• Author
    Posts
  • #266759

    fabirox21
    Member

    Hello everybody,

    This is my first post on this website and I hope not the last one. I have just graduated University of Houston majoring in Electrical Engineering. I have had two internships and plan to work here in the US for about a year. My gf is from Brazil and she lives in Vitoria, ES. I am very interested in moving to Brazil. We have talked about different possibilities and this option seems to be the best one. I know a lot of things can change in a year but still…

    So, my question is… How hard will it be to find a job in Brazil for the recent graduate with Electrical Engineering degree? We plan to marry, so visa issues should not be a problem.

  • #266760

    kenalag
    Member

    Well,
    1year is no relevant work experience.
    Vitoria is not the economical Hotspot of Brasil.
    How is your portugese?
    Get all documents done (RNE, CTPS)..
    What is the profession of your girlfriend? I mean, one of you should habe at least a job to survive the time of searching a job.
    Cheers
    WilliWilliButz2014-05-20 22:11:32

  • #266762

    fabirox21
    Member

    Hey, thank you for the reply. Since, I’m serious about it, I started starting Portuguese. I know I have a long way to go till I get to a good level. Do I have to take any special exams when I will be looking for engineering position? I have taken Fundamentals of Engineering exam in Houston but I don’t know if it is useful for Brazil.

    My gf is also an Electrical Engineer.
  • #266763

    fabirox21
    Member

    Thank you. What is the good place for electrical engineers? Except, Sao Paulo (mainly because it is way too expensive to live while I am looking for a job). Fo

  • #266764

    fabirox21
    Member

    Also, I have been told two different things… Some people telling me that it’s easier to find a job when I am already in Brazil. Others keep telling to apply online etc. I tried applying online but unless it’s international company, the application form requires different identification forms.

  • #266765

    kenalag
    Member

    Why should they hire you?
    Pros:
    qualification, speaks english, lack of engineers
    Cons:
    No Portuguese, no work documents, no work experience.
    Eliminate the negative aspects.

  • #266766

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=WilliButz]Why should they hire you?
    Pros:
    qualification, speaks english, lack of engineers
    Cons:
    No Portuguese, no work documents, no work experience.
    Eliminate the negative aspects.
    [/QUOTE]

    Again, I will be able to learn enough Portuguese so I can talk to people and communicate around. Work documents? Getting married should be able to fix that issue. I know that it is pretty bureaucratic process but it can be done. No work experience? Yes, that is definitely an issue. Can you give me any advice?
  • #266767

    Anonymous

    your engineering credentials from the US need to be approved by the engineering association here (CREA). marriage will not fix that. there are some threads here where people have gotten their credentials transferred but if i undestand correctly it is $$$ and takes a long time, do a search for CREA using the search function here.

  • #266768

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas]your engineering credentials from the US need to be approved by the engineering association here (CREA). marriage will not fix that. there are some threads here where people have gotten their credentials transferred but if i undestand correctly it is $$$ and takes a long time, do a search for CREA using the search function here.

    [/QUOTE]

    Thank you. I did not know about CREA. Will research more about it.
  • #266772

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=eemamedo] Thank you. What is the good place for electrical engineers? Except, Sao Paulo (mainly because it is way too expensive to live while I am looking for a job). Fo[/QUOTE]
    Vistoria has an electrical company that attends the whole state of ES.

  • #266773

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz] Engineers are pragmatic. If you’re not in the position of being responsible for projects that affect human lives, probably nobody will ask you to join CREA (engineers’ council). I’ve been an engineer for 25 years and I’ve never bothered to fulfill CREA’s requirements. You still can work in management, sales, planning, customer support etc.[/QUOTE]
    That may be true for a software engineer. Electrical engineers are required CREA. My brother in law works as a manager at a power and light company and one of the job requirement is CREA.
    You can’t get a managing position in (electrical) engineering without starting out as an engineer and that requires CREA. No CREA, no job.

