• Author
    Posts
  • #219781

    Gilmour
    Member

    I think so. 50% of the blame probably falls on us (ourselves– less the women-folk.. because most women lack testosterone) and 50% the culture here.
    Last night I walked into a friend-neighborhood buteco. I said Hi to everyone, and then one guy came up to shake my hand, as as he was doing it, started to shake his other hand/finger at me saying, “Seu país está quebrado.. seu país é uma merda..”Then he disappeared.
    ahh, how *I’ve* changed. I’m no longer the American that would have punched him in the ribs a few times and then gone to my car to get my 357. I just basically ignored the guy and acted as if nothing had ever happened.The people (all Brazilians) that know me seemed a little embarrassed. There was no tension whatsoever. I get this kind of thing about once a month on average. Even when I become an EX-US Citizen, I think I’m going to have to wear t-shirts that say, “Hey, I’m Canadian!” because I’m not 100% relieved of this gringo accent yet, unfortunately.
    Hopefully this is a lesson learned for anyone still wearing “Brazil Goggles”.
    spongebob2012-09-02 17:41:06

  • #219789

    doctorlili
    Member

    That’s why I always say I’m German. Works everywhere in the world, much better than US American.

  • #219793

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=spongebob]I think so. 50% of the blame probably falls on us (ourselves– less the women-folk.. because most women lack testosterone) and 50% the culture here.
    Last night I walked into a friend-neighborhood buteco. I said Hi to everyone, and then one guy came up to shake my hand, as as he was doing it, started to shake his other hand/finger at me saying, “Seu país está quebrado.. seu país é uma merda..”Then he disappeared.
    ahh, how *I’ve* changed. I’m no longer the American that would have punched him in the ribs a few times and then gone to my car to get my 357. I just basically ignored the guy and acted as if nothing had ever happened.The people (all Brazilians) that know me seemed a little embarrassed. There was no tension whatsoever. I get this kind of thing about once a month on average. Even when I become an EX-US Citizen, I think I’m going to have to wear t-shirts that say, “Hey, I’m Canadian!” because I’m not 100% relieved of this gringo accent yet, unfortunately.
    Hopefully this is a lesson learned for anyone still wearing “Brazil Goggles”.
    [/QUOTE]

    Bob, I’m surprised by you becauseyou remind us every week how you agree wholeheartedly with that guy about thatoppressive America from which you so earnestly want to detach. Methinks there’sstill a soft spot lurking deep within your soul for dear old Uncle Sam. I betyou wear red, white & blue underwear. LOLLOLLOL

  • #219794

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=spongebob]
    I think so. 50% of the blame probably falls on us (ourselves– less the women-folk.. because most women lack testosterone) and 50% the culture here.Last night I walked into a friend-neighborhood buteco. I said Hi to everyone, and then one guy came up to shake my hand, as as he was doing it, started to shake his other hand/finger at me saying, “Seu país está quebrado.. seu país é uma merda..”Then he disappeared.ahh, how *I’ve* changed. I’m no longer the American that would have punched him in the ribs a few times and then gone to my car to get my 357. I just basically ignored the guy and acted as if nothing had ever happened.The people (all Brazilians) that know me seemed a little embarrassed. There was no tension whatsoever. I get this kind of thing about once a month on average. Even when I become an EX-US Citizen, I think I’m going to have to wear t-shirts that say, “Hey, I’m Canadian!” because I’m not 100% relieved of this gringo accent yet, unfortunately.Hopefully this is a lesson learned for anyone still wearing “Brazil Goggles”.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes without doubt, at times it is harder as a gringo. The country is ruled by the red flag PT, “Worker’s Party.” Buddies of Fidel Castro and Hugo Chaves. There is a good chance that the country will fall farther left. Radicals in the PT, including Lula view the USA as the Great Satan. Problem is Brazil has 1/4 the income and 1/4 the tax revenue, with huge disparity in the distribution of wealth so yes, there are a bunch of jealous, ignorant Brazilians who badmouth the USA. I have found that usually the more educated a Brazilian is, the more he loves the USA.
    At the same time, as a citizen of the world, it is easier for a gringo to play global arbitrage. Sell dollars to buy reais and buy cheap in times of panic. Brazil always finds a way to enter a crisis every 12 years or so. I think another one is up ahead, not to far off. We have a get out of jail free card called a passport. A vastly superior judiciary, legislature and executive branch. 4X per capita income, 8X rail stock, vastly superior roads, education system, much better educated, trained work force. In many ways Brazil is in the stone age and held captive by arcane tax and labor laws. Never ending strikes going down the path of Argentina.GreatBallsoFire2012-09-02 19:19:45

  • #219800

    Anonymous

    Perhaps the Brazilian inferioritycomplex is born of the embarrassing realities about the economic development ofthese two great land masses since independence: Brazil and the USA. Yes, theUSA is a little bigger [12%] and has had a little longer time to develop [21%]with a larger population size today of [35%] and the all-important crucialdisparity of over a 600% larger economy. The chief determinant suggesting the causeof the differences between these two young countries being the culturalbackground of the founding population together with the efficiency of theirrespective institutions. Brazil has enjoyed a mediocre performance and shows nosign of significant progress; the oligarchy continues to dominate in the landof the ignorant.

    Esprit2012-09-02 22:15:43

  • #219805

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>
    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;” =”Msonormal”><span =”st”><span style=’line-height: 115%; font-family: “Times New Roman”,”serif”; font-size: 12pt;’>Perhaps the Brazilian inferiority
    complex is born of the embarrassing realities about the economic development of
    these two great land masses since independence: Brazil and the USA. Yes, the
    USA is a little bigger [12%] and has had a little longer time to develop [21%]
    with a larger population size today of [35%] and the all-important crucial
    disparity of an 85% larger economy. The chief determinant suggesting the cause
    of the differences between these two young countries being the cultural
    background of the founding population together with the efficiency of their
    respective institutions. Brazil has enjoyed a mediocre performance and shows no
    sign of significant progress; the oligarchy continues to dominate in the land
    of the ignorant. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><?:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /><o:p></o:p></span></span><font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>
    [/QUOTE]
    Strange stats. Take away Alaska and Brazil is bigger. Brazil suffers from the Portuguese get rich quick and same old colonial tax system and burocracia plus the Getulio Vargas labor law. (He was a friend of Hitler’s.) Rule by decree which Dilma and Lula do on a daily basis. By decree “Purchases on credit card abroad a new tax of ten percent.” “Gas price up 6% at the pump” (Soon up 20% to pay for the Pre-Sal build out with outrageous local content cost over runs.) … After election of course. Brazil brought in 10X the slaves from Africa as the USA so they are paying the price today for the sins of the past.
    Recent studies indicate you can predict the lifetime success of the child in any home based upon the number of books found within. Perhaps with e-books and tablets the equation needs to be adjusted. The good thing is that e-books bring down the price of literacy… Great for Brazil…

  • #219809

    doctorlili
    Member

    There aren’t even half decent book stores in most cities in Brazil. The Brazilian does not read. Internet, Wikipedia is changing availability, but making it harder to see the (lack of) consumption of literature. Still, it’s not that bad for a developing nation. Would you like to be in India or China or Kenya instead?Squiddie2012-09-02 22:12:16

