• Author
    Posts
  • #106951

    GOOP1966
    Member

    For us brazilians is sintaxe. All my students complain about it. (oração subordinada substantiva, restritiva, adjuntos etc) All students here have portuguese lessons until the university level , doent matter what kind of course. This means that our languague is not so easy. Indeed, there are two languages, written and spoken. The most difficult is written because we need to know rules that are not used in immersion, for example! So, what is the most difficult for you?

  • #106957

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    Definately sintaxe.

  • #106969

    THX1138
    Member

    we have taxes on sins here?

  • #106973

    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Jeffry]we have taxes on sins here? [/QUOTE] Those are the highest taxes. Tobacco, alcohol, drogas, mulheres……

  • #106999

    Hi Kelly,
    I’m a gringo who has lived in Brazil for over 2 years now. Many foreigners say that Portuguese is a difficult language to learn. I agree but only partially. As a person who likes to learn things by the book I find the grammar no easier or more difficult than most other languages. Perhaps similar to French. When it comes to speaking I found that I was capable of making all the sounds necessary for pronunciation but would often revert to a more English sounding pronunciation. Proper syntax is necessary for proper speaking and this may take a little longer to perfect in Portuguese than some other languages. The hardest part of learning Portuguese for me is understanding what others are saying. Even if I would understand 95% of what was said if it were written out I still miss a lot of what I hear in every day conversation. Only recently have I been able to follow the TV novellas and understand most of what is said. My first year was especially frustrating as I could read the newspapers and write out what I wanted to say and then say it but didn’t have a clue what people were saying to me. This is what I found difficult about learning Portuguese.

  • #107002

    lmaonade5
    Member

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]For us brazilians is sintaxe. [/QUOTE]

    That’s a moot point. Since syntax is defined as “the rules and principles that govern the sentence structure of any individual language”, what else is there for a native speaker of Portuguese? Sentence structure rules, and exceptions, are the major part of learning any language properly. btw, I’d be very surprised if a native speaker of Portuguese were to have difficulty with pronunciation or oral comprehension, and since Portuguese is spelled as it is spoken, ditto for that. The are not two languages; there is thelanguage properly spoken and written, and there is giria,street language, a corruption. Portuguese is not a language like Japanese, which has several politeness levels of proper speech that each use different vocabulary. Bahiana772008-11-22 11:06:44

  • #107003

    waynec
    Member

    I dunno, there is the difficulty of the switching of L and R sounds, for example. I have even seen some native speakers write this way – writing the name “Calorina” instead of “Carolina.”

  • #107006

    lmaonade5
    Member

    There are illiterate people (analfabeto, Thanks, Dunga. Bad habit.) in all populations. Bahiana772008-11-22 15:29:55

  • #107007

    micko
    Member

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]There are illiterate people (analfabetizado) in all populations. [/QUOTE]
    analfabeto/alfabetizado

  • #107011

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77] There are illiterate people  (analfabeto, Thanks, Dunga. Bad habit.) in all  populations.

     

    [/QUOTE]
    Not really, there are none in my country and when I came to Brazil it was a shock when I found out that there is a substantial group in Brazil which can’t neither write nor read.Dom Pedro2008-11-22 15:37:29

  • #107013

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]

     So, what is the most difficult for you?

    [/QUOTE]
    For me the most difficult is accent signs (agudo and circunflexo), I never remember where to put the darn thing.

  • #107014

    jonathand
    Member

    [QUOTE=Dom Pedro] [QUOTE=Bahiana77] There are illiterate people (analfabeto, Thanks, Dunga. Bad habit.) in all populations.
    [/QUOTE]

    Not really, there are none in my country and when I came to Brazil it was a shock when I found out that there is a substantial group in Brazil which can’tneither write nor read.[/QUOTE] Really??? Where are you from then? And would illiterate people be able to answer the market research questionnaire – or if a verbal questionnaire, would they be willing to admit to their illiteracy? Shockedglobetrotter2008-11-22 15:43:56

  • #107017

    Anonymous

    Globetrotter: I am Russian, and there is no need to do a market research, all ex-communist countries have 99,9% literacy. School education was and still is excellent and is obligatory for all.