  • #266775

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Many jobs require you to have a CREA certified Engineer on the payroll, who pays his CREA dues each year. For example, I have teams of technicians who install networks – nothing that requires an Engineering degree, but CREA have moved a court case against us in some backwater state for not having a CREA registered employee to approve what we do, which we have been contesting for over 18 months, as it opens a can of worms for us with every CREA organisation. Their argument is that the server is plugged into the electrical power supply, therefore there has to be an engineer involved, which is insane, but point being, many large companies will employ an electrical engineer with CREA membership just to avoid these sorts of issues.

    Back to the original thing of finding work – if you were an electrician, I think you would find plenty of work within the ex-pat community who are sick of local electricians turning up to a job with a hammer and a paint brush, eyes-rotating in different directions, and asking to be shown to the main distribution cabinet…
  • #266777

    Suiço
    Member

    Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young. Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here. However it builds character and experience. I have to ask: Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be. Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month. We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish). Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary. And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time. Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school. They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+. Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl. Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do. Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean. Good luck!

  • #266778

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=shinrai]Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young. Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here. However it builds character and experience. I have to ask: Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be. Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month. We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish). Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary. And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time. Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school. They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+. Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl. Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do. Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean. Good luck!
    [/QUOTE]

    ^^ This – good post.
  • #266779

    Steven
    Participant

    I think that Shinrai is giving you some good advice. When you said that you were coming from Houston, my ears perked up thinking that you were a petroleum engineer – always in demand in Brazil. But electrical engineers are less in need. As noted, for a guy with one year experience you might be looking at R$5K per month, maybe a little more but not much.

    The schools in Brazil turn out some pretty good engineers and plenty of them. The main difference between Brazilian engineers and American engineers is the cultural difference between Brazilians and Americans. The Brazilian engineers who work for me are good but complacent, risk-averse, and lack creativity. Your best bet would be to try to scout out a multinational company that understands this.
    Language is a huge barrier. Talking to a taxi driver in Portuguese and talking to technical people in Portuguese is vastly different.
    As an electrical geek is there any chance that you are a software geek too? Your best bet might be to follow the entrepreneurial path. Start your own business. People are hungry for quality workmanship here. You might even try your hand as an electrician. I can guarantee you that most of the workers who showed up at my door (or usually didn’t show up) had no license and little skill.
    And, finally, get yourself ready for the cultural aspects of being a part of a Brazilian family. Make sure to spend some long visits with your girl’s family before you actually get married and make the move. It’s definitely a challenge.
  • #266781

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]There are lots of losers in this forum. [/QUOTE]
    Including, and not in the least, yourself.

  • #266782

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=shinrai]Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young.¬† Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here.¬† However it builds character and experience.¬† I have to ask:¬† Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be.¬† Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month.¬† We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish).¬† Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary.¬† And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time.¬† Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school.¬† They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+.¬† Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl.¬† Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do.¬† Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean.¬† Good luck!
    [/QUOTE]

    ^^ This – good post.

    [/QUOTE]
    Well said.

  • #266783

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=finrudd] [QUOTE=shinrai]Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young.¬† Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here.¬† However it builds character and experience.¬† I have to ask:¬† Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be.¬† Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month.¬† We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish).¬† Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary.¬† And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time.¬† Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school.¬† They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+.¬† Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl.¬† Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do.¬† Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean.¬† Good luck!
    [/QUOTE]

    ^^ This – good post.

    [/QUOTE]
    Well said.[/QUOTE]
    Keep savings in an account at home. This is your escape account. Never discuss these funds with anyone. Remember, you are not a bank. …Great advice above.

  • #266787

    kenalag
    Member

    Apart of mindset, correct documents (RNE, CTPS, CPF) are an issue.

