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  • #275500

    Sambolina
    Member

    I was wondering if anyone has written anything about the regional differences between states in Brazil. Like how do people in the state of Sao Paulo differ from those in Rio de Janeiro? And so on.
    Also, can you make comparisons between areas of the U.S. and Brazil?… For instance, would the general character of the U.S. Northeast be similar to that of Southeastern Brazil in terms of attitudes for instance (faster paced, cosmopolitan(in some areas) but at the same time, historically entrenched/rooted (the northeast as a hub of cultural activity but at the same time a place with a lot of generational families.. vs say Los Angeles and the west coast… So Sao Paulo/Rio would be more similar to the Northeast in that regard I’m guessing)… And the Northeast of Brazil not being as much of a cultural hub as the Southeast but still retaining a unique character of its own(due to the proximity to the sea)… But then the interior of Brazil and way to the west in Acre being a having a more of sort of plain and dull character (like America’s midwest).
    And since pretty much all of Brazil exists in some variation of tropical climate and the language is Portuguese(a Latin language, a hotter language) does this allow for/facilitate a more all-encompassing(“welcoming”) notion of Brazil that is sort of felt no matter where you are in Brazil… Whereas in the U.S., because of the horrible winters in most of the country, and the English language, differences between regions are perpetually reinforced with the seasons (lines are always redrawn in a sharper way)
    tom722015-06-05 12:26:39

  • #275507

    brazil2010
    Member

    I have found that this is something Brazilians talk about amongst themselves but don’t discuss with foreigners too much unless you make a deliberate effort to ask in Portuguese. I suppose they might feel they are letting the side down if they make fun of their own countrymen, I think we do the same in England sometimes. We criticise ourselves all the time but don’t like it when a foreigner says the same thing.

    Also, there is the ever present danger of raising difficult issues like racism. Better to stay on safe ground. No one likes nastiness, enough of that already.

    Here is something for you to watch and enjoy about regional differences, but only if you speak Portuguese well: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4WFH-5n7WqoI didn’t understand all of it but it made me laugh. Its about how different regions perceive the temperature.
  • #275508

    graham
    Participant

    I agree with Jamest that Brasilians do discuss, compare and otherwise critique the personality and culture of various regions of Brasil. In fact, each region is known for their peculiar notorieties. Where to find all these views neatly and objectively summarized is a good question. If you’ve lived and mingled in Brasil for a good length of time, these opinions are often obvious.

    As to your query about regional differences/similarities in Brasil as compared with regional differences in the US, the answers are quite subjective and open to debate. The forum has an immense archive of such discussions. Good luck on finding someone with the time and knowledge to enter into a complex, elaborative dialog to explore this with you.
    As to your first question, “has anyone written anything,” I only know of the copious amount of “discussions” which have served as fodder for many discussions on this forum. Perhaps there are books or articles…
  • #275512

    ffm
    Member

    One thing I think is funny, wherever you are, the men from the other regions are gay. In São Paulo, they say cariocas and gaì∫chos are gay. If you are in Rio, the Paulistanos and gaì∫chos are gay and so on. From my experience, the NE is left out of this pilhaìßado. rsrsrsrsrs

  • #275513

    Ron
    Participant

    I can only comment on the coastal regions but if you were to regard the State of Espirito Santo as a transitional buffer the Brazil to the South and the Brazil to the north are like chalk and cheese, (or should that be charcoal). They are so different from each other that you might well think you are on a different planet.

    The most obvious difference, apart from the color of the people, is that things in the south present some form of order and progress whereas in the north it is the exact opposite.
    Basic cost of living and lifestyle is also a big factor. Here in Bahia I can have a hearty meal of beans, rice spaghetti, salad and meat or fish delivered to my house for R$4. I can get 3 X 600ml bottles of beer, served on the beach, including table chairs and an umbrella for R$10. In the south I would expect to pay, at least double.
    A friend of mine who has just spent the last 2 years living in the south reported from Forteleza, on route to the Caribbean, just yesterday that the poverty levels become more noticeable the further north you get. He said that Salvador was positively brimming with progress compared to Forteleza and the outskirts of Joao Pessoa.
  • #275514

    celso
    Member

    I got a nice haircut for ten reais a few days ago in the North. Rio price, 60 reais. Liter of beer at local joint 5 reais. Rio price 300ml for 12 reais.
    Captain Ron is spot on.

