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  • #115160

    jonathand
    Member

    I like Tony Ramos as an actor, but he’s hopelessly miscast in “Caminho das Índias” on Globo. Sticking a red dot on his forehead doesn’t change things either. I just can’t believe in him as an Indian – in fact few of the men in the novela could pass for Indians although some of the women could. Mind you, being a Brit I’ve had more exposure to Indians than the average Brazilian will have had, (plus I actually spent 3 weeks touring Rajasthan), so that’s probably why it’s more difficult for me to suspend my belief sufficiently.

  • #115161

    flyteen
    Member

    i don’t like the novelas, but i’ve been trying to get into this one when i can, just to give some appreciation of this famous brasilian art form a chance. some suspension of belief is required for the portugues expressions cast in india. so far, i find it ok entertainment. the setting of india does give it a little more exotic flair, if not interesting brasilan/indian appeal i don’t think i’ll ever be a novela junkie though.

  • #115162

    waynec
    Member

    I tried to watch it, but the acting was so bad and the plot so ridiculous that I couldn’t get into it. I liked Laços da Familia.

  • #115163

    flyteen
    Member

    yes…but i’m a little artfully unbalanced, and sometimes i find the ridiculous almost sublimely entertaining… (like the movie Nacho Livre). all novelas seem overacted to me anyway, but i’ll try to tune into Laços da Familia if i have the chance. i can’t believe i’m writing this now and missing watchin India. bye

  • #115168

    micko
    Member

    “Caminho das Índias” comes right after “Negócio de China” … but if you stay up late enough you can watch “Hecho em Mexico” … I mean “Chaves” …

  • #115182

    enchantbeau
    Member

    What I find strange about novelas like Caminhas das Indias is how static they are. Every scene seems to be in a sitting room or bedroom with people just talking endlessly. I would enjoy a scene where no-one was sitting or lying down. There seems to be about six unrelated stories happening at once and over the course of a week of our lives, their lives seem to move forward a day. Still my wife loves it so who am I to say anything.

  • #115183

    Even my wife thinks it is bad and she generally likes novelas. I on the other hand, would rather be subjected to physical torture than watch it (them).

  • #115196

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=globetrotter]

    I like Tony Ramos as an actor, but he’s hopelessly miscast in “Caminho das Índias” on Globo. Sticking a red dot on his forehead doesn’t change things either. [/QUOTE]
    Especially since the red dot usually indicates “married woman”LOL

  • #115200

    jonathand
    Member

    Yep… I forgot to mention that Sven. In N. India I had a dot put on my my forehead but it was saffron and not vermilion. And was more of a welcoming tradition. I think the programme is mainly a fashion vehicle.

  • #115205

    Guys
    You all are right. I’m an Indian living in SP now, that show is a comdey. All the actresses look horny. I think they should have taken all of them to India for a month and then shot the show over there so that everyone could get a feel of what Indian culture is all about….
    cheers
    Raj

  • #115207

    jonathand
    Member

    I couldn’t agree with you more Raj! Thumbs%20UpThere is so much culture to absorb in India and the programme makers missed out on a wonderful opportunity to teach Brazilians about the world outside – especially those who have little or no hope of travelling abroad and would probably find the experience fascinating. I was only over there for 3 weeks and it is impossible not to have the culture wash over you. This programme is just the typical Brazilian novela with different clothes

  • #115208

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=nitinhungama]Guys
    You all are right. I’m an Indian living in SP now, that show is a comdey. All the actresses look horny. I think they should have taken all of them to India for a month and then shot the show over there so that everyone could get a feel of what Indian culture is all about….
    cheers
    Raj
    [/QUOTE]
    Raj
    They Actually did take them to India for about a month Confused
    About the saffron, I got one of those in a temple.

