Gringoes > Topics > Newbie… Surprised at negative responses to posts
Newbie… Surprised at negative responses to posts

Home Forums Hello! Newbie… Surprised at negative responses to posts

This topic contains 0 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  gringodr 4 years, 10 months ago.

  • Author
    Posts
  • #233162

    sejpokp130
    Member

    Hey all…
    Am new to gringoes and just wanted to say hi!
    Have to say reading through some of the threads I’m surprised at the amount of negativity in response to people moving to brazil
    I’m British married to Brazilian and have been going to brazil yearly since 2004, lived there for 6 months but been living in uk for past 5 years and going back to brazil this year.
    Ok so salaries are lower, lots of beaurocracy, things are more expensive but everyone’s forgetting the Brazilian spirit… What about the positives?! Brazil can have its faults but they have sun, beaches, booming economy, World Cup, Olympics, party central, positivity in every aspect of life!!!
    My husband and I have worked our butts off for 5 years and yeah we have a decent life, but no more enjoyment in the uk. The weather sucks, we work to pay bils and have no spare cash. My husband works for minimum wage and I’ve had salary freeze for past 3 years. Economy down the pan and the countrys stuck in a hole.
    So to be honest I’d rather be poor and in brazil than poor and in England. At least in brazil we can wake up to sunshine instead of rain, when life gets tough call round some friends get in some beers turn on some music and chillax. In brazil you may work harder for your salary but you party harder too! In my opinion and in my situation, brazil is better than staying here in England.
    So anyone thinking about moving to brazil and has been discouraged by some posts… Do it. You won regret it. Brazilian attitude to life is infectious!

  • #233163

    Wellington
    Member

    You can’t compare being poor in Brazil to being poor in the UK. I wish you well but coming from a mature welfare state to an emerging economony, with nothing more than a cheery smile on your face may not be sufficient. Do you have savings or jobs lined-up or any means of support? If you think you can live on minimum salary in the UK and be comfortable but unhappy, I would agree, but the same can’t be said for a similar lifestyle here. And the added problem is that you have lived all your life in the welfare state so you will know what you are missing. My wife doesn’t miss it as she never knew it!man of leisure2013-01-17 16:59:52

  • #233167

    sejpokp130
    Member

    I get what you’re saying but the welfare state isn’t all its cracked up to be and doesn’t always benefit those who need it. Living costs go up, benefits go down and/or taken away from those who need it and salaries go down. Public funds are pushed to the limit, growth is slow and insolvency rises. I’m not saying living on minimum wage in Brazil is easy by any means as I know it’s not, we’ve been there, but Brazil is changing for the better in many aspects – not all of course whereas Europe continues to fall. Granted, in my situation speaking fluent Portuguese makes a huge difference in terms of employment options and general day to day life. I suppose everyones different so it depends on what makes you happy.

  • #233168

    Wellington
    Member

    If you don’t rely on schools and hospitals, you may not be too bad off, but once you need those, and if you don’t have access to the private sector, you’ll really start to think on what you left behind.

  • #233172

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    With all duerespect [sincerely] you are in no position to commend Brazil to anyone. I saythis because of your background experience and your obvious susceptibility tothe stereotypical Brazilian hype: “sun,beaches, booming economy, World Cup, Olympics, party central, positivity inevery aspect of life!!!” The fact that the economy no longer booms has escapedyour attention and the future sporting events you mention will have littlematerial value to the population in general but will have dire financialimplications for the country. Inflation is already rampant and it won’t be muchlonger before Brazil and Brazilians will awake to the inevitable hangover.

    Anyone aspiring to an IQ reaching three digits would tell you thatBrazil can be a wonderful place if you have money and it is obvious from whatyou say that, unfortunately, you are not in this category. I can fullyappreciate your feelings, particularly at this time of year in the UK’s winter,however there are more kinds of winter than those inflicted by weather.

    In passing I would add that the only aspect about Brazilian lifethat is infectious is the one thing you mention: when things get tough, getsome beers and turn on the music. It should read: when things get tough, thetough get going and out of the third world attitude that will forever makeBrazil a country of the future.

  • #233173

    @OP -This is what you are looking at for an average day as a middle class (not even lower class) resident of Rio de Janeiro (where it is DEFINITELY not always sunny)
    500am – Get up, either with the sun in summer or before the sun in winter. Try to straighten your house up a bit. Iron your clothes for work (while this may sound simple – remember, you are middle class, which means you have to wear a uniform of which your employer only give you 1-2. That means you must wash your clothes at least every other night and hang them dry. With the rain and humidity, they will not dry and while the spin cycle on your washer will help (if you have the luxury of owning one)it will also leave your clothes quite wrinkled. Therefore, you will spend forever ironing your clothes and your husbands clothes (which, by custom, will also be your chore. If you don`t do it, he will go to work wrinkled and his co-workers will comment to him on how lazy YOU are for letting him look like that. They will also tell their wives who will give you s*it 6 months later at the company BBQ for that, even if you iron every other day.) until they are dry enough to wear without cringing.
    530am – Youve finished ironing and are trying to make coffee by boiling water in a pot and pouring through a little net, mix your kid milk, and then chocolate milk by hand and cook grilled cheese for your kid and husband to eat for breakfast. Electric kitchen appliances like coffee pots and toasters are for `the rich` and your neighbors will give you crap for using them. Plus, when they break, they will be too expensive to replace on your middle class budget. Cereal is also a relative luxury and gross with powdered milk, hence the grilled cheese.
    600 – Now you are rushed as you quickly shower and work to straigthen your hair, do up your make-up and make sure your nail polish is not chipped. At lower level jobs anything other than super-dolled up is not exceptable and could cost you your job.
    615 – Lug your kid to a family member`s house down the street. Public school and cheap private schools are generally only half day. He will study 7-11 and you will need to find someone to watch him (for free) for the other 8-9hours per day you are not home because your budget wont cover anything better.
    630 begin the 5-15minute walk to the bus stop and be prepared to wait. Walk as many points back as you can and pray that you can get a seat through some miracle. Find a long line when you get to the stop.
    645-Just when you are getting nervous, the bus finally shows up. Even if it is the FIRST stop, it will be full (as people take the bus up to 40min in the other direction to try for a seat). You will curse as you realize that you have to stand in your heals (mandatory dress code at most jobs) for the next two hours, but you have no choice. Even if you can afford to have a car in your garage, you won`t be able to park near your low wage job.
    850-910-Finally get to the stop near your job, if there is no traffic. Walk the 10min to the office. If you get there early, be prepared to sit/stand outside as they wont let you in early for fear that you`ll say you started working early and go after them for over time.
    At 857 they will open the door for you and your co-workers to go in. You can not scan your fingerprint more than 2minutes before your shift, if you scan it more than 4 minutes late, they will give you a warning.
    Either pretend to work or do ALL of the work for your co-workers who refuse to do more than pretend for the next 4 hours. Be treated like crap because it appears that everyone in a uniform deserves to be treated like crap, especially by other people who usually where uniforms but have the luck to have that day off.
    12pm- 3pm wait to be told to go to lunch. At many companies, it can happen whenever they feel like it.
    Get order on your 1 hour break. You must leave the office and go on the mission of trying to find someplace to eat with the R$10-15 your employer gives you on a card, making full note that the average lunch in Rio is R$26. If you are lucky, your job will have a backroom with a microwave so that you can bring in food in an icecream pot and eat it. If not, you will likely chase down someone who sells rice, beans and mystery meat inside a flimsy tinfoil container out of a shopping card or styrofoam cooler.
    Note- In order to buy the flimsy tinfoil, you must sell your food card on an monthly basis 10-15% discount in centro.
    After EXACTLY 1 hour (no more, no less) you may return to either pretending, or killing yourself. You realize that there are no bonuses for merit but you feel like crap pretending when there is work to be done, so you exhaust yourself while everyone laughs at you behind your back.
    Since the hour lunch is not counted in your work time, you are allowed to punch out at exactly 6pm – unless any strange thing happened- then you will be ordered to stay overtime until it is resolved.
    615 You arrive at the bustop, dead tired.
    630 You finally find a bus that is empty enough to cram yourself into. Even though you are still on your healed feet, you are thankful for atleast that.
    730, You find yourself still on the perimetral, playing with facebook on your cell and cursing traffic. You look out the window at the beach and realize its been a year since youve been there and that your kid doesnt even know how to swin. You wonder if he ever will.
    815-830 You finally get to your bus stop, and drag yourself down the dirty streets to your house, avoid the bags of trash people have left out for the trash truck that have, invetiably, had their contents sprawled all over the sidewalk by stray dogs. Think of the COMLURB guys, literally sweeping up poop, and thank God that at least you don`t have to do that.
    840- Finally arrive home to find your kid, sitting there alone, entertaining himself with the tv. Head straight for the shower to try to get the street grime off as the air always feels dirty here. Then, fry up some nuggets and fries because they are among the few things you can afford and you dont have the time or energy to cook anything more complex.
    910-Collapse infront of the novela das 8 (which comes on an hour late…go figure). You are too tired to think, so the mindless drivel seems appropriate. You have no money for cable (unless you have a gato), so you really don`t have much of a choice.
    Let your kid do whatever he wants and put himself to bed. You can barely stand, let alone chase him around.
    At 1030, try to get some energy, knowning that mold and mice and spiders appear quickly here. Put your clothes in the washer. Fight exhaustion for the next hour, knowing you NEED to hang them tonight, or you are screwed for tomorrow. While you wait, drink the cheap beer to calm your nerves enough for you to actually sleep and not just slouch and stare.
    1200-Fall into bed. In 5 hours, it`ll all start again.
    This is the routine. For most service jobs in Rio, you work 6 days on, 2 days off so you barely ever have weekends off or the same days off as your husband. On your days off, which are random week days, you go to the bar or the mall, which gives the illusion that people go afterwork and have free time. In reality, most of those people are trying to make use of the little free time they have on their day off (after sleeping until noon, cleaning the house, spending hours at line at the bank and grocery store and getting the mandatory weekly manicure.)
    You dont drink and smoke and party here because you are happy (at least not if you are in the middle or lower classes). You do it because otherwise the stress will kill you and you need to try to do something to convince yourself that life doesnt just totally suck.
    I guess you have a month of holidays, which is more than in the US, but low-income earners are expected by most bosses to `sell` at least half of them back. Since normal days off are counted in your vaca time, in reality you only have as much time off as an American with 10days (although Brazilians will brag about how great their vaca pans are, they, along with feriados and feriadoes are really only good for the upper-middle and middle class with administrative jobs that give them the time…instead of a puny bonus for the day).
    The `Brazilian attitude` may be infectious. But the lower and lower-middle class lifestyle, at least in Rio, is not one I would recommend to anyone.
    The sun, beach, sports, etc are for the rich. Life here, for the majority, means constant hard work and sacrifice.nikkij121852013-01-17 18:21:03

  • #233174

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]So anyone thinking about moving to brazil and has been discouraged by some posts… Do it. You won regret it. Brazilian attitude to life is infectious![/QUOTE]
    I’ve lived in Brazil for over twenty years. I have a comfortable life here and enjoy myself. But I never encourage anyone willy-nilly to move here. When asked about it I tell people, “It’s not for everyone,” which I believe is the truth.
    You, on the other hand, by your own admission, don’t live here in Brazil. Yet you encourage people to move here. That’s crazy!!!

  • #233175

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    @ nikkij12185 РWow! That’s one hell of a post and a vividdescription of hell on earth. ClapClapClap

  • #233178

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    @ nikkij12185 Р>Wow! That’s one hell of a post and a vivid
    description of hell on earth. ClapClapClap</span>[/QUOTE]
    Nice wake up call!
    Yes for most of the middle and lower class, Brazil is a lethargic garbage pit. Hence the plentitude of 30 reais GPs.GreatBallsoFire2013-01-17 19:01:36

  • #233182

    Cici
    Member

    @nikkij12185……………………RESPECT!

  • #233183

    ClaudePeebles
    Participant

    We also have a very comfortable and enjoyable life after living in Brazil for over 10 years, however I’m on a full expat contract with everything paid including rent, utilities, car, gas etc, plus we’re tax free apart from a nominal equalization payment, literally all I need to pay for is food on the days we don’t have company meals.
    We have a large house in a safe area with two staff, however it stops there…we have a few young friends who live a life exactly as Nikki describes and she’s right, it’s a miserable existence for middle and lower class (as GBoF also states) with no end in sight.
    On the other side of the coin, I’ve learnt to live with the corruption, lies, inequality, incompetence, crime & horrendous traffic jams in Rio but our lifestyle is becoming less of a compensation for this and are we’re looking forward to leaving Brazil for another assignment.
    Like others, I would never recommend anybody move here permanently unless financially very well secure and you’re prepared to tolerate the mentality of Brazil, however it’s still a wonderful place for a vacation.

  • #233188

    Like the others, I am WOW’d by Nikki’s post! It should be the next episode of “Brazil Through Foreign Eyes”, published on the homepage of this site!

  • #233194

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    1

  • #233226

    Anonymous

    You got that really straight Nikki.
    I experienced that for a long time. The differences were:
    1 – Small cities, that 1 hour lunch seems to be much more.
    2 – Don’t have to wake up too early.
    3 – The distances between your house and work are very reduced.
    But anyways, even with those differences I know exactly how you feel. And I agree 100% with what you and Jacare wrote.
    Wagner2013-01-17 23:10:24

  • #233243

    Anonymous

    Wow. Nikki, mad props.
    to the OP, I would add: from outside, compared to my situation in the US, it attracted me too. It is, on the whole, a great move that I made, but I made it to reach a very specific goal, not because I loved the place in general.
    Brazil is full of contradictions, and for a myriad of reasons, all of which we love to b*tch about on this forum [because it’s the only safe place many of us living here in BR have]. For example, what did I just hear about yesterday? This study, showing Cariocas are the nicest people in the world. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/3002308.stm That is, when they’re not stealing your stuff, carjacking you, shooting schoolchildren, or anything else.
    I like life here, but it’s not simple. And honestly, I’ve been here long enough to see plenty of people lose their enthusiasm under sad circumstances.
    meant kindly.

