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  • #265748

    Eric B
    Member

    Would like to hear, for a refreshing change, from foreigners who are happy and successful living in Brasil. The recent posts have been so negative and pathetic that I wonder why the authors don’t pack their bags and return to their countries of origin. There are many gringoes who are doing very well in Brasil. They have started businesses, married Brazilian and are happy, found jobs (other than “teaching English!!) and do not regret their decision. I have lived in Brazil, on and off for last 10 years, have always been treated fairly, have never been assaulted, have never been cheated and have made long lasting friends. So let’s hear from the winners and not the whiners and loosers who will probably not be happy anywhere.
    Concerning the gentleman from Seattle, stay where you are, I would hate for you to suffer PTSD.

  • #265752

    Claude: ClapClapClap
    While the forum often seems to be overpopulated with the whiners and haters, I think the (silent) majority are content with their lives here. Granted, Brasil’s not perfect, there are MANY challenges, but once you let go of your NorthAmerican-UK-European expectations, things fall in place.
    I’ve gone from tourist visa home buyer, to permanent resident visa small business owner, to full fledged naturalized Brasilian, all in less than a decade. I’m originally from the US, and I have absolutely no desire to return (other than for shopping trips at Home Depot).
    Once I naturalized, and no longer required to jump through the hoops and hurdles of the constantly changing parameters of the investor visa, I turned that enterprise over to my socio. Win-win. I’m now focusing on a ‘turismo rural’ project in mountains. I purchased about 60 acres of pristine wilderness for a fraction of what something similar might cost in the US, if even obtainable. The region sits on top of what is known as the Guarani Aquifer, which just so happens to be the largest known reservior of fresh water on the entire planet (aquifers in the US are running dry).While real estate these days in the coastal cities of Brasil (as well as SP) are astronomical, IMO, rural property is where the bargains presently exist in Brasil. Go west young man!
    Being in a rural location has it’s own particular set of problems and challenges (like rural cultures in any country), but what doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger! Wink

  • #265753

    Eric B
    Member

    Well done! What a pleasure to hear something positive instead of the regurgitation of hate and endless criticism.
    All the best for the future

  • #265755

    Anonymous

    Given the recent â‚ǨÀúCharlie Sheen’ definition of winning on this forum Iwould prefer to respond by thinking of your quest for good news as, seeking successstories.

    I’m certain that more than a few of us are unlike that old yellow doghowling because he’s sitting on a thorn but too lazy to move. Freedom from the tyrannyof Brazil is but plane ticket away for those of us with enough savvy to shedany of perceived shackles or encumbrances that might cause our profound unhappiness.

    Maybe there are a few that have locked their fortune into Brazil and now cannotafford to leave and therefore feel themselves trapped in a love marriage to anintransigent Brazilian who is unwilling to leave the mother country. Such asituation might indeed represent the thorn causing their legitimate excuse for howlingin complaint. Equally I’m sure that any Brazil hating gringo otherwise forcedto stay in an anchor-marriage to a dusky maiden would require that she not onlyhave Halle Berry’s good looks and a pot of gold but also three pert tits and awilling nature.

    The success attributed to the avid readership of â‚ǨÀúVent your Frustrations’may be two-fold: Therapeutic relief in the form of assurance that one is not alonewhen forced to suffer the fools of this world and the other, as the Germanswould say, schadenfreude: taking joy in the misfortune of others.

    Let us examine the tedium if not the likely irritation by one suchsuccess story:

    “I was transferred to Brazil by my humongous multinational six years ago;the penthouse package was irresistible [token salary here and the majority inthe Caymans]. My surplus income has since seen great success in the bond market.Met my lovely virgin wife here and when I bought her that SUV she gratefullysigned the pre-nup; she has no family. Brazil is so wonderful that I daily burstinto song in the shower while the young maid lathers me all over and scrubs myback.”

  • #265757

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Esprit]

    Given the recent â‚ǨÀúCharlie Sheen’ definition of winning on this forum Iwould prefer to respond by thinking of your quest for good news as, seeking successstories.

    I’m certain that more than a few of us are unlike that old yellow doghowling because he’s sitting on a thorn but too lazy to move. Freedom from the tyrannyof Brazil is but plane ticket away for those of us with enough savvy to shedany of perceived shackles or encumbrances that might cause our profound unhappiness.

    Maybe there are a few that have locked their fortune into Brazil and now cannotafford to leave and therefore feel themselves trapped in a love marriage to anintransigent Brazilian who is unwilling to leave the mother country. Such asituation might indeed represent the thorn causing their legitimate excuse for howlingin complaint. Equally I’m sure that any Brazil hating gringo otherwise forcedto stay in an anchor-marriage to a dusky maiden would require that she not onlyhave Halle Berry’s good looks and a pot of gold but also three pert tits and awilling nature.

    The success attributed to the avid readership of â‚ǨÀúVent your Frustrations’may be two-fold: Therapeutic relief in the form of assurance that one is not alonewhen forced to suffer the fools of this world and the other, as the Germanswould say, schadenfreude: taking joy in the misfortune of others.

    Let us examine the tedium if not the likely irritation by one suchsuccess story:

    “I was transferred to Brazil by my humongous multinational six years ago;the penthouse package was irresistible [token salary here and the majority inthe Caymans]. My surplus income has since seen great success in the bond market.Met my lovelyvirginwife here and when I bought her that SUV she gratefullysigned the pre-nup; she has no family. Brazil is so wonderful that I daily burstinto song in the shower while the young maid lathers me all over and scrubs myback.”

    [/QUOTE]
    “Virgin”? here in Brazil? How old was she when you married her, 12 y/o ? LOL

  • #265760

    graham
    Participant

    Having lived in Brasil for years, I have been fairly successful and I am happy with my life. I meet and have met many good people; some became good friends. I do not know if this qualifies me as a winner, because I do not know if I can really take another election season of total BS with all the accomanying investigations. Politics is absurdo anywhere, though. Do I still get a prize?

  • #265762

    hoganti
    Member

    I’m happy enough not to start a thread bitching and moaning about lists of trivial things….in my book that makes me a winner

  • #265765

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=hpeak13]I’m happy enough not to start a thread bitching and moaning about lists of trivial things….in my book that makes me a winner[/QUOTE]

    Yeah, but you are an english teacher, so according to the OP you don’t qualify Confused
  • #265769

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    What’s wrong with teaching English?

  • #265770

    Eric B
    Member

    GYN
    There is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching English or any other subject for that matter. If you are happy fantastic!

  • #265772

    Anonymous

    i am willing to call myself a winner as long as don’t have to drink any michelob light.

  • #265775

    815
    Member

    I strangled a guy last night until he tapped out thereby making me a winner in our interaction, but I got strangled two times by a far superior man making the balance 2 losses to one win. I guess I am a loser. Cry

    But I am happy so by Claude’s scale I am back in the “W” column.
  • #265776

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=ObviouslyGYN]What’s wrong with teaching English? [/QUOTE]

    Whether intentional or not there can be little doubt thatthe implication of the comment is one of a disparaging tone and this isillustrated by the insertion of quotation marks that are used in a somewhat factiousway.

    However the intrepid Claude inadvertently makes a seriouspoint about gringos struggling to survive in Brazil. Other than bona fideteachers, teaching English is the default occupation of desperation for somegringos finding little alternative opportunity given a range of restrictionsthat the foreigners faces; most of which restrictions are well documented onthis forum.

    It’seven possible that, regardless of skilled vocation, a lot of gringos will neverreach their full potential while they remain in Brazil. Yet there are a fewlucky souls who, like the one-eyed man in the land of the blind, can be anundeserving king in this paradoxical land of the Latinos. We’re here because we’rehere because we are here.

  • #265781

    San-g
    Member

    Well, like GF, I have managed to buy a nice spot of jungle outside Sao Paulo, and am well on the way to planning a tourism-based venture that will enable me a change from the more corporate life that I have in Sao Paulo today. I will no doubt lose my shirt in the venture, and end up having to sell everything for a loss, if it is not taken away from me by some crazy Tribunal Judge somewhere for an employment mishap!

    So, I consider myself a winner, but it certainly doesn’t stop me being a whiner too!
  • #265782

    San-g
    Member

    Wow – I have reverted back into my 3-post alter-ego from 2005….it’s like I am in a time warp, and still living in the UK!

    Let me see if I can work out where my REAL login has gone Wacko
  • #265785

    Anonymous

    Well,after the passage of some 24 hours since the creation of this thread, I’mwondering if the op will lead by example and share any detail of his successesbeyond the significance of actually surviving, unharmed and making friends, whileliving “on and off” in Brazil?

    Smile
  • #265788

    celso
    Member

    The vast majority pack up and go away. Brazil is not a good choice for most people, especially people with small children.
    Ready for Dilma part two?
    I am content with what I have yet am growing tired of the lawlessness and increasing violence.
    Four winners? Not much for such a big country.

  • #265789

    Eric B
    Member

    Esprit
    I will not take the bait. Regardless of how I answer, my responses will be dissected, criticted and lead to numerous negative posts. I was pleased to see that the majority of the replies, to my original post, were positive, which re-inforces my belief that the silent majority, as Gringo Floripa pointed out, are too busy enjoying life in Brasil and are the masters of their own destiny.
    In all due respect

  • #265790

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    I’m certainly not yet considered a “winner” here in Brazil but things are OK. It’s been painfully obvious that I arrived with an infatuation with this country that has since mellowed to reality. On the plus side, business is improving, money will be finally flowing in better and my consistant annoyance which clouded me for the first 6 months has been replaced with acceptance and a deeper understanding of how things run here.

