• Author
    Posts
  • #197573

    Cici
    Member

    http://abcnews.go.com/m/story?id=15488000
    Seems that the brazzers are not content with having religious statues in their own back yard! Now they want them in others! They maybe should consider construction of stadiums as a priority, but no, they wanna “Jesus” up London! Brilliant!!!

  • #197575

    Anonymous

    Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.

  • #197588

    celso
    Member

    Oldebrecht built a huge ugly Jesus on a hill with some radio towers overlooking a shabby area near Lima Peru. Would have been nicer to build a giant Carmen Miranda with a fruit basket on her head.

    < id=1 = method=post name=1 =/sally-annephillips/photo/32759/843044/Peru/statue-of-Jesus>

    statue%20of%20Jesus

  • #197591

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire]Would have been nicer to build a giant Carmen Miranda with a fruit basket on her head.[/QUOTE]
    Definitely, but painted, right? sven2012-02-01 14:46:50

  • #197639

    [QUOTE=expt2233]Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.[/QUOTE] Yes, down with Christo!!! Tear down the churches and monasteries while at it!!!! Purge the insane religionists!!!! It didn’t quite go as intended the last time, but keep on trying until you get it right or ran out of people….

  • #197648

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=BorisG] [QUOTE=expt2233]Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.[/QUOTE]

     

    Yes, down with Christo!!!   Tear down the churches and monasteries while at it!!!!  Purge the insane religionists!!!!

     

    It didn’t quite go as intended the last time, but keep on trying until you get it right or ran out of people….

    [/QUOTE]
    No purging, just taking down hideous, giant religious statues…

  • #197649

    Gilmour
    Member

    If you don’t like it, don’t look at it! Ermm

  • #197653

    [QUOTE=expt2233] [QUOTE=BorisG] [QUOTE=expt2233]Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, down with Christo!!! Tear down the churches and monasteries while at it!!!! Purge the insane religionists!!!!

    It didn’t quite go as intended the last time, but keep on trying until you get it right or ran out of people…. [/QUOTE]

    No purging, just taking down hideous, giant religious statues… [/QUOTE] Really? Why stop there? Tear down all those cathedrals, churches, mosques, buddhist temples, pagodas, synagogues…. down with Moses, David, and all other not-so-giant and not so-hideous religious statues. Tear up all the religious-themed paintings…. Looks like you have your work cut out for you… Looks like you have little experience with giant hideus non-religious statues, I suggest that you visit FSU for a tour of patriotic and ideological themed pseudo-artistic atrocities…

  • #197655

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    Jesus is weeping in heaven – bad boys!

  • #197662

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=BorisG] [QUOTE=expt2233] [QUOTE=BorisG] [QUOTE=expt2233]Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.[/QUOTE]

     

    Yes, down with Christo!!!   Tear down the churches and monasteries while at it!!!!  Purge the insane religionists!!!!

     

    It didn’t quite go as intended the last time, but keep on trying until you get it right or ran out of people….

    [/QUOTE] No purging, just taking down hideous, giant religious statues… [/QUOTE]

     

    Really?¬† Why stop there?¬† Tear down all those cathedrals, churches, mosques, buddhist temples, pagodas, synagogues….¬† down with Moses, David, and all other not-so-giant and not so-hideous religious statues.¬† Tear up all the religious-themed paintings….¬†¬† Looks like you have your work cut out for you…

     

    Looks like you have little experience with giant hideus non-religious statues, I suggest that you visit FSU for a tour of patriotic and ideological themed pseudo-artistic atrocities…

    [/QUOTE]
    Well, as long as the hideous statues are private, not public, they can stay. However, paying tax dollars to refurbish religious symbols? Ridiculous. Obscene. Scandalous.
    FSU? As in Florida State University? Have never stepped foot in Florida, and aside from the everglades, nothing would make me go there…

  • #197679

    FSU- Former Soviet Union. You need to get out more….

  • #197681

    Gianni
    Member

  • #197684

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=BorisG]

    FSU- Former Soviet Union.¬† You need to get out more….