  • #107019

    GOOP1966
    Member

    I disagree with u Bahiana, unfortunaly there are 2 languages, one is more formal , nobody says “quando eu vir o quadro” or “para eu fazer” only very cultural people say that and they represent a minimum part of our society, so as I portuguese teacher I can say that. We have very specific rules that are not known by the most part of population and I m not talking about girias (slangs) “quando eu ver = wrong form” is not a slang. When I say that I mean one language for speaking and other for formal very formal situation!!!! Did you get my point???

  • #107021

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Dom Pedro, you are right, accent signs is hard for us also, I always teach that in my classes ( I teach for all levels, kids, adults) only few students remember, specially because of the computer which corrects all sentences and when my students need to write, they don’t know!

  • #107022

    GOOP1966
    Member

    [QUOTE=Henry]Hi Kelly,
    I’m a gringo who has lived in Brazil for over 2 years now. Many foreigners say that Portuguese is a difficult language to learn. I agree but only partially. As a person who likes to learn things by the book I find the grammar no easier or more difficult than most other languages. Perhaps similar to French. When it comes to speaking I found that I was capable of making all the sounds necessary for pronunciation but would often revert to a more English sounding pronunciation. If you know french is easier to learn portuguese and for us also. But in french is hard to understand all articles and the accents are bigger than our portuguese! I really don’t know, I m still learning, I m able to read but is hard to understand the speakers! Good luck with your portuguese and if you need some help I m here! Bom aprendizado!

  • #107026

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina] Dom Pedro, you are right, accent signs is hard for us also, I always teach that in my classes ( I teach for all levels, kids, adults) only¬†few students remember, specially because of the computer which corrects all sentences and when my students need to write, they don’t know![/QUOTE]
    You guys should have dropped all the accents except for tilda since they are useless anyhow, because everyone knows where the stress is, and if not this can be deducted by context. In my language there is no rule for stress and there are no accents, so you have to remember where they are, so remembering where the stress is in portuguese word is peanuts, but to remember where to put an accent and where not is a royal ardencia no regaço :)

  • #107034

    micko
    Member

    So how you going to tell your grandma from your grandpa? and it’s nice to see the difference between é and e. But there is a reforma gramatical coming up where they are going to get rid of many.

  • #107064

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] So how you going to tell your grandma from your grandpa? and it’s nice to see the difference between é and e. But there is a reforma gramatical coming up where they are going to get rid of many.
    [/QUOTE]
    The difference between é and e is always clear out of context, so this one has to go. The accent which does nothing except for indicating stress has no reason to exist – i.e. it should be either everywhere or in no word. But the circunflex should stay where it belongs to, because it reflexes a different sound.
    I believe new grammar rules will make it even more confusing, so I prefer not to put any acento agudo at all. Not even in my CELPE-BRAS test :)
    Dom Pedro2008-11-22 22:37:04

  • #107081

    lmaonade5
    Member

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]I disagree with u Bahiana, unfortunaly there are 2 languages, one is more formal , nobody says “quando eu vir o quadro” or “para eu fazer” only very cultural people say that and they represent a minimum part of our society, so as I portuguese teacher I can say that. We have very specific rules that are not known by the most part of population and I m not talking about girias (slangs) “quando eu ver = wrong form” is not a slang. When I say that I mean one language for speaking and other for formal very formal situation!!!! Did you get my point??? [/QUOTE] No, I don’t. And no linguist would either. It seems to me that you are parroting a cutesy way of thinking about this that some professor of yours came up with to make it easier to conceptualize. In English, it is proper to say “To whom are you speaking?”, but everyone uses “Who are you speaking to?” This doesn’t mean we have two languages, just that the proper grammar has been turned into everyday slang usage. (slang = a type of informal verbal communication that is generally unacceptable for formal writing, informal language consisting of words and expressions that are not considered appropriate for formal occasions) There is the rule based language that you call proper and there is the (intentional or not) street slang use of it. If not, you have Portuguese Ebonics, a language with the grammatical structure of another language imposed upon it. Bahiana772008-11-23 08:13:42