  • #115212

    Sanchezrawl7
    Member

    You would be surprised with the massive influence these tele novelas have on people despite the bollocks arse acting and bad lighting. I heard tourism for India has since increased (although I don’t have the statistics) since this show has been on air, and small details for example such as one of my students reading books on Indian mythology!?
    Ive heard of a script writer ( I cant tell you her name ) who works on tele novelas and has done so for years, she had a daughter who was an actor in her novelas 15 years ago or so but was murdered by two fellow actors in the same novela for sleeping around with one of the actors that is now in jail.
    She once wrote a novela around a gay character that created a positive response from the audience and on top of that the actor playing this role was attacked outside a bar once for simply playing that role. Since then it is said that the general perception of gay people has changed positively because of this.
    Right now she is planning to create a schizophrenic character for a new novela, im not sure how that will turn out.

  • #115213

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    I’d say you could compare these novelas to Oprah!

  • #115219

    Mindy
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]”Caminho das Índias” comes right after “Negócio de China” … but if you stay up late enough you can watch “Hecho em Mexico” … I mean “Chaves” … [/QUOTE] hahahahha Good one! I hate novelas myself, but i do love chaves ever since I was a kid

  • #115239

    [QUOTE=sven][QUOTE=nitinhungama]Guys
    You all are right. I’m an Indian living in SP now, that show is a comdey. All the actresses look horny. I think they should have taken all of them to India for a month and then shot the show over there so that everyone could get a feel of what Indian culture is all about….
    cheers
    Raj
    [/QUOTE]
    Raj
    They Actually did take them to India for about a month Confused
    About the saffron, I got one of those in a temple.
    [/QUOTE]
    shame they still couldn’t learn anything from there

  • #115240

    [QUOTE=globetrotter]I couldn’t agree with you more Raj! Thumbs%20Up

    There is so much culture to absorb in India and the programme makers missed out on a wonderful opportunity to teach Brazilians about the world outside – especially those who have little or no hope of travelling abroad and would probably find the experience fascinating.
    I was only over there for 3 weeks and it is impossible not to have the culture wash over you. This programme is just the typical Brazilian novela with different clothes

    [/QUOTE]
    correct my friend.
    btw have you guys seen the movie slumdog millionaire??

  • #115403

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=globetrotter]

    This programme is just the typical Brazilian novela with different clothes

    [/QUOTE]
    I remember a novela about Morrocos, same thing. There was the other one too “Ameleca” (America for those who liked it). They showed US state troopers with typical Brazilian police uniforms. Ignorant is not the right word.
    Other nice angle of novelas is that “favela dwellers” often live better then lowe middle class.

  • #115427

    micko
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]Other nice angle of novelas is that “favela dwellers” often live better then lowe middle class.
    [/QUOTE]Isn’t that the truth!

  • #115589

    M. Helena
    Member

    one thing they got good is the little movement of the head some of the men do. that is so Indian.
    I do like the exotic fabrics and scenes from India.

  • #115953

    I think this novela is so bad it is sometimes funny, but find it politically poignant. Its interesting how as soon as the Western world enters into crisis Globo introduces the idea of strengthening Brazilian-Indian relations by founding business in such a modern area as Biotechnology.
    Both of these countries boast enormous and rapidly growing economies and are trying to gain seats on the UN security council.
    Novelas, however ridiculous they may seem, exert an powerful influence over this country. Its amazing how blatant Globo’s attempts to direct Brazilian foreign policy are and how oblivious most people remain to it. I wouldn’t be surprised if more and more politicians begin to discuss strengthening ties with non-western nations (India in particular).
    They are just using the novela to warm everybody up for what it coming!

  • #115955

    flyteen
    Member

    nikkij12185…i enjoyed reading your observations. very insightful.
    i do not watch novelas, except for a feeble attempt to get into the caminho das indias a few times to see what all the fuss is about. i have also recently seen TV ads for two more novelas: in one, something like a space ship is trying to shoot down a helicopter, and the other is something about business in china. i suspect these go even further into the realm of sublime by being ridiculous. how they might influence things is anyone’s guess.