    Companys avoid sponsoring work visas because it is a lot of work.
    Being abroad, you can only start the permanent visa process if you are already married. This is the fastest way to get your docs done in Brasil.
    Being in Brasil, apart of permanent visa based on marrige you can get a visa based on stable union. Takes much more time than this permanencia based on marriage.
    Depends on what you prefer (and how long you know your girlfriend). How much work experience does she have? I am wondering that she never told you about CREA…

    WilliButz2014-05-21 09:25:18

  • #266791

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]I share Steven’s point of view.
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. Nevertheless, shinrai is right when he says race plays a role here.[/QUOTE]

    You are the lowest level of troll. The unfunny kind.
  • #266794

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]I share Steven’s point of view.
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. Nevertheless, shinrai is right when he says race plays a role here.[/QUOTE]

    So, you would avoid anyone who gives a view-point that you don’t agree with? A balanced view from people who live and work in Brazil is perhaps a good idea? Sven has been here working for almost two decades (from memory), and I have been visiting Brazil since 1998, working here since 2006, and living here for over six years now.
    I suspect what you don’t like is any criticism of Brazil or Brazilians, however I think it’s fair to say that it is a fact that most Americans and Northern Europeans that move to Brazil do not succeed here and usually return. Therefore anyone thinking of moving to Brazil needs to do so with their eyes fully wide open, and without the rose-tinted specs on.
    Steven makes some very good points about bringing entrepreneurial skills to Brazil, however, they are not Brazil specific I would argue. If you have this skillset, you would probably fare better in any number of countries other than Brazil, where the list of odds stacked against you are numerous and well documented. The advantage of bringing these skills to Brazil are probably only size of market and lack of competition.
  • #266798

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]I share Steven’s point of view.
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. Nevertheless, shinrai is right when he says race plays a role here.[/QUOTE]

    As a matter of fact, you are the type of person to avoid.
    Having experienced his situation myself and having seen tons of gringos come here “to make it in Brazil” go back after a year, or a year and a half with their tails between their legs, I can only tell people that your posts are simply lacking all foundation. You may have studied at ITA, but clearly have not come here as a gringo.
    I came here, after my software engineering BA and Law LLM, with the same attitude as the OP, now 18 years ago, and have been through all the crap Brazil has to offer.
    As a Brazilian, you have no clue as to what a foreigner has to go through to get esteblished here.
    Your posts smell like garlic.
  • #266799

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=jennerjcruz]I share Steven’s point of view.
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. Nevertheless, shinrai is right when he says race plays a role here.[/QUOTE]

    You are the lowest level of troll. The unfunny kind.

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL
  • #266800

    Fernandez
    Member

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. [/QUOTE]
    And yet here you are, engaging with them.

  • #266801

    Fernandez
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]

    I came here, after my software engineering BA and Law LLM, with the same attitude as the OP, now 18 years ago, and have been through all the crap Brazil has to offer.
    As a Brazilian, you have no clue as to what a foreigner has to go through to get esteblished here.

    [/QUOTE]
    I may not have read all of this poster’s 13,842 posts, but I can tell you of all the ones I’ve read, this sounds like the most earnest. Look forward to more like this.
    p.s. That was a compliment.
    ferrar2014-05-21 12:45:37

  • #266802

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=ferrar][QUOTE=sven]

    I came here, after my software engineering BA and Law LLM, with the same attitude as the OP, now 18 years ago, and have been through all the crap Brazil has to offer.
    As a Brazilian, you have no clue as to what a foreigner has to go through to get esteblished here.

    [/QUOTE]
    I may not have read all of this poster’s 13,842 posts, but I can tell you of all the ones I’ve read, this sounds like the most earnest. Look forward to more like this.
    p.s. That was a compliment.
    [/QUOTE]

    If gringoes.com were Islam, Sven would be one of the seven pillars!
  • #266804

    RealConsult
    Member

    There is only 5 pillars in Islam though

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  • #266805

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=kissmyjazz]There is only 5 pillars in Islam though