  • #107105

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Slang is not only informal comunication, it is a specific form of talking that identifies groups (guetos) of people. Read Willian Labov, or Dino Preti. Informal is a language that doent follows grammar and can be used in a coloquial way by everyone, slang can used or not, depends on the word. There are slangs for period, 60s, 70s, for age old, kids, for sex (women and man)… When I say 2 languages…written and spoken I mean in terms of specific rules. There is a song very famous here that says: Eu sei que vou te amar = coloquial Would be terrible if it was written in a formal correct way: Eu sei que vou amar-te a marte= sounds like a planet We have a lot of rules very specific that is not used in a coloquial way…sometimes my students say: is it portuguese???? Kelly_cristina2008-11-23 12:36:35

  • #107106

    GOOP1966
    Member

    DINO PRETI– A gíria é um vocabulário de grupo, surge do grupo, assumida por ele. Por exemplo, a palavra cachorra,no grupo Funk é usada em determinada situação com determinado sentido. Depois, quando a gíria se espalha, sai do grupo e vai para a sociedade, pode até ser contestada, pode deixar de ser vista como gíria e passa a fazer parte da linguagem popular. Mas a gíria é, de fato, vocabulário de grupo. Prefiro usar o termo gíria de grupo específico. Gíria comum já é, de certa maneira, uma negação da própria gíria, porque esta é, por natureza, uma linguagem secreta fechada. O trabalho que citei daquele rapaz pesquisando as gírias dos homossexuais é impressionante, às vezes não dá para entender nada. Trata-se de um fenômeno interessante. É o uso da linguagem como defesa pessoal; se você não entende, você não faz parte do grupo, está fora. São formas pessoais de exclusão do grupo. A gíria funciona como defesa e identificação de grupo. (Dino Preti – professor of USP- PUC)

  • #107107

    Anonymous

    Kelly, what Bahiana says is the following: slang and informal usage follow it’s own rules in many languages, which doesn’t make them a language in its own right, and I absolutely agree with that.Dom Pedro2008-11-23 13:11:55

  • #107112

    lmaonade5
    Member

    And Preti, above, says nothing about “another language”. The premise he seems to be discussing has to do with insider and outsider language. The quote is taken out of context and is not applicable.

  • #107115

    Anonymous

    And..Kelly you are inconsistent. You speak about deviations from standar grammar and syntax and support your opinion by a quote 100% dedicated to an alternative vocabulary. Aren’t you comparing apples and oranges? Or rather acerola and caju?

  • #107118

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Read all posts again Dom and you will see that Im not incosistent.

  • #107123

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]

    Read all posts again Dom and you will see that Im not incosistent.

    [/QUOTE]
    I am afraid nobody else can hear the music you are dancing to.
    You’ve been trying to sell us your theory of a palliative language which supposedly exists in Brazil. First on basis of grammar deviations, when you’ve been pointed by several forum members including yours truly that colloquial use doesn’t create a “second language”, you in support of your theory came up with a quote on closed social groups slang .
    I speak five languages fluently and at least four more on an intermediate level, and can tell you there is nothing unique to Brazilian Portuguese in it.
    What really counts as a “second language” is phenomenae like Swiss German, where the whole “German-speaking” population writes and reads the language they don’t speak.Dom Pedro2008-11-23 17:47:28

  • #107127

    Paulo
    Participant

    Schweizerdeutsch, Schwyzerdütsch, Schwiizertüütsch, Schwizertitsch

  • #107321

    GOOP1966
    Member

    [QUOTE=Dom Pedro] [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]

    Read all posts again Dom and you will see that Im not incosistent.

    [/QUOTE]

    I am afraid nobody else can hear the music you are dancing to.

    You’ve been trying to sell us your theory of a palliative language which supposedly exists in Brazil. First on basis of grammar deviations, when you’ve been pointed by several forum members including yours truly that colloquial use doesn’t create a “second language”, you in support of your theory came up with a quote on closed social groups slang .

    I speak five languages fluently and at least four more on an intermediate level, and can tell you there is nothing unique to Brazilian Portuguese in it.