    [/QUOTE]
    Sorry, not familiar with your shorthand. Judging by your name you have a strong connection with the FSU.

    Seriously though, you took what I said and twisted it. I didn’t say ban religion, I didn’t say purge people, etc. I said: tear down publicly funded religious statues, or move them to private hands to be funded by private dollars.

  • #197687

    Gianni
    Member

    I like how so called “post-modern” ideas aren’t back by any practical alternative; free minded or directionless thought ultimately lands on failure. Gringodude2012-02-01 21:50:38

  • #197689

    No, it is not mine short-hand, Expt. Yes, I have a strong connection with FSU. No, I didn’t twist what you’ve said, I merely took it to its logical conclusion. [QUOTE=expt2233] [QUOTE=BorisG]

    FSU- Former Soviet Union. You need to get out more….

    [/QUOTE]

    Sorry, not familiar with your shorthand. Judging by your name you have a strong connection with the FSU.

    Seriously though, you took what I said and twisted it. I didn’t say ban religion, I didn’t say purge people, etc. I said: tear down publicly funded religious statues, or move them to private hands to be funded by private dollars.

    [/QUOTE]

  • #197690

    In failure, or more correctly in utter disaster they’d land, but do not be decieved they are ruthless and very down to earth practical. Cozy fuzziness is just a cover. [QUOTE=Gringodude]I like how so called “post-modern” ideas aren’t back by any practical alternative; free minded or directionless thought ultimately lands on failure. [/QUOTE]

  • #197695

    [QUOTE=expt2233]

    Seriously though, you took what I said and twisted it. I didn’t say ban religion, I didn’t say purge people, etc. I said: tear down publicly funded religious statues, or move them to private hands to be funded by private dollars.
    [/QUOTE]
    Cristo was only definitively taken by the Brazilian government in 2009, after it was named one of the 7 Man Made Wonders of the world and the government realized how much money they were losing out on, and it is still “funded by private dollars”to this day (through private and corporate donations and ridiculous admissions prices).
    All of the major reforms have been undertaken by the Catholic Archdiocese (who still holds masses there, owns all of the rights to its image and funds much of the upkeep) and private companies (namely Globo, Shell and Vale – who have plaques up around the statue saying as much). As part of “lending” the monument to the government, the archdiocese has also guaranteed that all Catholics can see the monument free of charge on various dates, especially when masses are held.
    The government took over a religious monument so they could make a profit. What they earn through the tram, ridiculously expensive parking lot and renting the concessions stands far exceeds the costs and undoubtedly is lining the pockets of several funcionarios publicos.
    If you want to use Cristo to whine about corruption and abuse of an elite few robbing the rest of us, then by all means go ahead. But to say that it is “publicly funded” is bending the truth a bit.
    By the way, does anyone know if the Catholic Church ok’d this preliminary plan to put a replica in London? How much would Embratur have to pay for the rights? That would be interesting to see.

  • #197697

    Nikki, You are da Man! I am just saying that so, expt doesn’t feel too bad about being taken down by a girl Clap[QUOTE=nikkij12185] [QUOTE=expt2233]

    Seriously though, you took what I said and twisted it. I didn’t say ban religion, I didn’t say purge people, etc. I said: tear down publicly funded religious statues, or move them to private hands to be funded by private dollars.

    [/QUOTE]

    Cristo was only definitively taken by the Brazilian government in 2009, after it was named one of the 7 Man Made Wonders of the world and the government realized how much money they were losing out on, and it is still “funded by private dollars”to this day (through private and corporate donations and ridiculous admissions prices).

    All of the major reforms have been undertaken by the Catholic Archdiocese (who still holds masses there, owns all of the rights to its image and funds much of the upkeep) and private companies (namely Globo, Shell and Vale – who have plaques up around the statue saying as much). As part of “lending” the monument to the government, the archdiocese has also guaranteed that all Catholics can see the monument free of charge on various dates, especially when masses are held.

    The government took over a religious monument so they could make a profit. What they earn through the tram, ridiculously expensive parking lot and renting the concessions stands far exceeds the costs and undoubtedly is lining the pockets of several funcionarios publicos.

