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  • #266637

    Eddie
    Member

    Ok, so we have decided!!! We are moving back to Brazil after 12 years in Los Angeles (1 in Kansas)… We have a 5-month-old baby and a 7-year-old boy.
    We’ve been debating forever… We’re just starting the process by researching everything…
    Should we move our stuff or sell it here (for cheap for sure) or move everything there… And how???
    We’re both Brazilians. My kids were both born here.
    I’m just afraid I’m ruining their lives by moving back…
    But honestly, the immigrant life here is just not working… We are both drained and tired…
    As we are getting older we’ve come to realized we need more than extra money to buy designer clothes and go to Disney all the time…
    My father is very ill and he’s 80 years old, and I will have lots of help from him, since he has the means for it. Of course, financially only.
    We want to move to Campinas since my husband’s family lives there. I really would rather not having to live in São Paulo. I’m from there, btw.
    Anyways, we are both excited and scared.
    Please could u provide any POSITIVE input???? Any advices would be greatly appreciated too…;)
    We need it!!!
    Thanks in advance!!!

  • #266638

    lynchem
    Member

    Well you’re brazilian, that’s as good a start as any in my books..

  • #266644

    sergiu
    Member

    Well, too bad we can’t exchange houses. I have a large house with a lot of American appliances and furniture. It is very expensive to ship so I understand what you are talking about.

  • #266645

    sergiu
    Member

    By the way we used Confiance when we shipped our stuff to Brazil. Full 40 foot container. Wish I was in the area you needed.

  • #266648

    graham
    Participant

    LA is like my 2nd home, and I live in the interior, not far from Campinas. What a difference in worlds!

    Still, I think you can do it and have a good, though different life here…along with all the frustrations that living in today’s Brasil presents, life is what you make it.
    I would sell my stuff and only ship essentials and start over with your household here. Less hassle.
    You are moving against the flow, but it sounds like your move makes sense for you. Do a reality check, then follow your instincts.
    best of luck
  • #266650

    Anonymous

    Sell it all! We sold/gave it all away and came with suitcases and a few boxes. It’s only stuff.

    You can do it and I think you can be happy. It seems to take a kind of person that is not in the majority, but it’s not impossible.
    Kids are resilient and can do well (or poorly) anywhere. If you realize there is more to life than disney and clothes, then it sounds like you have a chance.
    We moved to Brazil when my daughter was 7. It was a good age to move (and hopefully your kids speak Portuguese, my daughter didn’t.)
    Do a search, you’ll find lots of info here (use advanced search, no time frame).
    And my suggestion to you is to make sure, one million percent sure, that your kids have all their ducks in a row immigration/documentation/citizenship wise. Make sure you registered their births at the brazilian consulate, and that their US birth certs and passports and all are in good order. It’s a PITA to sort out once you’re gone.
    And if you have your green cards and are surrendering them, you can do it on a voluntary basis in case things go wrong and you want to go back. I don’t know how to do it, all I know was that we DIDN’T do that. But I’ve heard of people who did.

    3casas2014-05-15 18:03:27

  • #266651

    felicidade
    Member

    Bad move amigos! Brasil is not a place people are moving to. Rather a place people are leaving from. You`re doing your kids a huge injustice by moving here.
    Brasil = Expensive, violent, vulgar, poor, ugly, dirty, widespread Prostituion, loud and obnoxious people.

  • #266661

    No idea if it is useful, but the Brazilian government publishes a Guia de retorno ao Brasil.
    Good luck!

  • #266662

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Luvusa]
    Please could u provide any POSITIVE input????
    Thanks in advance!!! [/QUOTE]

    That’s a tall order! You are moving to Brazil after all.
  • #266671

    lynchem
    Member

    [QUOTE=Lupo1]Bad move amigos! Brasil is not a place people are moving to. Rather a place people are leaving from. You`re doing your kids a huge injustice by moving here.
    Brasil = Expensive, violent, vulgar, poor, ugly, dirty, widespread Prostituion, loud and obnoxious people.
    [/QUOTE]

    You remind me of Raymond, whom wrote book(s) on how to secure females and ended up with a bad attitude.
    I’m curious if a reincarnation of sorts has taken place here, just maybe we’re in for a good ride.
    Welcome back Raymond!
    Alas, the topic of the thread.
    Moving to Brazil is an exciting venture, imaginatively of course. You have a family and what sounds like an “acceptable” standard of living in the United States. You seem only to complain of the trivial, mundane aspects of day to day living. It is quite certain that being bored means you’re doing fine, but that is your responsibility to entertain yourselves and family.
    Likewise if you are actually committed to coming here then you’re going to have it a lot easier than those who’re not citizens, permanent residence, or have permission to work. Simply stating that it is usually the biggest issue to peoples’ challenges here in Brazil.
    If you have a decent amount of savings and can get straight to work it might be fine for you. Again, as already mentioned, you’re swimming against the current, but sometimes that’s what we need in life so good luck!
  • #266672

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Not an easy decision to take, and not one I think anyone can really help you as a family with, as the decision to move here is influenced by so many different factors, each one different for all of us. You are Brazilian, so that will make the biggest obstacle fairly easy for you – I say fairly, as it doesn’t remove it: my wife moved back to Brazil after 18 years away, and it took her a while to get back into things, even with family and friends here. Good luck, and keep focused on the reasons you decided to come back.