    What really counts as a “second language” is phenomenae like Swiss German, where the whole “German-speaking” population writes and reads the language they don’t speak.[/QUOTE] Eu não estou vendendo nada para ninguém. O que digo é baseado em meu conhecimento empírico. Nossa gramática não acompanhou o desenvolvimento da língua oral. A última reformulação, se não me engano, foi de 1973 ou 1971. Há novas gramáticas que incluem a linguagem oral, mas não são adotadas nas escolas tradicionais. Eu ensino várias coisas que só são utilizadas em situações formais, às vezes, nem nessas situações, como é o caso do “tu” e do “vós” ou próclise e mesóclise. A nova reformulação muda um pouco o cenário, mas não resolve. Não sou papagaio que repete algo bonito como o Baiano disse, ninguém é obrigado a aceitar nada. Questionar é sadio e faz parte do conhecimento. Adoto uma corrente que não é aceita por todos aqui. Isso não me faz melhor nem pior, apenas pesquisadora da minha língua materna! Também encerro minhas discussões com vc neste caso! Kelly_cristina2008-11-25 16:59:47

  • #107327

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina] Isso não me faz melhor nem pior, apenas pesquisadora da minha língua materna!
    [/QUOTE]
    Which is…Gallego? Because Portuguese it definitely isn’t Dom Pedro2008-11-25 17:24:44

  • #107329

    Paulo
    Participant

    Dydy mo Cymraeg.

  • #108413

    Milenko
    Participant

    I have been several times in brasil and I don’t find portuguese to be too difficult to learn. Maybe it’s just me since I have a flare for languages. What I especially like in portuguese in difference in english is that portuguese can differentiate beetwen sexes for example amigo/amiga thus the same as my native language. In english languages this is not the case. Also I have a friend who is living and studying in Brazil and he told me, that written language is much more difficult to learn in contrast with spoken one. I couldn’t stay long enough there to found out if that was the case, as a tourist half year is all you can get.ptic2008-12-08 06:16:20

  • #108474

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=frank4000] often it would be easier for you as most european languages share a similiar root and structure.[/QUOTE]
    Frank, not really. Ptic’s native language (as well as mine which is similar to his) is from Slavonic family. It doesn’t share roots and structure neither with Latin nor with Germanic languages. I would say that since structurally our languages are much more complicated than Latin and Germanic, losing probably only to Fenno-Ugric (Finnish and Hungarian), so Portuguese and especially Spanish are fairly easy to learn. Also the native sounds are not that different, as in case of, let’s say, English.Dom Pedro2008-12-08 16:47:48

  • #108544

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=frank4000] the esatern european languages can be complex.

     

    how many languages do you speak?

    [/QUOTE]
    5(fluently)+4(can defend myself)

  • #108587

    Anonymous

    Frank – actually 3 is enough. Your native language, English, and language of the country where you live permanently. The rest is mostly useless and you can learn it if you want to do something hard and solitary – like icelandic or urdu.

  • #108609

    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=frank4000]often it would be easier for you as most european languages share a similiar root and structure.[/QUOTE] Apart from the Finno Ugric languages (which may link to Mongolian) and Basque (a mystery) European languages are all part of the Indo European group which includes Hindi Urdu, Farsi etc. and have similar grammatical structure. Languages such as Turkish and Arabic have completely different ways of expressing ideas in words. The Sino-Tibetan group use short sounds and tones to differentiate meaning. Some dialects of Cantonese have 12 different tones (Mandarin Chinese only has 4) and so the words Mai Chow in combination could theoretically have 144 different meanings depending on the tones.

  • #108642

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=frank4000] wow,

     

    are you a linguist ?

    [/QUOTE]
    It is common knowledge, I guess. Dom Pedro2008-12-09 13:26:05

  • #108644

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=cardi] [QUOTE=frank4000]often it would be easier for you as most european languages share a similiar root and structure.[/QUOTE]

     

    Apart from the Finno Ugric languages (which may link to Mongolian) and Basque (a mystery) European languages are all part of the Indo European group which includes Hindi Urdu, Farsi etc. and have similar grammatical structure.