  • #219811

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Squiddie] There aren’t even half decent book stores in most cities in Brazil. The Brazilian does not read. Internet, Wikipedia is changing availability, but making it harder to see the (lack of) consumption of literature. Still, it’s not that bad for a developing nation. Would you like to be in India or China or Kenya instead?[/QUOTE]
    So you say Brazil is a land of illiterates. They just had a huge book fair in SP. Brazil has a rich history of literature. I believe that the tablets will help create a more literate Brazil. Much easier to teach children to read with the interactive e-books.
    I was recently in China and found it very crowded, polluted, but with good roads and rail. The Chinese value education, work and saving for the future. This does not exist in most of Brazil. India is starting to get ahead. Most of the low hanging fruit has been harvested in Brazil. Much easier to take income per capita from $300 to $900. Now that commodity prices are much lower, Brazil is in trouble. Too much money paid for wages, retirement and interest to service debt. Very little as always for roads, rail, education, health.
    I had a recent victory in Labor Court against a lying illiterate empregada, so a literate Gringo who is fluent in Portuguese can get justice so being a gringo does not indicate you will be screwed, but they will always try…
    My life path brought me to Brazil 30 years ago so for me India and Kenya are not an option. But I am very happy to be a US citizen and would never trade that for India or Kenya. Perhaps I might get Brazilian residency, that is enough for me.GreatBallsoFire2012-09-02 23:14:08

  • #219819

    mpitter
    Member

    The US is repressive country clobberring the poor and killing innocent people all across the globe. My country, the Netherlands is by far the best peaceful and progressive of all. Beileve me i study world law and know every stat out there and my home town Amsterdam is best !

  • #219822

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    I think svenn needs a ham avatar to go with the cheese.

  • #219823

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=svenn]
    The US is repressive country clobberring the poor and killing innocent people all across the globe. My country, the Netherlands is by far the best peaceful and progressive of all. Beileve me i study world law and know every stat out there and my home town Amsterdam is best ![/QUOTE]
    Yes in Salvador alone the police shoot and kill about 600 people every year. No judge, jury, or hearing. Hitler would like this. In any city of Europe or the US just anything like this in a city of 3 million would cause riots without end. In fact the army in Brazil is there to stop rebellion. Locals are happy that the police are killing the bad guys. These guys are so bad they put friends in bank lobbies to see who is taking out some money so they attack upon exit… often killing the victim if he/she resists over a few thousand reais…

  • #219834

    Caio Andretta
    Participant

    Try saying you are from the Netherlands for fun. 50% of the reactions will be “Maurício de Nassau!” and they’ll happily talk about how great the place (I’m always near Recife) would have been if the Dutch stayed there.
    The other half (especiallywhen out at night) will start ranting about how my grandparents stole everything their grandparents had and that I am fully to blame for their poverty, since Recife was colonized by the Netherlands around 1650.
    Ah, the Brazilian bum, making my day, every other week :)

  • #219843

    Arkmuda
    Member
  • #219845

    monzon
    Member

    I know what you mean spongebob. Living here for the past 4 years i generally find that upon meeting and/or being introduced to Brazilians their reaction to you falls into two categories, the 1st (and thankfully the majority) are polite and appear to have no deep rooted misconceptions. The second suffer from a severe inferiority complex, or least that’s the best i can describe for such immediate, no holds barred rudeness and anti gringo attitude that is so in your face that it takes you by surprise. When i was a fresh here i used to just smile but now i give it back them and have plenty of ammunition :)

  • #219849

    Gilmour
    Member

    Well, glad you guys liked the topic. Nooo.. I don’t have any deep lurkings for Uncle Sam.
    As I always say, foreigners always carry a bit more risk than the natives. I think that’s the same ANYWHERE you go. This particular guy was just running his mouth because he was drunk.
    GBF – feel free to ellaborate on your labour court victory. Sometimes “incompetent” Brazilians take their ex-bosses to labour court because they think they have nothing to lose, or they actually buy into the papo furado from the lawyers. What ends up happening is that they have to share with the lawyer, so what they get is less than had they just had an accountant prepare a recissão and take the money.

  • #219856

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=svenn]
    My country, the Netherlands is by far the best peaceful and progressive of all. Beileve me i study world law and know every stat out there and my home town Amsterdam is best ![/QUOTE]
    Yeah right, just why do you copy cat me?
    Is that you, Ray?sven2012-09-03 11:06:13

  • #219870

    doctorlili
    Member

    It is creepy even I agree.

  • #219886

    minhnoir
    Member

    [QUOTE=spongebob]
    Last night I walked into a friend-neighborhood buteco. I said Hi to everyone, and then one guy came up to shake my hand, as as he was doing it, started to shake his other hand/finger at me saying, “Seu país está quebrado.. seu país é uma merda..”Then he disappeared.[/QUOTE] I’d offer the guy $5 to say that to a Mongolian.
    Or you could say, “Yes, and your country hasn’t been able to finish a highway you started in 1970.

  • #219894

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Unfortunately, too many Brazilians believe the hype about Brazil, which was initially generated by the faltering economies OUTSIDE of Brazil, when they wanted somewhere new to invest, and then latched onto by the Brazilian government under Lula, albeit slightly too late. After ten years of economic strength, Brazil has very little to show for it – the investment was not made in infrastructure, the reforms were not made in the laws, and as we are seeing now, with the economy slowing quite considerably, and personal debt rising, there is little, if anything to fall back on. I for one, as someone planning on being invested here both socially and financially for some time to come, am slightly worried…
    I know a Brazilian vendor who has a skype statement that says in English: ‘Nothing better than start a fresh year with such good news…”Brazil overtakes Britain as World’s 6th Largest Economy”…Happy 2012!’ so I guess it’s fairly common – I will see how long this statement stays on his Skype account for…finrudd2012-09-03 15:06:14

  • #219895

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    I find in interesting that someone whould take the effort and time to state that the US is broken and is poo when so much obvious things need to be done in Brazil…an I’ve only been there 3 times thus far!

    I have been in restaurants in Mogi Mirim and been stared at for the entire time I was there by locals…how do you deal with that? Someone staring at you for over 1 hour? If in the US, I’d walk over, pull over a chair and start a conversation. What is appropriate in BR?
  • #219920

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=mmaser]

    I have been in restaurants in Mogi Mirim and been stared at for the entire time I was there by locals…how do you deal with that? Someone staring at you for over 1 hour? If in the US, I’d walk over, pull over a chair and start a conversation. What is appropriate in BR?

    [/QUOTE]

    Exactly the same thing, people are scared of what they dont understand or that which is different. Just walk over to them, maybe on your way to the bathroom and passing and shake their hand and say hi, tudo bem and continue on. If they want to talk to you afterwards then you have broken the ice. I find this alot here, people walking in and shaking your hand even when you dont know them. One guy did this though and turned out to be a right a-hole afterwards, so it doesnt always mean it wont kick off.
    When i first came here, it was difficult to do this because in my country, people just dont do that, people are more reserved. In Brazil, people are more extroverted and a little ignorant at times, so it can be the norm for people to stare, but will happen more if you are new here. Once you get to know people and chill more, they will see you differently in the same setting.
    I think as gringoes here, we will spend afew years just getting used to the culture difference here, Brazilians are very laid back people on the whole and are just looking for fun most of the time.
    I had a drunk guy yesterday come over to talk, he was great, every other sentence was followed by a chuckle, i bought him a glass of cachaca and he got talking to my friend who is great with people and he curled up and went to sleep by my feet.
    Another guy fell over the other week and went into cachaca convulsions, my terminology, i had to put him in the recovery position as no one knew what to do with him, i thought the guy was dying.
    I wouldnt mention to anyone that your american, sometimes, they’ll still think your american even after telling them that your German or Dutch or Australian, some ignorant people will still pigeon hole you as american, its only their own ignorance of the geographical map. i had one drunk going on about how i could vote for a black president, even though he was black himself, i didnt bother telling him that i didnt and that i am not.
    I have found that on the whole, there seems to be a secret admiration for americans, even if they dont show it or admit it, its still there, but just dont stick your head out because many Brazilians like to challenge at times, especially when they are drunk. And definately dont say that your Argentinian. LOL