  • #115973

    Sanchezrawl7
    Member

    [QUOTE=nikkij12185]I think this novela is so bad it is sometimes funny, but find it politically poignant. Its interesting how as soon as the Western world enters into crisis Globo introduces the idea of strengthening Brazilian-Indian relations by founding business in such a modern area as Biotechnology.
    Both of these countries boast enormous and rapidly growing economies and are trying to gain seats on the UN security council.
    Novelas, however ridiculous they may seem, exert an powerful influence over this country. Its amazing how blatant Globo’s attempts to direct Brazilian foreign policy are and how oblivious most people remain to it. I wouldn’t be surprised if more and more politicians begin to discuss strengthening ties with non-western nations (India in particular).
    They are just using the novela to warm everybody up for what it coming![/QUOTE]
    Excellent observation, I did not pick up on that before but it makes perfect sense from a perspective as the one you mentioned. Its always good to dig deeper.
    Globo are horrible in my eyes. They have a nasty history – working in cahoots with the dictatorship, all for the money. They are chameleons. An interesting documentary was made by the BBC many years ago called ‘Beyond Citizen Kane’ which elaborates on their influence. You wont find it in shops here, as it’s been banned, but you could ‘you tube’ it if you are interested.

  • #125739

    Anonymous

    Ya know, the way i’ve been with novelas is i start off not liking them then i get attached, but with caminho, I still hate it. It boring and it just sucks. I think my favorite will always be malhacao… but we also like mutantes because it’s so cheesy and corny and they’re like a heros wanna-be and it’s so corny that we crack up when we watch it. God why can’t I remember the name of the novela, but there’s one that i think of when i think of novelas that i think will always be my favorite cuz it was just so action packed with lotsa drama and i was always yelling at the tv when i watched it. Oh yeah.. A Favorita that’s it! All time fav. right there. Tres Irmas was good too I loved that woman that always used to freak out cuz her man was flirting with other women and she found out she had a secret power to appear anywhere she wanted… she was hilarious.

  • #125742

    enchantbeau
    Member

    That’s a lot of TV going on there!

  • #125749

    PEARLYGURL
    Member

    [QUOTE=frank4000]last night show was ok[/QUOTE] ShockedDont you live in the Carribbean!!!

  • #125754

    PEARLYGURL
    Member

    Are baba! I loved the storyline where the guy wante to run away with his lover so he poisoned himself with a potion which gave all the impressions of him being dead and then they had a family funeral(obviously within the few hours it took till the potion ceased to have effect). He was then dug up and fleed to Saudi Arabia(where strangely everyone spoke Portuguese as well) with all his families money. It simply would not work Stern%20Smile

  • #125946

    815
    Member

    I’ll man up and admit, I got sucked into it. Even my wife makes fun
    of me for it!Ouch
    It’s like a metaphor for Brazil (in my life). It’s ridiculous, at times it doesn’t
    make sense and it is of low production quality….yet I stick around!

  • #127467

    PEARLYGURL
    Member

    Its funny how they can say incredibly complex portuguese sentences but when they need to say yes(tic) no(narhee) or oh my god(arry barbar!!) they resort to their mother tongue.
    heres a fun game, record how many times indian people say oh my god per conversation….

  • #127510

    India is cool in Brazil thanks to hot ‘novela’

    17 August, 2009

    RIO DE JANEIRO (Reuters) – The pink-walled palaces, shimmering saris and Bollywood dances all scream India. So why are the actors speaking Portuguese and kissing passionately?

    Welcome to Brazil’s latest soap opera hit, a lavish production that has sparked a mini India boom in Brazil, even while taking liberties with its portrayal of the Asian giant.

    The “Caminho das Indias” (Way of the Indias) telenovela, with Hindi phrases thrown into the Portuguese dialogue, has piqued Brazilians’ interest in the emerging economic powerhouse that was little-known here before.

    Hindi phrases such as the exclamation “Arre Baba” (Oh my goodness!) have entered everyday speech; interest in yoga, meditation and Indian dance is on the rise and demand for Indian clothes and decorations has jumped.

    On Rio de Janeiro’s beaches, vendors are touting Indian-style sarongs.

    “People like it because it’s very energetic and very happy,” said Samra Sanches, an instructor who has started giving Indian dance classes. “We try to work on moves similar to those in the novela.”

