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  • #268724

    ffm
    Member

    http://online.wsj.com/articles/banco-santanders-brazil-unit-fires-analyst-others-after-political-comment-1406665764?mod=_newsreel_1

    What are your opinions on this story? Reeks of dictator like censorship. A Santander Analyst critized the economic policies of Dilma and PT and after a sh*te storm from Brasilia (many threats) he was fired.
    He was saying nothing more than the truth and they used some strange election law to “shut him up” but it seems to have back fired because the international press is picking up on the story.
    This Dilma and PT have to go….but then again…who fills the void?????ConfusedConfusedConfused
  • #268725

    celso
    Member

    Change is in the air. I doubt Dilma will get re elected. Lots of unhappiness about crime, sh*tty healthcare, public education, infrastructure, taxation and corruption with inflation and stagnant growth. So next group will devalue real to make brazil competitive.

  • #268733

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire] Change is in the air. I doubt Dilma will get re elected. Lots of unhappiness about crime, sh*tty healthcare, public education, infrastructure, taxation and corruption with inflation and stagnant growth. So next group will devalue real to make brazil competitive.[/QUOTE]
    And another goal for Alemanha…

  • #268741

    agri2001
    Participant

    Its called “custo do Brasil” just kill the messenger, its easier.

    Just like that reporter that wrote an article on Lula as being a drunk, the gov voided his visa and he had to leave Brazil.
    What a country…!
  • #268742

    cohesco
    Member

    Pt has to go, this is unreal, petrobras is a joke, reminds me of our Berlusconi, all that corruption has to go too.

  • #268744

    Anonymous

    makes me a bit nervous to think about what is next- could they be worse than the PT?

  • #268745

    Anonymous

    Does anyone remember the Fernando Henrique Cardoso presidency? I might not have been old enough to be aware of everything in Brazil, but I still remember the 90s, especially the late 90s and early 2000s, up to about 2003, to be the best years in Brazil. Certainly better than today. From 1998-2003, the best years. It might have been a simpler time, but it was a better time. Yes, more fuscas and less “modern” cars. I remember Curitibanos drove fuscas about 1/4 of the time. But there was less overt poverty and much less “overt” violence. The drivers back then actually had a sense of consciousness about the rules of the road and other drivers. Also, you didn’t have a mass migration of the rural poor to the big cities. I don’t know, is it just me, or were those years truly better than the past few years?

  • #268746

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Grantham]Does anyone remember the Fernando Henrique Cardoso presidency? I might not have been old enough to be aware of everything in Brazil, but I still remember the 90s, especially the late 90s and early 2000s, up to about 2003, to be the best years in Brazil. Certainly better than today. From 1998-2003, the best years. It might have been a simpler time, but it was a better time. Yes, more fuscas and less “modern” cars. I remember Curitibanos drove fuscas about 1/4 of the time. But there was less overt poverty and much less “overt” violence. The drivers back then actually had a sense of consciousness about the rules of the road and other drivers. Also, you didn’t have a mass migration of the rural poor to the big cities. I don’t know, is it just me, or were those years truly better than the past few years?[/QUOTE]

    I have heard this from many people. Especially older Paulistanos. They talk of the days when ROTA killed scum bags and there was a lot less violent crime. This was the 90’s as well.
    Tres- I feel you! PT sucks but it’s not like there is some good party with forward thinking ideas waiting in the wings. If PT is ousted, it could be like the Arab Spring. Kick out one A-hole to have 5 A-holes fight it out in a dirty way to take power.
  • #268758

    lynchem
    Member

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire]Change is in the air. I doubt Dilma will get re elected. Lots of unhappiness about crime, sh*tty healthcare, public education, infrastructure, taxation and corruption with inflation and stagnant growth. So next group will devalue real to make brazil competitive.[/QUOTE]

    Everything you state has always existed. The first thing I would like to see is a devaluation of the currency so I can buy several properties. There will be something coming soon. The price of EVERYTHING is through the roof. I cannot understand how I pay 15 reais for a cairpirinha but the store beside my table sells 500ml plastic bottles for 3 reais… LOL
  • #268770

    miguel
    Participant

    [QUOTE=The Abbot]http://online.wsj.com/articles/banco-santanders-brazil-unit-fires-analyst-others-after-political-comment-1406665764?mod=_newsreel_1

    What are your opinions on this story? Reeks of dictator like censorship. A Santander Analyst critized the economic policies of Dilma and PT and after a sh*te storm from Brasilia (many threats) he was fired.
    He was saying nothing more than the truth and they used some strange election law to “shut him up” but it seems to have back fired because the international press is picking up on the story.