  • #233248

    hansomehyena
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2] Like others, I would never recommend anybody move here permanently unless financially very well secure and you’re prepared to tolerate the mentality of Brazil, however it’s still a wonderful place for a vacation.
    [/QUOTE]
    That surely is a clear cut statement. Liked it.
    Problem is, from the outside: what does “financially very well secure” mean, for a couple in the (very) early 40s, with a little kid (planning to move to PR or SC)? 5k reais a month?

  • #233249

    815
    Member

    @nikkij12185
    Props for that post! I laughed my butt off about the uniform comment. The school I am an administrator at wants me to wear a polo shirt with the school insignia on it. We are in the interior of São Paulo where it is hotter than the furnace room in Hades! …..they gave me one shirt!!!!
    I have an itching suspicion that being poor in England is better than middle class in Brazil. The OP spoke of “living to pay bills” in England. She’s a fool if she thinks that is not the case for the middle here in Brazil sans return whatsoever!
    I’m not saying life is total crap here. It’s what you make of it. But those rose colored glasses will get real foggy real quick in the Brazilian heat and humidity.
    Good luck whatever you decide OP. Paulistano USA2013-01-18 06:48:46

  • #233250

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]

    With all duerespect [sincerely] you are in no position to commend Brazil to anyone. I saythis because of your background experience and your obvious susceptibility tothe stereotypical Brazilian hype: “sun,beaches, booming economy,World Cup, Olympics, party central, positivity inevery aspect of life!!!” The fact that the economy no longer booms has escapedyour attention and the future sporting events you mention will have littlematerial value to the population in general but will have dire financialimplications for the country. Inflation is already rampant and it won’t be muchlonger before Brazil and Brazilians will awake to the inevitable hangover.

    Anyone aspiring to an IQ reaching three digits would tell you thatBrazil can be a wonderful place if you have money and it is obvious from whatyou say that, unfortunately, you are not in this category. I can fullyappreciate your feelings, particularly at this time of year in the UK’s winter,however there are more kinds of winter than those inflicted by weather.

    In passing I would add that the only aspect about Brazilian lifethat is infectious is the one thing you mention: when things get tough, getsome beers and turn on the music. It should read: when things get tough, thetough get going and out of the third world attitude that will forever makeBrazil a country of the future.

    [/QUOTE]
    There are two things being substantially exaggerated in this world: The economic “crisis” in Europe and economic success of Brazil.
    During the peak of the so called crisis in Europe I landed there two well-paid jobs in multinational companies without trying hard.
    I’ve been here for 3 years, still making one third of that I was making there .
    Low unemployment in Brazil exists only because of the policy of overemploying people while giving them low salaries. E.g. an office in Brazil that employs 15 people would employ only 5 in Europe and 3 in the US.
    Yes, the weather is good, the beaches are great, but it is tough here.
    WENGER2013-01-18 12:01:15

  • #233253

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]@OP -This is what you are looking at for an average day as a middle class (not even lower class) resident of Rio de Janeiro (where it is DEFINITELY not always sunny)
    500am – Get up, either with the sun in summer or before the sun in winter. Try to straighten your house up a bit. Iron your clothes for work (while this may sound simple – remember, you are middle class, which means you have to wear a uniform of which your employer only give you 1-2. That means you must wash your clothes at least every other night and hang them dry. With the rain and humidity, they will not dry and while the spin cycle on your washer will help (if you have the luxury of owning one)it will also leave your clothes quite wrinkled. Therefore, you will spend forever ironing your clothes and your husbands clothes (which, by custom, will also be your chore. If you don`t do it, he will go to work wrinkled and his co-workers will comment to him on how lazy YOU are for letting him look like that. They will also tell their wives who will give you s*it 6 months later at the company BBQ for that, even if you iron every other day.) until they are dry enough to wear without cringing.
    530am – Youve finished ironing and are trying to make coffee by boiling water in a pot and pouring through a little net, mix your kid milk, and then chocolate milk by hand and cook grilled cheese for your kid and husband to eat for breakfast. Electric kitchen appliances like coffee pots and toasters are for `the rich` and your neighbors will give you crap for using them. Plus, when they break, they will be too expensive to replace on your middle class budget. Cereal is also a relative luxury and gross with powdered milk, hence the grilled cheese.
    600 – Now you are rushed as you quickly shower and work to straigthen your hair, do up your make-up and make sure your nail polish is not chipped. At lower level jobs anything other than super-dolled up is not exceptable and could cost you your job.
    615 – Lug your kid to a family member`s house down the street. Public school and cheap private schools are generally only half day. He will study 7-11 and you will need to find someone to watch him (for free) for the other 8-9hours per day you are not home because your budget wont cover anything better.
    630 begin the 5-15minute walk to the bus stop and be prepared to wait. Walk as many points back as you can and pray that you can get a seat through some miracle. Find a long line when you get to the stop.
    645-Just when you are getting nervous, the bus finally shows up. Even if it is the FIRST stop, it will be full (as people take the bus up to 40min in the other direction to try for a seat). You will curse as you realize that you have to stand in your heals (mandatory dress code at most jobs) for the next two hours, but you have no choice. Even if you can afford to have a car in your garage, you won`t be able to park near your low wage job.
    850-910-Finally get to the stop near your job, if there is no traffic. Walk the 10min to the office. If you get there early, be prepared to sit/stand outside as they wont let you in early for fear that you`ll say you started working early and go after them for over time.
    At 857 they will open the door for you and your co-workers to go in. You can not scan your fingerprint more than 2minutes before your shift, if you scan it more than 4 minutes late, they will give you a warning.
    Either pretend to work or do ALL of the work for your co-workers who refuse to do more than pretend for the next 4 hours. Be treated like crap because it appears that everyone in a uniform deserves to be treated like crap, especially by other people who usually where uniforms but have the luck to have that day off.
    12pm- 3pm wait to be told to go to lunch. At many companies, it can happen whenever they feel like it.
    Get order on your 1 hour break. You must leave the office and go on the mission of trying to find someplace to eat with the R$10-15 your employer gives you on a card, making full note that the average lunch in Rio is R$26. If you are lucky, your job will have a backroom with a microwave so that you can bring in food in an icecream pot and eat it. If not, you will likely chase down someone who sells rice, beans and mystery meat inside a flimsy tinfoil container out of a shopping card or styrofoam cooler.
    Note- In order to buy the flimsy tinfoil, you must sell your food card on an monthly basis 10-15% discount in centro.
    After EXACTLY 1 hour (no more, no less) you may return to either pretending, or killing yourself. You realize that there are no bonuses for merit but you feel like crap pretending when there is work to be done, so you exhaust yourself while everyone laughs at you behind your back.
    Since the hour lunch is not counted in your work time, you are allowed to punch out at exactly 6pm – unless any strange thing happened- then you will be ordered to stay overtime until it is resolved.
    615 You arrive at the bustop, dead tired.
    630 You finally find a bus that is empty enough to cram yourself into. Even though you are still on your healed feet, you are thankful for atleast that.
    730, You find yourself still on the perimetral, playing with facebook on your cell and cursing traffic. You look out the window at the beach and realize its been a year since youve been there and that your kid doesnt even know how to swin. You wonder if he ever will.
    815-830 You finally get to your bus stop, and drag yourself down the dirty streets to your house, avoid the bags of trash people have left out for the trash truck that have, invetiably, had their contents sprawled all over the sidewalk by stray dogs. Think of the COMLURB guys, literally sweeping up poop, and thank God that at least you don`t have to do that.
    840- Finally arrive home to find your kid, sitting there alone, entertaining himself with the tv. Head straight for the shower to try to get the street grime off as the air always feels dirty here. Then, fry up some nuggets and fries because they are among the few things you can afford and you dont have the time or energy to cook anything more complex.
    910-Collapse infront of the novela das 8 (which comes on an hour late…go figure). You are too tired to think, so the mindless drivel seems appropriate. You have no money for cable (unless you have a gato), so you really don`t have much of a choice.
    Let your kid do whatever he wants and put himself to bed. You can barely stand, let alone chase him around.
    At 1030, try to get some energy, knowning that mold and mice and spiders appear quickly here. Put your clothes in the washer. Fight exhaustion for the next hour, knowing you NEED to hang them tonight, or you are screwed for tomorrow. While you wait, drink the cheap beer to calm your nerves enough for you to actually sleep and not just slouch and stare.
    1200-Fall into bed. In 5 hours, it`ll all start again.
    This is the routine. For most service jobs in Rio, you work 6 days on, 2 days off so you barely ever have weekends off or the same days off as your husband. On your days off, which are random week days, you go to the bar or the mall, which gives the illusion that people go afterwork and have free time. In reality, most of those people are trying to make use of the little free time they have on their day off (after sleeping until noon, cleaning the house, spending hours at line at the bank and grocery store and getting the mandatory weekly manicure.)
    You dont drink and smoke and party here because you are happy (at least not if you are in the middle or lower classes). You do it because otherwise the stress will kill you and you need to try to do something to convince yourself that life doesnt just totally suck.
    I guess you have a month of holidays, which is more than in the US, but low-income earners are expected by most bosses to `sell` at least half of them back. Since normal days off are counted in your vaca time, in reality you only have as much time off as an American with 10days (although Brazilians will brag about how great their vaca pans are, they, along with feriados and feriadoes are really only good for the upper-middle and middle class with administrative jobs that give them the time…instead of a puny bonus for the day).
    The `Brazilian attitude` may be infectious. But the lower and lower-middle class lifestyle, at least in Rio, is not one I would recommend to anyone.
    The sun, beach, sports, etc are for the rich. Life here, for the majority, means constant hard work and sacrifice.[/QUOTE]
    What the hellAngry
    I get up at 8:00, go to work at 8:55, starts work at 9:00. Rented apartment on the same street where I work.
    I am not rich, but enjoy the beach every Saturday (although it takes me 1 hour to get there )
    Women here are beautiful and the sun is shining most of the days
    WENGER2013-01-18 07:14:13

  • #233259

    NYesq
    Member

    First, Nikki…me too.. wow. I am hoping there is a way to keep your post from getting lost in the myriad of posts.
    OP. Yes, there is a lot of venting and complaining on here but it is healthy and important for people to do in order to release the tension from daily frustration, disappointment, the feeling of being alone, you against the world and the lack of means to do anything about certain situations you may (or may not) find yourself in. Most likely may.
    One can’t go to the neighbors, family or friends to complain. It’s rarely understood and sympathized with, so we come here. One day you may be as happy as a pig in …. and the next ready to sacrifice everything and just get out. It is not a hate forum..more like group therapy for when you feel like a complete outsider, as well as a useful tool for information.
    Whether you come to Brazil with money or not a cent in your pocket, life is not easy. It can take it’s toll.
    As far as the Brasilan attitude being infectious. Of course it is and that is not always a good thing for everyone. The apathy towards politics, the lack of need for intellectual growth, the isolation from world culture, the blind nationalism, the indifference to social problems and advancement, the fear of being different, the resistance to change, the tendency to turn to alcohol for any occasion. It is not compatible to my view of the world.
    Regardless. I sincerely wish you the best.
    Rob Allen2013-01-18 07:31:02

  • #233261

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz] lived there for 6 months
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s not living, it’s an extended vacation.
    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]
    Brazil can have its faults but they have (…) World Cup, Olympics,
    [/QUOTE]
    What’s good about the world cup and olimpics, unless of course you are a politician or you own a building company.
    They are actually destroying historic buildings to make way for parking lots that will never be used after the world cup.
    Stadiums built for the Pan American games are being torn down to make way for bigger stadiums.
    When the olimpics are over, most will never be used again.
    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]
    we work to pay bils and have no spare cash. My husband works for minimum wage and I’ve had salary freeze for past 3 years.[/QUOTE]
    So Brazil is some kind of Heaven?
    In Brazil you will have to work twice as hard to pay your bills. Spare cash, forget it.
    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]
    So to be honest I’d rather be poor and in brazil than poor and in England. [/QUOTE]
    You have no idea what it is to be poor in Brazil.
    Minimum wage in the UK (about 1000 gbp) is 5 times minimum wage here.
    This is what minimum wage gets you in Brazil

    against minimum wage in the UK:

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]At least in brazil we can wake up to sunshine instead of rain, when life gets tough call round some friends get in some beers turn on some music and chillax. [/QUOTE]
    Sure, when you’re here with your UK minimum wage, Beer now costs R$ 1.59 and is getting darn expensive. Next year, with the world cup, I wouldn’t be suprised to see Antartica Lata for R$ 1,99 in the supermarket.
    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]In brazil you may work harder for your salary but you party harder too! [/QUOTE]
    Yes, to forget about your povery
    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]In my opinion and in my situation, brazil is better than staying here in England.
    (…)You won regret it. [/QUOTE]
    I see some regretting comming up…
    [QUOTE=Esprit] Anyone aspiring to an IQ reaching three digits would tell you that
    Brazil can be a wonderful place if you have money and it is obvious from what
    you say that, unfortunately, you are not in this category. [/QUOTE]

    well said as ever

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    This is the routine. For most service jobs in Rio, you work 6 days on, 2 days off so you barely ever have weekends off or the same days off as your husband. [/QUOTE]
    Sounds about right for most people making between 622 and 2.5K
    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    You do it because otherwise the stress will kill you and you need to try to do something to convince yourself that life doesnt just totally suck.
    [/QUOTE]
    Mos people I know in that situation don’t drink and smoke because they simply can’t pay for it.
    Usually they come to my house in the hope to find beer…
    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    I guess you have a month of holidays, which is more than in the US, but low-income earners are expected by most bosses to `sell` at least half of them back. [/QUOTE]
    My brother in law is an engineer with Light, his idea of a great holiday is spend 30 days at home (he doesn’t sell his holidays) as he has no money to travel with his wife and 2 kids & mortgage.
    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    The `Brazilian attitude` may be infectious. But the lower and lower-middle class lifestyle, at least in Rio, is not one I would recommend to anyone.
    The sun, beach, sports, etc are for the rich. Life here, for the majority, means constant hard work and sacrifice.[/QUOTE]
    So true.sven2013-01-18 07:50:14

  • #233295

    ejboyd
    Member

    This thread should be sticky and nikki’s post highlighted! hehe!
    Although I only stayed 4 months in Brazil, what nikki said on her post is exactly what I noticed too, that everyday routine.. And since I don’t travel alone, I also had to wait for the weekend and for my friends to get off their work everyday for us to go out – eat at a restaurant, or go travel elsewhere.
    [QUOTE=Terry_2]
    Like others, I would never recommend anybody move here permanently unless financially very well secure and you’re prepared to tolerate the mentality of Brazil, however it’s still a wonderful place for a vacation.
    [/QUOTE]
    [QUOTE=Rob Allen]
    As far as the Brasilan attitude being infectious. Of course it is and that is not always a good thing for everyone. The apathy towards politics, the lack of need for intellectual growth, the isolation from world culture, the blind nationalism, the indifference to social problems and advancement, the fear of being different, the resistance to change, the tendency to turn to alcohol for any occasion. It is not compatible to my view of the world.
    [/QUOTE]
    I couldn’t agree more to what both of you said!