    If you want to use Cristo to whine about corruption and abuse of an elite few robbing the rest of us, then by all means go ahead. But to say that it is “publicly funded” is bending the truth a bit.

    By the way, does anyone know if the Catholic Church ok’d this preliminary plan to put a replica in London? How much would Embratur have to pay for the rights? That would be interesting to see.
    [/QUOTE]

  • #197699

    Anonymous

    First, I did not know that the Cristo was administered that way. Thanks for the info.
    Second, I really did not express myself clearly.
    Keep the government and religion separate. It’s a great principle, regardless of where it came from.
    I believe in it. I know it’s not Brazilian law. It’s just my opinion.

  • #197703

    Here I have to agree with you. Church and state should be kept separate as should be the shurch of atheism and state. State ideally should be impartial and extend equal protection and rights to or better yet to serve the same all the citizens.

  • #197708

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=expt2233] First, I did not know that the Cristo was administered that way. Thanks for the info.
    Second, I really did not express myself clearly.
    Keep the government and religion separate. It’s a great principle, regardless of where it came from.
    I believe in it. I know it’s not Brazilian law. It’s just my opinion.[/QUOTE]
    Actually it is brazilian law. The problem is that 90% of the people have some religion. So actual separation of church and state is really difficult to achieve.
    There was a national outcry when the desembargadores of the tribunal of rio declared that crucifixes should be removed from all publica areas in the tribunal.

  • #197709

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=BorisG] Here I have to agree with you.  Church and state should be kept separate as should be the shurch of atheism and state.  State ideally should be impartial and extend equal protection and rights to or better yet to serve the same all the citizens.[/QUOTE]
    Separation of church and state makes it agnostic not atheist.

  • #197721

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]
    There was a national outcry when the desembargadores of the tribunal of rio declared that crucifixes should be removed from all publica areas in the tribunal.[/QUOTE]
    This is something that I like about Brazil!! I noticed that the crucifixes are everywhere here, even in the Receita Federal. I’m about an non-religious as they come, but I can go with the flow.
    I like it how Brazilians in Brazil will tell people just to **** *** when someone tries to deny the majority of what they want! Whereas in the US, they will bow down to anyone with a lobby.

  • #197729

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=expt2233] First, I did not know that the Cristo was administered that way. Thanks for the info.
    Second, I really did not express myself clearly.
    Keep the government and religion separate. It’s a great principle, regardless of where it came from.
    I believe in it. I know it’s not Brazilian law. It’s just my opinion.[/QUOTE]
    Actually it is brazilian law. The problem is that 90% of the people have some religion. So actual separation of church and state is really difficult to achieve.[/QUOTE]
    This is actually one thing I believe Brazil is good at considering that only 100and someodd years ago it was a monarchy with an official religion. There are limits on the number of religious holidays and last year the gov removed the catholiv tv programing in the middle of the night from public television. Things here are going in a direction quite different from those in the US.
    Most of what people might see as a mix of “church and state” here is just a way to hide the prescient problems of racism and classism. For example, if you are white and have money in Rio, it is very easy to get an abortion. Most people know the name of the big clinic in bitafogo where they are performed. However, if you are poor or black you either dont have access or don’t know where to go and are forced to bare the burden if the child, which could further limit social mobility for you and your family.
    Protestantism took hold in Brazil when the Catholic church mobilized on behalf of the poor and began to condemn the very wealthy. Evangelical christianity has since been used as a tool to maintain racial and social divusions, and has been promited privately on a large scale (look at rede record). Any new mixing of church and state today is a symptom of those greater problems. It makes no sense to attack it when you should be attacking the troots.
    Instead of trying to “keep church and government seperate” a more informed position, at least in the case of Brazil, would be to want to “prevent the further institutionalization of classism and racism, using “religion”as a public guise”.

  • #197733

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=BorisG] Here I have to agree with you. Church and state should be kept separate as should be the shurch of atheism and state. State ideally should be impartial and extend equal protection and rights to or better yet to serve the same all the citizens.[/QUOTE]

    Separation of church and state makes it agnostic not atheist.[/QUOTE] Agnostic state is the ideal, yet, usually, the pendulum swing so the other extreme – militant atheism.