    I ran into a John Deer executive who in the course of a 2 hours flight, told me a similar story of how he has adapted to Brazilian culture finishing in stating that although his workers are never able to consistantly be on a completion schedule that he believes is necessary to finish projects, the work always gets done on time. They push the last 2 days and do the work of 4-5 days. Crazy but it seems to work here.
    Not yet a success story but I’m working on it.
    And my wife teaches English….
    -Marc
  • #265791

    San-g
    Member

    As someone said earlier – we’re here because we’re here, because we’re here etc. While I have grown accustomed to Brazil in the 16 years I have been coming here regularly, the last 6 of which living here full time, I can’t yet say that I feel totally comfortable here. I have a very nice niche carved out for me here, which works for my wife and I, and my own part of Brazil is great, once I shut and double-lock the other other part of Brazil outside of a night time. However, I can’t say, or really contemplate thinking about, how things might have been had I taken a different country to settle in as home – Central America, Asia or even North America (which was on the cards at one stage).
    Brazil is not easy for anyone I guess, and aspects of living here are equally as rewarding as they are galling on occasions. The next few years is going to be interesting though…

  • #265794

    815
    Member

    To Fintan and GF,

    Please get in contact with me when your projects have solidified a little more. My “baby momma” (for lack of better term as we are in separation limbo but on great terms thus far) has a tourism agency and we have been discussing doing English immersion tourism. We have already done day trips with Canoar (a white water rafting company) with great success. We have a lot of possible clients. GF, you might be a little to far being down South, but let’s still talk!
  • #265796

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Claude]Esprit
    I will not take the bait. Regardless of how I answer, my responses will be dissected, criticted and lead to numerous negative posts. I was pleased to see that the majority of the replies, to my original post, were positive, which re-inforces my belief that the silent majority, as Gringo Floripa pointed out, are too busy enjoying life in Brasil and are the masters of their own destiny.
    In all due respect[/QUOTE]

    Given those understandable expectations from the plebeianelement on this forum, don’t you otherwise think that it’s a little disingenuousto expect the members to provide their answers when they would risk theidentical responses that you fear? Incidentally, and obviously excludingEnglish teaching, you provoke the imagination and curiosity about your implied personalsuccess in mastering destiny; success that might incite negative posts. Themind boggles! LOLLOLLOL

  • #265797

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA]To Fintan and GF,

    Please get in contact with me when your projects have solidified a little more. My “baby momma” (for lack of better term as we are in separation limbo but on great terms thus far) has a tourism agency and we have been discussing doing English immersion tourism. We have already done day trips with Canoar (a white water rafting company) with great success. We have a lot of possible clients. GF, you might be a little to far being down South, but let’s still talk!

    [/QUOTE]

    White water rafting? If it doesn’t have a casino and a buffetit ain’t seaworthy! Shocked

  • #265798

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit][QUOTE=Paulistano USA]To Fintan and GF,

    Please get in contact with me when your projects have solidified a little more. My “baby momma” (for lack of better term as we are in separation limbo but on great terms thus far) has a tourism agency and we have been discussing doing English immersion tourism. We have already done day trips with Canoar (a white water rafting company) with great success. We have a lot of possible clients. GF, you might be a little to far being down South, but let’s still talk!

    [/QUOTE]

    White water rafting? If it doesn’t have a casino and a buffetit ain’t seaworthy! Shocked

    [/QUOTE]

    LOL
    They are extremely profession even for a Brazilian company and they import all the “boatches”, that’s how they pronounce them. They were quite sea worthy vessels.
  • #265804

    A postscript on the winner/happiness quotientâ‚Ǩ¬¶. Going from tourist visa to naturalization (and not via the ‘easy route’ of marriage), I beat the burro-cracia beast, so that’s one in the win column for me, as far as I’m concerned!
    Yet if you’ll notice in my initial post, I used the word ‘content’ and not ‘happy’. Happiness is when you find a nota cemon the sidewalk; unhappiness is when the other guy opens his wallet and realizes he’s just lost a nota cem. Happiness is based on externals and emotions (like having one’s back scrubbed by a dusky maiden). I think those that bitch and moan the most about how miserable they are here had their external stimuli ‘expire’.
    Contentment, on the other hand, is a state of mind. ”Herb’ and/or drink can help bring about that altered state of contentment. Wink
    And speaking of herb, I figure if the rural tourism thing doesn’t pan out, I’m already positioned to become a ‘grower’, should Brasilia have the sense to decriminalize the hemp plant, and make it available for adult consumption, like cigs and booze.
    And if not, I can always grow wasabi. Big smile
    @Paulistano, grower or not, sempre bem-vindo bro!

  • #265806

    Anonymous

    A couple of quotes that are worth absorbing if one is hellbent on the pursuit of happiness; be careful what you wish for:

    “To be stupid, selfish, and have good health are threerequirements for happiness, though if stupidity is lacking, all is lost.”

    “A lifetime of happiness! No man alive could bear it; it wouldbe hell on earth.”

  • #265807

    jaenicoll
    Member

    Gringofloripa, you are in Floripa and are apparently doing well, you are not allowed to be unhappy, and are for sure winning. I’m sorry, but after living in Rio for so long and then moving to Curitiba I am of the opinion that anyone living in the South is successful and winning by Brazzer standards, even us “English teachers”……Well except maybe those living in Porto Alegre, which does suck.

  • #265881

    sergiu
    Member

    Amen, I hear you. My husband and I are not Brazilian, came here and like a lot of things about Brazil.
    I can say if you had a forum in the States like this, you would get a lot of negative comments about the U.S. as can be seen even on facebook.
    The one thing I can say is any place we live has its challenges, it is just as humans we concentrate on all the negative stuff in our world.
    I think it the long run we all need to appreciate what we have and what is good in this world.

  • #265915

    vcbkol
    Member

    I find it more dign to be responding through resisting in any sense to the absurdity that governs here everything; and also: if you pose so much that you are a winner here, back to your country you must have been an insignificant unicelular organism (Yes, you, the self-proclamed weener).

    You may hear from the real winners themselvs about facing(being revolted and keeping on love than on the sanity or on decent security issues for themselves and for the loved ones)- the compelling desgust towards many unpricy but vital human requirements. SO THE REAL WINNERS ARE THOSE WHO WAKE UP EVERY MORNING AND THAT THEY ARE STILL HERE, STILL NOT DEAD OR …..FILL THE BLANKS.
    Success is all about being an un-crappy presence, to give and to receive love, to not humiliate yourself and nobody else for nothing in the world and for nobody and to be able to conduct with decency the challanges that most of the people on this world go through : to be in one piece home, healthy, and able to work to sustain your familly; as for the rest that do not understand or do not have nothing to hang on better than multiplying fictional unpalpable fortunes, go to show off with those you think you are competing with or with those that envy you exactly how you cherish those that you consider better than yourselves.
    Or the real winners probably should not even step the foot around here but sometimes the person some choose to share the entire life with deserves more than putting yourself in such a low decency on being just a person between others..

    gringovacilao2014-04-21 17:16:51

  • #265918

    graham
    Participant

    ?

  • #265919

    vcbkol
    Member

    Hi, if you want to point out so simple only through a question mark that you don-t understand what I mean or to whom I may be addressing – I talk about keeping one in a piece in B and not getting crazy or ruining a very nice familly by throwing the towel – and after specifying that I am obviosuly talking about Brasil – I am directing some of my thoughts to those that may feel as they are the real winners in Brazil after they met a few chicks or after they got married and they opened some bussiness and now they think that they hit the jackpot and now they finally scored maing some lousy money while here nothing works and 99% of the people are fake. And the rest, just check the news…

    gringovacilao2014-04-21 17:40:40

  • #265922

    Anonymous

    Gringovacilao, I have no doubt that you have somethingto say and that you genuinely think that you are saying it however I must tellyou that your writings amount to not much more that incoherent gobbledegook. Tryagain, your call is important to us.

  • #265924

    vcbkol
    Member

    I don-t know about who do you mean by “us” but I saw that you dig well some stuff so I’ll try to simplify at least this time. I am addressing only to 2 cathegories of people in here: to those that share a sense of desperation on moving or continuing to live here without tearing appart beautiful parts, let-s say, and the 2nd cathegory is of those semi-doct brazilians that do not realize that they can make a little effort to understand that are not the cherry, neither the seed on top of nothing.

    I possess no writing skills; probably I have too many things to express out of my house cause it would be a pitty to bring so often at home my indignation towards the Brazilian so called conduite. I don-t know your case and I am not that eager but I suppose that besides familial conversation, which, in my case, goes along with my dear one on any subject and while this does not limitate me to nothing, out of the house there is no such provocation as thinking more about the common Brazilian may go..in a dialogue..without ever challenging or requiring so much thinking or minimum general knowledge.
    I ain’t no donkey with a lion skin in terms of getting retarded by my surrounding but this does not mean that I am not aware that this may happen even to enlightened chritics such as you, as me, as whoever may probably look for ideas, not about limited patterns as in the class-room full of special specials.

    gringovacilao2014-04-21 19:53:40

  • #265927

    Anonymous

    Gringovacilao, in the interests of brevity and to help understand what you are attemptingto say, why not write in your native language and I’ll run it through an on-linetranslator?

  • #265928

    vcbkol
    Member

    Maybe just because I am no native English speaker it may facilitate the guess on my language construction to those natives that rape more than me the English language.