  • #233297

    pmcalif
    Member

    ‚ÄúIt’s disgusting in Brazil. It’s nothing you’d like. Tropical weather, beautiful women. It wouldn’t be good for you. I’ll send you a postcard.‚Äù
    Chael Sonnen

  • #233312

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=WENGER]‚ÄúIt’s disgusting in Brazil. It’s nothing you’d like. Tropical weather, beautiful women. It wouldn’t be good for you. I’ll send you a postcard.‚Äù
    Chael Sonnen
    [/QUOTE]

    Dunce.
  • #233318

    pmcalif
    Member

    “A win is a bi-product of a lifetime of hard work.”
    Chael Sonnen

  • #233328

    Anonymous

    This is one of the most realistic and non-venting threads about life in Brazil that I’ve ever seen on this forum. (props to the contributors, esp. nikkij) It should definitely be referenced by anyone thinking of moving to Brazil. Some of us here have come to some sort of a balance (perhaps unknown as yet for the short or longer term) with the conditions, both difficult and pleasurable, that we live in daily, but even of those with a positive outlook and/or the strongest reasons for being here, few would say it was easy (as easy as “at home”) or overwhelmingly upbeat and positive, particularly with limited funds.

  • #233354

    cantak
    Member

    One of the biggest mistakes I made was to have a girlfriend with kids. Its worst place to have kids. Worst when the kids are ill-mannered their grandmother can’t even stand them. I used pay R$300 bucks for daycare of the little boy. He stays there till six while mother f**king earns R$650. If you earn 650 bucks and have to transport to work etc. Why then are you working? I guess thats why the girls are always gringo searching. I didn’t know it will become a burden so heavy. And to shove it off is another drama. I still live poor spending an average of 4 to 5k monthly. Or just feel I’m not getting value for my money.
    Common home utilities are expensive double the price you will pay in any part of the world. By the way I need edit my username. Is that even possible. It was a misspell of ‘virtualist’
    virtalist20002013-01-18 15:00:16

  • #233356

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [QUOTE=virtalist2000]By the way I need edit my username. Is that even possible. It was a misspell of ‘virtualist'[/QUOTE]
    I don’t think you can. Just resister another profile … spell it right this time … har har
    Sorry you feel pressure money wise …

  • #233365

    Finrudd
    Participant

    @nikkij12185 – great post. This needs to be on the main webpage, under Brazil through Foreign Eyes. Someone has to say it like it is for so many people living here.

  • #233380

    sejpokp130
    Member

    With all due respect if that’s what you all think of Brazilian life… Quite frankly why would any of you live/want to live there?

  • #233386

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]With all due respect if that’s what you all think of Brazilian life… Quite frankly why would any of you live/want to live there?[/QUOTE]
    Forewarned, why would you move here?

  • #233390

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]With all due respect if that’s what you all think of Brazilian life… Quite frankly why would any of you live/want to live there?[/QUOTE]

    Coincidentally,today a new thread was started asking that very same question: Why are weall here?

  • #233393

    Wellington
    Member

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz] With all due respect if that’s what you all think of Brazilian life… Quite frankly why would any of you live/want to live there?[/QUOTE]
    Because not everyone is strapped for cash! If you can afford the upper end of the middle-class lifestyle here, it’s, within some limitations, not a bad place. But it comes at a very high price.

  • #233454

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=man of leisure] [QUOTE=Claieelizz] With all due respect if that’s what you all think of Brazilian life… Quite frankly why would any of you live/want to live there?[/QUOTE]
    Because not everyone is strapped for cash! If you can afford the upper end of the middle-class lifestyle here, it’s, within some limitations, not a bad place. But it comes at a very high price. [/QUOTE]
    That about sums it up.
    If I’d have to live on 5k or less I’d to back in a jiffy. Anything less than 7k and you spend your vacation at home.
    10 years ago, 5K was worth more than 10k now. Life is becoming more and more difficult in Brazil.

  • #233478

    Anonymous

    Would it be safe to say that with R$10K a month a newcomer to Brazil (like the OP) will be able to enjoy the lifestyle and the country?
    At current exchange rates that is $5K USD. That is not everyone’s budget, of course, but it is certainly within reach for lots of foreigners.
    Especially with prior investments, nest eggs or an international job which doesn’t depend on Brazilian pay scales.
    Or would more money be needed?

  • #233482

    brazil2010
    Member

    What a croc of sh*t you are all talking. I’m with Claieelizz (interesting we are both British – what does this mean? Uk is crap?). This forum is full of jaded old expats who are not earning enough to enjoy their life.
    Exaample: Some idealistic 18 year old comes on and says “should I go to Brazil?” and everyone says “NO- stay at home or you will die”. Idiots.
    Every country has its good and bad sides. Any fool knows that.
    Objections answered:
    1. You have to have a lot of money to enjoy living in Brazil
    Response – yeah, like every other country in the world. What you really mean is “It’s not as cheap here now as when i arrived 10 years ago, and now I have kids and am no longer single.” Also – I don’t know if you noticed, but Brazil is full of people with very low level wages/living conditions having a WHALE OF A TIME. Sex, beach, sun, bbq, friendship, nature, religion, laughter – these are all simple pleasures that 99% of the population can afford.
    Besides, like some people have already said, we aren’t all poor – if you can move to Brazil and maintain your home income you will be doing significantly better than most Brazilians.
    2. Brazilians are not interested in intellectually “improving” themselves or “culture”
    Response – rubbish. They are just not interested in the kind of pseudo intellectual crap you are in to. This objection to Brazil is entirely relative to the superficial engagement with actual Brazilian culture. Guess what – Globo is not indicative of the entire Brazilian population!
    3. “I have lived here for a long time and no longer enjoy it”.
    Response – ok, go home. Or get a job where you get to travel outside of Brazil every few months.
    4. I don’t like Brazilians for reason X (eg. the women/men are too jealous/credulous/corrupt/oversexed etc.)
    Response – this objection is so pathetic it’s unreal. You travel to another country and find out that the people are not like they are in your own country, get over it. Go to a boteco and make some new friends. Alternatively travel to other countries and slowly realise that Brazilians, for all their faults, are much easier to be with than at least 50% of all the other people in the world (ever been to Russia?).
    5. The politicians are corrupt and there is too much bureaucracy
    Response – this is true, but many of us, like most Brazilians, find a way (“jetinho”) to get round this. You are unlikely to change Brazilian politics – just get around it. As a foreigner you actually have better resources to do so than most Brazilians.
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches
    2. Nice people
    3. Lots of space
    4. Nature
    5. Nice Food
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe
    7. Sunshine
    8. Great music
    9. Interesting history
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world.
    BTW – “better to be poor in UK than Brazil” – not always true actually. I have lived with poor Brazilians and poor British so I think my judgement is objective.

  • #233486

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=jamest]What a croc of sh*t you are all talking. I’m with Claieelizz (interesting we are both British – what does this mean? Uk is crap?). This forum is full of jaded old expats who are not earning enough to enjoy their life.
    Exaample: Some idealistic 18 year old comes on and says “should I go to Brazil?” and everyone says “NO- stay at home or you will die”. Idiots.
    Every country has its good and bad sides. Any fool knows that.
    Objections answered:
    1. You have to have a lot of money to enjoy living in Brazil
    Response – yeah, like every other country in the world. What you really mean is “It’s not as cheap here now as when i arrived 10 years ago, and now I have kids and am no longer single.” Also – I don’t know if you noticed, but Brazil is full of people with very low level wages/living conditions having a WHALE OF A TIME. Sex, beach, sun, bbq, friendship, nature, religion, laughter – these are all simple pleasures that 99% of the population can afford.
    Besides, like some people have already said, we aren’t all poor – if you can move to Brazil and maintain your home income you will be doing significantly better than most Brazilians.
    2. Brazilians are not interested in intellectually “improving” themselves or “culture”
    Response – rubbish. They are just not interested in the kind of pseudo intellectual crap you are in to. This objection to Brazil is entirely relative to the superficial engagement with actual Brazilian culture. Guess what – Globo is not indicative of the entire Brazilian population!
    3. “I have lived here for a long time and no longer enjoy it”.
    Response – ok, go home. Or get a job where you get to travel outside of Brazil every few months.
    4. I don’t like Brazilians for reason X (eg. the women/men are too jealous/credulous/corrupt/oversexed etc.)
    Response – this objection is so pathetic it’s unreal. You travel to another country and find out that the people are not like they are in your own country, get over it. Go to a boteco and make some new friends. Alternatively travel to other countries and slowly realise that Brazilians, for all their faults, are much easier to be with than at least 50% of all the other people in the world (ever been to Russia?).
    5. The politicians are corrupt and there is too much bureaucracy
    Response – this is true, but many of us, like most Brazilians, find a way (“jetinho”) to get round this. You are unlikely to change Brazilian politics – just get around it. As a foreigner you actually have better resources to do so than most Brazilians.
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches
    2. Nice people
    3. Lots of space
    4. Nature
    5. Nice Food
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe
    7. Sunshine
    8. Great music
    9. Interesting history
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world.
    BTW – “better to be poor in UK than Brazil” – not always true actually. I have lived with poor Brazilians and poor British so I think my judgement is objective. [/QUOTE]

    Theobjections you have answered:

    1. You agree that it is essential to have to have a lot ofmoney to enjoy life in Brazil.

    2. You agree that Brazilians are not interested in culturesother than their own.

    3. You agree that ex-pats should regularly travel outsideBrazil to preserve their ‘perspective’.

    4. You agree that Brazilians have many faults; however in mitigationyou suggest that such faults are less onerous than the faults of 50% of theglobal population .

    5. You agree that Brazilian politicians are corrupt and that thereis too much bureaucracy.

    Having your broad and qualified agreementwith what has been commented upon, why would you say that such comments are, asyou rudely put it, a crock of sh*t? One suspects, given your living experienceswith both British and Brazilian poor, that your angst is perhaps tempered by acertain British working class ‘chip on your shoulder’?

    Given the ever expanding population of200 million Brazilians, isn’t it perhaps a little too obvious to mention thatpeople are having a whale of a time having sex, beach, sun, bbq, friendship, nature, religion, laughter; thezero to low cost aspects of life that comprise the apparent totality of Brazilianculture? And of that 200 million, how many Brazilians can aspire to what may beregarded as an acceptable living standard by an educated and qualified ex-patfrom the first world? With exception to pikies, there is a lot more to lifethan attempting to justify the overpriced chaos of an unkempt potholed Sambatits & ass lifestyle so adored by those that slavishly follow the drums.

  • #233489

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    [jamest] doth protest too much, methinks.

  • #233505

    Anonymous

    So, how much is needed per month in R$ to live good in Brazil? Ballpark figure?

  • #233508

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    [QUOTE=picolino]So, how much is needed per month in R$ to live good in Brazil? Ballpark figure?[/QUOTE]

    From R$15000 to infinity andbeyond.

