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  • #42235

    peabody
    Member

    Which parts of Rio are safest for pedestrians? I’m not so concerned about getting run over, I mean as far as getting mugged or threatened by criminals or punks. I’ve seen T.V. shows that would make me very leery of walking (at least w/o an armed bodyguard) in some areas of the city, but I’m not sure how accurate those shows are. I asked a guy from Rio about that a long time ago and he said, “Aaahhh, it’s propaganda,” I would assume that some places would be a lot safer than others. I wouldn’t be walking near a favela anyway, Here in the U.S., at least the places I’ve lived, they make life dangerous for us pedestrians in a different way… 6-Lane roads & enormous parking-lots. More than once I’ve come within an eyelash of getting run over. Thanks in advance.

  • #42269

    mercy224
    Member

    Best area to walk around in Rio is in Leblon and Ipanema – far better than Copacabana which has lots of hookers and low-lifes hanging around. If you get tired of beautiful people and beaches, you might also spend a day walking around Centro (downtown) and looking at old buildings, churches, etc – any tourist map will tell you where they are. hmmm… so you’ve nearly been run-over as a pedestrian in the USA… Would you mind if I took out a life insurance policy on you before you come to Rio (with meas the sole benificiary)?

  • #42301

    johndaddy
    Member

    Yeh lots of friends of mine have been mugged in copacobana ! Also go on satuarday as they bring in bus loads of police to protect the tourists then!

  • #42411

    Aaronk
    Member

    Thanks for the advice. I had been reading about Leblon and thought it seemed nice. Is housing expensive there, vs. other areas of Rio? I don’t know too much about Ipanema. Is it expensive? If you get tired of beautiful people and beaches, you might also spend a day walking around Centro (downtown) and looking at old buildings, churches, etc – any tourist map will tell you where they are. After living inland for so long, I’d never get tired of beaches – especially warm ones!!

  • #42530

    kylie
    Participant

    Housing in Leblon is VERY expensive! I have lived in Rio for years, and never had a problem. When I go out, I don’t carry a watch, any sort of jewels (rings, etc.) Hell, sometimes I think the “pivetes” want to give ME money‘’ cause I look so poor!

  • #42871

    lenine
    Member

    Ipanema is nicer cos Leblon is very brazilian and quieter. If I lived in Rio I would definatly carry a gun for protection. I friend of mine was sent there on a business conference and out of 100 people 70 got mugged!!

  • #43938

    Sian
    Member

    rio de janeiro is dangerous for brazilians from other states like sao paulo the carioca people are quite prejudiced i found against us paulistas but thats ok we dont like them heere in sao paulo rio is more dangerous than sao paulo thats for sure

  • #43962

    O.k.- Who woke up “santoslad again?

  • #43964

    Robert13212
    Member

    [QUOTE=billrio]O.k.- Who woke up “santoslad again?[/QUOTE]

  • #43974

    Anonymous

    I personally like Barra da Tijuca very much as it‘s not that touristic. Just don‘t really like that huge mall on Av. America where we got lost in the carpark Stayed twice in Ipanema with a friend and must say that we walked everywhere … even in the night. My husband & I even went for a stroll along the beach at night with just shorts & t-shirts and without shoes … maybe we look too poor and the rich ones just kind of avoided us

  • #44428

    beijobrazil
    Member

    Thanks. Would S.P. be safer for pedestrians, than Rio? And is it expensive to live near a subway station in S.P.? Also: after the recent attacks in S.P., I had been thinking that Rio might be safer, but from what I’ve read on these boards (and some other statistics), it looks like S.P. might be safer after all. What do you think? Thanks again.

  • #44429

    beijobrazil
    Member

    In terms of general safety, it’s a really hard thing to be specific about, as statistics would be dependent on the area within either of the two cities, particularly with SP which is so vast. If statistics even exist… As a pedestrian I’ve never felt threatened in SP, but I’ve never walked frequently in what are classed as dangerous areas. Even with Brazilians the attitude varies on what is classed as a bad area (just like anywhere else I suppose). I live near a subway station in SP, we specifically moved near one as I don’t have a driving license here. Our apartment is not expensive (in relative terms). Because the Metro stations are spread right across the city there are expensive areas and not so expensive areas near stations. In fact a lot of the expensive areas aren’t served by the Metro (Moema up north to Vila Madalena, where you are served by the Metro) but then if you can afford to live there, chances are you have a car. There are some basic safety tips you can follow which I’m sure will help reduce the chance of being robbed, like in any metropolis. Most of these are common sense, but I noticed recently Gringoes.com reiterates them under their Useful Info section.

  • #44430

    mexmanz
    Member

    Thanks, Russell. That’s true… I’ve lived in what would be considered some pretty dangerous cities in the U.S., but I knew which areas to avoid (and in some cities, there were a lot of such areas) and had very few problems. Also, I’ve read that S.P. isn’t as humid as northern Brasil. Is that true? Thanks in advance.

  • #44433

    beijobrazil
    Member

    I have a small weather station, and I’ve seen the humidity jump all over the shop. Even so, it doesn’t have that sticky heat that I remember so well from the UK which is attributed to humidity.