    Amsterdam2012-09-04 07:09:49

  • #219925

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire] [QUOTE=Esprit]

    <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>

    <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;” =”Msonormal”><span =”st”><span style=’line-height: 115%; font-family: “Times New Roman”,”serif”; font-size: 12pt;’>Perhaps the Brazilian inferiority
    complex is born of the embarrassing realities about the economic development of
    these two great land masses since independence: Brazil and the USA. Yes, the
    USA is a little bigger [12%] and has had a little longer time to develop [21%]
    with a larger population size today of [35%] and the all-important crucial
    disparity of an 85% larger economy. The chief determinant suggesting the cause
    of the differences between these two young countries being the cultural
    background of the founding population together with the efficiency of their
    respective institutions. Brazil has enjoyed a mediocre performance and shows no
    sign of significant progress; the oligarchy continues to dominate in the land
    of the ignorant. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”> </span><?:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /><o:p></o:p></span></span> <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”>

    [/QUOTE]
    Strange stats. Take away Alaska and Brazil is bigger. Brazil suffers from the Portuguese get rich quick and same old colonial tax system and burocracia plus the Getulio Vargas labor law. (He was a friend of Hitler’s.) Rule by decree which Dilma and Lula do on a daily basis. By decree “Purchases on credit card abroad a new tax of ten percent.” “Gas price up 6% at the pump” (Soon up 20% to pay for the Pre-Sal build out with outrageous local content cost over runs.) … After election of course. Brazil brought in 10X the slaves from Africa as the USA so they are paying the price today for the sins of the past.
    Recent studies indicate you can predict the lifetime success of the child in any home based upon the number of books found within. Perhaps with e-books and tablets the equation needs to be adjusted. The good thing is that e-books bring down the price of literacy… Great for Brazil…[/QUOTE] MAN, THANK you for giving me HEADS UP. When I was a child I had about 4,000 books at home Just can’t wait for this success to come. Clap

  • #219926

    Mila kunis
    Participant

    I get stared at a LOT. I have very blond hair and am quite a noticable looking person even in the UK, let alone as a gringo in Brazil.
    How do I deal with it? I just lap it up. I love the attention tbh

  • #219933

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Robert717] [QUOTE=GreatBallsoFire] [QUOTE=Esprit] <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”> <p style=”margin: 0cm 0cm 10pt;” =”Msonormal”><span =”st”><span style=’line-height: 115%; font-family: “Times New Roman”,”serif”; font-size: 12pt;’>Perhaps the Brazilian inferiority complex is born of the embarrassing realities about the economic development of these two great land masses since independence: Brazil and the USA. Yes, the USA is a little bigger [12%] and has had a little longer time to develop [21%] with a larger population size today of [35%] and the all-important crucial disparity of an 85% larger economy. The chief determinant suggesting the cause of the differences between these two young countries being the cultural background of the founding population together with the efficiency of their respective institutions. Brazil has enjoyed a mediocre performance and shows no sign of significant progress; the oligarchy continues to dominate in the land of the ignorant. <span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><span style=”mso-spacerun: yes;”>¬†</span><?:namespace prefix = o ns = “urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office” /><o:p></o:p></span></span>
    <font size=”3″ face=”Times New Roman”> [/QUOTE] Strange stats. Take away Alaska and Brazil is bigger. Brazil suffers from the Portuguese get rich quick and same old colonial tax system and burocracia plus the Getulio Vargas labor law. (He was a friend of Hitler’s.) Rule by decree which Dilma and Lula do on a daily basis. By decree “Purchases on credit card abroad a new tax of ten percent.” “Gas price up 6% at the pump” (Soon up 20% to pay for the Pre-Sal build out with outrageous local content cost over runs.) … After election of course. Brazil brought in 10X the slaves from Africa as the USA so they are paying the price today for the sins of the past. Recent studies indicate you can predict the lifetime success of the child in any home based upon the number of books found within. Perhaps with e-books and tablets the equation needs to be adjusted. The good thing is that e-books bring down the price of literacy… Great for Brazil…[/QUOTE]

     

    MAN, THANK you for giving me HEADS UP.

    When I was a child I had about 4,000 books at home

    Just can’t wait for this success to come.

    Clap

    [/QUOTE]
    Very funny, in statistics you always have errors. But the book concept implies that parents who are literate and care about education tend to pass this care for literacy and education to their children. This leads to greater success for their offspring… GreatBallsoFire2012-09-03 21:15:36

  • #219935

    Anonymous

    So what comes first, the egg or the chicken? Where do the literate parents come from? Confused

  • #219936

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=mmaser]I find in interesting that someone whould take the effort and time to state that the US is broken and is poo when so much obvious things need to be done in Brazil…an I’ve only been there 3 times thus far!

    I have been in restaurants in Mogi Mirim and been stared at for the entire time I was there by locals…how do you deal with that? Someone staring at you for over 1 hour? If in the US, I’d walk over, pull over a chair and start a conversation. What is appropriate in BR?

    [/QUOTE]
    I’ve been here for several years.. everyone in the “bairro” knows me. It’s not the same as if I were to go to a restaurant in SP, Rio, BH, MM and I’m a stanger.
    My bet is that I’m quite a bit of an enigma because I don’t do some things the way that would if they were in the same situation… but it’s fun. I do things for practicality only, not because I need to impress people.
    This kind of thing, blatant remarks, I don’t hear often, but I have heard some “indirect comments” along the way. My bet is that is likely to get worse in the future…. I don’t think it’s an alarm to stop a trip to Brazil, BUT a reason to wear EXTRA-THIN “Brazil Goggles” upon the next time one comes here.

  • #219938

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Amsterdam]

    . ..And definately dont say that your Argentinian. LOL

    [/QUOTE]

    YES!!!! Thanks for the advice! Ill try to be more outgoing with those who stare!
    -Marc
  • #219943

    mpitter
    Member

    Folks think brasilians love foreigners, well, not really. i cant tell you how many times i got bad vibes from people here. it hard to deal with. back in europe, even the US, people acept you. maybe they dont like you but they at least leave you alone. Not in Brasil.

  • #219944

    celso
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit]
    So what comes first, the egg or the chicken? Where do the literate parents come from? Confused[/QUOTE]
    Alas we arrive at the enlightenment. A culture whose people come mainly from a slave class without books finds little value in literacy. This is the egg Brazil needs to break. I believe with tablets and interactive e-books, literacy will experience a rebirth in Brazil. This will take time as the media giants prefer to shove soaps and bunda dancers down the populace throats as a pinga fueled circus distraction. “Yes we are the best.. Those blue eyed bankers of Europe and the USA did this to us”…(As the present crisis hits)GreatBallsoFire2012-09-03 22:36:53

  • #219949

    jaenicoll
    Member

    Don’t think it can only be blamed on the whole slave thing:
    “As Portugal tries to dig out of its financial mess, it’s confronted with a sobering fact: Fewer than 30 percent of adult Portuguese have graduated from high school. Not college. High school.”
    http://www.npr.org/2012/04/09/150062919/lack-of-graduates-hampers-portugals-recovery

  • #219960

    jheathco
    Member

    I have only been here 6 weeks, but I’ve had almost entirely positive vibes from the Bahians. Twice I have run into a group of Harley riders at the local barraca, who just loved talking about motorcycles with an American, even one who has a BMW bike back home. They love that I lived in Wisconsin for 12 or so years.
    I rode down the Orla path on Sunday, where there was a huge party going on in Piata, and me and my friend had to walk our bikes through the crowd of people, who were dancing and drinking like crazy. When I bumped into anyone, I just apologized and always got a nod or a thumbs up in return.
    My friend looks like a Brazilian, but I look as gringo as can be. Then again, if someone said that to me about the U.S., I would probably nod and buy them a drink.