    So even if you seem pretty interested into following my thoughts, that-s all I carry. No need to fake interest into these sort of curious depts.

    gringovacilao2014-04-21 20:08:14

  • #265933

    Well I’m not successful financially here in Brazil. But it’s mostly because I haven’t tried to be. I’m doing almost exactly what I want to do and I stay pretty happy.
    I have some issues, of course; continuing illegal permanence is always in the back of my head but I stopped proper worrying years ago. I have down times, mostly waiting for something (changing of water levels / a paddling partner / an opportunity to make a little money). Sometimes I pass periods of time with less than 20 reais in my pocket. But I am always able to make friends and carve out a little niche for myself wherever I end up, and I am always able to scrape together what I need to make my next move. My fluency in Portuguese and tendency to frequent areas with low population density and little to no foreign presence makes it exceedingly easy to befriend the local people.
    I spend long periods of time (20-60 days) living off the land and the river, and derive great satisfaction from doing so. I also spend long chunks of time living in the small towns of the interior of the state of Amazonas and Para. This can be frustrating in some respects, for some of the same reasons living anywhere in Brazil can be frustrating, but I rarely meet truly obnoxious people, or at least, true scumbags. Many are loud, obscene, ignorant. But they are mostly good people at heart. I have made some lasting friendships, and had a lot of fun. I haven’t put down specific roots anywhere in Brazil, yet, but I do live here — because I think after one year if stops being a trip and starts being your life.
    Anyways, I am happy and successful in my eyes — so I’m a winner, wo-hoo

  • #265935

    Anonymous

    Gringovacilao,at the outset I should make it clear that thus far, from what I can roughlydecipher from your ramblings, little of what you say has anything approaching uniquenessor of novelty value that might have any great interest to me; it’s just that itappears that you wish to communicate and as you are failing in this endeavour itmust be either frustrating for you or an enjoyable drug enhanced diversion.

  • #265936

    Anonymous

    vou_de_remo ,youappear to live the life of a character in a Hemingway novel.

  • #265937

    [QUOTE=Esprit]vou_de_remo ,youappear to live the life of a character in a Hemingway novel.

    [/QUOTE]
    Well, I never caught a fish that big. And there is no P.O.M., yet. Kinda picky on that front…

  • #265938

    vcbkol
    Member

    Esprit – I strongly hope that I learnt my lesson; I-ve never been following no forums before and I only arrived here by my desire to put out my constant -pissed the hell off – posture. This, by a huge post. Looks like even if you are pretty much a human, you simply gather what forums and the outdoors Brazilian walking fauna and hyper annoying gringos in fleh and blood must receive from me from now on – super ignore and a lousy pat on your shoulders.

    I don-t need more desgust than at this level so I can-t do nothing moreto you than to recommand you some drinks; does not make you a better presence the fact that you give crappy compliments as that one with Hemingway or to call me a Bozo from my first post here not even after reading my delirium abut this crappy environment in Brasil. Also I do not claim to become a super bad ass commenter reaching x thuousands of points cause we are not all your students,, also, not everybody is belonging to that elite that gives you trouble with dealing with their unsuccessfull offsprings. You may hate so much them as much as you envy them while posing into the good guy while looking for bussiness opportunities the jeitinho B style.
    I will avoid explaining mysef partialy or in any sense to entities as such; it-s like I say to some Brazilian Bringos with B that I really don-t give a care about any other gringoes cause they should either be crazy, but hardcore psychos as I frequently met, either some -sem nocao- gringorrinnos, annoying, naive, and mommy-s little boys from the suburbs that believe the world just opened to them or with super mercantilist know it alls that enjoy themselves patronizing the world while owning a pathetic bussiness.
    It-s not your merit for my decision but for what use to waste more time after having to deal with suc bright minds that have an opinion for anybody, for anything, and without even being questioned or solicitated. Most of the times those who like to give advices to others and with the same pleasure and interest jump to other’s throat just for not following one’s requirements.
    I see some cool people around but same old story: more and more hypocrisy, hate and arrogance at any corner and all is getting to the surface is about extracting any bennefits. I puked out my venom on my post where I sort of revenged on the most of Brazilians for their rudeneness and lack of empathy and ignorance/arrogance to not punch somebody in the street – I am 30(now you can show off you wiseness probably cause you are older) and since I was even younger I have never throwed a punch to attack somebody(without defending myself) but when even a walk in the street or a fast step out to buy cigs becomes a hellish monsturosity because of the lack of what I have already said repeteadly…then it goes on the same story on this forum where one like you thinks he is better than others.
    I hope you will manage now to go around my formulations in English; I also have thought that this is a forum for gringos in general, not being burnt on a spike for my lack of expression in a general coherent delimitation in English. The big problem that I have here is that the big number of un-necessary biological material surpass a decent proportion and fare rapport. Wish you luck to perpetuate on and on this jeitinho – “my crap is perfume and other’s is toxic “and each time someone does not please you on the Internet mangle him just because you want so to have this just to make you feel better.
    As for people that really, really would need to stay sane here, I recommend to avoid any sort of sources that perpetuate agressivity and fakeness. I consider completely un-necessary and uthopical any comprehension from the exterior one could expect from a fictious world full of nice people, which, by the way is even ok the way it is, cause seeing so many retards you cand spot super easy the ones that trully deserve real attention. When you-re surrounded by idiots or mean souls and huge egos is always a loss of time.

    gringovacilao2014-04-21 22:28:50

  • #265939

    brazil2010
    Member

    Thank you for your interesting comments. It is nice to hear from a Gringo that is not trapped in the typical routine.

    I am happy here in Brazil at the moment, but part of the reason is:
    1. I am fairly new
    2. I am still earning money outside Brazil
    3. My personality and history incline me to like Brazilians (I had a friendly, rural and outgoing childhood and an super intellectual education that made me realise that intellectualism is not the best place to find truth – I often prefer the company of uneducated people).
    4. I come from the Uk, so things like petty crime are to be expected. Bad weather and stale food are still common there, so good weather and fresh food are still a fresh pleasure.
    5. I frequently escape to the uk for shopping etc.
    6. My (brazilian) wife and I still love each other
    What do I do? I run an English language school franchise. I used to be a teacher and worked my way out of it. Anyone can do it. That wizard guy did it. It is hard work but simple at the same time. YOu don’t have to be super intelligent, but you do have to work hard and have balls of steel.
    Read the 4 hour week – apply the principles and live in Brazil. Hire yourself out on odesk and use a lan house as your office. Anyone can do it, except mr lazy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPBt4IuQEbw

    jamest2014-04-21 22:36:36

  • #265940

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=jamest]Thank you for your interesting comments. It is nice to hear from a Gringo that is not trapped in the typical routine.

    I am happy here in Brazil at the moment, but part of the reason is:
    1. I am fairly new
    2. I am still earning money outside Brazil
    3. My personality and history incline me to like Brazilians (I had a friendly, rural and outgoing childhood and an super intellectual education that made me realise that intellectualism is not the best place to find truth – I often prefer the company of uneducated people).
    4. I come from the Uk, so things like petty crime are to be expected. Bad weather and stale food are still common there, so good weather and fresh food are still a fresh pleasure.
    5. I frequently escape to the uk for shopping etc.
    6. My (brazilian) wife and I still love each other
    What do I do? I run an English language school franchise. I used to be a teacher and worked my way out of it. Anyone can do it. That wizard guy did it. It is hard work but simple at the same time. YOu don’t have to be super intelligent, but you do have to work hard and have balls of steel.
    Read the 4 hour week – apply the principles and live in Brazil. Hire yourself out on odesk and use a lan house as your office. Anyone can do it, except mr lazy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qPBt4IuQEbw

    [/QUOTE]

    Without defining whatbeing â‚ǨÀúfairly new’ actually means it would be reasonable to suggest that youhaven’t been here long enough to as yet describe yourself as â‚ǨÀúwinning’ inBrazil. I say this because your umbilical appears to be very much intact andproviding income in addition to the frequent replenishment of first worldcomforts. Speaking of which it’s comforting to note that you still love yourwife although one is on tenterhooks in anticipation because of the implied eventualitythat you may not love her.

    The good news here isthat your predisposition to favour the uneducated will be fully sated in acountry teeming with millions of illiterates who will fully accommodate yoursearch for truth; the anthropological truth that is the human condition. And inthis regard your familiarity with the petty crimes of the UK will have served asa kindergarten experience that may help prepare you for living in one of themost violent crime countries of the world. Still, no worries here because ofyour balls of steel. May the force continue to be with you.

  • #265943

    graham
    Participant

    I enjoy this frivolous on a Tuesday morning. Thanks.

  • #265983

    Anonymous

    A little more Wednesday frivolity for Grads:

    What can be said about winning and all its meanings? Surely it’s amatter of individual perspective. Could winning be explained as the continuousaccomplishment of the endeavours we set ourselves; activities that form theamalgam of our lives in all its various facets; an over view of satisfaction orcontentment with our lot? After all, life is, and cannot be other than a compromiseof aspiration. And if this is so, can we be true to ourselves if we should weset a lower target of goals and therefore more easily achieve this illusivewinning status?

    The truth is that not all men are equally gifted and cannot therefore bemeasured by the same set of criteria. It follows that success, or indeedhappiness, must be measured in accordance with not only ability but also byambition, temperament and aspiration. It is all too easy to fall into the materialisticjudgemental trap of trappings. We have to look inside ourselves to decide onwhat is our personal definition of winning and in doing so begin to ponder arevision of our dreams that might bring us closer to peace of mind.

  • #265988

    graham
    Participant

    how kind.

    Winning implies competition. Which race are we talking about? The OP was just generalizing. Fine.
    Semantics: winner, loser, or simply average joe, the label is subjective. Should one aim high and risk failure, or aim low and successfully underachieve? Who knows; who cares?
    No one is perfect, so we all fall short: Jesus save us, or rather, let us somehow make peace with ourselves. Ya gotta want to be happy. I suppose “peace of mind” in life is “winning.”…or perhaps it can be defined in many other ways too.
    good day
  • #265994

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    I think winning is based on individual perspective. It can be material trappings as Espirit stated or can be a greater sense of freedom or something else that holds value to you. Winning is how you see yourself compared with others. In that we can all be considered winners and/or losers based on whatever comparison we make.