  • #275515

    Sid
    Participant

    Surely when lunch costs 4 reais, including delivery, you have to start seriously questioning what corners are being cut to make it profitable at that price point?

    I’d say a typical almoìßo comercial costs 8 reais in Recife, maybe less way out in the excuses for neighbourhoods. Hard pressed to find a 600ml beer under 5-6 reais although I do get a litrão for around 4 reais when returning the bottle.

  • #275530

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    Biggest difference for me is the accents. The north east speaks something resembling Portuguese I think, I cannot generally understand them. The far south (RS) speaks Portuguese I can understand though they use the tu form and speak Portaì±ol towards the border. In terms of price, higher in general in the inner cities, less in the interior. In Mogi Mirim you can get a Marmitex (rice/beans/veg/meat) for 14 R enough for an American family of 4. Beer is 6 R per 600ml (Original) and a bag of pão francì™s “air bread” is around 5 R.

    -Marc
  • #275536

    Shell
    Member

    I have lived in Rio, Curitiba, Floripa, and Ilheus, in that order. The geography, topography, and demography of those places are dramatically different. Despite the differences, I did not find the culture or the people to be THAT different. My perception has been that no matter where you go in Brazil, the thing that most consistently distinguishes and stratifies people, is not skin color, not national origin, not the region where they live. It is their socioeconomic status. Wealthy and well off people in Bahia seem little different to me than the wealthy and well off in Curitiba or Rio. Poor and near poor people in Bahia seem the same as the poor and near poor in Rio or Floripa. Brazilians themselves tend to say that there are vast differences between how people are, based on their region. Supposedly those who live in the south are ‘stiff and cold and distant’, whereas Cariocas are ‘warm and friendly and inviting’. I have not found those stereotypes to be accurate……

  • #275550

    Sambolina
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]I have lived in Rio, Curitiba, Floripa, and Ilheus, in that order. The geography, topography, and demography of those places are dramatically different. Despite the differences, I did not find the culture or the people to be THAT different. My perception has been that no matter where you go in Brazil, the thing that most consistently distinguishes and stratifies people, is not skin color, not national origin, not the region where they live. It is their socioeconomic status. Wealthy and well off people in Bahia seem little different to me than the wealthy and well off in Curitiba or Rio. Poor and near poor people in Bahia seem the same as the poor and near poor in Rio or Floripa. Brazilians themselves tend to say that there are vast differences between how people are, based on their region. Supposedly those who live in the south are ‘stiff and cold and distant’, whereas Cariocas are ‘warm and friendly and inviting’. I have not found those stereotypes to be accurate…… [/QUOTE]
    I figured that money was the big divider and not race… I’ve head that same stereotype about Brazilians from the south being cold and distant from Brazilians here in the states(mostly from Minas)…Can’t imagine what they’d think of people from truly cold climates(if you can still grow palm trees it’s not “cold”)…
    Anyways, appreciate the replies… Now, Salvador, Rio, or Sao Paulo for Samba? Where is the scene most alive in terms of number of bars offering live entertainment on a regular basis (as this is a big deciding factor for my trip)… While Salvador is the supposed to be the birthplace of Samba, the greatest Samba seems to come from Rio… And Sao Paulo seems like maybe it appreciates Samba the most?(given the higher density of intellectual types)….
    And in terms of regional differences, does Salvador really pride itself on Samba in the way that Jamaica prides itself on Reggae? Or is that reggae-ish/Olodum type music more popular than Samba now in Salvador?(or worse that pop-country rubbish).