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    Arabic
    Armenian
    Azerbaijani
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    Bengali
    Belarusian
    Bulgarian
    Catalan
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    Dutch
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    Estonian
    Filipino
    Finnish
    French
    Galician
    Georgian
    German
    Greek
    Gujarati
    Haitian Creole
    Hebrew
    Hindi
    Hungarian
    Icelandic
    Indonesian
    Irish
    Italian
    Japanese
    Kannada
    Korean
    Lao
    Latin
    Latvian
    Lithuanian
    Macedonian
    Malay
    Maltese
    Norwegian
    Persian
    Polish
    Portuguese
    Romanian
    Russian
    Serbian
    Slovak
    Slovenian
    Spanish
    Swahili
    Swedish
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    Thai
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    < id=”SL_lng_to”>< value=”af”>Afrikaans< value=”sq”>Albanian< value=”ar”>Arabic< value=”hy”>Armenian< value=”az”>Azerbaijani< value=”eu”>Basque< value=”bn”>Bengali< value=”be”>Belarusian< value=”bg”>Bulgarian< value=”ca”>Catalan< value=”zh-CN”>Chinese (Simp)< value=”zh-TW”>Chinese (Trad)< value=”hr”>Croatian< value=”cs”>Czech< value=”da”>Danish< value=”nl”>Dutch< value=”en”>English< value=”eo”>Esperanto< value=”et”>Estonian< value=”tl”>Filipino< value=”fi”>Finnish< value=”fr”>French< value=”gl”>Galician< value=”ka”>Georgian< value=”de”>German< value=”el”>Greek< value=”gu”>Gujarati< value=”ht”>Haitian Creole< value=”iw”>Hebrew< value=”hi”>Hindi< value=”hu”>Hungarian< value=”is”>Icelandic< value=”id”>Indonesian< value=”ga”>Irish< value=”it”>Italian< value=”ja”>Japanese< value=”kn”>Kannada< value=”ko”>Korean< value=”lo”>Lao< value=”la”>Latin< value=”lv”>Latvian< value=”lt”>Lithuanian< value=”mk”>Macedonian< value=”ms”>Malay< value=”mt”>Maltese< value=”no”>Norwegian< value=”fa”>Persian< value=”pl”>Polish< value=”pt”>Portuguese< value=”ro”>Romanian< value=”ru”>Russian< value=”sr”>Serbian< value=”sk”>Slovak< value=”sl”>Slovenian< ed=”” value=”es”>Spanish< value=”sw”>Swahili< value=”sv”>Swedish< value=”ta”>Tamil< value=”te”>Telugu< value=”th”>Thai< value=”tr”>Turkish< value=”uk”>Ukrainian< value=”ur”>Urdu< value=”vi”>Vietnamese< value=”cy”>Welsh< value=”yi”>Yiddish

    [/QUOTE]

    That’s why it couldn’t be 1-5 now couldn’t it.
    Besides Ismaili islam has 7 pilars, Jihad being the 7th.
  • #266808

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven]I think that Shinrai is giving you some good advice. When you said that you were coming from Houston, my ears perked up thinking that you were a petroleum engineer – always in demand in Brazil. But electrical engineers are less in need. As noted, for a guy with one year experience you might be looking at R$5K per month, maybe a little more but not much.

    The schools in Brazil turn out some pretty good engineers and plenty of them. The main difference between Brazilian engineers and American engineers is the cultural difference between Brazilians and Americans. The Brazilian engineers who work for me are good but complacent, risk-averse, and lack creativity. Your best bet would be to try to scout out a multinational company that understands this.
    Language is a huge barrier. Talking to a taxi driver in Portuguese and talking to technical people in Portuguese is vastly different.
    As an electrical geek is there any chance that you are a software geek too? Your best bet might be to follow the entrepreneurial path. Start your own business. People are hungry for quality workmanship here. You might even try your hand as an electrician. I can guarantee you that most of the workers who showed up at my door (or usually didn’t show up) had no license and little skill.
    And, finally, get yourself ready for the cultural aspects of being a part of a Brazilian family. Make sure to spend some long visits with your girl’s family before you actually get married and make the move. It’s definitely a challenge.