  • #44486

    Can anyone suggest some funky things to do during 48 hours in Rio? I’m going with my Mum, who is going to want to do some of the touristy stuff, but are there any other tips from people who know the place well?

  • #44549

    dalmata
    Member

    I’m surprised to see no-one else reply. My visit there was very rapid and I just did the touristy stuff (pao de acucar, redentor and copacabana). All of these have to be done really, unless you’re after an alternative type of trip.

  • #44565

    CrydayTrach
    Member

    Well I would take my mum to tea downtown at the ConfeitariaColombo, (17:00hrs,) and maybe stay at the Hotel Gloria. But I don’t know ifthat qualifies as funky‚Äô, a word which conjures up images of a RioI don’t associate with my mother…Oh, and maybe the schooner tour out of MarinaGloria; cool, best views… Perhaps the Carmen Miranda Museumqualifies…

  • #44572

    I have a small weather station, and I’ve seen the humidity jump all over the shop. Even so, it doesn’t have that sticky heat that I remember so well from the UK which is attributed to humidity. The only time I’ve been in England was in Oct. (of ’03), but I didn’t think it got that humid there in the summer. Are there any affordable places in S.P. that would be reasonably safe for pedestrians? Could you recommend any areas? Thanks.

  • #44575

    Sian
    Member

    Depends what you mean by affordable. I certainly feel safe where I am in Saude, but I don’t go out walking around very late at night. The classic gringo haunts, some mentioned before, are Jardims, Moema, Pinheiros, Itaim and Vila Madalena. These are more expensive areas though. In all these areas there are huge variations in price, but at a guess you’re looking at around R$250-300,000 at the low end for a basic but reasonable apartment.

  • #44645

    cubasmarcela
    Member

    Thanks for the recommendations. Are these areas safer or more affordable than comparable areas of Rio (if such areas even exist)? Interesting… it seems like no one likes both Rio & S.P. They love one & hate the other… or some people hate both, & would prefer living in the N.E., but move there for jobs.

  • #46424

    Earl: Glad you’ve picked up on it. There is for sure a love/hate sentiment between Cariocas (prople from Rio) and Paulistanos (from SP). At times, it’s actualy a bit funny. But what you’ve read are good info about both places. They are very similar as far as safety and cost of living. If you pick a decent area in SP(as the ones described by Russ above), you’ll be fine, as long as you follow the typical common sense rules of safety. The same would apply in Rio. As far as chosing one over the other, some people like SP for the night life, the cosmopolitan way of life and the higher paycheck. Others like Rio because of the beaches, the year-long warm weather and the more relaxed lifestyle… F.

  • #47077

    austex
    Member

    Be careful everywhere you go. Mind your behavior and surroundings. Don’t act like a tourist (as best as you can) and don’t wear any jewelry/watch and don’t keep your money in one spot. My wife just returned and since I wasn’t along she took a lot of taxis. In talking to the drivers, the one place they all liked driving was Laranjeiras. That is near where Corcovado is. Near the beaches, if you’re street smart, you’ll definitely see thieves. More on Copacabana than Ipanema.

  • #47817

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    i dislike rio de janeiro its a trap of a sort everything is more expensive than in sampa and most people are not genuine but con artists

  • #47819

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    [QUOTE=santoslad]i dislike rio de janeiro its a trap of a sort everything is more expensive than in sampa and most people are notgenuine but con artists[/QUOTE] So how long have you lived in Rio?

  • #47821

    THEROCK
    Member

    lived there many moons ago and was recently jus there hadnt improved one bit if anything its even worse people are not very nice to other brazilians from other states especially mwe being paulista

  • #47824

    Sian
    Member

    [QUOTE=santoslad]lived there many moons ago and was recently justhere hadnt improved one bit if anything its evenworse people are not very nice to other brazilians fromother states especially mwe being paulista[/QUOTE]

  • #47825

    Irene_VOFT
    Member

    well it is true we dont like each other much

  • #47826

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    Rio is way more dangerous than Sao Paulo. In Sao Paulo you can walk around most places, in rio if you walk around you will get mugged. Also in Sao Paulo people are nice to foreigners, in Rio they just rob them. Even the hookers rip you off and ask for $100 (thats US!)

  • #47828

    DavidKy
    Member

    no we guys are pretty clued up as to how bad rio de janeiro is my freind !

  • #47829

    Greenback
    Member

    [QUOTE=santoslad]no we guys are pretty clued up as to how bad rio de janeiro is my freind ![/QUOTE] So, how many times have you been mugged in Rio?

  • #47830

    DavidKy
    Member

    i am brazilian but i can tell you i have been threatened and insulted and physically and verbally attacked many times in that rat hole of a city cidade maaivilhosa my a#$e

  • #47831

    mwcough13
    Member

    rio de janeiro is a horrid place to live if you are a poor brazilian from outside the city

  • #47832

    mwcough13
    Member

    [QUOTE=santoslad]i am brazilian but i can tell you i have beenthreatened and insulted and physically and verbally attacked many timesin that rat hole of a city cidade maaivilhosa mya#$e[/QUOTE] Where’s that can of troll repellant I had. Must be back here somewhere . . . .