  • #233510

    [QUOTE=jamest]
    Exaample: Some idealistic 18 year old comes on and says “should I go to Brazil?” and everyone says “NO- stay at home or you will die”. Idiots.[/QUOTE]
    I`ve been encouraging the 18 year olds to come for years (well, I encourage them to get college degrees first, but as long as they have no debt and keep their expectations low, it can be good for them to come right after graduation).
    Who should come to Brazil-
    Recent college graduates with no debt, no responsibilities and little to lose-
    They are going to be fine and have fun sharing a single room with 3 people and living off of ramen and cheap wine (or cheap vodka mixed with H20 and 50cent `juice` (colored sugar) packets). Since they are not trying to make their stay `permanent` they don`t have to worry the beaurocracy, or even maintaining a good standard of living. (especially the boys, who are often willing to wear the same clothes 10times over to avoid washing them by hand).
    Compared to the entry level job opportunities currently available in the US to say, a philosophy major, the experience in Brazil and fluency in Portuguese is a great addition to their resumes. The trip also buys undecided graduates time to figure out what they want to do with their lives and degrees.
    They get to enjoy the beaches and `the lifestyle` until they start looking for something more serious as they only work enough to put food in their mouths and they can always turn to mom and dad if things go really wrong. Though many originally dream of staying forever, the reality is that they usually stay from 6months to 2 or 3 years. Then they apply to graduate school and move back home.
    2.Retirees
    Like the young people, they don`t have to worry about jobs, income or many of the other responsibilities that Brazil makes difficult to deal with. They dont have to worry about surving off short salaries, long hours, long commutes or deal with office and union politics. They are free to chose a place with a lower cost of living and usually come with enough savings to purchase their home outright from the start. They can handle (and even enjoy) the ridiculous amount of time that everything takes (from cooking everything from scratch, to waiting for things to dry, dealing with the annoying cleaning rituals, etc.) because they have time to spare. Their lives are moving at a slower pace, as is Brazil and everyone here, including the young people, so it is a good fit. Also, Brazil gives `priority` everywhere to the elderly – so standing on the bus, waiting in mile long lines at the bank and grocer, paying high prices for movie tickets and bus fares (over 65 busses are free and most tickets are 50%) – are all non-issues for them. Finally, and most importantly, they don`t have kids to worry about.
    3.People who are financially secure
    There are a couple of subgroups here-
    a. Those sent in on comfortable expat packages
    b. Those with enough savings to open a company and get an investment visa
    c. Those with a fare deal of savings and unique skills that will allow them an upper level job and who have access to a permanent visa (normally through a Brazilian spouse or child)
    d. Those with a Brazilian spouse who has a high enough level job and income here to justify the move
    e.Those drawn here for family or other personal reasons who are at least able to get an upper level administrative job.
    In other words, Brazil is for the people who can avoid the daily life I described earlier, which is accurate for the MIDDLE (75%) class. Many of us have lived it for a bit. Most of us who remain here, thankfully, don`t have to live like that now. If we did, we wouldn`t stay.
    Most people who live like that have degrees, have experience, etc. (Look at the job post published the same day – everything the woman was looking for for R$1800, which in Rio, would give you the life I have described). In Rio, that is honestly considered good pay and a `good` life. I, myself, have worked for less than that here and heard from my boss everyday that R$1500 with no benefits and no bus pass (3years ago)was more than I was worth. I know another girl, married to a carioca, fluent in 4 languages, who graduated from an Ivy and moved to Rio after graduation. She was offered a job as an `itern` working 30hours a week for R$600 per month. When she turned it down, the guy offering the job yelled at her and told her she `needed to learn her worth in Brazil.`
    While Brazil is for some,
    Brazil is NOT for-
    1. The poor or the working class (which in Rio is 75% of the population)
    From the little the OP gave us, I can make some guesses-
    After 5 years of marriage, kids are pobably on the table…and somewhat soon – this is a big red flag against moving to Brazil (if they never want to have kids, then they might have a chance)
    She has held a steady job for at least 3 years- this leads me to guess that she is older than early-20`s and mid-career. That will both hurt her opportunities here (she isnt a dumb, entry-level foreigner they can kick around) and means that she is risking her career by taking a several year gap to try Brazl.
    Her age also leads me to beleive that she is past the ramen and mixed-drink-out-of-soda bottles age, and that while she does not live a luxurious life in the UK, she is accustomed to some level of comfort – which Brazil will likely rob from her.
    The fact that the husband earns minimum wage in the UK leads me to guess that he won`t make more than R$1500 or so here (again, that assumes he has experience, luck an probably one if not multiple college degrees. If he doesn`t, R$650-900 is more realistic), which, in Rio, again would lead to the lifestyle in my first post and is not enough for them to really raise kids with any level of peace.
    Also, they seem to have little or no savings and will be dependent on his family at first – which is a HORRIBLE idea. (bad, bad, bad!!!!) For all the talk about the risks of the mom-daughter bond in Brazl, the worst thing a foreign wife can be subject to is living with the mom-in-law, especially if she is lower class. They are like gremlins, they may seem nice and cute at first, but once you are in their clutches they morph – the OP will likely be reduced to tears after lectures on how she doesn`t do ridiculously things correctly like wash jeans with a wire brush or clean the floor by throwing buckets of water around and then pushing it with a rag tied to a stick. If she tries to introduce any `modern` or `fancy` technology, such as a mop, she will be harangued not just by the mother-in-law, but by the whole family and neighborhood. Even if the husband is helpful and well trained in the couple`s home – once he is back with mom he will return to an infantile, machista state where the women MUST do everything (especially if he is in his childhood home surrounded by family and neighbors who think the same way and remind him daily that that is how things should be).
    However, there could be some information she hasn`t shared which could make the move worth it -maybe the husband`s family has cash, a mansion for them to live in in comfort and a company for them to inherit where they will both have good jobs with nice pay and benefits and less than 44 hour workweeks. Maybe his parents will pay the kids private school and take care of the kids for free when they arent in school. Maybe they are moving to a small town, with little or no commute to the gauranteed jobs with flexible hours and the opportunity to go home and have lunch with the kids. Then it would be worth it.
    Joining the `new` middle class is not.
    [QUOTE=jamest]
    “better to be poor in UK than Brazil” – not always true actually. I have lived with poor Brazilians and poor British so I think my judgement is objective. [/QUOTE]
    I`ve been POOR (homeless poor) in the US and `middle` class in Brazil. While at 22 (or even 25) it didn`t bother me much, at 27, I would easily choose poverty in the US over the way 70% of the people in Rio live.
    My judgement is based on first hand experience and lots of close observation.

  • #233512

    [QUOTE=picolino] So, how much is needed per month in R$ to live good in Brazil? Ballpark figure?
    [/QUOTE]
    That`s a crazy question.
    Try making a seperate post with the following information-
    Age
    Sex
    Marital Status
    How many kids you have, or would like to have, and ages
    How much savings you have to spend upfront (will you buy a house or rent)
    Where you are coming from and what your current lifestyle is
    What are the minimum things you can`t do without
    What area do you plan to work in
    What city (or region) would you like to live in
    How much crap (commute, cramped living quarters, etc) are you willing to deal with.
    If you are retired, no wife, no kids, like to fish and read on your e-reader and planning to live in a small town in the Northeast, the ressponse will be very, very different from a 30year old hoping to raise kids in Rio.

  • #233513

    Anonymous

  • #233517

    Objections to your objections
    [QUOTE=jamest]
    1. You have to have a lot of money to enjoy living in Brazil
    Response – yeah, like every other country in the world. What you really mean is “It’s not as cheap here now as when i arrived 10 years ago, and now I have kids and am no longer single.” [/QUOTE]
    See my last post.
    [QUOTE=jamest]
    Also – I don’t know if you noticed, but Brazil is full of people with very low level wages/living conditions having a WHALE OF A TIME. Sex, beach, sun, bbq, friendship, nature, religion, laughter – these are all simple pleasures that 99% of the population can afford.
    [/QUOTE]
    My argument again, is that in reality, they pursue mindless interests (like Universal) to distract themselves from the pain.
    Brazil still has a net outward migration, and if you look at who is moving out (low wage earners and young, smart people) and who is moving in (older, wealthy people). It lends creedence to the fact that Brazil is for the wealthy foreigner, not the working class.
    Further breaking down your claims -it is far from sunny all the time, and it super sucks when it rains (cariocas, in particular, refuse to leave the house, as they are apparently made of sugar and would melt if hit by a single drop). Also, Brazil doesn`t have that much more beach than the US and working Brazilians have less time to enjoy it) Buying into that propaganda is like imagining all of the US to be Southern California.
    Relgion here is harmful, spreads hate and steals the little money the poor have.
    There is more time to enjoy `nature` and bbq`s in the US, if you are among the poor or working class. A recent documentary showed that poor Brazilian kids dont often know the names of vegetables, let alone wild animals. The working class dont camp or hike.
    Unlike in the US where the working class lives in more rural suburbs, the working class in Brazil live in tightly packed housing in areas often lacking trees or grass. Studies have been performed that show a direct negative correlation between income and greenery in Brazilian neighborhoods.
    Sex – the exploitative, sexualization of women shown naked everywhere that leads to abuse? That is so bad that women have to get into seperate train cars for fear of being sexually assaulted (having some dude grind his junk on her or try to put his hand up her skirt) for the two hour ride if she were to enter into a shared sex car?
    Or the sex that people all over the world have? If you were having bad/infrequent sex outside of Brazil, that is a personal, not a country issue (at least, I hope – I (maybe luckily) dont know the UK that well).
    Friendship – doesnt exist here to the same exent it does in the US. Nor does `community spirit`. Most people dream of living behind giant physical walls which reflect the emotional walls they construct between themselves and people outside of their family units.
    There is plenty false friendship based on one person possibly benefitting the other. But this a big criticism many people have, at least of Rio.
    Laughter – again, if you weren`t laughing outside of Brazil, that`s a personal thing. I always laughed plenty as did/does everyone I know here and abroad.
    [QUOTE=jamest]
    2. ….Guess what – Globo is not indicative of the entire Brazilian population! [/QUOTE]
    Just the vast majority, especially of those with lower incomes, which is what we are talking about.
    [QUOTE=jamest]
    3./4. …. ok, go home.
    – this objection is so pathetic it’s unreal.
    (ever been to Russia?). [/QUOTE]
    Can you be more immature? Most of us aren`t here by `choice`. We don`t have the freedom to pack our bags and go wherever we choose.
    For some of us, Brazil has been home for nearly as long as anywhere else. Just because we were born somewhere else means we don`t have the right to criticize a place where we have fought hard to build our homes and lives?
    Our decisions to move to Brazil were, in most cases, long and well-planned and based on many factors including income, housing and for many of us, Brazilian partners and familial obligations.
    Just because we think Brazil is for some, and not for others, doesn`t mean we hate it. And just because we are trying to help people make judicious decisions (as other people helped us) based on facts and personal experiences, doesn`t mean we are condemning the place or those who, fully aware of what they are getting themselves into, choose to move here.
    I would be just as reserved in recommending a move to the US or Canada for a Brazilian as I am in recommending Brazil (especially Rio) to a foreigner.
    5. My head is exploding trying to follow your logic.
    We use the burrocracy criticism to show how it is harder for people who don`t have means to get around it.
    The comment `As a foreigner you actually have better resources to do so than most Brazilians.` seems to support that idea.
    Also you make it seem like we shouldn`t complain that `The politicians are corrupt and there is too much bureaucracy` supported by our taxes. Those of us who are here legal (some who are even citizens who can vote) and are highly invested in this society need to complain, criticize and fight to make things better.
    Are we arguing about foreign tourists or foreigners here temporarily – or people who have full lives here, Brazilian spouses, children and in-laws, etc. etc.?
    If it is ok to complain about our birth homes, why is it not ok for us to complain about our adopted homes (to which we often have stronger ties at this point in the game).
    And, finally, onto your list-
    1. Beaches – Not everywhere has them. In Rio, only the rich (bar a few select favelas) have the opportunity to live near them. People in the suburbs often don`t have the time or money to visit them.
    The hour + it would take someone to go from Penha to the beach (the discussing pee whole known as the piscinao is NOT a beach, before someone tries to make that claim) is the same time it would take from many towns in central massachusetts that technically dont have beaches.
    2. Nice people – Fake people
    3. Lots of space – Where??? Certainly not in Rio or Sao Paulo
    4. Nature -Where?? Who has time to enjoy it?
    5. Nice Food – Hard to cook/expensive food that consumes much of the budget and much of a working woman`s sparse free time
    7. Sunshine – Where??? It has been raining forever? Obviously I am somehow living in the wrong Brazil.
    8. Great music – Funk? I don`t think the sexually explicit and violent lyrics that constantly booms from the neighboring houses counts.
    9. Interesting history – Intteresting, sad and frustrating history that 90% of the locals are completely clueless of
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world. – If only half of the thoughts they voiced weren`t logical falacies that make my head hurt (especially all of the racist, sexist, homophobic, xenophobic crap that freely flows from the mouths of people from all classes.
    Whether Brazil is a good place or bad place to live depends on the individual situation of each person.
    Money helps. It isn`t everything, but since this is a 3rd world country, it does play a larger role than it might elsewhere, especially in the cities.
    Working your way up doesn`t really exist here, so how much you are coming in with/earning upon arrival is crucial.
    The image that you are trying to sell, simply does not reflect the reality of the majority.
    People were responding to someone who is not single, is not a recent graduate or unemployed male in their early 20`s so please refrain from ranting about your (completely different) reality in response to people trying to shed their light on what the OP`s reality would be here so that she can make an informed decision.

  • #233524

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=jamest]
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches
    2. Nice people
    3. Lots of space
    4. Nature
    5. Nice Food
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe
    7. Sunshine
    8. Great music
    9. Interesting history
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world.
    [/QUOTE]
    Finally, a list of twisted reasons of why come to Brazil.
    1.Beaches = Are mostly dirt and in some part of the country the sewage ends up there. Also it’s only country in the world you can find them?
    2.Nice People = They’re rare and not easy to find. Most of the people will try to take advantage of you being a foreigner when you need something.
    3. Lots of space = The houses with “lots of space” are at least 3x the price you would pay for a middle class house in the US. I won’t talk about design and functionality.
    4. Nature = You’ll find only going to a rainforest because in the cities you can’t find trees on the street good landscaping on neighborhoods, absolutely nothing.
    5. Nice food = “Nice” only this word tells me a lot and means that the food is not good or excelent. Usually when we go to a buffet most of the time we find some food really salty.
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe = I won’t say a word about Europe because I don’t know how is it there, but freedom of the state here? it’s a democratic country where its population don’t even vote for their laws. The politicians do whatever they want according to their and big companies needs.
    7. Sunshine = Again. something so rare that is only avaliable here in Brazil? No other country in the world has a sunshine? It’s all dark?
    8. Great Music = “American Idol” tried to make a tv show here to find the talent hidden in this country. They left after the first tv show because the only thing they could find was 80% of the people only knew how to sing sertanejo.
    9. Interesting History = Europe history, Asian history, US history, Argentina history, they are all insteresting. Is this a reason to come to Brazil? why not buy a book and read about the history? maybe you thought about talking to natives and asking to hear about Brazil’s history, which I did, and they didn’t know anything about it.
    10. People usually say what they think = People are usually fake, they love to play mind games to get what they want. Wagner2013-01-20 10:51:07

  • #233527

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    This is so depressing that I’m going to garden to eat worms. Cry

  • #233540

    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    This is so depressing that I’m going to garden to eat worms. Cry[/QUOTE]
    This is usually about the time I run down to the market and buy about 6 cans of piss beer……..

  • #233546

    whelp
    Member

    nikkij12185,
    All points well taken and understood. Not bashing you but if I were a woman from US or UK, Brazil might be the last place I would live on Planet Earth. South America, especially Brazil is not a pro-friendly place for women. You went form the top of the ladder, US, the bottom of ladder, Brazil.
    It’s widely known that Brazil is one of the most difficult 3rd world countris to live for expats.

  • #233548

    whelp
    Member

    No matter what country you live the bottom line is money. Money makes every decision in your life, and money is the deciding factor for anyone living in Brazil. If you are well off, you’ll have a great life here. If your middle class or below, life will be a constant struggle.

  • #233549

    Cici
    Member

    [QUOTE=jamest]
    8. Great music
    [/QUOTE]
    This comment alone proves you are somewhat “challenged”! The only thing great about the music is it eventually stops, eventually after 10/12 painful hours of 10000db that could be heard on the moon! The great music is so great that Im moving house to get away from it!

  • #233553

    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=larry84] No matter what country you live the bottom line is money. Money makes every decision in your life, and money is the deciding factor for anyone living in Brazil. If you are well off, you’ll have a great life here. If your middle class or below, life will be a constant struggle. [/QUOTE]
    But I don’t think money would make life great here. Better for sure, but not great. The first time I moved here, 10 years ago, I had money and it was cheap due to the weak Real and you know what, it still wasn’t amazing. (I know I am am idiot for having returned) I could afford to go to the best places in Rio, I lived in Ipanema, but bottom line Brazilians are just not very interesting people, in fact most are downright bland and boring. That is when they are not bat crap crazy. Sure it was fun to get drunk, go restaurants, pick up on girls but in the end it was the same as living in any other guidoville like Miami where people are super vapid and only care about buying shiny objects, working on thier muscles and then showing off said muscles on the beach.

