Opticians

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  • #72460

    x32792
    Member

    Has anyone had any experience with opticians in Brazil. I need new glasses as I don’t want to wear my contacts every day when it’s hot and dusty. My wife is insisting I go to an eye doctor first to get a prescription which I can then take into the opticians shop to get fitted for specs, as this will be the best method.
    I’m confused by this as normally I would go to Lenscrafters or a similar venue and get a complete eye exam (glaucoma etc) in the shop. Do things work differently here?
    nevergoingback2007-07-20 10:45:39

  • #72463

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback] My wife is insisting I go to an eye doctor first to get a prescription which I can then take into the opticians shop to get fitted for specs [/QUOTE] This is the best way. It takes longer & may be more expensive, but you’ll choose the doctor of your preference.

  • #72469

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback]
    I’m confused by this as normally I would go to Lenscrafters or a similar venue and get a complete eye exam (glaucoma etc) in the shop. Do things work differently here?
    [/QUOTE]
    Of course. That‘s a doctors job! All regulated and stuff like that. I‘ve never even seen an optician that can give you a prescription.

  • #72470

    Jill
    Member

    Here or elsewhere? Normally in the UK and USA they give you a scrip in the shop as the guy is a qualified optometrist/ophthalmic optician. I would normally only go to doctor if I had an eye infection or other problems – certainly not for glasses!
    nevergoingback2007-07-20 11:41:07

  • #72473

    bocokzoy
    Member

    Consider this an eye check-up… A good doctor would be able to detect earlier lesions (like retinal detachment, etc)

  • #72474

    Jill
    Member

    [QUOTE=Denise]

    Consider this an eye check-up… A good doctor would be able to detect earlier lesions (like retinal detachment, etc) [/QUOTE]
    You talk just like anyone that has one of those regulated jobs. The optometrist/ophthalmic optician would indicate you going to a doctor in case anything was wrong. He‘s not allowed to make a diagnose but certainly has the knowledge to identify that something is wrong. In the netherlands also, for a prescription you go to the guy where you buy the glasses, if there‘s something wrong with your eyes you go to an eye doctor.
    I see glasses/lenses as bra‘s, I would guess your don‘t go to see a doctor just to buy a new bra.

  • #72475

    bocokzoy
    Member

    Denise, what happened to your icon? Now‘m getting so confused!!!

  • #72476

    Jill
    Member

    that was weird….

  • #72477

    x32792
    Member

    But in the UK the optometrist/opthalmic optician isthe guy in the glasses shop – not just a shopkeeper! He will give all the same tests that a doctor would as he is fully qualified. He would then refer me to a doctor if he saw any problems. You don’t have this in Brazil?nevergoingback2007-07-20 12:18:41

  • #72478

    x32792
    Member

    I got some glasses in the capital and the shop did the eye exam. They were ready in a day or two and quite a bargain. But in the end they turned out to be a literal headache.

  • #72479

    Jill
    Member

    Why not buy the glasses on the street after testing them by guessing the correct prescription and putting them on and looking around for a few seconds?

  • #72481

    Rpb24
    Member

    What, like the basic reading glasses that are sold in the newsagents in the UK? No, they are not the same thing! Proper glasses (especially for myopia) need specialist fitting (and it’s against the law to sell them without this).nevergoingback2007-07-20 12:33:41

  • #72484

    amynyc
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback]What, like the basic reading glasses that are sold in the newsagents in the UK? No, they are not the same thing! Proper glasses (especially for myopia) need specialist fitting (and it’s against the law to sell them without this).[/QUOTE]
    I meant proper glasses.
    It was supposed to be a funny post…obviously failed miserably. Embarrassed

  • #72486

    Anonymous

    Okay. You could have been serious though as some people really think that the glasses for reading are all you need (until they crash a car, that is!)

  • #72487

    andy6053
    Member

    [QUOTE=Polvo]
    It was supposed to be a funny post…obviously failed miserably. Embarrassed
    [/QUOTE]
    A bit of british humor eh ?

  • #72489

    Greenback
    Member

    Seriously though, I have seen lots of people use that method of buying glasses in Brazil. Are properly fitted glasses particularly expensive in Brazil?

  • #72494

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=Polvo]Seriously though, I have seen lots of people use that method of buying glasses in Brazil. Are properly fitted glasses particularly expensive in Brazil?[/QUOTE]
    That would depend a lot on how much you make. I say they are not particularly expensive. Maybe even “cheap”, but then, I do make more than a mer R$ 400 a month.

  • #72495

    x32792
    Member

    Places like Lenscrafter, etc, employ optometrists. They are specialists at corrective vision/prescriptive eyeglasses. They do, too, brief screenings for eye “problems”, but they’re not opthamologists, who dx/treat eye problems (retinal, corneal,etc.) The optician guys actually grind and make the lenses. I always was confused about this myself.

  • #72504

    Rpb24
    Member

    No way around going to the Doc that I am aware of. I just did this last month. Be prepared for ‘sticker shock’. Good quality lens and frames will cost you close to R$1,000.
    If you have a trip planed back to the UK in the not to distant future, you might want to put off the purchase until then.

  • #72506

    sfkenneth
    Member

    I would be expecting the usual vision test with BIG and small letters, green and red filtration, but also the flashing dots (Spatial test?) and the eye pressure glaucoma (puff of air) test etc. This is normal at any UK Optician shop. If that is not part of the game in Brazil then I will go to a doctor first and then use his scrip to buy something in a shop.

  • #72515

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=OldDogGyn] Be prepared for ‘sticker shock’. Good quality lens and frames will cost you close to R$1,000. [/QUOTE]
    I guess you can buy something good at R$600. But multifocal lenses are very expensive.

  • #72519

    Victor L
    Member

    Hi NGB,
    Got the letters and personal exam by the Doc. Nothing else.
    I assume the Doc would have been able to see any danger signs and sent me for more exams. Knew him personally.
    The Doc in question studied at Harvard for two years.
    Unimed paid.
    Obviously, very over-qualified to do eye exams.
    My good fortune; his economic frustration.

  • #72580

    dalmata
    Member

    LOLNo way around it in Brazil… have to go to an “oftalmologista” (aka good ole eye doctor) for a prescription.

  • #72754

    analivia
    Member

    I think I need glasses too.. So I will go to the eyedoctor here, but my problems are not too pressing, so I will wait until I get back to Norway and make a short trip over to Sweden to buy new glasses. At least there used to be big differences in price..
    My wife just got glasses and she paid 600 Reais for multifocal. Not too bad at all. I will of course check the prices here versus prices in Norway/Sweden. Might not be too bad prices here after all…

  • #10541

    EricSGU
    Member

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