  • #266673

    Anonymous

    I suppose the other important question is what will you guys do for work?

    Of my inlaws here in Brazil, nearly all have lived or worked abroad. A lot of them have a hard time after making good money doing crappy jobs abroad, coming back and finding that no job will pay as well, and the job market is not that easy to get into (my brother in law is a good example. he drove a forklift in a factory, made a bucket of money in Japan. Now in SP he works in a warehouse for a big company driving a forklift and makes very little, comparatively, but gets decent benefits at least. For him it’s enough, and he doesn’t care. Other family members couldn’t deal with the prospect of doing crappy work here for lower wages and went back.)
    And if you’re bringing money thinking you are going to start a business, that’s a whole different challenge. Not impossible by any means, but needs to be well planned.
  • #266677

    jeb2886
    Member

    I ended up going with confienca as well, they seemed ok. All told, it was about 10K for a 40′ container from the Bay Area to Natal. The process was decently painless, but it required a lot of planning and work. We also went to the port and caught them stealing a few items, and we saw them break a few things while loading the container, so we have an open ticket with harbor, apparently they weren’t following procedures and we might get a few people in trouble.

    We spent quite a bit of money before leaving to buy or upgrade a lot of what we had, and to ensure we had good quality items across the board. We definitely have more than we need and at the end of the day it’s only stuff. However, I think purchasing and repurchasing (expensive) cheap crap would have been pretty draining on me. I know I probably won’t have to buy any consumer goods here for years, perhaps a decade.
    The items that I would save we would have not been able to get in Brazil:
    — Fridge
    — Stove
    — Washer/Dryer
    — Proper Mattresses, you’ll spend a large fortune trying to bring those down
    — 50″+ tv’s
    — Floor standing speakers
    — Wicker chairs and outdoor furniture (We’re in Natal)
    — Solid chairs
    — Decent sized mirrors
    For you, you have probably 5 mattresses you’ll want at the very least, maybe even 6. You’ll want one for yourself, one for your older child, the current one for the younger one, a larger one for your younger child, and then a good guest bedroom (your replacement mattress in the future) for yourself.
    I ended up bring down a huge amount of goods which goes far beyond this, but probably just those items above justified my container.
    If you’re not going to get a container, choose your airline carefully. I flew down with us airways and their extra baggage was $85/bag I believe, delta might be $75? Others are $150-$200 so be careful, since you’ll be bringing down a lot of bags.
    I would put everything you can fit into your bags. On US airways you could bring down 9 bags per person, so you could bring down a huge number of bags with 4 people! Costco sells these $9 bins which are decently sized and make packing easy. I saw a guy in SP who had 18 of those because he was doing the same thing, bringing down his family of 4. They don’t necessarily maximize your space, but they do give you instant protection. Some airlines don’t allow you to bring down boxes, so watch for that. But for $85, you can like a blender and a fan in there and you’ll have justified the bag already, which means the next 10-25 items you put in there are all extra. You could probably bring down most of your items in your house within those containers, minus the furniture. Definitely worth it, you don’t want to be rebuying a blender you spent $50 on, with a $100 blender from brazil that was $15 at walmart.
    There is apparently another option with a container, to buy just a small amount of space within one. We have a friend who is currently doing that, I think they said they’re getting 10 cubic meters? It was roughly $4000, so not cheap either but that was door to door including broker. It was enough space to stuff a couple appliances, tv and mattress into.
    As for employment, I would say you’re better off in the US if you’re planning on working a simple job. If you plan on being an employee in Brazil, you’re better off being an employee in the US. You’ll always be fighting to make ends meet otherwise. If you’re planning on setting up a business, start working on it way before you leave. You’ll want to land running… We did a lot of planning before leaving, but we’re still dealing with “moving” and it’s been several months! You can print off business cards, marketing material and everything else you might need and bring it with you. At least you’ll have a decent income to support it all. You’ll save a lot on having it all done in the US, and you’ll save a lot of time by not having to mess around in Brazil trying to get it done, when you could be doing other more important business starting activities, like finding customers!
  • #266680

    felicidade
    Member

    Humongous risk involved as you well know by now! But is your life. The kids are at huge risk of being killed, robbed at knife point or racist anti-AMERICA sentiments. What I say? BACKASSWARDS MOVE INDEED. Stay in USA where folks are civilised for lord’s sakes. Paz e Sortes amigos.

  • #266710

    Joyhyd
    Member

    Luvusa, if you’ve been debating about it forever, I don’t believe it will be a mistake to move back. All the very best to you for your move!