    I have a happy wife, 2 great kids and am helping to run a small company and get it off the ground. I’m doing well and considering my previous working and living arrangement to be winning for right now.
    -Marc
  • #266010

    Anonymous

    There is an insidious after effect when theterm winning is used in the conventional sense; whether that is sport,productivity, sales, innovation or any other aspect of our working lives. Theinitial euphoria of a win always results in a type of legacy when it is combinedwith the fading laurels and the self-imposed pressure of expectation for thefuture. It is especially insidious when mingled with the peer pressure thatimplies the question, â‚ǨÀúYeah, yeah, well done, but what have you done for uslately?’

    It is only when a succession of such victories;victories of such magnitude that elevate one out of this arena and into to whatmay be described as an independent state. Perhaps it is only when this state isreached that one can claim to be a true winner. Alternatively, dying, agedninety, while floating on the gossamer clouds of opiates while surrounded by aloving family is perhaps the biggest win of all: Vene, vidi, vici.

  • #266032

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit] <span style=”color: rgb51, 51, 51; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9pt; line-height: 115%;”>There is an insidious after effect when the
    term winning is used in the conventional sense; whether that is sport,
    productivity, sales, innovation or any other aspect of our working lives. The
    initial euphoria of a win always results in a type of legacy when it is combined
    with the fading laurels and the self-imposed pressure of expectation for the
    future. It is especially insidious when mingled with the peer pressure that
    implies the question, â‚ǨÀúYeah, yeah, well done, but what have you done for us
    lately?'</span>
    <p =”Msonormal”><span style=”font-size: 9pt; line-height: 115%; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; color: rgb51, 51, 51; -: initial initial; -repeat: initial initial;”>It is only when a succession of such victories;
    victories of such magnitude that elevate one out of this arena and into to what
    may be described as an independent state. Perhaps it is only when this state is
    reached that one can claim to be a true winner. Alternatively, dying, aged
    ninety, while floating on the gossamer clouds of opiates while surrounded by a
    loving family is perhaps the biggest win of all: Vene, vidi, vici.<o:p></o:p></span>[/QUOTE]
    Anybody in Brazil who lives a day without being knifed, kidnapped, in a car crash, sued in labor court, violently assaulted, victim of fraud, is a winner.
    GreatBallsoFire2014-04-23 14:49:30

  • #266035

    Finrudd
    Participant

    I have managed to get my password reset. I am winning.

  • #266202

    oweng
    Member

    Living in Brazil is an adventure. Most Gringos moving here didn’t expect that. They should have instead relocated to Oslo, Singapore or Zurich. I, for one, enjoy the adventure. The people are quite friendly. My property value has increased ten fold in ten years. Despite a completely corrupt congress, there are actually many very intelligent leaders here. Portuguese is a beautiful language. Every phrase has a sexual double meaning. We are only 30 years after the end of the dictatorship. But doing much better than South Africa, for example.

  • #266205

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gandhi] We are only 30 years after the end of the dictatorship. [/QUOTE]

    Yes, 30 years after the dictatorship but almost 200 years after independence. On the other hand, look at a country like Israel. Independent in 1948 and has fought numerous wars since then but is still 50 years advanced to Brazil. Or, if you want to talk about dictatorships, look to modern day Germany after being devastated under the Nazi jackboot. Or Singapore and Hong Kong – raped by the Japanese.
    Always excuses, excuses, excuses. My Brazilian friends still blame all of their woes on the Portuguese.
    Brazil’s problem is not due to the most recent military coup, but rather the culture of passiveness that allowed a series of emperors, elected dictators, military juntas, with little resistance other than to increases in the price of cigarettes and beer.
    I will be there next week, quite happy to visit, but never regretting the fact that I pulled the plug and moved away.
  • #266206

    kenalag
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven]

    Or, if you want to talk about dictatorships, look to modern day Germany after being devastated under the Nazi jackboot.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes, sure Germany (and other european countries after WWII) got a big fat support package (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Plan), which has half a donation and half a loan.
    But sure, it is up to the recipient what to do with it…
    I don’t want to know many loans and donations Brasil has recieved so far…
    Willi
  • #266213

    oweng
    Member

    Okay, look at them. At Israel’s pathetic human rights record. Germany causing not one world war, but two. I am not saying Brasil is anywhere close to being immaculate, but its progress in the past ten years has been remarkable.

  • #266227

    sergiu
    Member

    Nice comments Gandhi, as in all of life, it is what you make it.

  • #266229

    oweng
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gandhi] Okay, look at them. At Israel’s pathetic human rights record. Germany causing not one world war, but two. I am not saying Brasil is anywhere close to being immaculate, but its progress in the past ten years has been remarkable. [/QUOTE]
    Singapore is a fake shell company land, and Hong Kong is ruled by a dictatorship. Switzerland nearly leads the world in suicide rates and teen drug abuse. England you have really awful cooking (rsrsrsrsrs!)

  • #266230

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=Gandhi] We are only 30 years after the end of the dictatorship. [/QUOTE]

    Yes, 30 years after the dictatorship but almost 200 years after independence. On the other hand, look at a country like Israel. Independent in 1948 and has fought numerous wars since then but is still 50 years advanced to Brazil. Or, if you want to talk about dictatorships, look to modern day Germany after being devastated under the Nazi jackboot. Or Singapore and Hong Kong – raped by the Japanese.
    Always excuses, excuses, excuses. My Brazilian friends still blame all of their woes on the Portuguese.
    Brazil’s problem is not due to the most recent military coup, but rather the culture of passiveness that allowed a series of emperors, elected dictators, military juntas, with little resistance other than to increases in the price of cigarettes and beer.
    I will be there next week, quite happy to visit, but never regretting the fact that I pulled the plug and moved away.

    [/QUOTE]

    I could not agree more with Steven’s comments.Brazil has, over the generations, continuously proven itself to be a nation swollenby two-hundred million â‚ǨÀúspecial needs’ persons, the majority of whom is aproven bunch of functioning retards that repeatedly re-elect corruptpoliticians in return for another bowl of beans or their equivalent. The greatunwashed is a collective idiot deserving of no better and they have been servedtheir deserts. To think otherwise; to deny the abundant evidence of nationfailure qualifies as being part and parcel of the hordes of dumbass dumb anddumber. Too strong?

  • #266232

    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Esprit][QUOTE=Steven][QUOTE=Gandhi] We are only 30 years after the end of the dictatorship. [/QUOTE]

    Yes, 30 years after the dictatorship but almost 200 years after independence. On the other hand, look at a country like Israel. Independent in 1948 and has fought numerous wars since then but is still 50 years advanced to Brazil. Or, if you want to talk about dictatorships, look to modern day Germany after being devastated under the Nazi jackboot. Or Singapore and Hong Kong – raped by the Japanese.
    Always excuses, excuses, excuses. My Brazilian friends still blame all of their woes on the Portuguese.
    Brazil’s problem is not due to the most recent military coup, but rather the culture of passiveness that allowed a series of emperors, elected dictators, military juntas, with little resistance other than to increases in the price of cigarettes and beer.
    I will be there next week, quite happy to visit, but never regretting the fact that I pulled the plug and moved away.

    [/QUOTE]

    >I could not agree more with Steven’s comments.Brazil has, over the generations, continuously proven itself to be a nation swollenby two-hundred million â‚ǨÀúspecial needs’ persons, the majority of whom is aproven bunch of functioning retards that repeatedly re-elect corruptpoliticians in return for another bowl of beans or their equivalent. The greatunwashed is a collective idiot deserving of no better and they have been servedtheir deserts. To think otherwise; to deny the abundant evidence of nationfailure qualifies as being part and parcel of the hordes of dumbass dumb anddumber. Too strong?

    [/QUOTE]

    @ Esprit: History is a matter of record; your, Steven’s et al views are an accurate interpretation for what Brasil is today (in terms of economic and social miseries) and how it got here. Is your opinion of Brasil’s failings “Too strong?” Perhaps not, but it precludes what can happen in the future. Sooner or later, things will change…for better or worse, because nothing can remain the same. Even the passiveness and ignorance of the “unwashed masses” looking for a social benefactor may at least somewhat wake from its dream and hazily grasp reality. Chaos and failure are extremes which definitely drive change, one way or another.
    Do not overlook the growing, though small, enlightened minority in Brasil who does understand all the hocus-pocus of Brasil’s modus operandi. Though I doubt it, there is a possibility that today’s regime and heirarchy could start to crumble with the upcoming elections. That could be a start, whether of something better, who can say. But it will be change because the current direction is futile.
  • #266233

    oweng
    Member

    Cultural, social and political change takes place over a matter of many years. Even decades. Twenty years ago we had runaway inflation. Now (at least for a while) we have a strong and relatively stable currency.

  • #266234

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gandhi]Okay, look at them. At Israel’s pathetic human rights record. [/QUOTE]

    I wouldn’t be so quick to brag about Brazil’s human rights record. And I’m talking about today, not under the dictatorship. We’re still talking about the land of the haves and have nots.
  • #266235

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gandhi] Twenty years ago we had runaway inflation. Now (at least for a while) we have a strong and relatively stable currency. [/QUOTE]

    Surely you jest. The Brazil of today has high inflation, low growth, and a currency that will hit 2.90-3.00 by the end of the year as soon as the infatuation with the high interest rates fades in the face of the reality of the horrible economy.
  • #266236

    oweng
    Member

    No bragging here. But it is getting better.

  • #266237

    oweng
    Member

    You obviously were not here twenty years ago.

  • #266238

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Gandhi]Cultural, social and political change takes place over a matter of many years. Even decades. Twenty years ago we had runaway inflation. Now (at least for a while) we have a strong and relatively stable currency. [/QUOTE]

    Yeah, change is slow yet inexorable, just likeso many of the southern African countries; the location of the origins of humankindwhere one can find the pinnacle of excellence? Eh, no, not yet. Nice try.