  • #233555

    SFO Murphy
    Member

    If you are in a middle class family in Brasil and you are a young male, you can live great. No pressure to move out of home until your in your 30’s. Hopefuilly, you can use the family car in the evenings if they have one. Work just enough at a stupid job to afford beers with your friends, a motel room with your girl, and a bus ride every few weeks to the beach. The music, samba, sunshine and smiles are free. What a life!

  • #233557

    Finrudd
    Participant

    The money makes Brazil better for many people, and there is no doubt a level of money with which you stop thinking about money. However, there is also a level above that I imagine, and when reached, you would want to be somewhere else. After all, if you are seriously rich, why live in Brazil? Comparatively speaking, there must be better places to be seriously rich – where goods and services are more readily available, where security is less of a concern.
    Seeing people trying to drive sports cars around Sao Paulo always makes me think of this: rich enough to buy a Lambo, but not rich enough to live somewhere that has smooth roads, less traffic and less chance of getting a gun pushed through your window at a traffic light.

  • #233558

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]For all the talk about the risks of the mom-daughter bond in Brazl, the worst thing a foreign wife can be subject to is living with the mom-in-law, especially if she is lower class. They are like gremlins, they may seem nice and cute at first, but once you are in their clutches they morph – the OP will likely be reduced to tears after lectures on how she doesn`t do ridiculously things correctly like wash jeans with a wire brush or clean the floor by throwing buckets of water around and then pushing it with a rag tied to a stick. If she tries to introduce any `modern` or `fancy` technology, such as a mop, she will be harangued not just by the mother-in-law, but by the whole family and neighborhood.[/QUOTE]
    Now THIS would make a novela worth watching!!! LOL
    In spite of having gone through great effort and expense to import a Dyson vacuum that runs on 220v, the diaristas still insist on using this inefficient vassora c/pano contraption! Confused

  • #233560

    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    In spite of having gone through great effort and expense to import a Dyson vacuum that runs on 220v, the diaristas still insist on using this inefficient vassora c/pano contraption!  
    [/QUOTE]
    Tell me how you got a Dyson vacuum, Please! I had one before I came here, sold it, thinking I would just go and buy a new one once I got here. All I see here are vacuums that are no bigger than the coffee maker and all they do is suck..badly at that. A decent vacuum..what a luxury!

  • #233563

    Deleted User
    Moderator

    Yeah, yeah. I once had a Dyson;looked like something that had fallen off the dashboard of the StarshipEnterprise and what an unadulterated multi-coloured swirly hurricane sucking pieceof crap it turned out to be. The damn thing soon started to fall apart and whenthe translucent power cable started to short out and fizzle internally it wasconsigned to the Vatican where it could make its last confession in an attemptto avoid the torture of the hellfire it certainly deserved.

    In Brazil I have no need of such afancy device, in fact we do our bit for global warming; no electrical fangledstuff used by my maid. Every day she flails and wallops the furniture withreligious fervour using some kind of ethnic towel thingy such that the dustflies in the air and, caught in the sunlight, it swirls majestically and,albeit ephemeral, during those brief and enthusiastic moments the furnituresparkles pristine. And continuing with the ‘green’ theme, this dust re-settlesready for the following day re-cycling when the process is repeated. Stern%20Smile

  • #233565

    duncanich
    Member

    Very interesting posts here. I don’t think the people who comment here are negative, it’s called reality. “Living” here for 6 months is not living here. You have no clue what daily life is here.
    I have a decent job (work for a multinational in SP) but I would not recommend this place to anyone. I am up for a visa renewal and I am seriously questioning if I want to stay for another 2-4 years. I love this place, but I have no life like I did in the US. I work 50-60 hours per week, spend 1-2 hours wasting away in the horrendous traffic and then, if I am lucky, I get to the gym 3 times a week and by the time Friday rolls around, I am dead tired. My friends (who are all Brazilians) are also all super tired from working as many hours and a lot of them are now super in debt from wanting the “First World Life” and they’re sacking their entire salary away to credit card debt. Which means they’re lucky to go out once a week for beer. Good times!
    I love Brazil and this is my 3rd time living here (1995-6, 2004-6 and 2011-present). I have been coming here since 1994 and yes, it used to be all of those excellent things that people say “sun, beaches, parties, great food, blah blah blah” People were very laid back, friendly, and had a way of enjoying life. Now, in 2013, most of Brazil is super westernized and people work their arse off to have the latest iPhone, trendy brand-name clothes/shoes, LCD tv and car. I find people (Brazilians and expats) to be stressed out, with no money and increasingly more rude, mean and wanting to get out of here. Heck, if the Brazilians don’t want to be here, that’s a sign. If you’re a rich foreigner, this is the place for you. If you’re working like the rest of us, get ready for another reality.
    My comments on the list:
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches: If you live in Rio, yes. If you’re in SP, you will not go to the beach for a while. Since if you want to go on the weekend, you’ll face a 2-4 hour drive just to get there cause of the traffic. And over holidays?? Not a chance. Long traffic jams everywhere to get to there, water/electric shortages? Yay!! FUN!
    2. Nice people: Yes, they’re really nice to foreigners. Cause they want to sponge off you or take advantage of you. Or they want to feel important when they bring their “gringo” friend to a party. You’re lucky you’re married. If you’re a single woman, this place is hell. Men just want to use you/show you off/just have sex and never really want a commitment. They want to “so ficar” Nice!! My Brazilian coworkers tell me “guys just tell you nice things to get you into bed.” And believe me, Brazilians are known to be the biggest brown-nosers. I met some people at my company’s HQ in the US who asked “Do all Brazilians kiss arse like that?”
    3. Lots of space: If you live in the countryside, yes. SP? Rio? HAHAHAHA. If you want a “spacious” apt, you will pay out the arse for this luxury. I pay R$1600 for 1 bd (inc. condominio) in a super non-fancy area. And we have no amenities. No pool. No workout room. Nada.
    4. Nature: If you look, you might find some nature. again, if you live in SP, the only nature is Parque Ibirapuera or Jardim Botanico.
    5. Nice Food: The food here is not that fabulous as compared to other places. Those fancy places you go to on vacation? You won’t be making enough money to go to them when you’re living here. And your friends won’t have $$ to join you either. This is what a “poor” UK salary can get you. A middle class Brazzo salary? Don’t even think about it.
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe: No comment. I am American, so I won’t even try this one.
    7. Sunshine: If you’re busting arse like the rest of us, you will not see the sun. I see the sun going into work, for 1 hour at lunch and then if I am lucky, for 30-60 mins as I am leaving work. Woo-hoo!
    8. Great music: Not really a valid reason to move to a country. Unless you’re a musician.
    9. Interesting history: Enslaving Africans? Not sure what else is so interesting about their history, but again Not really a valid reason to move to a country. You won’t see anything “historical” unless you work/live in downtown SP or Rio or the Pelourinho in Salvador. Or Ouro Preto.
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world. Are you serious?
    So, I agree with everyone. Bring a lots of money, don’t expect to have the exciting life you had when you did on vacation, get ready for some mega culture shock and to work long hours. It’s the Brazilian way! boa sorte

  • #233567

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    @ksaudades – I agree, “Very interesting posts here.” Yours included. +++

  • #233569

    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    Yeah, yeah. I once had a Dyson;
    looked like something that had fallen off the dashboard of the Starship
    Enterprise and what an unadulterated multi-coloured swirly hurricane sucking piece
    of crap it turned out to be. The damn thing soon started to fall apart and when
    the translucent power cable started to short out and fizzle internally it was
    consigned to the Vatican where it could make its last confession in an attempt
    to avoid the torture of the hellfire it certainly deserved.
    In Brazil I have no need of such a
    fancy device, in fact we do our bit for global warming; no electrical fangled
    stuff used by my maid. Every day she flails and wallops the furniture with
    religious fervour using some kind of ethnic towel thingy such that the dust
    flies in the air and, caught in the sunlight, it swirls majestically and,
    albeit ephemeral, during those brief and enthusiastic moments the furniture
    sparkles pristine. And continuing with the ‘green’ theme, this dust re-settles
    ready for the following day re-cycling when the process is repeated. 
    [/QUOTE]
    LOL Now that gave me a good laugh.
    Sorry to hear of your late Dyson. But it makes me feel better actually. All these years I felt as though I was missing out. Ok, I’ll just let them flail and wallop away.

  • #233571

    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=jamest] What a croc of sh*t you are all talking. I’m with Claieelizz (interesting we are both British – what does this mean? Uk is crap?). This forum is full of jaded old expats who are not earning enough to enjoy their life.
    2. Brazilians are not interested in intellectually “improving” themselves or “culture”
    Response – rubbish. They are just not interested in the kind of pseudo intellectual crap you are in to. This objection to Brazil is entirely relative to the superficial engagement with actual Brazilian culture. Guess what – Globo is not indicative of the entire Brazilian population!
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches
    2. Nice people
    3. Lots of space
    4. Nature
    5. Nice Food
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe
    7. Sunshine
    8. Great music
    9. Interesting history
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world.
    BTW – “better to be poor in UK than Brazil” – not always true actually. I have lived with poor Brazilians and poor British so I think my judgement is objective. [/QUOTE]
    According to you, the UK must be a dreadful place. I’m sorry to hear that your life was so dismal, dark and friendless and you had to suffer in a country without history. How horrible it sounds. It’s funny though, how my Brazilian friends who live or have lived there tell such a different story. I guess they must be deluded and I must warn them.
    Now, as far as your lists of reasons to come (you said come and not live) to Brazil, I am thinking it must be from the viewpoint of where you come from and your situation. Maybe I’m wrong so let me think.
    1. Beaches. Yes, I suppose Brazil does have the monopoly on those. I do know that in California, where I come from, we have over 1000 miles of beach, all preserved and maintained by the local and state governments. And then the beaches around the Gulf of Mexico and on yes, the USA has both oceans, Atlantic and Pacific.
    2. Nice people. Sad to hear that you never met any nice people in the UK. They must be a terrible lot. I, however, miss all the nice and wonderful people I left behind including every neighbor. I’ve met “nice” people in every country I’ve been but then that is probably just my curse.
    3. Lots of space. I had the mountains, desert, forests and miles of quiet deserted beaches to choose from. The only thing I didn’t have was the jungle and now that I am living in it, I can say I am not a fan of the humidity and insects and snakes and spiders. But that is just me.
    4. Nature. Sort of goes along with space. Again the mountains and Yosemite park. Even the desert has a lot of nature so I really don’t see the difference. Los Angeles also has the one of largest urban parks in North America ( 4,310 acres/1,740 ha of land) adjacent to downtown . Mission trails regional Park (5,800 acre (23 km¬≤) within the city of San Diego also in Southern California. No, it wasn’t nature I was missing.
    5. Nice food. I could go on all day about this one but let’s just say there is a lot more to cuisine other than beans and rice and other sundries on the buffet table. And I have heard that some food actually has spices in some parts of the world.
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe. Yep. Those statistics tell me that the police in Britain are just shooting people left and right. It must be such a bother when they ask you for your papers and proof of residency all the time.
    7. Sunshine. Nope that isn’t it. I was use to the average of 329 days of sun a year with the average temperature being between 66 ¬∞F (19 ¬∞C) and 75 ¬∞F (24 ¬∞C)
    8. Great music. Well, that is personal taste. Although I was a fan of Caetano Veloso before coming here, I still think the best rock comes out of England and I am a rock fan. That isn’t it either because if it came down to music alone, I would pick the UK.
    9. Interesting history. Yes, we all know that the USA has no history and Britain hasn’t enough to even be mentioned. Never mind the negligible history of Asia and the European countries (including Portugal). Nope, no interesting history at all.
    10. People say what they think. Are you kidding me with this one?
    11. oh, no 11 but I can add one I see all the time on here. Beautiful women. Of course but you know what? There are beautiful women in every country I have been to. Just visit the beaches of Spain or even Southern California ..Baywatch , anyone? Beautiful men, too.
    The rest of your post has been addresssed by Nikki. I don’t need to say anything else about it.
    Oh, and I suppose that by ” that kind of pseudo intellectual crap you are in to”, you are referring to architecture, science, philosophy, world history, art, international music, design, cuisine, film, literature, theatre, archeology, anthropology, world economics and politics. Yep, all crap.Rob Allen2013-01-20 17:54:27

  • #233572

    SFO Murphy
    Member

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz]Hey all…
    Have to say reading through some of the threads I’m surprised at the amount of negativity in response to people moving to brazil
    So anyone thinking about moving to brazil and has been discouraged by some posts… Do it. You won regret it. Brazilian attitude to life is infectious![/QUOTE]

    Every country has its downsides. I chose to live in Brasil because its a better choice than most countries in the world, including the beloved school-kid slaughter-house US, the dreary UK and the 75% taxation France. Where else do you gringoes want to be?
    South Africa? You think crime is bad here? You are cynical about our government here?
    China, Japan? You think learning Portugues is difficult? You think nobody understands you here?
    Jakarta, Bangkok, Manila, Mexico City? You have no idea how bad traffic and pollution can be.
    Russia? Are you mentally ill?
    Mumbai, New Delhi, etc. in India? So you think Brasil has a bad infrastructure an aweful bureaucracy (never mind the places noted above)
    Geneva, Zurich? Switzerland consistantly gets the “best quality of life ratings.” For some people it might be if you never want to go out to eat after 10 pm (except for the vending machine at the train station). It also has one of the world’s highest suicide rates, and most of its kids are stoned, because THEY ARE BORED BEYOND BELIEF.
    There are plenty of other options of course. But Brasil actually has more advantages than most of them.
  • #233573

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Kitten][QUOTE=Claieelizz]Hey all…
    Have to say reading through some of the threads I’m surprised at the amount of negativity in response to people moving to brazil
    So anyone thinking about moving to brazil and has been discouraged by some posts… Do it. You won regret it. Brazilian attitude to life is infectious![/QUOTE]

    Every country has its downsides. I chose to live in Brasil because its a better choice than most countries in the world, including the beloved school-kid slaughter-house US, the dreary UK and the 75% taxation France. Where else do you gringoes want to be?
    South Africa? You think crime is bad here? You are cynical about our government here?
    China, Japan? You think learning Portugues is difficult? You think nobody understands you here?
    Jakarta, Bangkok, Manila, Mexico City? You have no idea how bad traffic and pollution can be.
    Russia? Are you mentally ill?
    Mumbai, New Delhi, etc. in India? So you think Brasil has a bad infrastructure an aweful bureaucracy (never mind the places noted above)
    Geneva, Zurich? Switzerland consistantly gets the “best quality of life ratings.” For some people it might be if you never want to go out to eat after 10 pm (except for the vending machine at the train station). It also has one of the world’s highest suicide rates, and most of its kids are stoned, because THEY ARE BORED BEYOND BELIEF.
    There are plenty of other options of course. But Brasil actually has more advantages than most of them.