  • #275574

    Shell
    Member

    From the perspective of the most bars offering live entertainment on a regular basis, between Salvador, Sao Paulo, and Rio, for sure Rio and SP offer the most of that, simply because they are both giant cities, compared to the much smaller size that Salvador is. How you would choose between Rio and SP I guess would depend on the other things you are looking for. If you also want to have access to good beaches, Rio offers that, SP does not. SP has more cultural type things to do, and also more, and somewhat more affordable, accomodations for staying. Rio is notorious for not having enough mid priced hotels – There are some, but mostly what you find in Rio is lower priced hotels and pousadas in not so good or safe areas, or the much higher priced high end hotels. My very strong suggestion is, any accomodation you are considering staying at, be it Rio or SP, first google maps the address, and get down to street level and just look around in the general area. It is so easy to do. And what you often find is a hotel or pousada that on decolar.com looks fine, but the area around it is terrible. Most South American cities are well known for having slum type areas spread out and interspersed in direct proximity to very highly developed areas. Take Rio, for example, just about every well known suburb of Rio (Copacabana, Ipanema, Leblon……..) has it’s accompanying favela. Sucks, but it is what it is…….

  • #275581

    jeb2886
    Member

    SP is going to be a lot more expensive for a tourist, and it’s massive. You have to choose a “city” within SP to visit, because there is no way you could go from one area to another without wasting a day traveling around.

    Salvador is probably the most distinct city in Brazil I’ve been to. The people are completely different and the culture is very unique. RIO and SP are just huge melting pots, Salvador was definitely way out there. I liked it, you would probably have a good time there, and it would be pretty easy to find what you want. It’s large enough that you’ll find what you want — but small enough that you can actually travel to those areas easily by taxi or bus.
  • #275588

    Ron
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jkennedy]SP is going to be a lot more expensive for a tourist, and it’s massive. You have to choose a “city” within SP to visit, because there is no way you could go from one area to another without wasting a day traveling around.

    Salvador is probably the most distinct city in Brazil I’ve been to. The people are completely different and the culture is very unique. RIO and SP are just huge melting pots, Salvador was definitely way out there. I liked it, you would probably have a good time there, and it would be pretty easy to find what you want. It’s large enough that you’ll find what you want — but small enough that you can actually travel to those areas easily by taxi or bus.

    [/QUOTE]

    There are also some very nice places to visit close to Salvador. The after Carnaval party at Morro de Sao Paulo attracts thousands of tourists. You also have Chapada Diamantina for spectacular natural scenery and attractions and there is always the Island of Itaparica to escape to. Just as the Cariocas flock to Ilha Grande to avoid Carnaval in Rio so the people of Salvador flock to Itaparica.
  • #275604

    a6abeGGkz-0
    Member

    Captain Ron, your feedback makes me think it could be an affordable place to stay for 2 to 3 months with 5 k dollars? maybe find a Pousada for a 2 month stay, a place to park and take off to travel the region and even head to the Amazon. just thinking how to cope with moskitoes in the NE …

  • #275613

    Ron
    Participant

    Sure there are mosquitoes but repellent and a net solves that problem.

    Be aware that prices for accommodation increase over the summer break and reach a peak over Carnaval.
    Depending on what you are comfortable with, finding a room within a family home could make a good base from which to travel.
  • #275617

    Shell
    Member

    If you plan to stay 2-3 months, check out homeaway.com. Pousadas generally quote their prices on a per-night basis, and are usually resistant to making you a better deal for a possible longer stay. I have tried this, and what they have told me is, people frequently come, promising to stay for a month, maybe more, of course to get a much better price, then the people leave after a week. I would think if you plan to stay put for 2-3 months, something more like a fully furnished apartment or kitnet is more what you would be looking for, and you can definitely find those on homeaway.com. Hope this is helpful information…….

  • #275618

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]If you plan to stay 2-3 months, check out homeaway.com. Pousadas generally quote their prices on a per-night basis, and are usually resistant to making you a better deal for a possible longer stay. I have tried this, and what they have told me is, people frequently come, promising to stay for a month, maybe more, of course to get a much better price, then the people leave after a week.I would think if you plan to stay put for 2-3 months, something more like a fully furnished apartment or kitnet is more what you would be looking for, and you can definitely find those on homeaway.com. Hope this is helpful information…….[/QUOTE]
    Couldn’t they mitigate that by just charging upfront? Confused