    Whilst the passage of time and having anopposable thumb are factors, the application of intelligence features muchhigher in the scale of things. Brazilians don’t know that they don’t know andlittle progress can be made from this base.

    To paraphrase the infamous assessment made by avisiting US politician in Africa, “All the people want is loose fitting shoes,plenty of coitus and a warm place in which to defecateâ‚Ǩ¬¶I’ll give â‚ǨÀúem anotherfifty years.” Perhaps we can agree onthat time extension? I don’t mean to pick on Africa because thereare many other and quite different countries where the intellectual pygmiesabound.

  • #266239

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Gandhi]You obviously were not here twenty years ago. [/QUOTE]

    How about 16 years ago. The only real change I notice is that people seem to be driving nicer cars. Fewer scrap heaps. Other than that everything is the same except for crime which is worse.
  • #266241

    oweng
    Member

    Sorry that has been your unfortunate experience. It has not been mine in this country.

  • #266243

    Anonymous

    Nature has its own, what may be described as, anaestheticor a numbing effect in so far that the poor and ignorant can often beblissfully unaware of their sorry predicament. In this context and inaccordance with degree, some of the peoples of the world have adjusted toalmost any condition and, because of ignorance, can be genuinely content withthe quality of their lives. Any minor improvement in their condition is rightlyhailed as a sign of modernity, order and progress.

    Quality of life is therefore a relative termand it very much depends on worldliness in tandem with what the individual isused to. e.g. To have been poor in the first world, yet in equivalence in standard,to be middle class in Brazil, could be regarded as betterment – but in nothingmore than the hollow ego massage of status; a feel good factor.

  • #266244

    oweng
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit] <span style=”: rgb251, 251, 253; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; font-size: 9pt; line-height: normal;”>Nature has its own, what may be described as, anaesthetic
    or a numbing effect in so far that the poor and ignorant can often be
    blissfully unaware of their sorry predicament. In this context and in
    accordance with degree, some of the peoples of the world have adjusted to
    almost any condition and, because of ignorance, can be genuinely content with
    the quality of their lives. Any minor improvement in their condition is rightly
    hailed as a sign of modernity, order and progress.</span>
    <p =”Msonormal” style=”margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal”><span style=”font-size: 9pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; : rgb251, 251, 253; -: initial initial; -repeat: initial initial;”>Quality of life is therefore a relative term
    and it very much depends on worldliness in tandem with what the individual is
    used to. e.g. To have been poor in the first world, yet in equivalence in standard,
    to be middle class in Brazil, could be regarded as betterment – but in nothing
    more than the hollow ego massage of status; a feel good factor. <o:p></o:p></span>[/QUOTE]
    Wow. You are really an ignorant blowhard.

  • #266245

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Gandhi]
    Wow. You are really an ignorant blowhard. [/QUOTE]

    I thought that might touch a personal nerve andwas written especially for you and your one line philosophies. Tongue

  • #266247

    oweng
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit] [QUOTE=Gandhi] 
    Wow. You are really an ignorant blowhard. [/QUOTE]

    <p =”Msonormal” style=”margin-bottom:0cm;margin-bottom:.0001pt;line-height: normal”><span style=”font-size: 9pt; font-family: Verdana, sans-serif; : rgb251, 251, 253; -: initial initial; -repeat: initial initial;”>I thought that might touch a personal nerve and
    was written especially for you and your one line philosophies. Tongue <o:p></o:p></span>

    [/QUOTE]
    Really. You seem to be a very sad case.

  • #266249

    spenymoon
    Member

    time to replace “winners” with “whiners” in the topic name?

  • #266251

    graham
    Participant
  • #266254

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gandhi]Sorry that has been your unfortunate experience. It has not been mine in this country.[/QUOTE]

    That’s not an experience, that’s a reality stated. If you have not noticed this your head must be up your arse.
  • #266260

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=Gandhi]Sorry that has been your unfortunate experience. It has not been mine in this country.[/QUOTE]

    That’s not an experience, that’s a reality stated. If you have not noticed this your head must be up your arse.

    [/QUOTE]
    I think that you wasted too many words when only ” your head must be up your arse.” would have sufficed.
    One liners, just like the ones he likes to post LOL

  • #266264

    815
    Member

    LOL

  • #266346

    Kathy2012
    Participant

  • #267089

    JHZcali24
    Member

    The thread seems to have been derailed, but I like the food here, so I guess I am a winner too.

  • #267093

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Amazonian]The thread seems to have been derailed, but I like the food here, so I guess I am a winner too.[/QUOTE]

    Oh how I envy you; a manfrom the mountains finding a liking for Brazilian food. I bet it makes a changefrom possum and bear claw stew, no doubt ;-) Just kidding!

    If such things can make onehappy and therefore a winner let me list the ways: To wake each morning to thechorus of bird song accompanied by the reassurance of the perpetual oceanlapping the shore. The invigorating massage of the shower, the therapy of soaparoma and a soft fluffy towel as a prelude to the razor gliding followed by theexquisite sting of an astringent rejoicing in the latest politically correct metrosexualtitle and boasting a masculine pong to make one simply irresistibly irresistibleto women and sexually immature small dogs. Breakfast with fresh juice, andsomething from a cheerily coloured cardboard box festooned with happy andhealthy faces sprinkled in a bowl and douched with chilled low fat milk therebyensuring future satisfying bowel movements followed by coffee when that old impulse todraw heavily on a cigarette must be denied at all cost; the first forty-fiveminutes of yet another day in paradise.

  • #267164

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    Good BBQ and easy access to cheap weed.

  • #267330

    HansDiffey
    Member

    I came from Italy to Brazil in 2012 for a graduation project. I lived in Sao Paulo for 2 years. When I went down there, I wasn’t expecting that life would be like it is in Europe, of course it wouldn’t. Want to say, after first months in Brazilian soil, I was absolutely amazed. I made reliable friends for the entire life. I never met warmer and happier people. Sao Paulo has the best of every country, with restaurants, events and a great culture line-up. I hope to come back someday, this time who knows, to live there.
    When I read the negative comments here I was really surprised, cause that’s absolutely not the impression I have of this beautiful country.

  • #269652

    paddygringo
    Member

    sorry guys I didnt introduced myself here.

    Im brazilian, about 33 years of my life I hear about the country of the future bullsh*t, past year I get tired of this and moved away.
    I dont understand why an american or european could move to there… really is it real? Sao Paulo is a piece of crap, lived there about 5 years, worst city of country. Im from Brasilia where I usually to like but year after year I realized that I could have any future there!
    Please dont be hypocrite and dont lie to yourself, most brazilians REALLY WANT TO LEAVE but they cant because they dont have the cash for it!
    sorry but its the reality of the country if you dont believe on a true brazilian guy like me keep your own conscious for you but dont blame me for not advise.
    Brazil has a good propaganda, nothing more.
  • #269653

    sergiu
    Member

    Well, one thing about the area we live in, no tornadoes, no hurricanes, seldom a thunderstorm, mostly sun and rain and absolutely no snow. Don’t need to heat the house. Weather doesn’t change drastically. So there are good things and to be honest. I like the people. Less of a problem with racism, I actually feel more comfortable with the people here. Now I don’t live in the big city, never cared for big cities in any country. Yes there are problems, watch any news report even from the States and there are lots of problems, so it isn’t all peachy good there anymore. A lot of this is how you look at life, enjoy the moment and look for the good things.

  • #269655

    graham
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jcarlos]sorry guys I didnt introduced myself here.

    Im brazilian, about 33 years of my life I hear about the country of the future bullsh*t, past year I get tired of this and moved away.
    I dont understand why an american or european could move to there… really is it real? Sao Paulo is a piece of crap, lived there about 5 years, worst city of country. Im from Brasilia where I usually to like but year after year I realized that I could have any future there!
    Please dont be hypocrite and dont lie to yourself, most brazilians REALLY WANT TO LEAVE but they cant because they dont have the cash for it!
    sorry but its the reality of the country if you dont believe on a true brazilian guy like me keep your own conscious for you but dont blame me for not advise.
    Brazil has a good propaganda, nothing more.

    [/QUOTE]

    Thank you for this thoughtful warning. It is always great to hear advice from another disgruntled brasilian winner, -h-
  • #269658

    KristaN107
    Member

    Brazil “grows” on you. I’m originally from the land of Tio Sam but I only want to go there for shopping trips. Everything else I need, I can find in Brazil or order it from someplace else. In fact, I would venture to say that it is EASIER to make money in Brasil than in the USA. Nowhere is perfect though.

  • #269659

    ffm
    Member

    Any winners here the way Charlie Sheen is a winner?

  • #269731

    Being positive is wonderful. However, living in denial is detrimental. As one writer mentioned, the silent majority speaks to those that are content. Those that post in Vent Your Frustrations are in the proper forum. Complaining or comparing stories is therapeutic and healthy. I don’t find anything wrong with that. Everything is a balance.

  • #269854

    yeah, well, a common denominator is that everyone seems to be self-sufficient with money or they have a money tree in their garden like GringoFloripa, or the newest incarnation.
    There’s probably many of us here that could move to any country in the world and work, or at least make money legally to pay the bills. I consider that to be an extremely useful ability. But there are many more people that took the blue pill and they are still slaves to the boss. I say Let them be slaves. It was their choice to get addicted to regular paycheck instead of learning how to really be independent.

  • #269861

    Serrano
    Participant

    [QUOTE=andrew_nofro]…or they have a money tree in their garden like GringoFloripa, or the newest incarnation. [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, but before that ‘money tree’ bears fruit, you have to dig the hole, plant the seed, water the seedling, fertilize, weed, eradicate pests, prune, in other words, work.
    I know a few pests on here I’d like to eradicateâ‚Ǩ¬¶. Evil Smile
    “Haters hate”.