  • #219964

    doctorlili
    Member

    I think it is not generally true that Brazil does or did not spend money on infrastructure.
    My 3500 km driving at the coast showed streets in good condition. Lombadas was the only shaky thing, no potholes. Interstate highways of 3 or 4 lanes over the hills, very good conditions.
    Also, take the Transoeste connecting Rio’s Zona Oeste with Recreio. It is very slick smooth ride through the tunnel, shaving off 1 hour over the Serra that it used to take. And this is so slick increasing quality of life for millions of lower income people living out there in Campo Grande and Santa Cruz. Even without that, the public transport is so darn affordable in Rio, it’s nothing compared with Chicago or Berlin today or any other big city in the north-western world. I mean, R$ 2.70 buys you a 3 hour bus ride from one end of the city of Rio de Janeiro to the other. In Berlin that would be, what, R$8.
    Or take the rule that any road interconnecting two municipalities (of a certain small size threshold) are being asphalted now. That’s big and increases value.
    So, I think, those grudges about Brazil being such a pit are as overstated and unreasonable as those bums raving against USAmerica.
    Squiddie2012-09-04 10:31:30

  • #219966

    Gilmour
    Member

    Squiddie, let’s not just use Rio as an example. Where I live, it’s R$ 2,50 for a bus ride, and the city is only 4 square kilometers. That means from one end to the other, you are out of the city in 4 km. R$ 2,50 is a huge rip-off.
    This whole morning, I’ve been re-doing work I did a month ago because some incompetent people dismantled what I had been working on. This happens quite often…. people give me more work to do – A BIG f’ing waste of time. Please don’t sugar coat it.. I like the country OK; I live here. But my opinion is there are more incompetent people per square kilometer here than any other country (except those in Africa).
    Even then, everything is 8 ou 80.. either someone works and is “usually” somewhat successful or they are a complete lazy douchebag that’s *desperate* for money cause they owe everyone in the city.

  • #219969

    doctorlili
    Member

    Not sugar-coating. Just perspective. If you go to a small town in Germany, also just few kilometers wide and long, you still pay 3-5 Euro for the bus fare.
    Incompetence abounds everywhere in the world and I do not doubt that this is amplified in Brazil. But you need to compare apples to apples. So how does Brazil fare compared to India? I can’t quite tell, and you probably have some level of morality that’s amazingly high in India (about impossible to get mugged/robbed in India). But in the US you can bang your head on some people (typically the underlings), and then there are those who have ethics.
    And I am sure that towards a gringo the ratio of effort vs. invoice amount goes down. So I am not denying. Just sometimes there is a lot of whining and complaining here … usually you, Bob, are of the more reasonable sort. So, go ahead and vent

  • #219975

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=spongebob] Squiddie, let’s not just use Rio as an example. Where I live, it’s R$ 2,50 for a bus ride, and the city is only 4 square kilometers. That means from one end to the other, you are out of the city in 4 km.
    [/QUOTE]
    Only if the town is 4 KM long and 1 meter wide. However in a normal 4 square KM, you’d be out of the town in 2KM.
    (EX) Americans and the metric system

  • #219978

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=spongebob] Squiddie, let’s not just use Rio as an example. Where I live, it’s R$ 2,50 for a bus ride, and the city is only 4 square kilometers. That means from one end to the other, you are out of the city in 4 km.
    [/QUOTE]
    Only if the town is 4 KM long and 1 meter wide. However in a normal 4 square KM, you’d be out of the town in 2KM.
    (EX) Americans and the metric system [/QUOTE]
    SvenN, 4 sq. km = 4 4 sq km.
    4

    4
    From one end to the other (left -> right), it’s 4 km. I live near the geographical center, so I’m out in around 2-3 km.
    Nonetheless, I recommend this for you:
    http://www.m2math.com/
    spongebob2012-09-04 12:02:03

  • #219982

    Gilmour
    Member

    Squiddle, I’m not venting… in all of the countries have lived in, Brazilians win the dunce award. When I talk about dunces, I’m NOT referring really to book smarts that people in other countries learn, never use, and then forget. I’m just talking about common sense— very simple stuff. Someone here explained it pretty well: Brazilians are the descendants of slaves. Slaves never had to think for themselves. Yes, you are still wearing Brazil Goggles and sugar coating. Most (not all) Brazilians remind me of very lazy lemmings.
    Sven, ok.. I see what you’re saying. I was talking about “4 squared” instead of 16 km2. Hmm.. I’ve been living in Brazil for too long. Strange how I made that disassociation with the language. When you go in to ask for tile here, you don’t specify “squared” (or at least nobody in this city does). If you have an area that’s 5×5, you just say “25 meters”. What’s even scarier is that I’m starting to use the “gerund” like a Brazilian, but in English. Yikes…
    spongebob2012-09-04 12:18:23

  • #219984

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    I think it is not generally true that Brazil does or did not spend money on infrastructure.My 3500 km driving at the coast showed streets in good condition. Lombadas was the only shaky thing, no potholes. Interstate highways of 3 or 4 lanes over the hills, very good conditions. Also, take the Transoeste connecting Rio’s Zona Oeste with Recreio. It is very slick smooth ride through the tunnel, shaving off 1 hour over the Serra that it used to take. And this is so slick increasing quality of life for millions of lower income people living out there in Campo Grande and Santa Cruz. Even without that, the public transport is so darn affordable in Rio, it’s nothing compared with Chicago or Berlin today or any other big city in the north-western world. I mean, R$ 2.70 buys you a 3 hour bus ride from one end of the city of Rio de Janeiro to the other. In Berlin that would be, what, R$8.Or take the rule that any road interconnecting two municipalities (of a certain small size threshold) are being asphalted now. That’s big and increases value. So, I think, those grudges about Brazil being such a pit are as overstated and unreasonable as those bums raving against USAmerica.
    [/QUOTE]
    Without having anything much to back this up, I would say it is a fairly well recognised and agreed point that Brazil has failed dismally in terms of investing in the country’s infrastructure over the past ten years. Of course there will be exceptions, but for a country of this size, the infrastructure in terms or rail, road, air and sea transport is lacking, as it is in the telecoms infrastructure. There are exceptions – there is 27,5km of Raposo Tavares motoroway that is really quite good.
    To add to this, I have it in mind that the majority of the actual roads, ports and airports in Brazil today were actually created during the Military Dictatorship…and since then, successive governments have basically failed even on the basic upkeep, let alone any sort of development.finrudd2012-09-04 12:25:53