    [/QUOTE]
    Back to the OP. Clearly the analyst spoke the economic ‘truth,’ and his firm’s president, fearing very real government reprisals, against their most profitable subsidiary in any country, took this very unfortunate action. Botin, Santander’s president, clearly also miscalculated the blow to his enterprise’s (not that Santander had much to begin with) integrity and reputation with this act of censorship and political action of his own.
    Technically, if you go back to the actual research note, it was very amateurly worded, the work of an intern, which would have been easily fixed by any half-way decent editor.
    The note stated that if Dilma goes up in the polls, that its economywould suffer, when instead, and in the context of its note, it meant that that its markets would suffer – foreign exchange, fixed income, equities, commodities, the works – as documented by previous investor behavior. Yes of course the economy would also suffer, if Dilma is reelected and she continues her policies, but analysts need to remain technical and avoid even the appearance of bias by couching it in terms like “if fiscal policies continue as xyz” or “if the bndes continues its credit subsidizing policies” then this “could adversely effect the country’s credit rating ” or “could lead to a further widening of the fiscal deficit” or well you get the picture.
    Such carelessness left the firm vulnerable to a government absolutely desperate to divert attention and assign blame.
    miguel2014-08-02 16:36:54

  • #268779

    Shell
    Member

    What a bunch of kool-aid drinkers some of you are. Dilma will be reelected, easily. And she deserves to be. She has been a pretty good presidente. This is going to sound sexist, but in my opinion women voters should be especially supportive of Dilma. Not only is her being the first female president of Brazil of great historical significance, she has doubled down on it by being a solid and stable chief exective, amidst some pretty turbulent times, in Brazil, in South Amì©rica, and the world in general. Just look at the disastrous job Cristina Kirchner has done in Argentina, and then tell me that Dilma has not done so much better. Corruption, bloated government, poor infrastructure, high taxation, bureaucratically burdensome business climate, yes, these remain big problems in Brazil. But did Dilma create any of these? No. They were all there long before Dilma, and the rise of the PT. Seems to me that a lot of Gringoes in Brazil look around themselves and only see what they want to see, or maybe they don’t look around at all, and just repeat what they have heard. What I see is a Brazil, yes beset by problems, but a Brazil that has acknowledged those problems and is working on those problems. What I see, is a Brazil that is a little better every day. In fact, that is my adopted motto, ‘Brazil-Better Every Day!’.

  • #268780

    wtdknknm
    Member

    Excuse my ignorance but I ca never work out which way the currency will go when it strengthens/weakens.
    If the Real were devalued, would that be better or worse for money coming into Brazil? Confused

  • #268781

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]What a bunch of kool-aid drinkers some of you are. Dilma will be reelected, easily. And she deserves to be. She has been a pretty good presidente. This is going to sound sexist, but in my opinion women voters should be especially supportive of Dilma. Not only is her being the first female president of Brazil of great historical significance, she has doubled down on it by being a solid and stable chief exective, amidst some pretty turbulent times, in Brazil, in South Amì©rica, and the world in general. Just look at the disastrous job Cristina Kirchner has done in Argentina, and then tell me that Dilma has not done so much better. Corruption, bloated government, poor infrastructure, high taxation, bureaucratically burdensome business climate, yes, these remain big problems in Brazil. But did Dilma create any of these? No. They were all there long before Dilma, and the rise of the PT. Seems to me that a lot of Gringoes in Brazil look around themselves and only see what they want to see, or maybe they don’t look around at all, and just repeat what they have heard. What I see is a Brazil, yes beset by problems, but a Brazil that has acknowledged those problems and is working on those problems. What I see, is a Brazil that is a little better every day. In fact, that is my adopted motto, ‘Brazil-Better Every Day!’. [/QUOTE]

    Well done carloseduardo! You appear to be amember of the free thinking Brazilian intelligenciea and an excellent apologistfor the status quo. You freely admit that Brazil continues to be a haven forcorruption, bloated government, high taxation combined with a bureaucratically burdensome business climate and arestrictive infrastructure while praising the President Dilma, despite having avagina, for her skills in avoiding an Argentinian-like economic collapse.Bloody marvellous! I could and perhaps should go on but I fear that you are asomewhat biased idiot and therefore not only a waste of sperm but a waste of mykey depressions.

  • #268782

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=growler]Excuse my ignorance but I ca never work out which way the currency will go when it strengthens/weakens.
    If the Real were devalued, would that be better or worse for money coming into Brazil? Confused
    [/QUOTE]

    Better, of course.
  • #268783

    kenalag
    Member

    Well, if I would be on Dilma’s payroll, I would praise her all day long…everywhere on the internet.