  • #197745

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=spongebob]
    [QUOTE=sven]There was a national outcry when the desembargadores of the tribunal of rio declared that crucifixes should be removed from all publica areas in the tribunal.[/QUOTE]This is something that I like about Brazil!! I noticed that the crucifixes are everywhere here, even in the Receita Federal. I’m about an non-religious as they come, but I can go with the flow.I like it how Brazilians in Brazil will tell people just to **** *** when someone tries to deny the majority of what they want! Whereas in the US, they will bow down to anyone with a lobby.[/QUOTE]
    Spongebob, ever hear the phrase ‘the tyranny of the majority’?

  • #209404

    Anonymous

    I never saw this thread, but this has to be the most concise, helpful view of this whole situation I have heard since i have been interested in Brazil. [QUOTE=nikkij12185] Most of what people might see as a mix of “church and state” here is just a way to hide the prescient problems of racism and classism. … Protestantism took hold in Brazil when the Catholic church mobilized on behalf of the poor and began to condemn the very wealthy. Evangelical christianity has since been used as a tool to maintain racial and social divusions, and has been promited privately on a large scale (look at rede record). Any new mixing of church and state today is a symptom of those greater problems. It makes no sense to attack it when you should be attacking the troots.
    Instead of trying to “keep church and government seperate” a more informed position, at least in the case of Brazil, would be to want to “prevent the further institutionalization of classism and racism, using “religion”as a public guise”.[/QUOTE]

  • #209423

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    “prevent the further institutionalization of classism and racism, using “religion”as a public guise”.[/QUOTE]
    Isn’t this what is going on in the USA, but in the open, politically? I read yesterday that Obama is attacking Romney for being rich. And Obama is trying to drive a huge wedge between the “have’s” and the “have nots”….
    Dirty tactic, but I guess that’s politics for ya.

  • #21301

    flamesrock
    Member
  • #197657

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=BorisG][QUOTE=expt2233] [QUOTE=BorisG] [QUOTE=expt2233]Religion is a social disease. They should tear down the Cristo above Rio.[/QUOTE]

    Yes, down with Christo!!! Tear down the churches and monasteries while at it!!!! Purge the insane religionists!!!!

    It didn’t quite go as intended the last time, but keep on trying until you get it right or ran out of people…. [/QUOTE]

    No purging, just taking down hideous, giant religious statues… [/QUOTE] Really? Why stop there? Tear down all those cathedrals, churches, mosques, buddhist temples, pagodas, synagogues…. down with Moses, David, and all other not-so-giant and not so-hideous religious statues. Tear up all the religious-themed paintings…. Looks like you have your work cut out for you… Looks like you have little experience with giant hideus non-religious statues, I suggest that you visit FSU for a tour of patriotic and ideological themed pseudo-artistic atrocities… [/QUOTE] Hey Friends, Soon you can visit “Solomon’s Temple” in Sao Paulo. (Estimated cost over $200,000,000) Forget about teaching a man to fish, trade schools etc, build a grand temple to prove God loves you!!

    25 Aug

    The laying of the Foundation Stone – Second meeting, at 4:00pm

    Listen to the meeting:

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:foundation stone, meeting, Solomon’s Temple

    9 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

    23 Aug

    The laying of the Foundation Stone – First meeting, at 9:30am

    Listen to the meeting:

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:foundation stone, meeting, Solomon’s Temple

    4 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

    15 Aug

    Jews and Christians unite in favour of the construction of the Temple

    Shalom,

    A Jewish parliamentarian wrote an article in this week‚Äôs Israeli newspaper about the construction of our Temple in Brazil. He said: “Who ever heard of a church wanting to build the Great Temple? They must be thinking that they can drag Jews into that place. Many religious Jews are concerned about this news because since the destruction of our own temple in Jerusalem, Jews around the world are waiting for the temple to be rebuilt so that they can go worship God there.”