    [/QUOTE]

    One of the main reasons why I think our relationship would work out is mainly because our cultures are similar. I do know that Brazilian girls are very attached to their families and it doesn’t bother me at all (it’s pretty much the same in my culture). I am not a big software geek. I do program but treat it as a hobby.
    I was thinking about starting business in Brazil. However, I heard that due to corruption it will be extremely hard to have business that actually will bring you profit.
  • #266809

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz]Think out of the box. There are lots of losers in this forum. Don’t let them let you down. Of course some jobs will be beyond your reach without a CREA registration, but there is a huge services sector filled with unprepared professionals. You can easily find a niche for yourself. I think you can make from R$5,000 to R$15,000 a month. Choose a good place to live, like any large city in the Sao Paulo state countryside and start your research now.[/QUOTE]

    Lmao that is little harsh but I will definitely take a look at CREA registration more closely. From what I found it is just transferring credits but I cannot find if I have to take any tests. I am still looking at that option.
  • #266810

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=shinrai]Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young. Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here. However it builds character and experience. I have to ask: Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be. Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month. We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish). Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary. And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time. Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school. They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+. Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl. Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do. Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean. Good luck!
    [/QUOTE]

    No it is not. I am originally from Baku, Azerbaijan and I have mix of Russian and Azeri blood. I look Caucasian.
    I do understand that nobody will pay me 15k a month. I was looking at around 6k or 7k. I have graduated without any loans due to scholarships.
  • #266811

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=jennerjcruz]I share Steven’s point of view.
    Sven, finrudd and shinrai have the wrong mindset and are the kind of people you should avoid. Nevertheless, shinrai is right when he says race plays a role here.[/QUOTE]

    You are the lowest level of troll. The unfunny kind.

    [/QUOTE]

    I’m a little bit annoyed having my view (whatever it was) shared by jennercruz
  • #266812

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=shinrai]Good on you for thinking about coming down here while you’re young. Be aware that everything is a total pain in the rear end down here. However it builds character and experience. I have to ask: Is English your first language? Your skin color also greatly affects how people treat you and what your salary will be. Keep that in mind.
    Getting your CREA should probably be at the bottom of your list at the moment.
    Unless you have some unobtainium expertise or experience you will definitely not be making R$15k a month. We pay our wet-behind-the-ears engineers the minimum salary of roughly R$5k (ish). Do the math and you will not be paying off your student loan anytime soon on that salary. And if you factor in living the same lifestyle as you do in the USA you’ll be underwater in a very short amount of time. Oh yeah the economy down here is about to crumble like a Jenga tower.
    I would recommend teaching at an international school. They’ll put you up in a nice flat in a decent area and pay you R$10k+. Get your feet wet and see how it works out with the girl. Be sure to tread lightly so you don’t get locked down to this country like so many people here do. Visit the romance section on this board and you’ll see what I mean. Good luck!
    [/QUOTE]

    I think that is the main reason why I am planning to move to Brazil. I came here on student visa and it’s ridiculously hard (almost impossible) to find a job that will sponsor me for work visa. Even if it does, moving my gf to the USA will be even harder (since she will graduate from Brazilian school)
  • #266813

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=eemamedo]

    I was thinking about starting business in Brazil. However, I heard that due to corruption it will be extremely hard to have business that actually will bring you profit.

    [/QUOTE]

    Quite the contrary. The corruption in Brazil has allowed many businesses to make out quite well. It’s all in knowing how to play the game.
  • #266814

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=WilliButz]Apart of mindset, correct documents (RNE, CTPS, CPF) are an issue.

    Companys avoid sponsoring work visas because it is a lot of work.
    Being abroad, you can only start the permanent visa process if you are already married. This is the fastest way to get your docs done in Brasil.
    Being in Brasil, apart of permanent visa based on marrige you can get a visa based on stable union. Takes much more time than this permanencia based on marriage.
    Depends on what you prefer (and how long you know your girlfriend). How much work experience does she have? I am wondering that she never told you about CREA…

    [/QUOTE]

    We have been dating for a yr. She has told me about CREA but she told me that you need it only if you sign papers on projects. In the US, this is similar to EIT (Engineer-in-Training) license, which most of us don’t have (unless you are civil or mechanical). She is still in school and will graduate in a year. I plan to move to Brazil when she graduates and gets a job.
    What do you mean by visa based on stable union? If it takes more time, why would I go with that option?
  • #266815

    RealConsult
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]

    That’s why it couldn’t be 1-5 now couldn’t it. [/QUOTE]
    No, pillars 1-5 are already taken
    [QUOTE=sven]
    Besides Ismaili islam has 7 pilars, Jihad being the 7th.