    [/QUOTE]
    You’ve missed Albanian which is in the family of its own (although some place it in Indo-European group). Also the fact that all the European languages are part of Indo European group doesn’t mean structurally all languages are similar. It merely means that there are certain common roots, which can be sometimes traced.
    Like some of the eleven cases in Polish have equivalents in nine cases that Russian has or four cases of German. English in its turn has no cases at all, but since German does it sort of shows the historical proximity.
    Or certain roots like “wad” “mat” etc. Interesting field for linguists, nothing practical for those who have to speak the language. Dom Pedro2008-12-09 13:36:48

  • #108647

    lmaonade5
    Member

    [QUOTE=Dom Pedro] 4(can defend myself)[/QUOTE] What does that involve, exactly? LOL(One of mine is Japanese, which doesn’t have a lot of words to ‘xingar’. OuchUrusai just doesn’t do it very well.) Bahiana772008-12-09 13:43:51

  • #108655

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77] [QUOTE=Dom Pedro] 4(can defend myself)[/QUOTE]

     

    What does that involve, exactly? LOL

     

     

    (One of mine is Japanese, which doesn’t have a lot of words to ‘xingar’. Ouch¬†Urusai just doesn’t do it very well.)

    [/QUOTE]
    It involves being able to ask a way to a library at 2am and to say “and your mother too!”
    After 3 years in Qatar I curse very well in Urdu so we can exchange the knowledge
    Dom Pedro2008-12-09 15:20:01

  • #108659

    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Dom Pedro]

    Like some of the eleven cases in Polish have equivalents in nine cases that Russian has or four cases of German. English in its turn has no cases at all, but since German does it sort of shows the historical proximity.
    Or certain roots like “wad” “mat” etc. Interesting field for linguists, nothing practical for those who have to speak the language. [/QUOTE] The fact that these languages all can accept the concept of cases makes them similar. There is no place for ablatives and datives in Vietnamese or Korean. It is much easier to become fluent in a language of your ‘family’. Some languages such as Turkish and Malay allow easy familiarity with the basics of communication, Turkish for example has only one irregular noun so once you know the patterns you can substitute when you learn the word. One famous colonial scholar made the observation that ‘after one year speaking Malay (now Bahasa Malaysia) I thought I knew it all but now after 7 years I know I never will’.

  • #108662

    Anonymous

    Cardi – try Quechua. A language so clear and regular that it looks like it has been invented by someone.

  • #108702

    lmaonade5
    Member

    Quechua: Peru, south-western and central Bolivia, southern Colombia and Ecuador, north-western Argentina and northern Chile

  • #108716

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Oh boy..doubtlessly “sintaxe”, I’m on your side. Kelly you right “sintaxe” it’s really complicated but really necessary to speak good portuguese(just me), I mean good jobs,and of course not a necessary prerequisite for living day by day(survival)LOL[/QUOTE] Well, you dont need to say : oração subordinada adverbial, or adjetiva…blá blá blá…but this is good for organize better formal writtens , articles…all will depend on what kind of jod do you have. I dont like this specific part of grammarDeadBut I depend it all time!! I m a teacher!

  • #108781

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina]  But I depend it all time!! I m a teacher![/QUOTE]
    For the sake of your students, I hope it is not English you teach….Dom Pedro2008-12-10 13:54:48

  • #108811

    GOOP1966
    Member

    [QUOTE=Dom Pedro] [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina] But I depend it all time!! I m a teacher![/QUOTE]

    For the sake of your students, I hope it is not English you teach….[/QUOTE] No! Is not english.

  • #108855

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Língua Portuguesa for elementary schools and Comunicação e Expressão, Comunicação Empresarial e Metodologia Científica for universities. I’ve been teaching for 6 years. As I m young, I m 30, I have a lot to learn! Learning is a long process, continous! It is necessary years of experience and I m going to this direction!

  • #109087

    GOOP1966
    Member

    It is my carrer. I did Language, after that I had an opportunity to do master in the best university of Brasil. Then, I didnt stop, I m doing phd. But education is a bad area, I mean, a very bad carrer, specially with children! They have a bad behave, dont have goals, dont know what they are doing and for what! This generation is very ….how can I say this in english….there is a ….niilismo! lack of goals in life! The academy part is nice , I love studying. Bjs Kelly_cristina2008-12-14 07:10:13

  • #109090

    MarianaF
    Member

    Nossa, para mim é tudo/todo.
    When it comes to those two words I want to scream. I always tend to say tudo, but when I have to say todo, I get it wrong most of the time.