  • #219986

    doctorlili
    Member

    Bob, I may be wearing “Brazil Goggles” but then why are you still there? I hear you and GBF and all the others howling, but why the foder are you still there? There must be something good enough for you. If US was so much better to live, you would be here. If Europe was better you’d be there. Either you are trapped (in which case I would understand the frustration) or you are choosing Brazil anyway, in which case your actions speak louder than words.
    A lot is being made about cultural disposition, these people over there are just dumb and don’t know how to live. This has been used by the colonial powers and slave-holders to morally justify their actions. It’s unfair to compare Brazil to the US, Canada, or Australia because they were never really colonies as the underdeveloped world is. US and Canadian and Australian history was that of the colonizers took over. Natives have been all but eradicated and slaves have been limited to 20%. So you have plenty of crap going on in the US, but they are not comparable with Brazil or other post-colonial countries. And still, if you actually compare apples to apples, Brazil against India, other Asian countries, Africa, or even Arabia, or other Sounth American countries, where does Brazil rank? I think they are pretty well up there in the area of respectability. Or would you prefer Colombia? Argentinia? Chile? Peru? Paraguay? Why do Uruguayans come to Brazil? Because Brazil is the dump?
    Brazil is a relatively free country, with a public health care system, and the highest tax bracket under 30%. It’s vast, and green. The roads are a heck of a lot better than in India, and so are the quality of the trucks and drivers on it. The system is more free than in China. The red-tape and corruption probably on par if not better than in India. Wages are way higher than in India. Don’t even begin to compare with Africa where malnutrition and genocidal tribal wars abound. Arabia you can smoke in the Hooka for nepotism and corruption and stupidity.
    Really all you have to compare is your country of origin as a Gringo, and when you think that is better, then again, why do you live in Brazil? Your words say one thing, but your actions show that there is a value proposition which you’re just not talking about.
    I’m glad you guys figured out the geometry Smile
    PS: finrudd, I wasn’t talking about 27 km but 3500 km of BR 101 and SP-Curitiba freeway and in SC. Granted this may look different in Goias, not sure. But I am talking about the towns and villages that I saw the big and smaller streets. It is way, way, way better than in India and heck even better than in some of the pot-hole ridden roads in my US city. The port in São Sebastião SP and Santos seemed in good shape to me, hardly worse than, say Chicago. The subway and trains in Rio certainly better than the pitiful excuse of rail transportation that exist around Chicago. Man as I drove through Joinville, SC, I felt like in a small town in Germany so tidy (if a bit boring.) As for phone infrastructure: I was parked in a super small pretty beach town in litoral SP near São Sebastião just on the beach, and got my work done connecting with my cellphone to the Internet 3G at 50 fodendo centavos per day! Here in the US I pay $2 US per day 2G modem speed to T-Mobile, and AT&T suck big time (including your money). Squiddie2012-09-04 13:05:18

  • #219993

    mpitter
    Member

    Bob maybe you need a one way tick back USA? I study law, had issues way back when but now every so often i get harrased. I love law and love being a life lerner of law. The US everybody hates, well so they say. Paz / sorte

  • #219995

    jaenicoll
    Member

    I’m not really in on this fight but I don’t think comparing India to Brazil is comparing apples to apples. Colonialism is not a binary history of either settler colonies (Canada, Austrailia, US) or opressed native Colonies. Most of Latin America countries fall in between these two realities on what could be described as a spectrum. With some combination of the destruction of natives and at the same time European immigration and institutions and slavery. Brazil can’t be compared to India, where there was very little european immigration. Brazil has been a beneficiary of colonization in the fact that it would’t exist if it hadn’t been a colony. nesne22012-09-04 14:28:16

  • #220007

    Anonymous

    Oh dear, Bob, your complaints aboutsome aspects of Brazil have roused the reactionary into their familiar taunt,Why don’t you go back to where you came form! Personally I wouldn‚Äôt be too concerned with erroneous claims suggestingthat Brazil‚Äôs infrastructure is coping with the country‚Äôs demands or with its economicaspirations when all the facts, in concert with the overwhelming businessopinion, argue the contrary. Brazil goggles worn by those ten hairs short ofbeing a baboon are highly likely to fall into what passes for Brazil‚Äôs sewageprocessing plant.

    Listen to this audio commentaryfrom the grown-ups: http://www.economist.com/blogs/americasview/2012/08/investing-brazils-infrastructure

  • #220011

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=svenn]
    Bob maybe you need a one way tick back USA?  I study law, had issues way back when but now every so often i get harrased. I love law and love being a life lerner of law. The US everybody hates, well so they say. Paz / sorte[/QUOTE]
    So, how’s the Oudemanhuis Poort doing nowadays?

  • #220013

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=spongebob]
    [QUOTE=sven] [QUOTE=spongebob] Squiddie, let’s not just use Rio as an example. Where I live, it’s R$ 2,50 for a bus ride, and the city is only 4 square kilometers. That means from one end to the other, you are out of the city in 4 km.
    [/QUOTE]
    Only if the town is 4 KM long and 1 meter wide. However in a normal 4 square KM, you’d be out of the town in 2KM.
    (EX) Americans and the metric system [/QUOTE]SvenN, 4 sq. km = 4 4 sq km. ¬†4 — 4From one end to the other (left -> right), it’s 4 km. I live near the geographical center, so I’m out in around 2-3 km.Nonetheless, I recommend this for you:http://www.m2math.com/
    [/QUOTE]
    4 Square kilometers =
    4 km x 1 km
    2 km x 2 km
    The square root of 4 = 2
    2 to the power of 2 = 4
    [quote] 4 sq. km = 4 4 sq km. [/quote]
    4 equals 44
    Please look at:
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Square_kilometre
    Note: “km2” means (km)2, square kilometre or kilometre squared and not k(m2), kilo‚Äìsquare metre. For example, 3 km2 is equal to 3×(1,000m)2 = 3,000,000 m2, not 3,000 m2.
    If your wall is 2 meters high and 2 meters long, it’s 4 square meters (4 m2) just put three 0’s after the 2 ad you have the same sum in kilometers.

  • #220015

    doctorlili
    Member

    So what is so bad about that Economist audio spiel? We have privatization of infrastructure, the kind of sell-off has happened in the north-western world since the 1980s. T-Mobile was once the telephone branch of the Deutsche Bundespost. I don’t want to know how many private people got a really good deal for that. The US railway system was altogether handed over to the Rockefellers, etc. back in the day when paying your congressman directly to cast your vote was good US style.
    So what exactly is wrong here with this Economist audio?
    The selection criteria will be lowest tariffs to the public, that is innovative. I do not remember that having been a criterion when the lucrative Telecom was handed over to the German millionaire industry czars. Of course the initial lower tariff bids will be increased over time, but it’s still a good idea. Of course there will be corruption, just like in the US, what else is new?
    Squiddie2012-09-04 16:11:08

  • #220016

    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=svenn]
    Bob maybe you need a one way tick back USA?  I study law, had issues way back when but now every so often i get harrased. I love law and love being a life lerner of law. The US everybody hates, well so they say. Paz / sorte[/QUOTE]
    Love law? Why?
    Because it has a tenuous link with justice? I don’t think so.
    Because it is a bunch of conflicting bureaucratic rules where someone who studies them can make money helping others through the morass, maybe.

  • #220017

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=cardi]
    Because it is a bunch of conflicting bureaucratic rules where someone who studies them can make money helping others through the morass, maybe. [/QUOTE]

  • #220018

    doctorlili
    Member

    [QUOTE=cardi] [QUOTE=svenn]
    I love law and love being a life lerner of law.[/QUOTE]
    Love law? Why?[/QUOTE]
    No he’s just saying that because “svenn” is some troll impersonating the real Sven and trying to make people believe it’s him.
    ShockedOMG/MD what did I just say?? I think I’ve been here for too long, the troll paranoia has taken hold of me. SOMEBODY come and do some exorcism on me to drive out the evil spirits ….. haaar haaaaar haaa. Dead

  • #220019

    jaenicoll
    Member

    Ok, I’ve resisted for five pages but I have to do it:
    Yes being a Gringo does make it harder, at least that’s what the ladies tell me.