  • #47833

    mercy224
    Member

    I went and stayed in a fancy hotel in rio and asked where was safe and the girl said no where! Plus loads of my friends were in copacobana looking for “fun” and they got mugged too!! Even walking on Ipaniema all the guards for the apartments have guns and on Sat + Sun they bring down about 500 cops to try and keep it safe. For the rest of the week its put your life on the line time:)

  • #47836

    [QUOTE=Rupert]I went and stayed in a fancy hotel in rio and asked where was safe and the girl said no where! Plus loads of my friends were in copacobana looking for “fun” and they got mugged too!! Even walking on Ipaniema all the guards for the apartments have gunsand on Sat + Sun they bring down about 500 cops to try and keep itsafe. For the rest of the week its put your life on the linetime:) [/QUOTE] Well I heard Sao Paulo has herds of wild buffalos roaming the streets.Everyone I know who has ever been there has been caught in a stampede.Every single one – and I know 11,000 people who have been to Sao Paulo.Maybe even more.

  • #48020

    sphiatt
    Member

    Well I live in SP and I can tell you there are definitely no wild buffalo roaming the streets. The odd horse and plenty of dogs though What is it with this Paulista / Carioca divide?… I’ve only seen it from the Paulista side, but there’s this definite “look down the nose” at Cariocas. I’ve only spent a week in Rio personally, and it’s not somewhere I’d be in a rush to return to. I can only think I missed the good parts so I’ll need an expert guide next time, if I ever return.

  • #48039

    EricSGU
    Member

    It is EXACTLY the same thing in the US. Los Angeles (big orange) vs. New Yorkers (big apple). Angelenos don’t like to work, just go to the beach, party, and live in their fantasy “film” world. New Yorkers on the other hand only know how to work and take life very seriously, indeed! Cariocas don’t like to work, just go to the beach, party and live in their “samba” carnaval world. Paulistas on the other hand only know how to work, have no carnaval or beaches and take life very seriously indeed

  • #48066

    Taddei
    Member

    Stereotypes, they’re great

  • #48102

    [! Cariocas don’t like to work, just go to the beach, party and live in their “samba” carnaval world. Paulistas on the other hand only know how to work, have no carnaval or beaches and take life very seriously indeed[/QUOTE] There are Cariocas and Cariocas. My own experience of working with Cariocas in the Baixada is that they work very hard, certainly the ones I worked with. Getting up early to work two jobs in the city staying for six days to return at the weekend. Its a very poor stereotype and one that is difficult to put down. But on reflection, I dont think the people I know really care as they are too busy making a living.tamashin38991,6528009259

  • #50006

    EricSGU
    Member

    [QUOTE=santoslad]rio de janeiro is a horrid place to live if you are a poor brazilian from outside the city [/QUOTE] Is that why so many of them go there to live?

  • #51539

    brettsmith
    Member

    carioca your city is aparhteid writ large

  • #51564

    lenine
    Member

    Completely ignoring any other post and writing just about the original question, that titles the thread… I’ve never not felt safe walking in Rio, or São Paulo for that matter. I think it’s partly a question of avoiding the obviously dodgy places and being reasonable about stuff… (not walking alone at wee hours of the night in extremely empty places, not flashing gold, not letting dollars fall out of your back pocket when you go for a walk… ) :P I’m sure sh*t happens regardless though, so in the end, I really don’t know how to answer that question in an exact way.

  • #51573

    Crybeaddy
    Member

    The safest places to walk in Rio are through Urca, where there is a beautiful seaside trail through a bit of the Atlantic rainforest (Mata Atlantica) as well as a trail down guanabara bay. Urca very safe because the Army and Navy bases and training grounds are in Urca.I also like walking the praia de Botofogo to praia de Flamengo trail, which is the other side of guanabara bay from Urca. It‘s really pretty at dusk, and quite safe. You can also walk up to the top of Corcovado from Larenjeiras, which is a very nice climb. I don‘t like walking in Copacabana. Pedastrians are basically either predators or prey (espeically gringoes). Ipanema is a lot less stressful, aside from the occaissonal gunfight between police and drug dealers, which usually occurs at night. The most dangerous city, as far as fatalities are concerned, in Brazil is once again, Vitoria, ES.

  • #51586

    brettsmith
    Member

    i tend to agree with the above rio is safe in urca praia vermenlha region but copacabana is full of vipers and the places reaks of apartheid worse than in S.A

  • #51640

    mercy224
    Member

    The problem with Copacabana isn‘t arparthied. Pretty much every who lives there is lower-middle class or working class. There aren‘t any “nice” parts, like there are in Ipanema or Leblon. The problem is that it is the Times Square of Brazil, a la Robert DeNiro in “Taxi Driver”. A lot of people come here for cheap sex, illegal drugs, bars, fast money, easy pickings, or because they have nothing better to do. Trying to take money from gringoes is like fishing on a lazy summer day, something to help pass the time, and hey, you might catch something. I don‘t recommend Copacabana as a good way to experience the beauty of Rio.

  • #8206

    casitamancy
    Member

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