  • #269878

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Serrano][QUOTE=andrew_nofro]…or they have a money tree in their garden like GringoFloripa, or the newest incarnation. [/QUOTE]
    Yeah, but before that ‘money tree’ bears fruit, you have to dig the hole, plant the seed, water the seedling, fertilize, weed, eradicate pests, prune, in other words, work.
    I know a few pests on here I’d like to eradicateâ‚Ǩ¬¶. Evil Smile
    “Haters hate”.
    [/QUOTE]
    Hah, relax dude. Maybe not a money tree, but maybe a trust fund? No problem if you don’t want to answer, but for all we know, you could be a major drug dealer or coyote.
    Are you guys on Facebook? I don’t use it, but I’m thinking about jumping on there. I’ve tried in the past and I could only endure a few months of it before I deleted my account. I could never figure out how to block selfies from my cousin– I’m not from Appalachia.
    On TOPIC:
    I’m about to walk outside and have a few caxachas and probably a beer, and say whatsup to about 50 people. And all those gringos that WERE here years ago and then left. Their loss, nì©? I really couldn’t imagine living anywhere else.

  • #272281

    David Denning
    Participant

    This topic appears to have gone stale, but I would like to add my views. I think a lot depends on the reasons why we came here in the first place, but I can only really speak from own personal experience.

    In 2009 I was made redundant back in the UK, and at 56 the prospect of finding suitable alternative employment was pretty grim. I came to Brazil for a holiday (and to visit my nephew who moved here a few years earlier), but also with a view to check out whether I felt Brazil was a viable option for me. Salvador de Bahia, where I was based, was a definite no-no as I am not a city lover, but I visited the Chapada Diamantina and fell in love! With the area, not a person!!
    I had lived in both Angola and Mozambique before so spoke passable Portuguese, but the whole feel of Bahia was very African. I hoped to be able to teach English here – did the course and everything – and initially came for 2 years on a volunteer visa helping a small local charity, and with the hope that I might later be able to get permanent residence. The Policia Federal killed that hope, though, as they told me that my only options were marriage or fatherhood! (I know there are others, retirement, investment, etc. but all beyond my finances).
    I bought a house and settled down to life here – and 5 years later am still enjoying it. OK, I can only stay here legally for 180 days, so spend the rest of the year in Peru, but am longing to get back here the whole time I am away.
    As I do not wish to jeopardise my tourist status here I do not work (and gave up the voluntary work in Brazil as that would violate my visa too) so how do I manage? Before moving here I “cashed in” a couple of work-related pensions, and my endowment policies (that were related to a mortgage, but I lost the house and got them when I divorced!) and bought a small annuity – which would not last me a week in the UK, but is enough to live on reasonably well here in Brazil. Before all you nay-sayers jump on this and start pontificating about how expensive Brazil is, or how I must be living in a favela on arroz e feijão, I have a 4 bedroomed detached house on a 690sq m plot, and I never eat feijão. My lifestyle is hardly different from what it was in the UK, but I don’t have any heating bills, do not need winter clothing and also do not have to “watch my back” every time I go outside.
    What I am getting at is that I am living as well as (if not better) than I did back in the UK, at a fraction of the cost, so that is a “win” for me. Yes, I get frustrated about availability in the shops, about punctuality of everyone, and a thousand and one other things that everyone in the forum complains about – BUT there are at least as many things we complain about back “home”, and for now there is still nowhere I would rather be living – just wish I didn’t have to go to Peru every 6 months, without getting married!!
  • #272282

    sergiu
    Member

    Very nice response. There is good and bad to every place, weather here is some of the best and a big reason to be here. Food grows naturally here, so there are a lot of healthy choices, seems to me people in the U.S. just keep getting bigger and bigger, which is getting to be a problem here in Brazil as people start eating more and more packaged foods. Brazil could cash in on people retiring here if they would make things a little easier for retired people to do so.
    Hope you find a way to stay full time. Enjoy!

  • #272283

    David Denning
    Participant

    I understand the “retirement” visa (which I believe they will apply to anyone meeting the criteria) requires a “pension” (or a guaranteed monthly amount) of US$2000 a month being transferred into Brazil. I queried this with the PF, as I am living on far less than this, and they say it covers a spouse and one dependant (more dependants need an extra US$500 for each one). I explained that I had no spouse or dependant, just me, but this was just met with the usual shrug.

    The rules are too intransigent, and they should examine applications on merit. In 3 years when I can also get my UK pension (but paid in the UK as I cannot open a suitable bank account here) my “income” will more than double, but still fall well below their threshold. At least at the moment the pound is strong (or is it that the Real is weak?) so I am actually 35% “better off” that I was when I first moved here, plus my annuity has also grown much faster than inflation!
  • #272284

    S Bibb
    Participant

    the minimum monthly pension requirement for a retirement visa is now US$3600.
    norah2015-01-08 07:28:54

  • #272286

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=CJBaker]Very nice response. There is good and bad to every place, weather here is some of the best and a big reason to be here. Food grows naturally here, so there are a lot of healthy choices, seems to me people in the U.S. just keep getting bigger and bigger, which is getting to be a problem here in Brazil as people start eating more and more packaged foods. Brazil could cash in on people retiring here if they would make things a little easier for retired people to do so.
    [/QUOTE]

    I noticed this last week during my visit. Brazilians are really starting to get chubby. At least in the Sao Paulo area. They don’t look much different than the Americans living in the corn belt.
    Of course, a 75 Kg American woman is rolling along in her sweat pants and Nikes whereas the Brazilian 75 Kg girl still squeezes into her jeans and stilettos but, no doubt about it, Brazilians are getting fatter.
  • #272287

    David Denning
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Steven]the Brazilian 75 Kg girl still squeezes into her jeans and stilettos
    [/QUOTE]

    Here in Bahia it is the hot pants and crop top! Sometimes from the front between overhanging belly and thigh you cannot see the hot pants!

    ZambeziDave2015-01-08 08:16:14

  • #272288

    David Denning
    Participant

    [QUOTE=norah]the minimum monthly pension requirement for a retirement visa is now US$3600.
    [/QUOTE]

    This is from the visa section of the UK Consulate General website: (wonder if the US$3600 is for US citizens??) It has gone up though, probably due to exchange differences.
    A â‚ǨÀúPermanent Visa’ may be granted to the retired foreign citizens wishing to live in
    Brazil, provided that they are already in use of their pension, and legally allowed to transfer to Brazil a regular monthly income in a foreign currency, pension included, equivalent to a minimum of R$ 6.000,00 (Six thousand Reais).

    . This minimum required income will allow for the applicant to take two legal dependants (wife and child, for example) to Brazil.

    . For every additional dependant (an old and financially dependant parent, for example), an additional amount of R$ 2.000,00 (Two Thousand Reais) per month will be required.
  • #272289

    Mkamerling
    Member

    [QUOTE=ZambeziDave] [QUOTE=Steven]<span style=”line-height: 1.4;”>the Brazilian 75 Kg girl still squeezes into her jeans and stilettos ¬†</span>
    [/QUOTE]

    Here in Bahia it is the hot pants and crop top! Sometimes from the from between overhanging belly and thigh you cannot see the hot pants! 

    [/QUOTE]
    I have just returned from Rio and couldn’t believe how fat the young girls and guys were; people in their teens and twenties with huge thighs, behinds and bellies. All, of course, were wearing beachwear totally inappropriate for their size.

  • #272290

    Anonymous

    to be fair, it is really difficult to find clothing here that is not what i would call “skank-wear”. I am blessed to have a teenage daughter who has the same taste in clothes that I do (carpenter is probably the most appropriate descriptor)- unless you are okay wearing men’s clothes, there isn’t much choice. don’t get me started on bathing suits.

    I used to think “wow, Brazil! women feel empowered enough to wear teeny bikinis no matter what their body shape!” now I realize, there are very few other options for most people.
  • #272293

    celso
    Member

    Start you own nonprofit with some Brazilian neighbor friends, could be a literacy/language related free classes for poor children. Then you can stay as a volunteer.
    Other option. Just overstay. tat way you qualify for the next amnesty program. Rumored to be this year…
    When was the last time a cop asked you for your ID and looked for your passport visa page?
    Carry a nice plasticized copy of passport as a safety precaution….

  • #272294

    agri2001
    Participant

    Or get one of those off the wall religious entities to sponsor you as a missionary ( I believe you can even buy that honor)

    You get a visa with not too many questions asked, if any.
    And in the event you are a good bullsh*tter you can start your own lil church and make a boat load of money…Smile
    I knew a guy that did this and it works, or it did back about 4 years ago.
  • #272295

    Mkamerling
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas] to be fair, it is really difficult to find clothing here that is not what i would call “skank-wear”. I am blessed to have a teenage daughter who has the same taste in clothes that I do (carpenter is probably the most appropriate descriptor)- unless you are okay wearing men’s clothes, there isn’t much choice. don’t get me started on bathing suits.

    I used to think “wow, Brazil! women feel empowered enough to wear teeny bikinis no matter what their body shape!” now I realize, there are very few other options for most people.

    [/QUOTE]
    Haha, so true , though I think a lot of the larger women wear micro bikinis way too small for their bodies and they resemble a loin of roast pork.
    I remember once trying to buy a bikini in Brazil. I asked the sales assistant if they had any bikinis that covered more of my rear end rather than a tiny triangle. She looked at me in disgust and suggested that I go to a shop for obese women (my BMI is around 22). Needless to say on my trips back to Europe I stock up heavily on clothing.

  • #272298

    David Denning
    Participant

    Gbof, for a volunteer visa (also only valid for a maximum of 2 years – been there done that!) you need to get that outside the country and have lived in your “home” nation for 6 months (looked into that some time ago). Overstay? No thanks – never broken a law in my life and don’t want to start now, plus as a house and vehicle owner my name and address are on public record, so difficult to stay under the radar. Also I have heard that to qualify for any amnesty you have had to be “illegal” at least 18 months, so wouldn’t qualify if it was this year.