  • #220021

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Squiddie] I think I’ve been here for too long, the troll paranoia has taken hold of me. [/QUOTE]
    You’re a senior member now, live up to it.
    I just wonder when we will have a svennagainn

  • #220029

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    …So what exactly is wrong here with this Economist audio?…
    [/QUOTE]

    Allow me to put this simplisticallyas possible: There was never any suggestion that there was something wrong’with the audio file. I posted it in the context of the discussion about thelack of Brazilian infrastructure and the audio discusses the proposedinvestment in infrastructure which, by its very nature and the enormous proposedcost, implies that there is a chronic lack of infrastructure despite any individual’slimited personal experience witnessed through Brazil goggles.

  • #220031

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    ShockedOMG/MD what did I just say?? I think I’ve been here for too long, the troll paranoia has taken hold of me. SOMEBODY come and do some exorcism on me to drive out the evil spirits ….. haaar haaaaar haaa. Dead
    [/QUOTE]

    You rang?
  • #220047

    Paulo
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]
    [QUOTE=cardi] [QUOTE=svenn]
    I love law and love being a life lerner of law.[/QUOTE]
    Love law? Why?[/QUOTE]No he’s just saying that because “svenn” is some troll impersonating the real Sven and trying to make people believe it’s him.ShockedOMG/MD what did I just say?? I think I’ve been here for too long, the troll paranoia has taken hold of me. SOMEBODY come and do some exorcism on me to drive out the evil spirits ….. haaar haaaaar haaa. Dead[/QUOTE]
    The real Sven appreciates my comments about law.
    The troll? Who knows or cares?

  • #220049

    doctorlili
    Member

    Oh the Economist interview gave an opinion that Brazil needs more infrastructure and that is the proof? Of course Brazil needs more infrastructure, who doesn’t. I merely put this in perspective. I know German roads, they are perfect. But all of that needs to be seen in perspective. I have driven in India a major intercity highway and died a thousand deaths, I drove in Brazil and found it a breeze. So, I don’t care about an Economist article. There is of course always more to do.

  • #220053

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]Oh the Economist interview gave an opinion that Brazil needs more infrastructure and that is the proof? Of course Brazil needs more infrastructure, who doesn’t. I merely put this in perspective. I know German roads, they are perfect. But all of that needs to be seen in perspective. I have driven in India a major intercity highway and died a thousand deaths, I drove in Brazil and found it a breeze. So, I don’t care about an Economist article. There is of course always more to do.[/QUOTE]

    The Economist interview, that youcare so little about, was not intended as offered proof and, frankly, your reactionto it and subsequent question is quite irrational. And where is the perspectivethat you offer? Are we supposed to find it somewhere in the vagaries within themention of Germany, India and Brazil? India, an ancient culture, has littleexcuse for its backward infrastructure given the lessons offered during theBritish colonial days, while Brazil has pretentions of grandeur within itsfalse view of itself. If anything, I’d bet on India’s future given its cultureand track record on education.

  • #220056

    doctorlili
    Member

    I don’t need to repeat myself for you. It’s in the end of page 4 of this thread. But anyway this whole thing has gotten way off topic.

  • #220087

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=svenn]Bob maybe you need a one way tick back USA? I study law, had issues way back when but now every so often i get harrased. I love law and love being a life lerner of law. The US everybody hates, well so they say. Paz / sorte[/QUOTE]
    Are you crazy? I don’t want to go back to the Police State.

  • #220088

    Gilmour
    Member

    Squiddle:
    Why am I still here?

    I have to choose the lesser of the 2 evils:
    1- Morons in Brazil
    2- US Police State
    I fear#2.
    I don’t fear $1 unless they are in a car and I’m on a moto.

  • #220089

    Gilmour
    Member

    Sven, you’re right. I actually looked up “square kilometer” on Wikipedia before I made the first comment. I just left the link in there because I thought it was funny.
    Sometimes I think without the internet I would forget everything….

  • #220092

    doctorlili
    Member

    Interesting that you would think of US as a police state, Bob. I agree that Police presence in US is high (my sister commented this too, compared to Germany). However, in Brazil the frequent PF checkpoints on the rodovias and then even Policia Militar presence always makes me queezy and I think of the old GDR. Is this remnant of a military dictatorship in Brazil not bothering your heightened sense of police-statedom?

  • #220101

    Luca
    Member

    Interesting discussion. As a European who have lived over 5 years in both Brazil and the US, I personally don’t think there is any comparison in terms of whether one or the other is a police state. The US is not a police state! Sure, there is lots of police on the street (is that bad?) and the local cops are a pain in the ass when they get on your back over a broken tail light and crap like that. But at least the treatment in the US is fairly predicable. In Brazil, however, anything can happen because of the corruption, impunity and generalized incompetence. I am also afraid of those PRF and PM road blocks.You never know what they are up to.
    Brazil has a lot of remnants from its military dictatorship (requirement to carry ID, militarized civilian police etc).
    The US has become a bit of a Surveillance State post 9/11 but I still dont think that it equates to a police state.tbird2012-09-05 08:48:37

  • #220102

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    US is no where close to a police state, just the fact that you don’t need to carry an ID goes a long way in that. It bugs me here that I need to always carry an ID around, the US has no national ID and there is no need to carry ID, hard to be a Police state like that.

  • #220103

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=Squiddie]Interesting that you would think of US as a police state, Bob. I agree that Police presence in US is high (my sister commented this too, compared to Germany). However, in Brazil the frequent PF checkpoints on the rodovias and then even Policia Militar presence always makes me queezy and I think of the old GDR. Is this remnant of a military dictatorship in Brazil not bothering your heightened sense of police-statedom?[/QUOTE]
    puleeeez! Where I live, there are few police on the street. Occaisionally, they stop to ask for vehicle documents.
    Meantime, in the “Land of the Free”:
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/caught-on-tape-cop-punches-teen-girl-10921057
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/man-tased-toddler-arms-8755985
    http://digitaljournal.com/article/250615
    (Woman stopped for DWI is left in pool of own blood)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrMokM3U-VU
    (San Antonio Police beating a pregant woman)
    I know things are perfect here, even with the cops, but should things like this even be happening in a 1st world country. I don’t think so.

  • #220104

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Police on the streets is a bad thing??? Of course there will be some police abuse, but there is no way police abuse/corruption in the US is worse than Brasil.

  • #220106

    jaenicoll
    Member

    The PM is not a legacy of the Dictatorship. The PM was created long before that. Here is a nice article to compare police in Brazil to the US.
    http://noticias.r7.com/sao-paulo/noticias/em-cinco-anos-pm-de-sao-paulo-mata-mais-que-todas-as-policias-dos-eua-juntas-20110607.html

  • #220107

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=andrewfroboy]Police on the streets is a bad thing??? Of course there will be some police abuse, but there is no way police abuse/corruption in the US is worse than Brasil. [/QUOTE]
    Think logically here:
    There are more police on the street in the US, by far. The chance of an encounter is much higher in the US, therefore, your chances encountering a cop that is “having a bad day” is much greater.
    I’ll let you guys decide for yourselves.
    http://whathappenedtoprotectandserve.blogspot.com.br/
    What’s a little shocking are the incidents with police and rape.

  • #220108

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    I’ll take police on the streets and literally knowing no one who has had a car robbed in the US compared to SP at least where I know few people who haven’t had a car robbed. Any police force as large as the US or Brasil will have its bad eggs, but open corruption is far more common here.