    [/QUOTE]

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    Well, those people are heretics…
  • #266816

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=eemamedo]

    I think that is the main reason why I am planning to move to Brazil. I came here on student visa and it’s ridiculously hard (almost impossible) to find a job that will sponsor me for work visa. Even if it does, moving my gf to the USA will be even harder (since she will graduate from Brazilian school)

    [/QUOTE]

    I don’t know what course of study your girlfriend is pursuing in the Brazilian system but I can say, without a doubt, that moving her to the U.S. will be infinitely easier than for you to move to Brazil. Simply start down the road today of getting her a fiance K-1 visa. Even if she gets a job as a school crossing guard in your home town, your standard of living will be multiple times higher than in ES. Plus, you won’t have to endure the disgrace of being a poor gringo living in close proximity to her family.
    The major difficulty, however, with this plan of action is that the Brazilian umbilical cord is very strong and very long and your girlfriend would probably be crying every day to move back close to her mama.
  • #266818

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=eemamedo]

    I think that is the main reason why I am planning to move to Brazil. I came here on student visa and it’s ridiculously hard (almost impossible) to find a job that will sponsor me for work visa. Even if it does, moving my gf to the USA will be even harder (since she will graduate from Brazilian school)

    [/QUOTE]

    I don’t know what course of study your girlfriend is pursuing in the Brazilian system but I can say, without a doubt, that moving her to the U.S. will be infinitely easier than for you to move to Brazil. Simply start down the road today of getting her a fiance K-1 visa. Even if she gets a job as a school crossing guard in your home town, your standard of living will be multiple times higher than in ES. Plus, you won’t have to endure the disgrace of being a poor gringo living in close proximity to her family.
    The major difficulty, however, with this plan of action is that the Brazilian umbilical cord is very strong and very long and your girlfriend would probably be crying every day to move back close to her mama.

    [/QUOTE]

    K-1 visa is only for spouses of US citizen. As I have mentioned in my post I came here on F-1 visa and I will get H1 visa. Now, if I marry her she will be able to come here and be student only. To get working visa, she will have to go through all of the troubles with sponsorship.
    She is studying Electrical Engineering. Little different branch of EE though (my concentration is power systems). She was here for the whole year and I saw her talking to her parents at least 2-3 times a week but I have never seen her crying. Again, this was only for a year but there will be no problem with her parents coming to visit us in the US. The main problem is that it is extremely hard to get work here in the US if you are not citizen or GC holder.
  • #266819

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=eemamedo][QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=eemamedo]

    I think that is the main reason why I am planning to move to Brazil. I came here on student visa and it’s ridiculously hard (almost impossible) to find a job that will sponsor me for work visa. Even if it does, moving my gf to the USA will be even harder (since she will graduate from Brazilian school)

    [/QUOTE]

    I don’t know what course of study your girlfriend is pursuing in the Brazilian system but I can say, without a doubt, that moving her to the U.S. will be infinitely easier than for you to move to Brazil. Simply start down the road today of getting her a fiance K-1 visa. Even if she gets a job as a school crossing guard in your home town, your standard of living will be multiple times higher than in ES. Plus, you won’t have to endure the disgrace of being a poor gringo living in close proximity to her family.
    The major difficulty, however, with this plan of action is that the Brazilian umbilical cord is very strong and very long and your girlfriend would probably be crying every day to move back close to her mama.