    Guess I will have to continue my current path – 6 months in the beautiful Chapada Diamantina, and 6 months by the beach in Northern Peru fishing and touring by motorbike!!
  • #272300

    jeb2886
    Member

    Those pension requirements seem pretty stiff. That’s 43K/year, 25K is the median income in the US.

    The real issue with retired people is that they get sick, and Brazil offers free public healthcare, so even if you don’t get enough of it, or it’s not good enough… if you manage to get one decent stay in there, you’ll chew through a huge amount of their resources!
    Personally, I wouldn’t have chosen Brazil as my first choice, but like many others, a spouse was involved that was Brazilian. Not that Brazil isn’t great, it’s just that it’s not as cheap as many of the other tropical countries, and with the high import taxes, it’s a PIA to get anything of quality. Not to mention I always wanted to “try out” a few places, and if you don’t own anything, a flight to another country isn’t difficult! Instead I doubled down and got a 40′ container and spent a good year purchasing everything I could possibly need. Instead of being very nimble and being able to move around, I’ve become unmovable! That container had so many goods in it, that I don’t think I could even move to another house in Brazil easily, let alone another city or state!
    Regardless, I have everything I really want and more at this point, so in the last year I’ve probably spent less then R$500 on goods in Brazil! Just little plastic bits and bobs, shower heads, electrical outlets, just the basic maintenance items. We also purchased our car outright, and both of us dislike eating out. We love our food, but we want quality food, and things we can’t cook at home (especially things we can’t cook better at home!) so we eat in. We brought enough kitchen gadgets to keep us happy for a long time, and everything was high quality so as to make the process of preparing food more enjoyable.
    The last thing we did was purchase a car outright. So our budget has no eating out, no buying of Brazil goods, and no monthly car payments at their ludacris rates. All of this has allowed us to rent a much larger home than we needed, but with a great location, and lots of land for parties! I think our budget is about 1/3rd the typical Brazilians who would live in this house, simply because of our lifestyle choices.
    My wife likes to attend church, like many Brazilians, but hers tends to attract higher educated people. So our circle of friends grew from that, and basically everyone we know is now a professor, doctor, or lawyer! I had a bacteria enter my skin a few weeks ago, apparently common in kids? I’ve never had it. We were at an event, and I said I had a couple spider or ant bites and had an otologist look at, who called over his wife who is a great clinician, and then a cardiologist take a peek. It was a saturday night, and they said drop by they’d give me a prescription sunday so I didn’t have to wait until monday.
    I can’t really ask for more than that! My only disappointment really is not being able to bike at times I really enjoy. We’re in Natal, so by 7:30am the sun is insane. So to bike, I have to go at 5:30am! Nighttime is just too risky with the drivers around here, and sunset is right at prime commute time and not when I want to be on the roads!
    We lucked in financially with many house purchases in the US when the bubble burst there. I was a strong proponent that the economy had bottomed and was going to take off again. I purchased everything I could, and the rents from those places now covers my living expenses here! So I retired a couple of decades early. I might still do some work, but for now, I’m enjoying my time here!
    Like many, I still have to watch my finances, and I can no longer just buy whatever I want, fly whenever I want, but I have 100% of my time to myself, and time is the one thing we can never get back. So we traded off higher incomes, a decent amount of security, for time and amazing weather.
  • #272304

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jkennedy]

    Like many, I still have to watch my finances, and I can no longer just buy whatever I want, fly whenever I want, but I have 100% of my time to myself, and time is the one thing we can never get back. So we traded off higher incomes, a decent amount of security, for time and amazing weather.
    [/QUOTE]
    From my perspective, you have found the Holy Grail there, and certainly what I aim for. I don’t enjoy my work, and have not done for rising ten years now, but if it enables me to retire before I am 45, with a viable source of income from investments, and live a simpler life, with time to spend doing something new, then it’s worth sticking out for another year or two longer! It remains to be seen if the place I want to retire remains as Brazil, but most likely it will.
  • #272305

    jeb2886
    Member

    You have to watch out for the 1-2 more years idea because you’ll never cut the string and soon that 46-47 year data is 47 with a 1-2 year date at 49-50.

    The only issue with Brazil is the need for a container. Which makes it a lot harder to just test out Brazil. Its one thing to go native, and another living with $1 store crap, being sold for $10. The container appears expensive, but it’s like paying full retail for decent appliances in Brazil. Suddenly, everything else is free in there. You could spend several months just buying used items off craigslist to fill the container. Those items will be far higher quality, and cost you next to nothing.

  • #272306

    S Bibb
    Participant

    [QUOTE=ZambeziDave][QUOTE=norah]the minimum monthly pension requirement for a retirement visa is now US$3600.
    [/QUOTE]

    This is from the visa section of the UK Consulate General website: (wonder if the US$3600 is for US citizens??) It has gone up though, probably due to exchange differences.
    A â‚ǨÀúPermanent Visa’ may be granted to the retired foreign citizens wishing to live in
    Brazil, provided that they are already in use of their pension, and legally allowed to transfer to Brazil a regular monthly income in a foreign currency, pension included, equivalent to a minimum of R$ 6.000,00 (Six thousand Reais).

    . This minimum required income will allow for the applicant to take two legal dependants (wife and child, for example) to Brazil.

    . For every additional dependant (an old and financially dependant parent, for example), an additional amount of R$ 2.000,00 (Two Thousand Reais) per month will be required.

    [/QUOTE]
    no, you’re correct. my number was from the consulate-general in los angeles. it does say R$6000, but it calculated the conversion to $3600 USD, which isn’t accurate right now.

  • #272308

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jkennedy]You have to watch out for the 1-2 more years idea because you’ll never cut the string and soon that 46-47 year data is 47 with a 1-2 year date at 49-50.

    The only issue with Brazil is the need for a container. Which makes it a lot harder to just test out Brazil. Its one thing to go native, and another living with $1 store crap, being sold for $10. The container appears expensive, but it’s like paying full retail for decent appliances in Brazil. Suddenly, everything else is free in there. You could spend several months just buying used items off craigslist to fill the container. Those items will be far higher quality, and cost you next to nothing.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes – you are totally correct! I have been planning to cut the string at the end of 2014, and now we are talking about 2016. I keep hoping for a rescisão so I can get the FGTS + 40% and that is a double-edge sword. The longer you work, the more it’s worth, but the more it’s worth, the less you want to resign of your own free will and lose the 40%, as well as not being able to get the FGTS until you have been unemployed for 3 years!
  • #272313

    jeb2886
    Member

    If you do a container, give yourself a good 6 months to do. I would recommend going that path. So the last 6 months you can start packing and buying items you’ll want for a tropical climate, hopefully as seasons end so you get the best deals, and possibly used. But packing takes a long time, and documenting it all takes even longer :)

  • #272314

    celso
    Member

    I agree rental income from US or Europe is great. Works for me.
    I have doubts about the container issue. Now that the Real is cheaper, buying the local crappy products is not as bad, including cars.
    The scary part is that Lula is preparing for another run. Dilma wants more press controls and Brazil could face a violent shift left. Oh well, I need to bring down some coconuts.

  • #272319

    jeb2886
    Member

    True, with the real being weaker, having a container is less important to some degree, but there is a lot of money that gets spent every month replacing crap that failed. It also depends on where you plan on living, and how much space you plan on having. If it’s a 1 bedroom apartment, it might not be worth it, unless you split the cost with someone else, and put it all under your name.

    Many items can fit in your luggage, but after about 10 bags of luggage, if you’re going with AA that’s $2000 extra, and others it could be $1000 or so. Now you’re at about 20% of the value of a whole container. Toss in a good mattress and a good tv and you’re probably at about 50% of the cost of the container.
    It isn’t as imperative to have the container, but once you buy a couple decent items down here for your house, you’ve basically still paid for it, and you might as well get good build quality for the same price.
    Cars are definitely looking a lot better though. They’re still ridiculous for the quality, but at least they aren’t 50% more expensive like they were 2 years ago when the currency was really strong.
  • #272320

    Finrudd
    Participant

    The container solution is a good one for those moving here for the first time, who get that import amnesty and how I wish I had taken more advantage of it six years ago when I moved from Singapore. That said, there comes a time when even good quality stuff wears out or fails in some way or another. Not least because it is not used to the crappy power supply here! I am still using some LED lightbulbs from Singapore having said that – along with a Makita (not Makita Brazil) drill.

    Now, if there was a viable way of bringing in a container once every ten years, without having to go through the risk of losing it all, I would probably do it, and even pay tax on it! In my experience paying the bribe to the official at the airport is far cheaper than paying the taxes, and normally a requirement anyway. My last commercial import cost R$2k to release US R$250k of hardware, which was cleared in 24 hours. Not that I want to do it that way, but I dont have a choice, so if that could be applied to a personal container…
  • #272321

    jeb2886
    Member

    Some things definitely wear out, like mattresses, but it gives you a good 10 years of quality, in my case, the guest bed will then be swapped over and I get another 10ish years hopefully :)

    Power is an issue, but I came from the US, so I needed voltage transformers, and mine come with voltage stabilizers. I also put a couple of UPS’s in there. Although I wish I had put more :( I hear the transformers switching the power all the time, when it drops too low, or goes too high they fix it up.
  • #272343

    miguel
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jkennedy] So I retired a couple of decades early.
    [/QUOTE]
    That’s about what I did around the time I acquired permanent residency – and became a member of this site. While my background is in international finance posts here have tended to focus on tax issues. Mainly because of the lack of decent information here on that topic, but my interest therein lies mainly as to how they affect potential investments. Especially with taxes looming so large here and with the very real possibility of double taxation with your home country, one really needs to have a handle on how that, among many other variables, will affect your financial objectives here, especially in retirement.
    miguel2015-01-12 08:58:22

  • #273465

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=mariann]I am keenly looking for a voice of winner in Brazil which sounds some refreshing and not follow the old trends that goes on. The cream peopleare looks very different in crowd of thousand of people and are called as winner who has the ability to do something different.
    [/QUOTE]

    Now that’s just racist. People of color can succeed as well!
  • #273480

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=The Abbot][QUOTE=mariann]I am keenly looking for a voice of winner in Brazil which sounds some refreshing and not follow the old trends that goes on. The cream peopleare looks very different in crowd of thousand of people and are called as winner who has the ability to do something different.
    [/QUOTE]

    Now that’s just racist. People of color can succeed as well!