    The story, which like most Brazilian soaps is told in a grueling 200 or so episodes over more than six months, centers on a forbidden love between beautiful high-caste woman Maya and handsome Bahuan, a low-caste Dalit, a group formerly known as “Untouchables.”

    Filmed partly in India’s Rajasthan, the action flits between Jaipur and Agra where tradition and religion hang in the air and the beach-side Rio of micro-bikinis. I WOULD BE MORE IMPRESSED BY DECENT INDIAN FOOD/RESTAURANTS IN BRASIL; AND WE CERTAINLY KNOW THAT NOT GOING HAPPEN!!

    “The novela shows the respect in India for the elders of a family, which isn’t always the case in the West,” said Tony Ramos, a 60-year-old soap opera idol who plays the conservative head of the Brahmin Ananda family in the series.

    CROSSING THE LINE

    He spoke between takes at Brazilian entertainment giant Globo’s studios, where several Indian “towns” have been constructed complete with Hindi temples and a river Ganges.

    Ramos and the other leading actors spent three weeks filming in India, on top of a two-month course to get them up to speed on yoga, Indian dance moves and language.

    The impact of “Caminhos” on Brazilians’ speech, fashion, and interests is the latest example of soap operas’ powerful social influence in Latin America’s biggest country.

    Globo’s prime-time novelas, often portraying a wealthy elite in Rio that is far from the everyday reality of most Brazilians, can grab more than 40 million viewers a night.

    Indian Ambassador to Brazil B.S. Prakash said his embassy had seen a jump in phone calls and e-mails from Brazilians curious about India. The novela, he said, helped fill a cultural gap between the two nations that remained wide despite stronger diplomatic relations in recent years.

    “The novela in that sense has opened many doors, many people are getting to have an impression about India,” he told Reuters by telephone from Brasilia.

    “Caminhos” has attracted strong ratings and spawned at least one spin-off program on Indian life. But the steamy demands of a Brazilian soap opera have inevitably crossed the line of what would be acceptable in India, where public or on-screen kissing is still taboo.

    Some Indians in Brazil are shocked by the sexual encounters between Maya and Bahuan, saying Maya would have been expelled by her family if they had happened in real life.

    Some critics also take issue with the portrayal of widespread discrimination against Dalits and a rigid caste system which they say is out of date.

    But actor Ramos, fresh from a scene in which he goes head-to-head against a Dalit candidate in an election, defended the portrayal of the caste system as not so far from reality.

    “It’s the same when you show the Brazil of slums, or the political problems — many Brazilians will say my country isn’t like that,” he said. eldman2009-08-18 15:32:26

  • #127549

    PEARLYGURL
    Member

    Nice article. Im sure that arre baba isnt a real Indian expression though!

  • #127553

    a.uhfma
    Member

    [QUOTE=Guinness]Nice article. Im sure that arre baba isnt a real Indian expression though![/QUOTE]
    I was going to say the same thing! A lot of my friends back home are from India and I have *never* heard any of them ever say “arre baba”.
    On a recent trip up, I asked a coworker in the US who is from India and he said he never heard the expression before. At first he thought I was saying “Ali Baba” and he said “Ali baba? No, no no, they’re confused, that’s Arab countries – they’re a few countries west of India”LOL
    I also showed him on youtube the intro video they show before the novella and he laughed so hard I thought we were going to have to take him to the hospital. Smile
    juan95692009-08-18 08:29:40