  • #275619

    Shell
    Member

    Yeah, they could. But customers almost never want to pay everything up front, right away, because then what leverage do they have when, for example the mattress turns out to be a sheet over an ancient torture device, or the AC stops working, or any of a number of other unacceptable aspects crop up. The owner is a lot more likely to fix something PDQ if the customer will otherwise walk. Who is going to walk when they have already paid for a month, or more, up front? Also, pousadas tend to do cash only business. When you have paid for something via credit card, and some aspect of the service turns out to be totally unacceptable, you have the advantage of disputing the charge with the help of the credit card. I once reserved a room in a pousada in Porto Seguro, on decolar.com, it was a pay up front with credit card scenario. When I got there I discovered the water coming out of the bathroom sink and the shower head was not only saltwater, it also had a huge amount of calcium in it. Neither soap or shampoo would lather or even foam at all. It was disgusting. So I got online, made a reservation elsewhere, high tailed it to elsewhere, and disputed the charge for the pousada with my credit card. The dispute was upheld.

  • #275622

    a6abeGGkz-0
    Member

    CR and CE thanks for the tips and yes the info is great and priceless. I just got a great idea on the net thing just by talking about moskitoes. For sure anyone can use a bed net and when outside a good extra strength repellant should help a bit.

  • #275625

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]Yeah, they could. But customers almost never want to pay everything up front, right away, because then what leverage do they have when, for example the mattress turns out to be a sheet over an ancient torture device, or the AC stops working, or any of a number of other unacceptable aspects crop up. The owner is a lot more likely to fix something PDQ if the customer will otherwise walk. Who is going to walk when they have already paid for a month, or more, up front? Also, pousadas tend to do cash only business. When you have paid for something via credit card, and some aspect of the service turns out to be totally unacceptable, you have the advantage of disputing the charge with the help of the credit card. I once reserved a room in a pousada in Porto Seguro, on decolar.com, it was a pay up front with credit card scenario. When I got there I discovered the water coming out of the bathroom sink and the shower head was not only saltwater, it also had a huge amount of calcium in it. Neither soap or shampoo would lather or even foam at all. It was disgusting. So I got online, made a reservation elsewhere, high tailed it to elsewhere, and disputed the charge for the pousada with my credit card. The dispute was upheld. [/QUOTE]

    Yes. I pay after or in installments whenever possible. I even wait to pay until I see the pizza I ordered via take out! Always feel weird when I pay in advance; it’s like I’m no longer a priority anymore.
    -Marc
  • #275627

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=carloseduardo]Yeah, they could. But customers almost never want to pay everything up front, right away,because then what leverage do they have when, for example the mattress turns out to be a sheet over an ancient torture device, or the AC stops working, or any of a number of other unacceptable aspects crop up. The owner is a lot more likely to fix something PDQ if the customer will otherwise walk.Who is going to walk when they have already paid for a month, or more, up front? Also, pousadas tend to do cash only business. When you have paid for something via credit card, and some aspect of the service turns out to be totally unacceptable, you have the advantage of disputing the charge with the help of the credit card. I once reserved a room in a pousada in Porto Seguro, on decolar.com, it was a pay up front with credit card scenario. When I got there I discovered the water coming out of the bathroom sink and the shower head was not only saltwater, it also had a huge amount of calcium in it. Neither soap or shampoo would lather or even foam at all. It was disgusting. So I got online, made a reservation elsewhere, high tailed it to elsewhere, and disputed the charge for the pousada with my credit card. The dispute was upheld. [/QUOTE]

    Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh yeah! I forgot where we are!!!! LOL
  • #275953

    I live in Minas; I would ONLY consider living in the biggest city in MG or RJ/SP -> on the beach. The South is too cold for me, and the NE speaks with an irritating accent. I’m very familiar with the beaches of Southern Europe, but I would take beaches of RJ (STATE) to Southern Europe. You just have to wait for the tourists to go home during the high months.

  • #276054

    Shell
    Member

    I think many of the beaches of RJ state are nice, with the one caveat that the water temp tends to be cold to very cold. Ever been to Buzios or Cabo Frio? The water is icy cold there. I have not been everywhere in Brasil, but of all the places I have been, I personally think the beaches around Maceio are the nicest. The sand is very fine, not shelly or rocky, and the water is warm year round. Maceio the city is not such a great place overall, but they have a nice mercado near centro, lots of good quality merchandise for very cheap prices, and Pajucara is a nice part of Maceio to spend time or maybe even live…….

  • #28427

    Gianne
    Member

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