  • #220109

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=nesne2]The PM is not a legacy of the Dictatorship. The PM was created long before that. Here is a nice article to compare police in Brazil to the US.
    http://noticias.r7.com/sao-paulo/noticias/em-cinco-anos-pm-de-sao-paulo-mata-mais-que-todas-as-policias-dos-eua-juntas-20110607.html%5B/QUOTE%5D
    Add SP to the list of places I wouldn’t like to live!! I’m always hearing about stuff that is happening there with the cops. It seems different here. If you call the cops, they show up 3-4 hours later. Some days I don’t even see any at all.
    I prefer things like this.. haha, too funny:
    http://noticias.r7.com/sao-paulo/noticias/jovem-aceita-fazer-sexo-com-criminosos-para-recuperar-celular-roubado-em-casa-noturna-de-barueri-20120813.html

  • #220110

    Andrewfroboy
    Participant

    Right so if you leave SP its better, just like the US, growing up in the suburbs we often didn’t lock our doors, only cops i ever encountered were giving speeding tickets.

  • #220113

    doctorlili
    Member

    Yes, those encounters on video and this “whathappenedtoprotectandserve” stuff is just a collection of horror stories. Stuff happens. Just as with domestic violence, you can stay out of trouble if you want to, or you can collude to participate in drama. Take the woman who got hit for example. They are all insanely arguing with that police officer. And of course he’s a jerk (who else would take such underpaid jobs as a deputy) but they are all morons, those “victims” included.
    Or take the majority of those shot in SP state. Or in Rio. Well, if you are part of favela wars, what do you expect? [Poor people being caught in the cross-fire … but then, they came to the city from the country and could have the information that their only place to stay is in illegal encroachments of public land run by mafia criminals who will enlist your sons and rape your daughters. If you want to avoid that, consider continuing farming in the Amazonas, or take the risk and live with it by being smarter.] I am not saying the police in Brazil or in US has no fault or is just good, all I am saying is that these collections of horror stories are just part of a hysteria / paranoia.
    When I saw “Police man <Full Name> on trial for sexual misconduct / domestic violence, etc. etc.” I go WTF! Why are police officer’s private lives being stalked upon and then collected in some horror-story-collection website? What is the point? The moron had a moronic girlfriend who probably provoked him or accused him just right out lying so she could get a protective order as part of her marital end-fight. What happened to innocent until proven guilty?
    Hysteria and paranoia, people with the “please don’t kick me” sign on their backs, playing victim cards. It’s mostly B/S. If you want to stay out of trouble, you can in most places do that.
    Squiddie2012-09-05 10:22:46

  • #220119

    Gilmour
    Member

    Squiddie, on the front page of that site, they have 2 cops busted for prostitution!! On the lower right-hand side, you can see things by category. They’ve caught cops involved in sex-with-minor cases, kiddie porn, prostitution, drug trafficking, basically everything conceivable.
    Not surprisingly either, a guy from Phoenix had a site like that, pointing out police brutality. You can bet that the cops have made the guy’s life hell. You wouldn’t expect that in the US, but people are human, no matter how great they think they are.
    I’m not a total US-hater. This kind of thing goes on all over the world.

  • #220122

    Pedro
    Member
    To answer the OP’s question..Yes, of course it does.
    We are starting from square one, the Brazilians have the experience here and the backing of generations of people, family, friends and associates, who ALL stick together. They will never look at a gringo in the same way.
    Also, if they are not gaining from you in anyway, then things probably wont happen, i can assure you.
    I have already mentioned on here how the Brazilians would rather pay more for something and deal with a Brazilian, than pay less and deal with a gringo.
    I have no idea why, but we arent on their Christmas card list. Wink
  • #220137

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=spongebob]Some days I don’t even see any at all.
    [/QUOTE]

    Your not looking in the right places LOL
    Tell me something, in the US are the cops allowed to moonlight? In the UK, as far as i know the cops cant moonlight, the Fire Brigade (FireFighters) do, but i dont know if they are allowed to either.
    A more balanced liberal thinking Texan, now that must have been a little tough at times. Why is it that Brazil seems to attract quite afew Texan americans and other southerners aswell. Interesting demographical american immigration stats. I think i know the answer aswell, its called looking for balance, which i can fully understand, just watch out for the rebound, once or if ever, the reality kicks in. Wink
    Now, do many Texans emigrate to Mexico i wonder.
    I would be afraid of going to Texas, i think i would fit right in there. Wake up singing the Davy Crockett melody every day.
    Was that a little strong, not meant to be at all.
    Smile

    Amsterdam2012-09-05 15:17:00

  • #220147

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=frank4000][QUOTE=Amsterdam][QUOTE=spongebob]Some days I don’t even see any at all.
    [/QUOTE]

    Your not looking in the right places LOL
    Tell me something, in the US are the cops allowed to moonlight? In the UK, as far as i know the cops cant moonlight, the Fire Brigade (FireFighters) do, but i dont know if they are allowed to either.
    A more balanced liberal thinking Texan, now that must have been a little tough at times. Why is it that Brazil seems to attract quite afew Texan americans and other southerners aswell. Interesting demographical american immigration stats. I think i know the answer aswell, its called looking for balance, which i can fully understand, just watch out for the rebound, once if the reality kicks in. Wink
    Now, do many Texans emigrate to Mexico i wonder.
    I would be afraid of going to Texas, i think i would fit right in there. Wake up singing the Davy Crockett melody every day.
    Was that a little strong, not meant to be at all. Wink
    Smile

    [/QUOTE]
    You got to be kidding right. Texans are attracted to Brasil for the same reasons they love Texas.
    [/QUOTE]

    I may well be wrong Frank, but they dont appear to have liked Texas or they wouldnt have moved, explain your theory?

    Amsterdam2012-09-05 12:13:59

  • #220148

    Anonymous

    Cops do moonlight as security officers in the US too. (my brother was a police officer and ended up leaving when he blew the whistle on a corruption thing. very bad situation, death threats for the whole family. but all’s well that ends well, he is fine and out of law enforcement.)
    corruption here, corruption there. it’s everywhere, surprise surprise.
    Spongebob, i’ve had the same experience as you in several countries. Usually either they want to see if they can get you pissed, or sometimes they won’t say that sort of thing if they don’t know you (a friendly criticism, if you will). I always respond with “well, i’m here (outside the US) so what do you think I think about it?”

  • #220149

    Pedro
    Member

    Power Corrupts i guess, too much power corrupts absolutely, i see it here all the time and it annoys the mda out of me.

  • #220158

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=frank4000]Horses, red meat, guns open fields and land lots of land.
    lol
    [/QUOTE]

    Smile

    Amsterdam2012-09-05 12:44:14

  • #220164

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=3casas]Spongebob, i’ve had the same experience as you in several countries. Usually either they want to see if they can get you pissed, or sometimes they won’t say that sort of thing if they don’t know you (a friendly criticism, if you will). I always respond with “well, i’m here (outside the US) so what do you think I think about it?” [/QUOTE]
    The reaction from that question must be like this:


    Hamster, Svenn
    : I’m not from Texas. Do you think I’m really going to give REAL details to people on here or in PM’s?

  • #220167

    Pedro
    Member
    Spongey – Calm down.

    You have made implied references to being from Texas, i thought you were. Sorry if i misunderstood. Smile

    I think it was the part where you said you would pull out a .357 if someone insulted you. Wink
    ..