    [/QUOTE]
    If the crisis wasn’t so heavy in Europe I’d give Barcelona a shot for sure – however I rank some of my most desirable city’s in the world in the US – NYC for one. – going to Miami later this year to see how that’s cracked up to be.
    However Rio is fine for now, it ticks most boxes but just be prepared to pay equal supermarket prices to the UK.
    For example I’ve just bought some shower gel,1 milk, and a packet of crisps for R16.90…. that’s about ¬£5. so that’s about what you’d pay in the UK if not more.
    I agree with you – Brasil does have more advantages that many places at this moment in time.
    Boycie2013-01-20 18:39:27

  • #233575

    hoganti
    Member

    great thread, i think a lot of it boils down to what you want and what you deem as a fair price to pay for things. plus, if you have the ability to go back to your home country (or out of brazil) it can make a big difference.
    just got back after 40 days in the US and I loaded up on clothes and electronics and stuff I wouldnt buy here.
    However, not every gringo need work the schedule’live the life that nikki posted. Also, most gringos I know came with a wife/husband who has job prospects here. Coming here with no connections, and no Portuguese I couldnt imagine. But with a spouse who can help you adjust I think life is more than manageable….if not quite enjoyable.
    I am lucky I guess to have made some good friends, not the fake let’s go to my sitio types- but real friends and feel pretty comfortable with life here (not pará, pará sucks donkey balls).
    I like working my own schedule, 2 or 3 hours at a time, deciding when i go on vacation etc. Granted I get healthcare through my wife’s job and we have housing provided for us now (was not the case in BH)I was easily able to take care of us just by teaching English when she was still studying. And I for one really enjoy teaching and I enjoy my students, which makes a world of a difference especially if you travel all over the city to teach people or work at a school and are subjected to their hours.
    not really concisely written, but I wanted to throw my two cents in before I went to bed.

  • #233578

    Timmanaus
    Member

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]
    For some of us, Brazil has been home for nearly as long as anywhere else. Just because we were born somewhere else means we don`t have the right to criticize a place where we have fought hard to build our homes and lives?
    [/QUOTE]
    Nikki, I think, to some extent, this is a basic human nature. People generally don’t like listening criticism of their birth place from foreigners which I think is true in your case also.
    If the Germans who chose to live in England/France start telling how things can be done in a better way, you think it wont irritate the English/French ?

  • #233606

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=KSaudades]Very interesting posts here. I don’t think the people who comment here are negative, it’s called reality. “Living” here for 6 months is not living here. You have no clue what daily life is here.
    I have a decent job (work for a multinational in SP) but I would not recommend this place to anyone. I am up for a visa renewal and I am seriously questioning if I want to stay for another 2-4 years. I love this place, but I have no life like I did in the US.
    I work 50-60 hours per week, spend 1-2 hours wasting away in the horrendous traffic and then,
    If you have a good job, why the hell you don’t you rent apartment closer to work.
    I did it.

    For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.
    if I am lucky, I get to the gym 3 times a week and by the time Friday rolls around, I am dead tired. My friends (who are all Brazilians) are also all super tired from working as many hours and a lot of them are now super in debt from wanting the “First World Life” and they’re sacking their entire salary away to credit card debt. Which means they’re lucky to go out once a week for beer. Good times!
    I love Brazil and this is my 3rd time living here (1995-6, 2004-6 and 2011-present). I have been coming here since 1994 and yes, it used to be all of those excellent things that people say “sun, beaches, parties, great food, blah blah blah” People were very laid back, friendly, and had a way of enjoying life. Now, in 2013, most of Brazil is super westernized and people work their arse off to have the latest iPhone, trendy brand-name clothes/shoes, LCD tv and car. I find people (Brazilians and expats) to be stressed out, with no money and increasingly more rude, mean and wanting to get out of here. Heck, if the Brazilians don’t want to be here, that’s a sign. If you’re a rich foreigner, this is the place for you. If you’re working like the rest of us, get ready for another reality.
    My comments on the list:
    Finally, a list of reasons to come to Brazil,for people wondering whether to come or not:
    1. Beaches: If you live in Rio, yes. If you’re in SP, you will not go to the beach for a while. Since if you want to go on the weekend, you’ll face a 2-4 hour drive just to get there cause of the traffic. And over holidays?? Not a chance. Long traffic jams everywhere to get to there, water/electric shortages? Yay!! FUN!
    WOW, it takes me usually 1 hour and 15 minutes to get to the beach, and I also live in SP. (try bus from terminal Jabaquara)
    2 hours – yes a day after the New Years Eve

    2. Nice people: Yes, they’re really nice to foreigners. Cause they want to sponge off you or take advantage of you. Or they want to feel important when they bring their “gringo” friend to a party. You’re lucky you’re married. If you’re a single woman, this place is hell. Men just want to use you/show you off/just have sex and never really want a commitment.
    I know single women who do the opposite, they use the men

    They want to “so ficar” Nice!! My Brazilian coworkers tell me “guys just tell you nice things to get you into bed.” And believe me, Brazilians are known to be the biggest brown-nosers. I met some people at my company’s HQ in the US who asked “Do all Brazilians kiss arse like that?”
    Ok, maybe it makes a sence. But at least, they do not hate you
    3. Lots of space: If you live in the countryside, yes. SP? Rio? HAHAHAHA. If you want a “spacious” apt, you will pay out the arse for this luxury. I pay R$1600 for 1 bd (inc. condominio) in a super non-fancy area. And we have no amenities. No pool. No workout room. Nada.
    I pay 1,300 for 3 bdr apartament in Ipiranga, 10 minutes driving fro Avenida Paulista, or 20 by bus
    4. Nature: If you look, you might find some nature. again, if you live in SP, the only nature isParque Ibirapuera or Jardim Botanico.
    true

    5. Nice Food: The food here is not that fabulous as compared to other places. Those fancy places you go to on vacation? You won’t be making enough money to go to them when you’re living here. And your friends won’t have $$ to join you either. This is what a “poor” UK salary can get you. A middle class Brazzo salary? Don’t even think about it.
    6. Slightly more freedom from the state than in Europe: No comment. I am American, so I won’t even try this one.
    Substantially more
    7. Sunshine: If you’re busting arse like the rest of us, you will not see the sun. I see the sun going into work, for 1 hour at lunch and then if I am lucky, for 30-60 mins as I am leaving work. Woo-hoo!
    8. Great music: Not really a valid reason to move to a country. Unless you’re a musician.
    9. Interesting history: Enslaving Africans? Not sure what else is so interesting about their history, but again Not really a valid reason to move to a country. You won’t see anything “historical” unless you work/live in downtown SP or Rio or the Pelourinho in Salvador. Or Ouro Preto.
    10. People often say what they think, nice change from many parts of the “developed” world. Are you serious?
    So, I agree with everyone. Bring a lots of money, don’t expect to have the exciting life you had when you did on vacation, get ready for some mega culture shock and to work long hours. It’s the Brazilian way! boa sorte
    [/QUOTE]WENGER2013-01-21 06:58:36

  • #233609

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    Nikki hits the nail right on the head in this thread (again)….

  • #233610

    815
    Member

    “For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.”
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Anywhere in São Paulo? Are you typing from 5 years ago or what?
    Three years ago I paid this sum in Brooklin for 50 m2 (and the apartment was ugly as sin). As soon as we left the owner jacked the price up to $2000… Remember, this was three years ago. God knows what he’s getting today.

  • #233611

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]”For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.”
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Anywhere in São Paulo? Are you typing from 5 years ago or what?
    Three years ago I paid this sum in Brooklin for 50 m2 (and the apartment was ugly as sin). As soon as we left the owner jacked the price up to $2000… Remember, this was three years ago. God knows what he’s getting today.
    [/QUOTE]
    Do you speak Portuguese ???
    Do you know any native Brazilians to help you out ???
    How many apartments do you visit before you rent, where do you look for apartments ??
    WENGER2013-01-21 07:31:27

  • #233613

    pmcalif
    Member

    I think most of the Gringoes here serve as a good prey to greedy brazilian Landlords
    Try some out of the box thinking.
    A fact that you are a GRINGO, does not mean that you have to be ROBBED,
    or that you have to tomar no c., each time you buy something or rent something here
    WENGER2013-01-21 07:37:53

  • #233615

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]”For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.”
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Anywhere in São Paulo? Are you typing from 5 years ago or what?
    Three years ago I paid this sum in Brooklin for 50 m2 (and the apartment was ugly as sin). As soon as we left the owner jacked the price up to $2000… Remember, this was three years ago. God knows what he’s getting today.
    [/QUOTE]Do you speak Portuguese ???Do you know any native Brazilians to help you out ???How many apartments do you visit before you rent, where do you look for apartments ??
    [/QUOTE]
    You apparently aren’t up to date on real estate in São Paulo my friend. That’s all.

  • #233618

    pmcalif
    Member


    Just pay him everything he asks for
    YOU have NO CHOICE
    BECAUSE YOU ARE THE GRINGO

  • #233620

    Mkamerling
    Member

    There is some really sound advice on this thread, the quality of life in Brazil is low unless you are loaded. Weather helps, but it isn’t everything. Ok, so some Brits are a bit reserved, but one can meet really interesting characters there on a regular basis and have great conversations. Brazilians are, in general, quite boring and not the brightest sparks.
    If your partner can only find low paid work in the UK then what are his chances in Brazil? Unless you are exceptionally lucky you too will end up teaching English for very low pay, with no stability.
    You should really try and change your life in the UK first. Maybe your partner could go back to university to improve his chances of getting a better job. Start looking for a new job yourself. It’s the new year and lots of people change jobs around this time. If you don’t like where you live move to a different city.
    Moving to Brazil was the worse decision I’ve ever made. I totally regret it, but can’t get my husband to leave. Trust me, you don’t want to end up in my postion in 18 months time.NICB2013-01-21 08:28:58

  • #233622

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]”For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.”
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Anywhere in São Paulo? Are you typing from 5 years ago or what?
    Three years ago I paid this sum in Brooklin for 50 m2 (and the apartment was ugly as sin). As soon as we left the owner jacked the price up to $2000… Remember, this was three years ago. God knows what he’s getting today.
    [/QUOTE]Do you speak Portuguese ???Do you know any native Brazilians to help you out ???How many apartments do you visit before you rent, where do you look for apartments ??
    [/QUOTE]
    You apparently aren’t up to date on real estate in São Paulo my friend. That’s all. [/QUOTE]
    A co-worker rents a studio in Botafogo for R$ 1500 (25 m2) (needless to say, he’s a native)
    R$ 1600 for a 1brd in SP is a good price.sven2013-01-21 08:37:12

  • #233623

    Wellington
    Member

    And, and I would have to add that moving back to the UK could be very difficult for those that wish to. The income threshold is 18.6K from employment and without this, savings of 62.5K in cash are required. Without either of these, a spouse-settlement visa will not be issued. man of leisure2013-01-21 08:37:30

  • #233625

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]”For 1,600 reais of monthly rent, that you pay now, you could rent apartment in any place in Sao Paulo.”
    kkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkkk
    Anywhere in São Paulo? Are you typing from 5 years ago or what?
    Three years ago I paid this sum in Brooklin for 50 m2 (and the apartment was ugly as sin). As soon as we left the owner jacked the price up to $2000… Remember, this was three years ago. God knows what he’s getting today.
    [/QUOTE]Do you speak Portuguese ???Do you know any native Brazilians to help you out ???How many apartments do you visit before you rent, where do you look for apartments ??
    [/QUOTE]
    You apparently aren’t up to date on real estate in São Paulo my friend. That’s all. [/QUOTE]
    A co-worker rents a studio in Botafogo for R$ 1500 (25 m2) (needless to say, he’s a native)
    R$ 1600 for a 1brd in SP is a good price.[/QUOTE]
    Sven, let me invite you to SP.
    I can visit some apartments with you, just to show you the market here.
    Sure 1600 reas is a good price for a GP that lives in Jardims and charge 400 $ per hour
    Average 1bdr should not cost more then 1200 $, but you could find (with a little effort) something for 900 reais as well as
    If you want I can e-mail you offers with prices and photos

  • #233626

    pmcalif
    Member
  • #233627

    pmcalif
    Member

    that was an apto 5 minutes walking from Ave Paulista

  • #233629

    pmcalif
    Member
  • #233630

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=WENGER] http://www.zap.com.br/imoveis/oferta/Apartamento-Padrao-1-quartos-aluguel-SAO-PAULO-BELA-VISTA-RUA-DR-PENAFORTE-MENDES/ID-4015936
    [/QUOTE]
    What a dump. It doesn’t even have something resembling a kitchen

    At least you can take a shower and a dump at the same time

    My dogs live better than that sven2013-01-21 09:08:23

  • #233631

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    if you are willing to live in Capão Redondo you can pay R$900, if you want to live anywhere near anything you will pay at least R$1300 after IPTU, Condo fees etc. And that will get you a tiny place in a bad neighborhood but that isn’t so far from metro or the center of the city.