    While purchasing items in a warehouse for our church in Israel, Pastor Israel spoke to the owner, a religious Jew, who said: “I saw on the internet that some church is going to build the Temple and I immediately thought about your church. Is what I saw true?”

    The pastor then showed him Bishop Macedo‚Äôs blog posts. He marvelled and said: “If I help, can you put my name in the Temple?How can I help?” The pastor showed him the account information and he said, I‚Äôm going to check with my bank on how to make my donation. I also told my wife that we‚Äôre going to Brazil to worship God after the temple‚Äôs completion. With his Jewish way of thinking he said: If my name is placed in the temple and I go there to worship God, everything in my life will become successful.

    Another Jewish man called pastor Israel and said: “Bishop Macedo is a very intelligent man. Nobody has had the courage and taken up the challenge to rebuild the Temple. I‚Äôm sure many Jews will go to that temple to worship God. He also told the pastor not to pay any mind to what another Jew had written in the newspaper because since the temple has never been rebuilt in Israel, many Jews will surely go to Brazil to worship God in the Temple of Solomon.

    It’s like Bishop Macedo said, “We must be prepared more than ever. Our war was, is and will be even greater because the devil knows that the temple‚Äôs construction will be drawing the world‚Äôs attention.

    Let‚Äôs stay strong in this war because the victory belongs to God’s people.

    Pastor David Smith
    Nazareth, Israel

    Donate to the building of the Temple:

    Bank of Brazil – Ag 3221-2
    CC: 1258-0

    Bradesco – Ag 3396-0
    CC: 865-6

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:Christians, Jews, Solomon’s Temple, UCKG

    9 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

    11 Aug

    The Temple: the laying of the Foundation Stone

    < height=445 ="http://www.bispomacedo.com.br/galeria-fotos/index_090810." Border=0 width=530 scrolling=no>

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:foundation stone, Solomon’s Temple

    3 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

    30 Jul

    Sweat, blood and tears

    It’s true. Sweat, blood and tears have always been a part of the Work of God. The path of faith has never been an easy one, much to the contrary‚Äîwhen it comes to a mega project like Solomon‚Äôs Temple, hatred that fuels the natural man burns even stronger. The conventions of society approve the costly construction of theatres, cinemas, soccer and sports stadiums, but when it comes to glorifying God, especially the Almighty God of His chosen ones, the answer is always: no. It’s considered nonsense. It‚Äôs time consuming. It‚Äôs a waste of money.

    But the natural man does not receive the things of the Spirit of God, for they are foolishness to him; nor can he know them, because they are spiritually discerned.(1 Corinthians 2:14)

    Only those who have a degree of spiritual discernment can understand the importance that this temple has to the Christian faith. We aren’t simply talking about another church project, much less about a personal one. We’re speaking from a spiritual point of view about something glorious that goes beyond reason itself. It will no doubt awaken those whose faith has been dormant, cold or lukewarm, to create a revival across the nation, and even worldwide.

    For it is God who works in you both to will and to do for His good pleasure.(Philippians 2:13)

    I’m absolutely sure that the same Spirit that placed this dream inside our hearts will also touch those who are going to help us accomplish it.

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:Solomon’s Temple, UCKG

    6 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

    25 Jul

    The UCKG Temple Project

    The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God will build a replica of Solomon’s Temple, with stones from Israel

    The Bible explains that King David, during his reign, decided to build a temple for God because he did not accept the fact that he, a mere mortal, lived in a palace, surrounded by riches and comfort, whilst the ark of the Lord was kept in tents and tabernacles. However, the Lord, through the prophet Nathan, warned him saying that he could not build the temple himself, but his successor, King Solomon. So, David, before handing his throne over to his son, gathered as much as he could for building the Temple of the Lord—100,000 talents of gold and 1 million talents of silver—and he also gave his own special treasure of gold and silver: 3,000 talents of gold and 7,000 talents of refined silver.

    One talent of gold is the same as 36kg of gold, and one talent of silver is the same as 36kg of silver. Therefore, King David offered 360,000kg of gold and silver, which is worth over US$5,6 billion.

    After seven years, Solomon built the temple. And it was used for many years as a place where people worshipped and offered sacrifices to the Lord.