    Amsterdam2012-09-05 14:13:36

  • #220181

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=frank4000]Horses, red meat, guns open fields and land lots of land.
    lol
    [/QUOTE]

    Frank.
    Thats nothing compared to Russians, they make Texans look like something out of the Wizard of Oz LOL
    Confused
    ..
  • #220186

    Pedro
    Member

    Queue – Angie and Flooripa Sleepy

  • #220191

    hoganti
    Member

    [QUOTE=spongebob]
    I’m really going to give REAL details to people on here or in PM’s?[/QUOTE]
    you are one paranoid dude

  • #220274

    Gilmour
    Member

    [QUOTE=hpeak13] [QUOTE=spongebob]
    I’m really going to give REAL details to people on here or in PM’s?[/QUOTE]
    you are one paranoid dude[/QUOTE]
    Of course I am. Most everything is totally anonymous and expat90210 and his ilk may be serial killers for all we know. Too bad there’s no “association” of long-timers here where you could actually trust who we’re talking to.
    hpeak, there are many more paranoid people on here as well. Why do you think you always see these new nicknames for people with 1-2 posts to the nickname? I, on the other hand, am too lazy and just post with this nickname.

  • #220307

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=spongebob][QUOTE=hpeak13] [QUOTE=spongebob]
    I’m really going to give REAL details to people on here or in PM’s?[/QUOTE]
    you are one paranoid dude[/QUOTE]
    Of course I am. Most everything is totally anonymous and expat90210 and his ilk may be serial killers for all we know. Too bad there’s no “association” of long-timers here where you could actually trust who we’re talking to.
    hpeak, there are many more paranoid people on here as well. Why do you think you always see these new nicknames for people with 1-2 posts to the nickname? I, on the other hand, am too lazy and just post with this nickname.
    [/QUOTE]
    Say Spongie maybe we should hire that forensic linguist to vet out these trolls here. LOL
    According to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, the owner of a landfill that is the target of a federal probe got so fed up with Mencken1951’s comments on NOLA.com articles about him that he hired the famous forensic linguist James Fitzgerald to unmask the troll.Fitzgerald compared the comments to a legal brief by then-Assistant U.S. Attorney Sal Perricone, and found striking similarities, including the use of obscure words such as “dubiety” and “redoubt.” Perricone eventually fessed up and stepped down from his position, and he now faces a defamation lawsuit from the landfill owner, Fred Heebe.
    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2012/09/06/sal_perricone_anonymous_online_comments_cost_federal_prosecutor_his_job.html?wpisrc=xs_wp_0001

  • #220311

    Pedro
    Member

    Trolling for trolls. Oh the Irony of it allLOL

    Amsterdam2012-09-06 22:52:48

  • #220316

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Amsterdam]

    Trolling for trolls. Oh the Irony of it all LOL

    [/QUOTE]
    Try looking in your mirror

  • #220336

    Patigell
    Member

    [QUOTE=agri2001] [QUOTE=spongebob] [QUOTE=hpeak13] [QUOTE=spongebob]
    I’m really going to give REAL details to people on here or in PM’s?[/QUOTE]

    you are one paranoid dude[/QUOTE]

    Of course I am. Most everything is totally anonymous and expat90210 and his ilk may be serial killers for all we know. Too bad there’s no “association” of long-timers here where you could actually trust who we’re talking to.

    hpeak, there are many more paranoid people on here as well. Why do you think you always see these new nicknames for people with 1-2 posts to the nickname? I, on the other hand, am too lazy and just post with this nickname.

    [/QUOTE]

    Say Spongie maybe we should hire that forensic linguist to vet out these trolls here. LOL

    According to the New Orleans Times-Picayune, the owner of a landfill that is the target of a federal probe got so fed up with Mencken1951’s comments on NOLA.com articles about him that he hired the famous forensic linguist James Fitzgerald to unmask the troll.Fitzgerald compared the comments to a legal brief by then-Assistant U.S. Attorney Sal Perricone, and found striking similarities, including the use of obscure words such as “dubiety” and “redoubt.” Perricone eventually fessed up and stepped down from his position, and he now faces a defamation lawsuit from the landfill owner, Fred Heebe.

    http://www.slate.com/blogs/future_tense/2012/09/06/sal_perricone_anonymous_online_comments_cost_federal_prosecutor_his_job.html?wpisrc=xs_wp_0001
    [/QUOTE] The word on the street is that trolls can be lured out of their troll hut with the offer of free acai. Just saying. LOL

  • #220340

    pmcalif
    Member

    [QUOTE=spongebob][QUOTE=Squiddie]Interesting that you would think of US as a police state, Bob. I agree that Police presence in US is high (my sister commented this too, compared to Germany). However, in Brazil the frequent PF checkpoints on the rodovias and then even Policia Militar presence always makes me queezy and I think of the old GDR. Is this remnant of a military dictatorship in Brazil not bothering your heightened sense of police-statedom?[/QUOTE]
    puleeeez! Where I live, there are few police on the street. Occaisionally, they stop to ask for vehicle documents.
    Meantime, in the “Land of the Free”:
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/caught-on-tape-cop-punches-teen-girl-10921057
    http://abcnews.go.com/US/video/man-tased-toddler-arms-8755985
    http://digitaljournal.com/article/250615
    (Woman stopped for DWI is left in pool of own blood)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VrMokM3U-VU
    (San Antonio Police beating a pregant woman)
    I know things are perfect here, even with the cops, but should things like this even be happening in a 1st world country. I don’t think so.
    [/QUOTE]

    Let me comment some of the videos:
    1st ABC video) Nazi cop beating beating a black woman – its nothing new in the US, you can just ask the blacks there
    2nd ABC video ) Nazi cop being a black men
    youtube video) cops beating a pregnant hispanic girl
    (as a reason they state a prostitution)
    How could be a prostitution there illegal and at the same time they sell most of the porn in the world ?
    I think the prostitution is illegal also in China, another example of the human rights champion.
    Anyway, the US has many in common with China
    a) they both kill children (China only kills girls)
    b) they both support communism
    and something tells me they both worship Satan
  • #220344

    Pedro
    Member

    [QUOTE=WENGER]

    and something tells me they both worship Satan

    [/QUOTE]

    By Satan, do you mean Money and Power by any chance.
    Two places in the world i dont think i would have ever compared it would have been them. Basically power corrupts, the cops in america have way too much of it, that is the problem. I see it here aswell, its absolutely absurd and they copy the US here aswell and just bend the rules beyond breaking point. I could tell you some stories here that would make your hair stand on end aswell.
    This happens all over the world also, look at Iran, do they worship satan, i can tell you that they do,. its not only the US, its only that the US gets more publicity.
  • #220356

    agri2001
    Participant

    [/QUOTE]

    The word on the street is that trolls can be lured out of their troll hut with the offer of free acai. Just saying. LOL[/QUOTE]
    Aghh..! Acai the magic potion.
    BTW how`s KL treating you.
    agri20012012-09-07 10:29:45

  • #220394

    Patigell
    Member

    [QUOTE=agri2001]
    [/QUOTE] The word on the street is that trolls can be lured out of their troll hut with the offer of free acai. Just saying. LOL[/QUOTE]

    Aghh..! Acai the magic potion.
    BTW how`s KL treating you.
    [/QUOTE] Hey, KL is not bad and SE Asia. Just heading back there tonight after a few weeks maxing and relaxing in Brasil. Had an acai today with guarana for extra potency. Can’t drink the stuff anymore with a straight face. LOLLOL

  • #23357

    Daisy
    Member

You must be logged in to reply to this topic.