  • #233636

    NYesq
    Member

    [QUOTE=NICB] There is some really sound advice on this thread, the quality of life in Brazil is low unless you are loaded. Weather helps, but it isn’t everything. Ok, so some Brits are a bit reserved, but one can meet really interesting characters there on a regular basis and have great conversations. Brazilians are, in general, quite boring and not the brightest sparks.
    If your partner can only find low paid work in the UK then what are his chances in Brazil? Unless you are exceptionally lucky you too will end up teaching English for very low pay, with no stability.
    You should really try and change your life in the UK first. Maybe your partner could go back to university to improve his chances of getting a better job. Start looking for a new job yourself. It’s the new year and lots of people change jobs around this time. If you don’t like where you live move to a different city.
    Moving to Brazil was the worse decision I’ve ever made. I totally regret it, but can’t get my husband to leave. Trust me, you don’t want to end up in my postion in 18 months time.[/QUOTE]
    This saddened me. That is a very strong statement. I know it came from the heart. To me, to have regret after making such a major life change is tragic and painful. I wish there was something I could do for you.
    I think in most cases, posters here stress the downside so people who are thinking of moving here will not feel that regret with no escape.
    You gave some sound advice.

  • #233641

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Rob Allen] [QUOTE=NICB] There is some really sound advice on this thread, the quality of life in Brazil is low unless you are loaded. Weather helps, but it isn’t everything. Ok, so some Brits are a bit reserved, but one can meet really interesting characters there on a regular basis and have great conversations. Brazilians are, in general, quite boring and not the brightest sparks.
    If your partner can only find low paid work in the UK then what are his chances in Brazil? Unless you are exceptionally lucky you too will end up teaching English for very low pay, with no stability.
    You should really try and change your life in the UK first. Maybe your partner could go back to university to improve his chances of getting a better job. Start looking for a new job yourself. It’s the new year and lots of people change jobs around this time. If you don’t like where you live move to a different city.
    Moving to Brazil was the worse decision I’ve ever made. I totally regret it, but can’t get my husband to leave. Trust me, you don’t want to end up in my postion in 18 months time.[/QUOTE]
    This saddened me. That is a very strong statement. I know it came from the heart. To me, to have regret after making such a major life change is tragic and painful. I wish there was something I could do for you.
    I think in most cases, posters here stress the downside so people who are thinking of moving here will not feel that regret with no escape.
    You gave some sound advice.[/QUOTE]
    Everyone coming to Brazil must have a nest egg saved up and not revealed to anybody. If things don’t work out you have an escape route. Enough for a plane ticket home and savings to get started again in the home country.

  • #233642

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=WENGER] http://www.zap.com.br/imoveis/oferta/Apartamento-Padrao-1-quartos-aluguel-SAO-PAULO-BELA-VISTA-RUA-DR-PENAFORTE-MENDES/ID-4015936
    [/QUOTE]
    What a dump. It doesn’t even have something resembling a kitchen

    At least you can take a shower and a dump at the same time

    My dogs live better than that [/QUOTE]
    Sure it is a dump. This a standard in São Paulo.
    That is why you have to visit and see at least 20 apartments until you rent something.

  • #233643

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    Hmm, I never had a nestegg.
    I’m actually the in the 1st category of Nikkis post, the ex colege student with nothing to loose, happily eating Ramen and drinking cheap vodka (cheap cachassa it was in my case).
    I’m a firm believer of burning your ships behind you when arriving in the new world.
    Having that nest egg will make it easy to give up.

  • #233644

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=WENGER] Sure it is a dump. This a standard in São Paulo.That is why you have to visit and see at least 20 apartments until you rent something.[/QUOTE]
    Well, I have a house with an ool(no PEE in it), a BBQ, about 4 times as big as that dump with an even bigger yard and I pary 650 (no condo).
    Guess who’s NOT moving to São Paulo sven2013-01-21 10:23:57

  • #233645

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=WENGER] Sure it is a dump. This a standard in São Paulo.That is why you have to visit and see at least 20 apartments until you rent something.[/QUOTE]
    Well, I have a house with an ool(no PEE in it), a BBQ, about 4 times as big as that dump with an even bigger yard and I pary 650 (no condo).
    Guess who’s NOT moving to São Paulo [/QUOTE]
    In the country where I have lived before. The unfurnished apartment means actually a fully furnished kitchen and a fully furnished bathroom.
    Here unfurnished apartment meansNOTHING AT ALL.
    You have to buy even the shower head and take it with you.
    Mostly the owners even don’t let the apto cleaned before renting it to other person.
    WENGER2013-01-21 10:30:30

  • #233646

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=WENGER] Sure it is a dump. This a standard in São Paulo.That is why you have to visit and see at least 20 apartments until you rent something.[/QUOTE]
    Well, I have a house with an ool(no PEE in it), a BBQ, about 4 times as big as that dump with an even bigger yard and I pary 650 (no condo).
    Guess who’s NOT moving to São Paulo [/QUOTE]
    According to the recent statistics 84 % of paulistanos would like to live in other place than São Paulo, if only they could.
    Average time it takes to get to work in SP = 2 hours !!!
    (My average time of commuting to work = 3 minutes)

  • #233651

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Wenger, you mind sharing where you got those two stats on SP, I certainly believe you but would love to read the article where they were found.

  • #233652

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy]Wenger, you mind sharing where you got those two stats on SP, I certainly believe you but would love to read the article where they were found. [/QUOTE]
    I heard it on TV, Journal na Band or Globo

  • #233653

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    I’m surprised that 84% number isn’t higher…lol. Two hour average seems absurd considering some people commute very close, but I guess there are enough 3 hour commutes. I thought an hour an a half was bad, basically means that the average Paulistano (assuming 8 hours sleep) is spending 25% of their awake time commuting.

  • #233656

    Anonymous

    Sven, and that kind of “apartment” is what they call here a Flat.
    I guess they thought if they used an English name it would make it sound better. LOL

  • #233683

    BossaNova2012
    Participant

    Esprit,
    Once again, you have made my day! I am only at page 6 out of 10, of the comments made here, but I don’t see how it can get any better than this!
    With great joy, I have already read “unkempt potholed Sambatits & ass lifestyle so adored by those that slavishly follow the drums.” This was followed by your intention to go garden and eat worms. If this wasn’t enough, there was your description of the Dyson, and your maid wallopping the furniture.
    I must tell you – I don’t know if your icon is an urubu/vulture/buzzard or what have you, but each time there is a new posting, I fervently hope that you will make a comment. Your colorful prose is equal to, if not better than, “the slap drag of a lolling dog’s tongue.”
    Obrigado, com sinceridade!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
    Tongue
    BossaNova20122013-01-21 15:25:16

  • #233703

    [QUOTE=BossaNova2012]Esprit… I must tell you – I don’t know if your icon is an urubu/vulture/buzzard or what have you, but each time there is a new posting, I fervently hope that you will make a comment. Your colorful prose is equal to, if not better than, “the slap drag of a lolling dog’s tongue.”
    [/QUOTE]
    +1 Clap

  • #233707

    [QUOTE=sven]A co-worker rents a studio in Botafogo for R$ 1500 (25 m2)[/QUOTE]
    The kennel for my dogs is 12 m2. They pay no rent.

  • #233729

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Floripa]
    [QUOTE=sven]A co-worker rents a studio in Botafogo for R$ 1500 (25 m2)
    [/QUOTE]The kennel for my dogs is 12 m2.  They pay no rent.[/QUOTE]
    You cite the advantage of the early arrival. Prices of real estate 8 years ago about 1/4th of what one pays today. Everything else also. I remember doing the math when a Brahma was 2 reais and the dollar at 2.80. Nice!
    The pizza bill with beer for all, big family gathering 50 reais! Ha! Back at 2.80 it was next to nothing. Now you are going well over a hundred fifty reais and change…or more..

  • #233738

    whelp
    Member

    1. First world women [ women from US/UK ) should never live in Brazil or anywhere in Latin America, period. That’s like Paris Hilton re-locating to Ethiopia.
    2. Brazil has one huge thing over most every country in the world-women, extremely sexy, slim and beautiful women! The food is ok. The beach is ok. But the women thing is enough to lure many, many 1st world men to Brazil, poor and rich.
    3. Today, Brazil is way more expensive and way less expat friendly and the Brazilians today tend to be more westernized. I could buy a 2br / 2bth Flat in Ipanema Guinle for $700.000 reais in 2003. Today that same flat is $2M reais and condominio is $2,000 reais ( each month ).
    5. This forum, a few long time people post a lot. This indicates these few are well funded or well off financially and have little to do but hang out here.
    I used to work for multinational then got laid off. Moved to Brazil because of past experiences here. Lived in here from 2001-5 and 2010-11. The novelty wore off so I moved to a large but unpopular island in the Caribbean. No, will not name the island!!!larry842013-01-21 20:43:59

  • #233739

    whelp
    Member

    Agreed about Brazilians being nice to foreigners because of pre-motivated ideas of sponging off the gringoe.
    Living in SP and driving to the beach in 2 hours? Are you completely insane?!?! With traffic 4 hours!!!

  • #233740

    whelp
    Member

    The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.larry842013-01-21 20:45:27

  • #233763

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=larry84]Agreed about Brazilians being nice to foreigners because of pre-motivated ideas of sponging off the gringoe.
    Living in SP and driving to the beach in 2 hours? Are you completely insane?!?! With traffic 4 hours!!![/QUOTE]
    It takes me usually 1 and 15 minutesby bus or one hourif my wife drives me there. And I can assure you that she drives slowly.
    Last year only 2 times it took me 2 hours but never 4 hours.

  • #233764

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]
    YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.

  • #233776

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=larry84]
    2. Brazil has one huge thing over most every country in the world-women, extremely sexy, slim and beautiful women! The food is ok. The beach is ok. But the women thing is enough to lure many, many 1st world men to Brazil, poor and rich.
    [/QUOTE]
    such as:

  • #233777

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.[/QUOTE]
    Things are changing. Dilma is President and she is a symbol of hope for the women of Brazil. One can no longer shoot wife and her lover in bed and claim it was a crime of passion and walk free, common twenty years ago.
    But, in a country where men have sex with transvestites and claim they are “not cheating,” and also visit the clubs for “ball massages,” there is much work for Dilma and her team.

  • #233779

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=larry84]
    2. Brazil has one huge thing over most every country in the world-women, extremely sexy, slim and beautiful women! The food is ok. The beach is ok. But the women thing is enough to lure many, many 1st world men to Brazil, poor and rich.
    [/QUOTE]
    such as:
    [/QUOTE]
    Sven, I am really happy that I do not live in Rio Big%20smile

  • #233791

    Crybeaddy
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER][QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]
    YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.
    [/QUOTE]
    I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.

  • #233865

    Mkamerling
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten]
    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.[/QUOTE]I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.[/QUOTE]
    I live in the South and I really don’t think the women are anything special.
    1. Firstly, there is just as many chubby or fat women as there is anywhere in the world, although in other countries people at least make an effort to hide their flab. Here they just let it all hang out.
    2.Secondly, everyone looks the same- same hair (fake blond), same Michael Jackson noise, same beach ball breasts, same trashy clothes, same duck lips and same glow in the dark teeth. I think that the plastic surgeons down here must be using some generic flat pack kit.
    There are beautiful women all over the world including Brazil, but Brazilian women are too fake looking. Off the top of my head I can think of at least five or more countries with better looking natural beauties for example, Sweden, Ukraine, Holland, Japan, Australia, South Africa etc. The women in the majority of these countries are also educated and can hold decent conversations.

  • #233867

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=NICB] [QUOTE=maarten]
    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.[/QUOTE]I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.[/QUOTE]
    I live in the South and I really don’t think the women are anything special.
    1. Firstly, there is just as many chubby or fat women as there is anywhere in the world, although in other countries people at least make an effort to hide their flab. Here they just let it all hang out.
    2.Secondly, everyone looks the same- same hair (fake blond), same Michael Jackson noise, same beach ball breasts, same trashy clothes, same duck lips and same glow in the dark teeth. I think that the plastic surgeons down here must be using some generic flat pack kit.
    There are beautiful women all over the world including Brazil, but Brazilian women are too fake looking. Off the top of my head I can think of at least five or more countries with better looking natural beauties for example, Sweden, Ukraine, Holland, Japan, Australia, South Africa etc. The women in the majority of these countries are also educated and can hold decent conversations.
    [/QUOTE]
    Ok I wish you have a lot of decent conversations
    I prefer this :

  • #233868

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    You forget Mexico and Venezuela.

  • #233871

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=NICB] [QUOTE=maarten]
    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.[/QUOTE]I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.[/QUOTE]
    I live in the South and I really don’t think the women are anything special.
    1. Firstly, there is just as many chubby or fat women as there is anywhere in the world, although in other countries people at least make an effort to hide their flab. Here they just let it all hang out.
    2.Secondly, everyone looks the same- same hair (fake blond), same Michael Jackson noise, same beach ball breasts, same trashy clothes, same duck lips and same glow in the dark teeth. I think that the plastic surgeons down here must be using some generic flat pack kit.
    There are beautiful women all over the world including Brazil, but Brazilian women are too fake looking. Off the top of my head I can think of at least five or more countries with better looking natural beauties for example, Sweden, Ukraine, Holland, Japan, Australia, South Africa etc. The women in the majority of these countries are also educated and can hold decent conversations.
    [/QUOTE]
    I know, South is different, Sven has just contributed one picture from there:

  • #233877

    jaenicoll
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] You forget Mexico and Venezuela.[/QUOTE]
    Having lived in Mexico DF I would have to say the average in Brazil is much better. However, Mexico is a country of 100 million people with all different types of races and mixes (white, mestizo, indian, even black) So you can find plenty of hot girls there, too. But your average, to me, was pretty ugly. On the plus side, I never really got the impression that they were as materialistic as here.

  • #233884

    [QUOTE=WENGER]I know, South is different, Sven has just contributed one picture from there:

    [/QUOTE]
    Now this sis-tah would be a hot item in the south of Brasil!!! A rarity, compared to the peroxide blondes, with colored blue contacts, who all appear to be anorexic. There are exceptions of course. Some real and genuine eye-candy here, but they know it, which IMO, detracts from their beauty.
    This girl would indeed turn heads, but I’m afraid to say the tongues would be wagging too. Racism wouldn’t be overt, but it would be present. She’d essentially feel as if she’s invisible. Yet once ‘the crowd’ all goes home, and if Pretinha was still hanging out on the beach, I guarantee ya some Brasileiro of German descent would make his move! LOL

  • #233885

    Mkamerling
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [/QUOTE]Ok I wish you have a lot of decent conversationsI prefer this :[/QUOTE]
    Aren’t you Brazilian?
    Eventually you will have to get out of bed and hold the odd conversation with your ficar or whatever you’re into . I hope you enjoy talking about soap operas, children, and outlet shopping…
    P.S- I highly doubt that you are dating or sleeping with anyone who looks remotely like a Playboy model or you wouldn’t be hanging around a forum for foreigners.