    Despite its glory and impressiveness, in the year 587 BC, the Babylonians invaded Jerusalem and reduced the great temple to ashes. Decades later, the Second Temple was built in the same place, but it was destroyed too. Today, the only part of the temple that stands is the Wailing Wall, which is considered holy by thousands of Jews and Christians all over the world.

    The Jews still hope that the Third Temple is built, so that the Messiah may reign with them. However, in order for this to happen, they need to count on some kind of natural catastrophe or governmental changes to have the Dome of the Rock, an Islamic shrine built by the Muslims, removed from its place.

    Following the guidelines contained in the Bible, the UCKG will build a replica of Solomon‚Äôs Temple in the city of São Paulo, Brazil. It will be a mega church, measuring 126 metres long and 104 metres wide‚Äîdimensions that surpass those of an official football pitch and those of the biggest Catholic Church in the city of São Paulo, the Cathedral of Sé. It‚Äôs over 70,000 m2 of built-up area in an entire block of 28,000 metres. It will be 55 metres high, which correspond to a 18-floor building‚Äîalmost twice the height of the statue of Christ the Redeemer, in Rio de Janeiro. The work, which should be completed within the next 4 years, will be a landmark in the history of the Universal Church of the Kingdom of God.

    There will be 36 Bible Schools with capacity for approximately 1,300 children, radio and TV studios, an auditorium with capacity for 500 people, and a car park with capacity for over 1,000 vehicles.

    Designed to cause the smallest impact possible to the environment, the temple will be built with hi-tech recycled and regional materials that will allow rational use of energy as well as the re-use of water and heat.

    In the area outside the temple, a memorial measuring 250 m2 will be built, which will also be used to hold expositions and events. The idea was to use the area not only to tell the story of the Church, but also to explain a little bit of the temple’s architectural engineering.

    According to the architect and designer of the temple, Rogério Silva de Araújo, it‚Äôs a major undertaking, which uses the best leading edge technology, so that when people enter the building, they can travel in time and feel as though they were in the first temple, built by Solomon. From the facade to the auditorium, we‚Äôve created an environment that will take people back to the past. To achieve this, we‚Äôve used leading edge technology associated with architectural common sense to avoid a clash of periods, said Araújo.

    Still inside the church, there will be an ark on the altar that will represent the Ark of Covenant. The aim is to produce a three-dimensional effect: when open, people will be able to see it inside, and its image will be reflected in the baptism pool, giving people the sensation that, during the baptism, they are being baptised inside the Ark. On the altar, there will be twelve stones representing the twelve tribes of Israel, and there will be two distinct pillars, called Joachim and Boaz. The church will be situated at Brás (eastern region of the capital), with a seating capacity of over 10,000.

    According to Bishop Edir Macedo, the temple will not be built with gold, but the richness in detail applied to every corner of the temple will be very similar to that of the old sanctuary. We‚Äôve ordered, from Jerusalem, the same kind of stones used by Solomon, because we want to cover the walls of the temples with them. We want people to have a beautiful place to seek God and also have the opportunity to touch these stones and pray, said the bishop during a meeting in São Paulo. He believes that the place will not be limited to the visitation of UCKG members, but it will become a cultural and tourist attraction that will draw the attention of people all over the world.

    According to the president of the World Zionist Organisation’s youth department, Persio Bider, the initiative will give non-Judaic Brazilians the opportunity to know more about Israel and the Jews, eliminating prejudice and anti-Semitism, still present in our society. Only by getting to know each other will we be able to eradicate prejudice and discrimination, to work together, and to respect each other’s differences. We have a lot in common, and we need to unite ourselves and work for a just and more positive society, focused on coexistence and religious tolerance. And that’s the reason why I found Bishop Macedo’s initiative very interesting; he seems to love Israel and the Jewish people very much, affirmed Bider.

    Cinthia Meibach

    Watch the video:

    Posted by: Bishop Edir Macedo

    Tags:Solomon’s Temple, temple, UCKG

    11 Comments addedEmail%20This%20PostEmail This Post

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.