    [/QUOTE]

    K-1 visa is only for spouses of US citizen. As I have mentioned in my post I came here on F-1 visa and I will get H1 visa. Now, if I marry her she will be able to come here and be student only. To get working visa, she will have to go through all of the troubles with sponsorship.
    She is studying Electrical Engineering. Little different branch of EE though (my concentration is power systems). She was here for the whole year and I saw her talking to her parents at least 2-3 times a week but I have never seen her crying. Again, this was only for a year but there will be no problem with her parents coming to visit us in the US. The main problem is that it is extremely hard to get work here in the US if you are not citizen or GC holder.

    [/QUOTE]

    And trust me on how hard it is to get a job. I have graduated with honors from University of Houston and I have two internships and I still can’t land a job. Imagine, how hard will it be for her, She is doing her internship with pretty big company in Chicago so that will definitely be a plus on her resume but the sponsorship issue will always be there.
  • #266820

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    It’s tough, but marriage is the only great way you guys can both be in the same place and work. Definitely will have a better standard of living in the US than Brasil. This coming from someone who chose Brasil, been here 3 years, but thinking of moving home.

  • #266821

    Anonymous

    I really don’t wish to be pickybut I wish the op would at least make some effort to make the thread title atleast a little grammatical. The University of Houston must be curling its toesin embarrassment. Moving to Brazil for Engineer â‚Ǩ what does that actually mean?

  • #266822

    kenalag
    Member

    [QUOTE=eemamedo]

    What do you mean by visa based on stable union? If it takes more time, why would I go with that option?

    [/QUOTE]

    Look for it. It is like wedding “light”…
    Cheers
    Willi
  • #266823

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=eemamedo]

    And trust me on how hard it is to get a job. I have graduated with honors from University of Houston and I have two internships and I still can’t land a job. Imagine, how hard will it be for her, She is doing her internship with pretty big company in Chicago so that will definitely be a plus on her resume but the sponsorship issue will always be there.

    [/QUOTE]

    In Brazil, interns will usually become employees as soon as they graduate.
  • #266824

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]

    I really don’t wish to be pickybut I wish the op would at least make some effort to make the thread title atleast a little grammatical. The University of Houston must be curling its toesin embarrassment. Moving to Brazil for Engineer â‚Ǩ what does that actually mean?

    [/QUOTE]

    Haha mate I have noticed that today morning when I have already gotten about 4 pgs of replies. What I actually meant was “Moving to Brazil as an Engineer”.Not sure if I can edit the thread anymore :(
  • #266825

    fabirox21
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven][QUOTE=eemamedo]

    And trust me on how hard it is to get a job. I have graduated with honors from University of Houston and I have two internships and I still can’t land a job. Imagine, how hard will it be for her, She is doing her internship with pretty big company in Chicago so that will definitely be a plus on her resume but the sponsorship issue will always be there.

    [/QUOTE]

    In Brazil, interns will usually become employees as soon as they graduate.

    [/QUOTE]

    In Brazil maybe… But in the US nobody guarantees that. Most of HRs are quite lazy with paperwork for interns. For example, I was an intern for a big Oil & Gas contractor and I was not offered a contract only because I am not a US citizen.
  • #266826

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=kissmyjazz]

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    (…)
    value=”vi”>Vietnamese< value=”cy”>Welsh< value=”yi”>Yiddish

    [/QUOTE]

    WTF did you mean by that?

    sven2014-05-21 17:05:15

  • #266827

    Steven
    Participant

    I’m getting tired of this post. Signing off.

  • #266833

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jennerjcruz] It was funny to realise Sven has researched my curriculum. Anyway, this week I had lunch with a quite successful young German engineer who has been in Brazil for the last 3 years. He doesn’t have CREA registration, nor do I. Bottom line is life has many paths and only you know which one is the best for you.[/QUOTE]
    Its not really “research” now is it. One just asks Google and a lot on a person just pops up. This forum attracts trolls like sugar attracts ants.
    O also know quite a few that don’t have CREA. It all depends on what you do. If you work in software, or as a manager in some civil engineering company it really isn’t necessary, just like not having OAB will not be a problem if you studied law but work as a managing director of a company.
    On the other hand. In my building there is a company with 6 floors of CREA members. They design oil platforms. (including P-36, which makes me think that CREA really doesn’t mean anything)
    CREA is just one of those burrocratic idiosyncrasies of Brazil. You may have studied engineering, but are only an engineer once you make yearly payments to some organ or other.