  • #233886

    pmcalif
    Member

    God bless São Paulo !!!

  • #233887

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=NICB] [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [/QUOTE]Ok I wish you have a lot of decent conversationsI prefer this :[/QUOTE]
    Aren’t you Brazilian?
    Eventually you will have to get out of bed and hold the odd conversation with your ficar or whatever you’re into . I hope you enjoy talking about soap operas, children, and outlet shopping…
    P.S- I highly doubt that you are dating or sleeping with anyone who looks remotely like a Playboy model or you wouldn’t be hanging around a forum for foreigners. [/QUOTE]
    If I post some photos of girlfriends that I was dating here, it would cause only negative reactions:

    PURE ENVY

  • #233897

    Timmanaus
    Member

    This forum has become a ….
    Fofffocca.com

  • #233899

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    I guess anything beats this:

  • #233901

    toolio
    Participant

    I find this thread very interesting. I agree with Nikki’s post. I think it sums up a lot of what people are likely to face in Brazil.
    I also agree with what others said. Brazil is not for everybody and what you make of it will depend on your individual circumstances. I am fortunate in that I’ve done quite well in Brazil, but even so often find it to be an odd place to live.
    I am unlikely to leave because my wife is Brazilian and she’s unlikely to leave. After more than a decade she remains the main reason I stay.
    I enjoy a few advantages many gringos don’t. I work at home so I don’t have to worry about traffic. I live in Salvador, where traffic isn’t as bad as SP—but it’s still no picnic. I earn my income from foreign sources, which means that I make a fair bit of money by Brazilian standards. My wife is a doctor who has a decent income as well. We also on own a clinic. And I am able to get out of the country two or three three times a year to spend time in Canada, where we still own a small house. I see this as essential to my survival in Brazil.
    Yet as we all know it’s difficult for gringos to ever really feel Brazilian. I have found it difficult to make what I would consider to be true friends here. It’s not a problem I had when I lived in Canada. And there are all the issues that people worry about here including crime, cost-of-living that is spiralling out of control, etc.
    So I often find myself asking whether, if I could do it all over again, would I move to Brazil. I would because of my wife. But if she wasn’t in the picture I think I’d be looking elsewhere. It’s not that I don’t enjoy Brazil. I do. But I think there are other places I would enjoy more. One thing is certain–I could never move back to a country that has a cold climate. However there are many countries that offer a pleasant climate.
    But ask me another day how I feel and my opinion might be different. That’s the thing about living in Brazil. One day it’s great and the next day it’s not so great. But it’s always interesting. And whether I leave or stay I’ll never regret coming here. I have learned a lot about myself, about other people. And, of course, about another country.toolio2013-01-22 15:30:59

  • #233920

    whelp
    Member

    Women from the 1st world who choose to marry a Brazilian man and live in Brazil are asking for trouble.
    Imagine a man moving to a planet occupied and controlled by she women? Women who have all the power and abuse that power, and cheat on their husbands …. ? Well, there IS a place like that, it’s called Planet USA!
    Nikki, if I was you, I would bail out / cut my losses and head back home the US, where women have equal if not more power than men. In USA you can live a much better life. Boa sorte e boa viaje gata!larry842013-01-22 18:15:24

  • #233928

    Timmanaus
    Member

  • #233936

    whelp
    Member

    I meant She Men, not she women. Sorry.

  • #235181

    gringodr
    Member

    [QUOTE=Claieelizz] Hey all…
    Am new to gringoes and just wanted to say hi!
    Have to say reading through some of the threads I’m surprised at the amount of negativity in response to people moving to brazil
    I’m British married to Brazilian and have been going to brazil yearly since 2004, lived there for 6 months but been living in uk for past 5 years and going back to brazil this year.
    Ok so salaries are lower, lots of beaurocracy, things are more expensive but everyone’s forgetting the Brazilian spirit… What about the positives?! Brazil can have its faults but they have sun, beaches, booming economy, World Cup, Olympics, party central, positivity in every aspect of life!!!
    My husband and I have worked our butts off for 5 years and yeah we have a decent life, but no more enjoyment in the uk. The weather sucks, we work to pay bils and have no spare cash. My husband works for minimum wage and I’ve had salary freeze for past 3 years. Economy down the pan and the countrys stuck in a hole.
    So to be honest I’d rather be poor and in brazil than poor and in England. At least in brazil we can wake up to sunshine instead of rain, when life gets tough call round some friends get in some beers turn on some music and chillax. In brazil you may work harder for your salary but you party harder too! In my opinion and in my situation, brazil is better than staying here in England.
    So anyone thinking about moving to brazil and has been discouraged by some posts… Do it. You won regret it. Brazilian attitude to life is infectious![/QUOTE]
    Pagaha you’d rather be poor in brazil than UK!!!!
    Haha well I guess there is the beach to sleep on when you are on the bones of your ass…. Probably better than a council house and a fist full of benefits….
    What a ridiculous post…..

  • #235188

    gringodr
    Member

    [QUOTE=NICB] [QUOTE=maarten]
    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    [QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.[/QUOTE]I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.[/QUOTE]
    I live in the South and I really don’t think the women are anything special.
    1. Firstly, there is just as many chubby or fat women as there is anywhere in the world, although in other countries people at least make an effort to hide their flab. Here they just let it all hang out.
    2.Secondly, everyone looks the same- same hair (fake blond), same Michael Jackson noise, same beach ball breasts, same trashy clothes, same duck lips and same glow in the dark teeth. I think that the plastic surgeons down here must be using some generic flat pack kit.
    There are beautiful women all over the world including Brazil, but Brazilian women are too fake looking. Off the top of my head I can think of at least five or more countries with better looking natural beauties for example, Sweden, Ukraine, Holland, Japan, Australia, South Africa etc. The women in the majority of these countries are also educated and can hold decent conversations.
    [/QUOTE]
    I agree the lesbians in Rio are RANK compared to London…. I literally ran from one the other day…they are gross…. If I wanted something that looked like a man.. Etc etc……
    Plus why does everyone here have a brace!!! I thought my kissing a partner with a brace days were over at 15….seriously are you not allowed to visit the orthodontist here until you are 30!? I’ve never seen so many grown men and women with braces…. It freaks me out….
    And what’s up with the fatties showing all their fat…. I agree at least in England (apart from the north) women hide it! I’m all for being confident about your body, but please decency!!
    Being a designer, the fashion or lack of it here makes me want to cry…. People in Leblon think they are so wildly trendy and fashionable when in reality their so called posh shops look like primark inside…
    Don’t even get me started on some of the outfits people throw on….literally throw on….
    I knew this before I came and therefore came with enough clothes so I wouldn’t need to buy any of this tat….

  • #235196

    toolio
    Participant

    On the topic of women’s beauty: I live in Salvador and I find on average that women here are better looking than many places I’ve been. Of course, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and I do find the racial mix here enticing. I won’t comment on men because I don’t much care, and I’m certainly no authority on that. I certainly don’t see as many attractive women when I visit São Paulo.
    I have spent time in places where women are more beautiful on average. Tahiti is one of them. I also find many Asian countries have good-looking women. In the end it at all boils down to personal preference.
    Just a comment on the braces thing. It’s not just Brazil. I’m Canadian and every time I visit Canada it seems that everybody has braces. And they are not necessarily young. Some are in their 40s and 50s.. Because nobody in Canada has cavities anymore are dentists selling everybody braces to stay in business? Why did all these people discover later in life they suddenly need them? When I was younger It seemed that only kids had braces. Strange, indeed.toolio2013-01-31 17:46:48

  • #235206

    Finrudd
    Participant

    The braces thing is a good point. When I was a kid, braces were something you had to correct a dental problem, where here I suspect, braces are something that is cosmetic.
    Brazilians are more interested in their teeth looking good than their education and I have heard an expression about ‘teeth and shoes being your passport to success’ here. It would go some way to explain why there are so many feckwits with good teeth and shoes (and MBAs) but no common sense or ability.

  • #235208

    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd] It would go some way to explain why there are so many feckwits with good teeth and shoes (and MBAs) but no common sense or ability.[/QUOTE]

  • #235218

    gringodr
    Member

    Ha!!
    Yeah it’s like a fashion thing or a wealth thing, I’m sure… If only they knew how ridiculous they looked…
    When I had my braces it was kinda fashionable, even though they hurt like hell, but yeah I was 15…there were lots of things I thought fashionable but clearly wernt….

  • #235227

    Mkamerling
    Member

    [QUOTE=toolio] [QUOTE=finrudd] It would go some way to explain why there are so many feckwits with good teeth and shoes (and MBAs) but no common sense or ability.[/QUOTE]
    [/QUOTE]
    Ha ha , so true, every half-wit seems to have an MBA, or is in the process of doing one. I guess most of them are probably worth nothing outside of Brazil. In most other countries you need to be managerial level or a business owner with a good few years of experience under your belt to gain a place on an MBA course. Here it’s just a matter of paying. I have a 26 year old student with two MBA’s !
    The braces thing baffles me too, I’ve never seen so many people over the age of 20 with them. It kind of creeps me out. The self love here overwhelms me a little. My gym is unbelievable, I’ve seen women in full make-up, stilettos, cleavage on display working out. Most of them spend all their time looking in the mirror. If they loved themselves a little more I think that they might die of vanity.
    Regarding the lesbians, I have a gringa friend who is a lesbian. Her partner is Brazilian and is pretty and not at all butch. I’ve met some of their friends. None of them fit the bull dike description, but they all seem to be very tomboyish.

  • #235230

    [QUOTE=NICB]
    Ha ha , so true, every half-wit seems to have an MBA, or is in the process of doing one. I guess most of them are probably worth nothing outside of Brazil. In most other countries you need to be managerial level or a business owner with a good few years of experience under your belt to gain a place on an MBA course. Here it’s just a matter of paying. I have a 26 year old student with two MBA’s !
    [/QUOTE]
    MBA`s in Brazil just mean non-thesis graduate courses. Even here they are much less respected than masters and anyone who wants a real MBA goes abroad (with a select few exceptions) They are the equivalent of a `graduate certificate` in the US.

  • #235258

    jaenicoll
    Member

    Mba`s: In the USofA if it is not from a good school an MBA is not really respected in the either. I think the difference is a lot of the crappy schools here are not that expensive and many times the company even pay for it (company probably gets tax breaks or something). I think this makes them even more common, easy to do, not so expensive and many times the company pays.
    Lesbians: I used to live really close to La Girl in Copacabana many years ago and I can say I saw a lot of really really hot lesbians. A lot that wanted to be men too, but isn’t that normal in any country? Or is England different?

  • #235260

    Anonymous

    Just saying from the things I see around here- the non-butch lesbians you probably would not “recognize” on the street. Just as the best transvestites- one does not see on the street and say “tranny”, one says “hot tamale”.

  • #235274

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=toolio]On the topic of women’s beauty: I live in Salvador and I find on average that women here are better looking than many places I’ve been. Of course, beauty is in the eye of the beholder, and I do find the racial mix here enticing. I won’t comment on men because I don’t much care, and I’m certainly no authority on that. I certainly don’t see as many attractive women when I visit São Paulo.
    I have spent time in places where women are more beautiful on average. Tahiti is one of them. I also find many Asian countries have good-looking women. In the end it at all boils down to personal preference.
    Just a comment on the braces thing. It’s not just Brazil. I’m Canadian and every time I visit Canada it seems that everybody has braces. And they are not necessarily young. Some are in their 40s and 50s.. Because nobody in Canada has cavities anymore are dentists selling everybody braces to stay in business? Why did all these people discover later in life they suddenly need them? When I was younger It seemed that only kids had braces. Strange, indeed.[/QUOTE]
    That is interesting, given the number of women from BAHIA that actually live in São Paulo, maybe you visit only wrong places in São Paulo.
    I was dating 3 Bahians without ever traveling to Bahia. Sao Paulo is full of women from Bahia and yes they are exceptionally beautiful.
    I think that braces is another local scam, good way of additional income for so-called “dentists”
    WENGER2013-02-01 06:35:20

  • #235278

    toolio
    Participant

    [QUOTE=WENGER]
    That is interesting, given the number of women from BAHIA that actually live in São Paulo, maybe you visit only wrong places in São Paulo.I was dating 3 Bahians without ever traveling to Bahia. Sao Paulo is full of women from Bahia and yes they are exceptionally beautiful.I think that braces is another local scam, good way of additional income for so-called “dentists”
    [/QUOTE]
    I don’t visit a lot of places in SP because I don’t go there all that often. I’m just talking about when walking down the street. I don’t go looking because I’m happily married. I can assure you that, for obvious reasons, it is easier to find people from Bahia in Bahia than it is in SP.

  • #235286

    gringodr
    Member

    [QUOTE=nesne2]
    Lesbians: I used to live really close to La Girl in Copacabana many years ago and I can say I saw a lot of really really hot lesbians. A lot that wanted to be men too, but isn’t that normal in any country? Or is England different? [/QUOTE]
    Like most girl places that closed down 🙁

  • #235287

    gringodr
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas] Just saying from the things I see around here- the non-butch lesbians you probably would not “recognize” on the street. Just as the best transvestites- one does not see on the street and say “tranny”, one says “hot tamale”. [/QUOTE]
    No of course
    I’m only commenting from clubs/ bars etc

  • #24388

    frojasf
    Member
  • #233870

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten][QUOTE=WENGER][QUOTE=larry84]The ladies complaining should have done due diligence before moving to Brazil. Brazil, and most of America Latina is a Man’s World.[/QUOTE]
    YES, I think you could not put it better. A man rich or poor, young or old is a king here.
    [/QUOTE]
    I think your wife FORCED you to write this. Otherwise you must be talking about a different planet.
    [/QUOTE]
    Hey maarten, I can prove it :
    Normal021falsefalsefalsePT-BRX-NONEX-NONEMicrosoftInternetExplorer4< ![endif]-->< ![endif]-->

    http://www.gringoes.com/forum/forum_posts.asp?TID=17395

    Normal021falsefalsefalsePT-BRX-NONEX-NONEMicrosoftInternetExplorer4< ![endif]-->< ![endif]-->

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.

Skip to toolbar