in about the same time and you eventually need that anyway.
    Now, do I hear any critique? I would like to, because I made that plan myself for the eventuality (which has not panned out or not yet occurred).
    Another thing: I tell everybody this, so you too. You are marrying, and this paperwork stuff may look important to you now (and if you do it the wrong way it is a veritable hassle.) BUT what really matters is that big contract you are signing, the one that isn’t written on paper, not even in fine-print, it has no words at all on it. It comes out big time should you two run into problems. What I mean is, make that explicit. Make a prenup agreement before you marry. Even if it just states what is applicable by default law, at least then you know it.
    Squiddie2012-11-28 17:48:40

  • #228403

    ellepasso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    Here is what I would try. I wonder why nobody else ever suggests this:1. Get her a tourist visa, if it works for her it is very fast (15 days interview backlog in Rio) . She should not say you are fiance just say she got this trip for a present or something and she wants to visit the US to learn about this great country. If she speaks English it should be possible to argue that. Best is not to make a big deal of connection to you, perhaps a contact address of a responsible person is good, but you can give your friend’s addresses.2. Once in the US, you do a quick marriage, e.g., Las Vegas or a place much nicer, such as Reno or around Lake Tahoe (Lake Tahoe is awesome!)3. Apply for the visa/green card based on her being your spouse. Go to Brazil on honeymoon while you wait, or just let her go and wait the time you would have to wait for fiance visa. (The important thing for the US BCIS is they don’t like people coming in on tourist visa and stay with an immigrant petition. But if you leave the country while you wait, it’s not their concern.)My rationale: marriage in Brazil is a hassle with all the paperwork and red tape. Marriage in Nevada is so easy, people do it while drunk not even remembering that they did. But it is equally valid. You have no need to translate any documents for the US visa application.And as far as I understand, the US fiance visa is a long and complicated matter including background check, your background check, by the way, not so much hers. I think a spousal immigrant petition is processed in about the same time and you eventually need that anyway.Now, do I hear any critique? I would like to, because I made that plan myself for the eventuality (which has not panned out or not yet occurred).Another thing: I tell everybody this, so you too. You are marrying, and this paperwork stuff may look important to you now (and if you do it the wrong way it is a veritable hassle.) BUT what really matters is that big contract you are signing, the one that isn’t written on paper, not even in fine-print, it has no words at all on it. It comes out big time should you two run into problems. What I mean is, make that explicit. Make a prenup agreement before you marry. Even if it just states what is applicable by default law, at least then you know it.
    [/QUOTE]
    My Fiance has already been in the US on a aupair visa for 2 years. Her aupair visa expired so she went back to Brazil. I am not in Brazil and can not take any trips soon to Brazil with my current job situation.
    About the prenup, can you give me more information on this? she is very hesitant to sign anything ‘unless she understands it and has a lawyer look at it’. What should the prenup include? I dont want to leave her with nothing but at the same time I dont want her taking half of my bank account if things go sour after a while. With a prenup, would we have to separate washer/dryer, couches, and things like that if one of us purchases something? seems like a huge hassle if so.
    Could we try the tourist visa and if that gets denied, apply for fiance visa?
    We basically are just in love and want to live together because we have not experienced that important part of the relationship. When she was in the US, we spent time together but never lived together. I think the fiance visa would be the best in terms of getting her here in 6 months, living with her, and the fiance visa also allows her to work in the US once we are married.gringoGatinho2012-12-02 18:37:30

  • #228404

    ellepasso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Solteropolitano]
    Be prepared to be at the interview in Rio with your fiancee, on short notice.
    [/QUOTE]
    I am in the US. I have read through the process of Fiance visa and do not see anything about me having to go to Rio for an interview.

  • #228408

    Anonymous

    Have you read the description of all the supporting documents needed for the main application form? Did you see where it did say something about proof of relationship? You are supposed to be able to show to the interviewers satisfaction (a very subjective criteria) that the relationship is legitimate. If the most important person in my life were facing a crucial interview on which our future together was balanced, what proves the strength of that relationship more than being there alongside my significant other, at whatever sacrifice that means? Sometimes the Brazilian partner is OK by him/her self. Sometimes the interviewer wants to see more proof at second interview. If so, better to be there for that one with her, and put the interviewers mind at rest. That interview will be on short notice. Best to have sufficient airfare set aside.