  • #266836

    celso
    Member

    Young? Come to Brazil and give it a try.
    Remember, you can always leave…. Most people do.
    Other option:
    I suggest you build up savings and come back many years from now. Might even wait for retirement years…
    Brazil will have a bust and then you can buy in cheaply.

  • #266837

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire] Young? Come to Brazil and give it a try.
    Remember, you can always leave…. Most people do.
    [/QUOTE]
    That about says it all.

  • #266838

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=kissmyjazz]There is only 5 pillars in Islam though

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    [/QUOTE]

    Oh, how my cheeks are red. Embarrassed
    While “correction mode” is on: There are only 5 pillars in Islam.
  • #266840

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Brazil has an amazing amount of great places to retire.

  • #266842

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=eemamedo]I do understand that nobody will pay me 15k a month. I was looking at around 6k or 7k. I have graduated without any loans due to scholarships. [/QUOTE]
    I would be *shocked* if you made that with no experience and barely any Portuguese.

  • #266843

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy]Brazil has an amazing amount of great places to retire. [/QUOTE]

    I have been thinking the opposite – I can live in Brazil while I am in my mid-life, but I don’t see myself retiring here. Mostly because of the increasing lack of security, recent events in Pernambuco spring to mind where 24 hours without a fairly brutal police force leads to mass looting and killings. I think mass killings is a fair comment for what I remember being one person murdered for every hour the police were on strike..
    So, as an elderly person, unless things change drastically in the next 30 years, do I want to be navigating the roads here, trying to get medical care here (remembering private sector if I can afford it won’t be where I want to live mostly) and trying not to be too much of a potential victim of crime? Probably not – there are other places in Latin America that seem to be safer and potentially offer a quality of life for a pensioner than Brazil currently looks able to offer.
    However, if we are talking about retiring at 45 – 50, then I totally agree!
  • #266846

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    True, maybe it has a lot of great places to go on vacation…didn’t think of the medical care aspect.

  • #266855

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy] True, maybe it has a lot of great places to go on vacation…didn’t think of the medical care aspect. ¬†[/QUOTE]
    What medical care aspect? Healthcare by SUS is FREE!

  • #266878

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Ha, and of great quality in the beach/retirement areas!

  • #266884

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=andrewfroboy] True, maybe it has a lot of great places to go on vacation…didn’t think of the medical care aspect. ¬†[/QUOTE]
    What medical care aspect? Healthcare by SUS is FREE!
    [/QUOTE]
    Odds,of kidnapping or violent death combined with nice SUS care causing riots make Brazil a poor retirement choice, Not to mention the wheelchair unfriendly nature of the place…

  • #266886

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    No doubt, I recant my statement. I will have a vacation home maybe…I still have another 35-40 years till then, so who knows what the world will look like by then.

  • #269614

    kaur_
    Member

    They need alot of electrical engineers in the petroleum business, if you got the right papers and experience. Its 4/4 rotation, but very good paid for brazilian salary. 4 weeks is long away, not like what we are used to in the norwegian continental shelf. And Id be careful in brazil, not the same level of safety as we are used to. But anyway, its not more dangerous than you make it yourself. I heard rumors they gonna make 200 000 jobs in brazil related to the petroleum industry before 2020.
    No doubt one of these jobs gonna be mine :)

  • #273321

    Anonymous

    @OP
    Have you tried looking for a job in Dubai as well? 80% of the population is foreign and you will earn more compared to Brasil. Work for 2 years, learn Portuguese, and plan to enter the Brazilian job market with options and greater bargaining power. newyork372015-02-21 07:11:31

  • #27531

    M_Paula
    Member

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