  • #268784

    wtdknknm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit][QUOTE=growler]Excuse my ignorance but I ca never work out which way the currency will go when it strengthens/weakens.
    If the Real were devalued, would that be better or worse for money coming into Brazil? Confused
    [/QUOTE]

    Better, of course.

    [/QUOTE]
    That’s what I thought but not what I wanted to hear…..so even less if sending money to the UK. Unhappy

  • #268785

    Fernandez
    Member

    @carloseduardo
    My pet guinea pig, fondly referred to as Chiquinho, is also extremely competent when compared with the likes of Cristina Kirchner.
    ferrar2014-08-03 14:38:52

  • #268786

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Dilma not being re-elected: be careful what you wish for.

    What are the alternatives? How are these alternatives set to improve Brazil? While I don’t support PT, I do still feel Dilma is hugely better than Lula, who struck me as being not that far off Chavez and his ilk in terms of his ignorance.
  • #268789

    celso
    Member

    Aceio Neves will allow the real to fall to stimulate trade. He will seek reform in many fronts and Brazil will hurt with or without him in the first few years. Just the lack of water in SP and the huge jump in electricity prices at 30 to 40% will zap the real.

  • #268801

    Shell
    Member

    Esprit, I could be totally wrong about who you really are, as opposed to what you seem like based on what you write. One never knows for sure in the cyberworld. However, your writings make you seem like a person that was unhappy and angry when you were wherever you came to Brazil from, and furthermore like a person who manages to find unhappiness and discontent wherever you are in the world. Maybe you should try drinking either a lot less or a lot more…….

  • #268802

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]What a bunch of kool-aid drinkers some of you are. Dilma will be reelected, easily. And she deserves to be. She has been a pretty good presidente. This is going to sound sexist, but in my opinion women voters should be especially supportive of Dilma. Not only is her being the first female president of Brazil of great historical significance, she has doubled down on it by being a solid and stable chief exective, amidst some pretty turbulent times, in Brazil, in South Amì©rica, and the world in general. Just look at the disastrous job Cristina Kirchner has done in Argentina, and then tell me that Dilma has not done so much better. Corruption, bloated government, poor infrastructure, high taxation, bureaucratically burdensome business climate, yes, these remain big problems in Brazil. But did Dilma create any of these? No. They were all there long before Dilma, and the rise of the PT. Seems to me that a lot of Gringoes in Brazil look around themselves and only see what they want to see, or maybe they don’t look around at all, and just repeat what they have heard. What I see is a Brazil, yes beset by problems, but a Brazil that has acknowledged those problems and is working on those problems. What I see, is a Brazil that is a little better every day. In fact, that is my adopted motto, ‘Brazil-Better Every Day!’. [/QUOTE]

    Either this is a hack job at satire or you, meu amigo, have your head lodged up your calamari ring! WOW! Confused
  • #268827

    Shell
    Member

    Or just maybe you are one of those people who are predisposed to see everything in the most negative possible light. So many people judge Brazil, based on a perception of what they or some others say what Brazil SHOULD be, based on this that and the other things. Maybe a year ago there was this cover on The Economist magazine, suggesting that Brazil had, once again, ‘Blown It’. That’s a prime example of what comes from the ‘SHOULD’ mongers. I have not suggested that Brazil is perfect. I do assert that most everything in Brazil is WAY better than it was 20 years, 10 years ago, even 3 years ago. This is sustained growth and improvement, with democratically elected governments, the likes of which Brazil has NEVER experienced in it’s history. That is a factual analysis, and it is indisputable. I prefer to form opinions based on facts and reality, not on speculation. And we don’t have to look long or far for examples of countries that most definitely ‘Blew It’. Greece blew it. Ireland blew it. Spain blew it. Portugal blew it. Argentina blew it. The USA blew it. Venezuela blew it. During the very same time that those countries were definitely blowing it, Brazil has continued to grow and get better, admittedly at a slower pace than before, but unquestionably so. Much is wrong with Brazil, especially the federal government. None of it is Dilma’s fault, but like every chief executive, it is her responsibility. So as long as she is accepting and standing up to the responsibility for all those bad things, and she is, then how about we give her credit for at least SOME of the good things. That’s my two cents……

    ‘Brazil-Better Every Day’

  • #268828

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    Froman historical viewpoint perhaps it would be well-intentioned to consider thereason why it has been possible to govern Brazil in the absence of the current typeof democratically elected government; governance that the country has not, allegedly,hitherto experienced and, crucially, assuming that the current government is ofa high enough standard of excellence? Can this reason be explained as simply asa product of the laissez-fairetemperament of the Latin; a people deserving of the governance theyallow? And in this regard we should not separate individual facets of societybut take an overall view of the calibre and quality of living standards of theBrazilians together with the country’s ranking. When and if such measures areapplied, Brazil has little to excuse itself other than the plethora of hackneyedand, by now, pathetic reasons to blame this or that; enough already!