  • #228409

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=gringoGatinho] [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    3. Apply for the visa/green card based on her being your spouse. Go to Brazil on honeymoon while you wait, or just let her go and wait the time you would have to wait for fiance visa. (The important thing for the US BCIS is they don’t like people coming in on tourist visa and stay with an immigrant petition. But if you leave the country while you wait, it’s not their concern.) [/QUOTE]

    Could we try the tourist visa and if that gets denied, apply for fiance visa?

    We basically are just in love and want to live together …[/QUOTE] What he said was that it is considered fraud to come on a tourist visa with the intent of getting married and staying in the U.S. It will prejudice her spousal application for a visa to stay, and if you want to live together in the U.S. that is an important thing to consider. That is why the poster recommends her going back to Brazil after the marriage if she comes on a tourist visa to marry in the U.S. If the tourist visa is denied, there is more chance of a subsequent fiancee visa being denied. Solteropolitano2012-12-02 19:33:27

  • #228410

    dodge
    Member

    Another marriage topic. Some guys will do anything !!!

  • #228411

    dodge
    Member

    Dont do it !!
    Once she gets to to USA everything will change. Divorced within 3 years, I bet ya.

  • #228852

    ellepasso
    Member

    [QUOTE=pilot_expat] Another marriage topic. Some guys will do anything !!!
    [/QUOTE]
    you are in the Brazil-Marriage section of Gringoes forum. I’m not sure what else you’re expecting to find here besides marriage topics. Please stop posting in this thread as you have absolutely nothing of value to add.

  • #252061

    larky458
    Member

    In the same vein but sort of the opposite…
    I want to marry my Brazilian and then I want to move to Brazil. From what I have read, it seems that it would be easier to get married here (in the USA) so that is what we will probably do. He would come here on a tourist visa, we would get married, and then probably leave together and go to Brazil for our honeymoon/second marriage ceremony for his family. So my question is, what is required by Brazil to prove our US marriage so that I can have a Brazilian equivalent of a green card?
    Also, now that I’m thinking about it…. would we want to apply for his green card before we leave for the honeymoon/wedding #2 as a backup, just in case we decide to move back to the US?
    Sorry if anything I’m asking is already answered, I am a newbie and honestly (embarassing) I don’t understand the search function in this dang forum.
    Thanks! MeninaRuiva2013-06-20 19:40:07

  • #253777

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=MeninaRuiva]In the same vein but sort of the opposite…
    I want to marry my Brazilian and then I want to move to Brazil. From what I have read, it seems that it would be easier to get married here (in the USA) so that is what we will probably do. He would come here on a tourist visa, we would get married, and then probably leave together and go to Brazil for our honeymoon/second marriage ceremony for his family. So my question is, what is required by Brazil to prove our US marriage so that I can have a Brazilian equivalent of a green card?
    Also, now that I’m thinking about it…. would we want to apply for his green card before we leave for the honeymoon/wedding #2 as a backup, just in case we decide to move back to the US?
    Sorry if anything I’m asking is already answered, I am a newbie and honestly (embarassing) I don’t understand the search function in this dang forum.
    Thanks! [/QUOTE]

    If you’re getting married in the US, register the marriage at the consulate (fast), and then apply for permanì™ncia (a few months). Or you could apply for the permanì™ncia from within Brazil (a few years), but you still will have to have registered the marriage at the consulate in the US first.
    From what I understand, you can’t apply for his green card if you aren’t going to live in the US.
  • #253786

    Anonymous

    that is true– also, if you have a US green card, you can’t move abroad or you lose it (you may be able to file an affadavit with the US govt if you know how long you will be gone, but I’ve heard mixed things about that- it is meant for people who get a grant to study abroad for a time or have to deal with an emergency back in the old country). Even too much travel outside the US raises flags.

  • #253815

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    I am thinking that if you get married in the US, then register it at the Brazilian consulate, you still have to re-register it at a cartorio in Brazil.

  • #255103

    ginaferminio
    Member

    What about just applying for the green card @ the US consulate, when you get back to Brasil? Then, you wouldn’t have the fraud aspect of entering the US under false pretenses…right? Also, you wouldn’t have to deal with the thieves in the cartorios, trying to get a marriage license.

  • #23972

    eep123
    Member

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