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  • #174087
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Whilst I am sure you will no doubt be bored of the sight of these many cries for help, I have scoured the forum and would like some feedback on my conclusions
    (N.B. I have spent the last 5 years teaching English in Seoul, South Korea. The last 3 of those at at women’s university. I am British with a major in English. I do not possess a teaching certificate however http://www.gringoes.com/forum/smileys/smiley5.gif.)
    Conclusions for verification:
    1) I should forgo finding a job before I arrive and gamble on turning up and securing work in Brazil
    2) The big cities, though hectic and expensive, are where most of the work is to be found and thus the best bet.
    3) I should have some decent coin saved for this venture
    4) Rio is the best city for newcomers to begin.
    Yes?No?
    Cheers!

  • #174090
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    Wellington
    Member

    1. You can make enquiries but Brazilian polite culture forces everyone to make appearances of being interested rather than being genuinely interested with a genuine job to offer, and so you will not know for sure and therefore it’s really a waste of time.
    2. Yes
    3. More than you currently imagine
    4. There is more to do in Rio while you are not working (which will be the majority of time for a newcomer)

  • #174091

    [QUOTE=Kyuss]I have spent the last 5 years teaching English in Seoul, South Korea. The last 3 of those at at women’s university. I am British with a major in English. I do not possess a teaching certificate however.[/QUOTE]
    There are many posts which discuss these issues and challenges. From what I’ve read, it’s essentially agreed that students primarily want a native speaker, and any sort of certificate is secondary in importance.
    [QUOTE=Kyuss]Conclusions for verification:
    1) I should forgo finding a job before I arrive and gamble on turning up and securing work in Brazil
    2) The big cities, though hectic and expensive, are where most of the work is to be found and thus the best bet.
    3) I should have some decent coin saved for this venture
    4) Rio is the best city for newcomers to begin.
    Yes?No?[/QUOTE]
    I’m not an english teacher, but there are many forum members who are. Perhaps they’ll weigh in with their opinions. But for what it’s worth, my two centavos below…
    1) Yes. I’m assuming you’ll be arriving with only a tourist visa. No business or school will talk with you, much less hire you in that instance.
    2) Yes and no. Big cities obviously have more prospects, but they are also a magnet for people just like you, seeking to do the same. I’d think a better opportunity could actually be found in a medium sized city, which has a university, or two. Your bread and butter will most likely come from students. Check out the various cities which will be hosting the World Cup in 2014. I would think a city in the interior would have more opportunities (and less competition) than a coastal city. Yet if you want to be near the beach, then opt for a city in the NE.
    3) YES!!! “Decent coin”… more like a duffle bag full of cash! I think you will be shocked at how expensive Brasil has become. Another advantage of a city away from the coast, is that the cost of living will be less.
    4) No, because that’s what most newcomers believe. They are arriving there in droves. IMO, your chances are diluted by going to Rio.
    Boa sorte!
    Gringo.Floripa2011-05-31 07:45:02

  • #174093
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    hoganti
    Member

    yes
    yes
    yes
    I don’t think so. I would suggest a non tourist town with a university. I moved to Belo Horizonte and it fits that description. There is a large demand for English here, and I have never really had a shortage of business…just around Carnival time…

  • #174108
    Profile photo of Tracy
    Tracy
    Participant

    you can make work almost anywhere, especially if you come equipped with materials you know very well and have the language ability to sell yourself. obviously you want to be in an area where there are clients who can pay, not in a place where residents have no need/interest or funds even if they were interested.
    be prepared for your teaching perspective to change (korean mistakes are quite different from portuguese mistakes) and you will have a big learning curve, but if you have real world experience you should be able to do just fine.
    i’d be more concerned about living in a place that you like, or your location being connected to your visa prospect. are you planning to just spend your tourist visa time working here? it’s not likely that you will get a work visa for teaching, unfortunately. Do you have family/friends you will be close to? it’s a rough first year (as you know, if you were a brit teaching in korea) if you’re all alone without much support.

  • #174181
    Profile photo of
    Anonymous

    Many thanks for the replies, it is nice to know there is somewhat of a community out there that has a vested interest in others.
    I’ve been quite taken by hpeak13’s suggestion of a slighty more remote, interior location as I believe this will suit me more initially. I’ll investigate Belo Horizonte; are there any other cities I should be looking at?

  • #19296
    Profile photo of Kieran Gartlan
    richfree
    Member

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