    [/QUOTE]

    Sure theycan: Jesus of Nazareth, Harry Belafonte and that popular Irish-American, Barak O’Bama

  • #273483

    Steven
    Participant

    Jesus of Nazareth – a man of color? No problem with me but I hadn’t heard this before. He will probably be happy to hear this as well.

  • #273484

    kevin owen
    Participant

    I like the blonde haired blue eyed depiction of him.
    Because most people from Palestine are like that.

  • #273485

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Steven]Jesus of Nazareth – a man of color? No problem with me but I hadn’t heard this before. He will probably be happy to hear this as well. [/QUOTE]

    Surely you don’t buy into the European “whitening” of Jesus. If he was born where that book said he was, he was at minimum, brown skinned. I guess you couldn’t “sell” to people a colored dude as their god, so his inventors spread the image that he was a blue eyed devil. It’s hilarious some of the depictions of him how white, blonde and blued eyed with angular features he was when that would probably be geographically impossible at the time.
    Then again, his mother was a virgin so….I guess nothing is impossible when it comes to Big J.
  • #273489

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=The Abbot][QUOTE=Steven]Jesus of Nazareth – a man of color? No problem with me but I hadn’t heard this before. He will probably be happy to hear this as well. [/QUOTE]

    Surely you don’t buy into the European “whitening” of Jesus. If he was born where that book said he was, he was at minimum, brown skinned. I guess you couldn’t “sell” to people a colored dude as their god, so his inventors spread the image that he was a blue eyed devil. It’s hilarious some of the depictions of him how white, blonde and blued eyed with angular features he was when that would probably be geographically impossible at the time.
    Then again, his mother was a virgin so….I guess nothing is impossible when it comes to Big J.

    [/QUOTE]

    Includedin this entire, rather incredulous story, is made more so by the suggestion thatMary, a dusky maiden, was also a virgin?

    Shocked
  • #273490

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Fila][QUOTE=The Abbot][QUOTE=Steven]Jesus of Nazareth – a man of color? No problem with me but I hadn’t heard this before. He will probably be happy to hear this as well. [/QUOTE]

    Surely you don’t buy into the European “whitening” of Jesus. If he was born where that book said he was, he was at minimum, brown skinned. I guess you couldn’t “sell” to people a colored dude as their god, so his inventors spread the image that he was a blue eyed devil. It’s hilarious some of the depictions of him how white, blonde and blued eyed with angular features he was when that would probably be geographically impossible at the time.
    Then again, his mother was a virgin so….I guess nothing is impossible when it comes to Big J.

    [/QUOTE]

    Includedin this entire, rather incredulous story, is made more so by the suggestion thatMary, a dusky maiden, was also a virgin?

    Shocked

    [/QUOTE]

    How she is still hailed a virgin after crapping out four other sons is beyond me. Were they all without purple headed invasion? Confused
  • #273496

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Steven]Jesus of Nazareth – a man of color? No problem with me but I hadn’t heard this before. He will probably be happy to hear this as well. [/QUOTE]

    It’s not at all surprising that most would be surprised, ifnot shocked, to learn that Jesus was not a white man. The great multitudes ofChristians may be described as cradle Christians; born into Christian families,baptised, educated parrot fashion and later to go through life without givingany real depth of thought that might question what they think they believe.Religion is like a duvet; warm and comforting in the secure snuggles of apaternal protectorate with simple rules: Love me, adore me, praise me, sing tome and obey my rules if you want eternal life in paradise [sorry, no virgins].

    But of course Jesus was not a white man! Bethlehem isn’t inthe suburbs of Stockholm. In common with his fellows, Jesus was a swarthy Jewand not at all the blue-eyed boy depicted in countless European paintings. http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/1244037.stm

    Anti-Semiticand colour prejudiced Europe couldn’t tolerate the idea that Jesus was anythingbut a fine-looking Aryan; after all, business is business and the church neededto fill its coffers. Now I wonder how many bible bashers in the belt would taketo this idea of their Jesus?

    Today’s quiz: Why are Jewish men circumcised? It’s becauseJewish women like a discount.

    Fila2015-02-26 11:52:00

  • #273516

    Ron
    Participant

    God is black and she’s a lesbian.

  • #273517

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Captain Ron]God is black and she’s a lesbian.[/QUOTE]

    Lipstick or butch?
  • #273521

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=kevbo]I like the blonde haired blue eyed depiction of him.
    Because most people from Palestine are like that. [/QUOTE]

    You mean Israel.
    Jesus ws a Jew
  • #273522

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Captain Ron]God is a lesbian.[/QUOTE]

    That would explain quite a lot.
  • #273523

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=sven][QUOTE=kevbo]I like the blonde haired blue eyed depiction of him.
    Because most people from Palestine are like that. [/QUOTE]

    You mean Israel.
    Jesus ws a Jew

    [/QUOTE]

    I’m by no means an expert on this subject yet I seem torecall that the Kingdom of Israel was founded around 900bc and lasted untilaround 550bc. Israel didn’t exist in Jesus’ time. Israel as we know it todaydidn’t come into being until 1948 when I understand that a British army officerdrew a few lines on a map and said the Jews of Europe could settle there. Such imperialarrogance simply ignored on whose map those lines were drawn and dismissed anyopposition as, “Camel shaggers and thieves.” Similarly, so did the Israeliswhen expanding their borders under armistice. Winning!

  • #273525

    Serrano
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Captain Ron]God is black and she’s a lesbian.[/QUOTE]
    Are you saying Michelle Obama is G-D?!? LOL

  • #273527

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Serrano][QUOTE=Captain Ron]God is black and she’s a lesbian.[/QUOTE]
    Are you saying Michelle Obama is G-D?!? LOL
    [/QUOTE]

    Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhhh snap!
    No-you-did-int! *furiously waving finger in the air*
  • #273528

    Anonymous

    This video gives one the same guilty feeling when, as akid, uncontrolled giggles cannot be supressed when in church. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gvuulZPbfBg

  • #275714

    abrechtel1
    Member

    this forum is pathetic

  • #275715

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Irishguy.]this forum is pathetic [/QUOTE]
    A saw an angry ginger saying this as I read it. LOL

  • #275718

    kevin owen
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Irishguy.] this forum is pathetic [/QUOTE]
    Why?

  • #275719

    abrechtel1
    Member

    its full of trolls,off topic comments and spamsters. you have to wade through a load of sh*t to see any replies to questions asked.

  • #275721

    kevin owen
    Participant

    Fair enough, can’t argue with that.

  • #275722

    a6abeGGkz-0
    Member

    I admit I am guilty of making off topic comments but what’s wrong with spreading awareness about things in general? And it’s entertaining to read posts about silly stuff. And when members share experiences about their lives in Brazil I actually learn a few things here and there. Honestly I didn’t appreciate you saying this forum is pathetic but hey you can move on to something that suits you better. I’m now going to post something way way off topic, just a warning

  • #275950

    really bad. I come here once a month, if that.
    I think Facebook killed this forum. Why deal with the BS, when it’s so easy to check facebook from your mobile phone? At least all of the groups I subscribe to have vigilant moderators with no Passport SPAM.
    Maybe too, there are fewer foreigners coming to Brazil with rosie-pink Brazil Goggles, and sticking around. Who knows.

  • #275955

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=andrew_nofro]really bad. I come here once a month, if that.

    I think Facebook killed this forum. Why deal with the BS, when it’s so easy to check facebook from your mobile phone? At least all of the groups I subscribe to have vigilant moderators with no Passport SPAM.

    Maybe too, there are fewer foreigners coming to Brazil with rosie-pink Brazil Goggles, and sticking around. Who knows.


    [/QUOTE]

    I think you hit the nail on the head, but while the Facebook page may have temporarily killed this forum, I think it will also be the reason this Forum doesn’t die out totally. The FB page is for short-term amusement, and offers almost nothing in the way of useful, or referable information. It’s very much of the here and now.
    I think there are fewer people coming to Brazil these past years too, and I think this will continue. There are probably more doing the homeward journey and wanting to know how to sell their place in Brazil, salvage their money, take pets home etc.
  • #275956

    Anonymous

    There still seem to be plenty of inbound people. i average at least one PM asking for advice and job contacts a month.

    (or maybe it is just the same sock, over and over again– always possible)
  • #275958

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas]There still seem to be plenty of inbound people. i average at least one PM asking for advice and job contacts a month.

    (or maybe it is just the same sock, over and over again– always possible)

    [/QUOTE]
    That is highly probable! After the melt down from a sock a few months ago who called you out repeatedly, sì≥ deus sabe!

  • #275959

    Anonymous

    meh. i have a teenager in the house and an almost boundless supply of alcohol. If you want to get my goat, you have to try pretty hard.

    then again, that many contacts over the years involves a degree of commitment that seems a bit much even for the most dedicated of socks. Ah, and yes, some of these socks do actually come here and we meet up (despite my counsel to not come here).

  • #275962

    graham
    Participant

    remarkable attitude: remarkable life

  • #27411

    peabody
    Member

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