  • #109137

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]There are illiterate people (analfabeto, Thanks, Dunga. Bad habit.) in all populations. [/QUOTE] Yeah my birds tatto artist was one of them, he tattooed Watt on her back and when he asked me what I thought I said, “yeah it’s great but my name’s Matt” Clap

  • #109141

    Gringo go go
    Participant

    Watt?

  • #109233

    The guy tattooed a W instead of an M for Matt. I have no idea whether Watt is a Brazilian name or not but my assumption is that it isnt… I found pronunciation the most difficult aspect of portuguese, especially verbs ending – ria like gostaria(would like)

  • #109235

    Paulo
    Participant

    French people seem to have problems in Portuguese hearing the difference betweem pasta and apple and also between avocado and pineapple. This is likely due to their monotonal way of speaking.

  • #109237

    That is a right mofo, I think it goes like this: all the(masc. sin.) – todo o all the(fem. sin.) – toda a all the(masc. plur.) – todos os all the(fem. sin.) – todas as if it doesnt need the definite article like the infamous ‘all good’ then it’s tudo as in ‘tudo bem’! this may well be wrong!

  • #109239

    micko
    Member

    todois the adjective all … o dia todo – all day … todo mundo – everybody – all people …
    tudo
    is the pronouneverything … tudo bem? – everything well?
    but I have a hard time remembering in the heat of the moment …
    [QUOTE=nyc2008] I always tend to say tudo, but when I have to say todo, I get it wrong most of the time.[/QUOTE]I do too … I guess because we hear ‘tudo bem’ so much …
    Best Luck!!!
    DUNGA2008-12-15 16:59:45

  • #127354

    thrillbill
    Member

    Lol at the pissy linguistic contest. Can definitely tell who thinks they are part of the aristocracy here in Brazil.
    Like Americans, Brazilians ignore a lot of the stodgy rules handed down by their former colonizers. Both languages are becoming simpler as time goes on. American English is governed by usage, that is to say that if enough people use slang terms, then they go in the dictionary and become part of the ‘language’. I would say that Brazil is headed in the same direction.

  • #128622

    GOOP1966
    Member

    Ainda bem…eu odiaria falar como os portugueses ahaha sou muito mais a pronúncia nossa, brasileira ahahahah

  • #131453

    janelleyn60
    Member

    I also find european porutuguese pronunciation to be insufferable.

  • #131468

    815
    Member

    I mess up tinha/tive teve I don’t know why.
    Also to be in the past fui, era, estava. I use them at the wrong time every once and a while.
    The conjugation Nos is complicated because I use a gente as a crutch (It’s just like ela/ele….so easy!!!)
    And the masculine feminine thing gets me. I say seu when I need to say sua, meu/ minha etc.
    I also put o at the end of words that should end in a some times (and vice versa) and this cracks my wife up to no end.
    The “esse”, “asse” as in tivesses/falasse “na hora de falar” trips me up sometimes. (ie. Se eu fallase com ela…..Se ele tivesse o dinheiro…..pior…..Se eu tivesse ido……Forget about using this conjugation with Nos…… eta porra!!!!
    All in all I have strong Portuguese skills, I get accused of being from the south if I don’t have a long drawn out convesation (then I can’t hide my Gringo-ness!!!!) but I can always improve!!!

  • #131575

    Horia
    Member

    [QUOTE=Kelly_cristina] There is a song very famous here that says: Eu sei que vou te amar = coloquial [/QUOTE] Sorry for bumping old threads, but I love Alexandre Pires and Alcione’s duet version of this song Big%20smile.

  • #132678

    Tenzin
    Member

    Portuguese is a dificult language, it’s the most dificult latin language in Europe (if i may believe the info) beside Romenean language.

    i think the grammar and sintax is one of the hardest to learn. Portuguese isn’t like what you see is what you hear. exp: electrico is pronounced eletrico (without the c). I’m not sure but i think Brasileiros write eletrico, we however the european portugueses still write electrico (unless the rules are changed because i live in belgium)

  • #13543

    afforcini
    Member

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