  • #266716

    Anonymous

    Another perspective:
    For more than two decades now, we have been living on and off in Brazil (but mostly off). Over the years we built up our real estate portfolio in Brazil, but we spent most of our actual time living and working in a couple of the neighboring countries (Spanish-speaking Latin America).
    Last year we finally decided to make Brazil the focus again and began the process of moving back. My wife is Brazilian, thus our ties to this country.
    Being here now is OK, but not “all that.”
    In terms of bang for your buck, your quality of life will be immensely higher if you move to almost any other Latin American country.
    Been there, done that.
    For the same money, my quality of life was higher up until last year. When we were still living near Brazil, but on the other side of the border.
    For someone considering a possible move to Brazil, I would recommend looking closely at some of the nearby alternatives first before jumping into Brazil with both feet.
    Since this is a forum about Brazil I won’t clutter it up with info on other countries, but anyone can PM me directly if they want tips and info on those places from an experienced LatAm-hand.

  • #266725

    S.A.
    Participant

    Sound advice ! We did the same. Took a risk and flew to brazil into unchartered waters. Brought everything we had in suitcases. No furniture though. We rent a futnished house. We planned to invest and its been a year and little more now in floripa and we are still ‘ settling ‘. Its a different country , differentppl , so embrace it as such. You are here for an adventure and its imp to take the good things with the bad. We had a baby here. We didnt have any sort of issues and things worked fine; except we still are waiting for a police visit. Which means we cannot open a company for busibess unless we get our SINCRE. Or have a brazilian partner. This and few other small probs cause trouble. So be sure you have enough savings , atleast a 6 month buffer when u land here. And yeag its way expensive with lower quality ( read very low ) consumer products. But I love it here in floripa. Life is a bit slow paced and we needed that as now i get more quality time with the kuds. Best of luck !

  • #266726

    S.A.
    Participant

    A lot of countries have anti american sentiments but that doesnt mean u will get stabbed . People in general dont go around stabbibg ppl. :) You have as much chances of beibg stabbed in america . If you are a nice person , you will meet nice people. And if you dont. …Dont worry , you only live once . ;)

  • #266727

    myrna
    Member

    [QUOTE=daffodils]A lot of countries have anti american sentiments but that doesnt mean u will get stabbed [/QUOTE]
    No one is saying they will stab you cuz you’re American. They will stab you because they are robbing you.

  • #266728

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=daffodils] You have as much chances of beibg stabbed in america . [/QUOTE]

    To quote the illustrious Doctor Evil: “Riiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiight……”
  • #266729

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Floripa is different from big cities like Rio and Sampa. I am starting to think about moving back. I have been robbed at gunpoint, had my car broken into to, my ATM card cloned all in the last year. I am certain none of those would have happend to me in the US, or at least the probablity is way lower. São Paulo is not a city with a high quality of life. andrewfroboy2014-05-19 16:01:19

  • #266740

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy]

    São Paulo is not a city with anyquality of life. [/QUOTE]
    Fixed. Wink
  • #266745

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=andrewfroboy]

    São Paulo is not a city with anyquality of life. [/QUOTE]
    Fixed. Wink

    [/QUOTE]

    I strongly disagree with this outrageous slur on dear Sao Paulo. I had a quality of life moment last month for almost 76 minutes! I don’t recall now what it was, but I did note it in Facebook as a Life Event, so it must have been good..
  • #266749

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=finrudd][QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=andrewfroboy]

    São Paulo is not a city with anyquality of life. [/QUOTE]
    Fixed. Wink

    [/QUOTE]

    I strongly disagree with this outrageous slur on dear Sao Paulo. I had a quality of life moment last month for almost 76 minutes! I don’t recall now what it was, but I did note it in Facebook as a Life Event, so it must have been good..

    [/QUOTE]

    KKKKKKKKKKKK! LOL
  • #266756

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA] [QUOTE=finrudd][QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=andrewfroboy]

    ¬†Â¬†São Paulo is not a city with anyquality of life. ¬†
    [/QUOTE]
    Fixed. Wink

    [/QUOTE]

    I strongly disagree with this outrageous slur on dear Sao Paulo. I had a quality of life moment last month for almost 76 minutes! I don’t recall now what it was, but I did note it in Facebook as a Life Event, so it must have been good..

    [/QUOTE]

    Great SP day today for the bus drivers and teachers on Strike! Quality time with family for those Paulistas.
    KKKKKKKKKKKK! LOL

    [/QUOTE]

  • #266947

    stillestilo
    Member

    My advice is to sell it all. I’ve moved to about six different countries and from my experience, selling your stuff is the best way.

    Of course there’s sentimental stuff like trinkets and artwork that you can get shipped, but for most of the furniture and other stuff, my advice is to sell.
    Getting new stuff is easier to fit into your new home and a lot easier in terms of logistics.
  • #27514

    Eddie
    Member

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