    What,other than Brazilians and their chronic short termism, is to blame? Elitism andbenign racism prevent nation-wide development while political corruptionensures that sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof. Perhaps some progresscould be initiated if voting was relegated to a simple right and not acompulsion and following on from there a steady improvement in literacy andpolitical education. This isn’t rocket science; first world standards areexampled everywhere and so it’s monkey see, monkey do – if the zoo keepersallow. And so, to continue with this cruel metaphor, perhaps we could list the achievements;let’s call them bananas, that Dilma has thrown into the cage.

  • #268830

    Anonymous

    In that vein, Gringoes.com had a related commentary on that particular issue here:
    http://gringoes.com/articles.asp?ID_Noticia=2705

    Brazil: The Beautiful Circus – Conjugating the Culture of Brazil
    By Robert Eugene DiPaolo
    July 15, 2014

  • #268838

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]Esprit, Maybe you should try drinking either a lot less or a lot more……. [/QUOTE]

    Esprit – The gent has a good point here. Drinking a lot less is not really something to consider. Perhaps a trial run at drinking a lot more? I might join you so that we have a statistically valid control in the experiment.
  • #268841

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=carloseduardo]Esprit, Maybe you should try drinking either a lot less or a lot more……. [/QUOTE]

    Esprit – The gent has a good point here. Drinking a lot less is not really something to consider. Perhaps a trial run at drinking a lot more? I might join you so that we have a statistically valid control in the experiment.

    [/QUOTE]

    Lula “did a great job” and that nine finger having, Keebler Elf looking mofo was drunk most of the time!
  • #268844

    Shell
    Member

    OK. I see you chose the drinking a lot more option. The prose that flows, but a bit incoherently, is a dead give away mate…..

  • #268846

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    Whatâ‚Ǩ no bananas?

  • #268848

    Shell
    Member

    Only in daiquiris.

  • #268849

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]OK. I see you chose the drinking a lot more option. The prose that flows, but a bit incoherently, is a dead give away mate….. [/QUOTE]

    Justas I thought; you got nothin’ but parroted half-assed rhetoric that gets doesn’tget Better Every Day!

    LOL

  • #268856

    Finrudd
    Participant

    As someone rightly pointed out, whoever gets elected next is in for a rough term. If it’s Dilma driving the bad news of price increases in Electricity, water shortages and anything else on the cards, then Lala will take over once she is done, and she will be sacrificed. If it’s Neves, he will be crucified for delivering the bad news of the previous regime, as it is in politics, and Lala will be waiting in the wings to woo the disenchanted masses.

  • #268887

    Shell
    Member

    Well, my rhetoric, if you want to call it that, is that it is Brazil that gets better every day, not me. THe only thing I get every day, for sure, is older…….

  • #268888

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]
    Well, my rhetoric, if you want to call it that, is that it is Brazil that gets better every day, not me. THe only thing I get every day, for sure, is older…….[/QUOTE]
    Brazil gets worse every day. More violence, crime, potholes, kidnapings, saidinha bancarias, federal and state tax laws, labor court filings (millions), leftist communist sem terra, Petrobras, kill thy neighbor, macho Latin, lawless land of impunity, war zone with 50,000 killed with firearms annually. Civil war brewing as violence gets out of hand.
    Brazil is the next Argentina. Argentina the next Venezuela, And Venezuela is….Venezuela.GreatBallsoFire2014-08-05 14:06:55

  • #268892

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]Well, my rhetoric, if you want to call it that, is that it is Brazil that gets better every day, not me. THe only thing I get every day, for sure, is older…….[/QUOTE]

    Brazil may have gotten somewhat better from it’s horror show past but it has long jumped the shark on its improvements! It peaked a few years ago and now the roller coaster cars are on the down slope.
    Smile for the camera!
  • #269062

    Tony
    Participant

    A currency devaluation would facilitate exports by pricing the manufactured below current threshold. . On the flip side, everything local business needs would become less affordable.
    I was looking the other day, at Sao Bernardo census data, they had R$1.2 billion annual exports to Argentina against only 500,000 to the US, through the same period. Problem is, China just stepped in to help Argentina with loans, and expects to get reciprocity on Argentina’s imports. The impact in Sao Bernardo’s manufacturing base is already being felt. Factories cutting, workforce from ate 32-40

  • #27707

    jessbuurman
    Member

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