  • #127613

    Slimseun
    Participant

    Never mind about the ridiculous plot, this novela is a lost opportunity to show the mainstream population what India is really like (up to a point). Instead they show everyone wearing their best party clothes all the time, excessive head-wagging, social concepts which are now forbidden (the caste system, which still exists, but try talking to an Indian about it)
    Everyone says “are baba” in almost every sentence. I have never heard an Indian say that, especially when speaking Portuguese . The family traditions are so exaggerated, etc,etc. I would not be surprised if there is a suttee scene in there before it ends (has it ended?)
    I think the Bollywood people they used to show them around over there were probably having heir own little joke
    The same old actors doing Indians are just not credible.
    What is also amazing is that many Brazilians really believe this is the way it is. I work with Indians from all parts of India in Brazil every week, and I can guarantee that communication between them and Brazilians is not at all as easy as it it is made to seem in the novela, where everyone speaks fluent Portuguese. Even if the Brazilians involved speak fluent English, there are still huge communication gaps.
    A real waste of an opportunity, even if Globo’s political manipulation is behind it. On the other hand, how many of the people who watch this are ever going to have to deal with an Indian? So if considered pure entertainment it is about right for the povão.
    One thing though – Indian also have the “sogra problem”

  • #130116

    815
    Member

    Last night!!!!
    Who’s in?!?!

  • #130119

    jonathand
    Member

    Not me…. I’m watching The Reaper on Universal, (My girlfriend is watching it though)

  • #130121

    aagrin
    Member

    Yeah I’m watching the bloody thing, and dieing slowly as the Mrs has to watch it before we can high the bars/clubs ….
    I have to say the worst thing about it is it really makes me wanna eat a nice curry and there is only one place in Rio I know that does a Indian Curry, but that place is a load of rubbish…
    When is some one going to open a good Indian restaurant in Rio again?, since the last place shut in Leblon the place it doomed… going to have to make do with a Thai curry instead…

  • #130153

    lmaonade5
    Member

    Thank (whoever’s) gods it’s OVER!!!!!!!!!!!!!

  • #130165

    enchantbeau
    Member

    But no doubt some new brain sapping tosh will soon have begun!

  • #130166

    jonathand
    Member

    Well they still have the other BRIC nation to deal with. We’ve had a novela about China and this one about India. Can we now expect a new novela about Russia? LOL

  • #130167

    lmaonade5
    Member

    The romance of Dr. Zhivago…….. Do you think any Brazilian could pronounce zdravstvujteor sayK sozhaleniyu, ya poka ne govoryu po russki? Zhelayu vsego khoroshego.

  • #130180

    enchantbeau
    Member

    Can anybody? Except a Russian I suppose! The ‘romance of Dr. Zhivago’ set so vividly in the midst of the terror of the Russian Revolution, now that would be a class act for a novela!

  • #130183

    medrama
    Member

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]

    The romance of Dr. Zhivago…….. Do you think any Brazilian could pronounce zdravstvujteor sayK sozhaleniyu, ya poka ne govoryu po russki? Zhelayu vsego khoroshego.[/QUOTE] You are correct Bahiana, Brazilians can not pronounce any word without a vowel on it…maybe that James Bond who was able to learn Portuguese in 8 weeks can…

  • #130186

    jonathand
    Member

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]

    The romance of Dr. Zhivago…….. Do you think any Brazilian could pronounce zdravstvujteor sayK sozhaleniyu, ya poka ne govoryu po russki? Zhelayu vsego khoroshego.[/QUOTE] [QUOTE=delco]Can anybody? QUOTE] I can… though I’d need to see it in the original Russian script so that I could attribute the pronunciation rules. I learned Russian for a year at school and, though I don’t remember too much of the grammar & vocabulary, I do remember how to pronounce Russian words. (I was very popular amongst my friends when I was able to translate the menu in MacDonalds in Moscow) LOLPlus… I’m English globetrotter2009-09-12 16:38:04

  • #130188

    lmaonade5
    Member

    OK, GT… Здравствуйте К сожалению, я пока не говорю по-русски Желаю всего хорошего

  • #130190

    jonathand
    Member

    спасибо B77 I can pronounce it now (but had to use an online translator to find out what it meant – apart from Здравствуйте and по-русски (I knew those) ) Big%20smileglobetrotter2009-09-12 17:03:05

  • #130196

    medrama
    Member

    [QUOTE=globetrotter]Well they still have the other BRIC nation to deal with. We’ve had a novela about China and this one about India. Can we now expect a new novela about Russia? LOL[/QUOTE] That was good Globe! LOL

  • #130211

    flyteen
    Member

    Fim, yea!

  • #130212

    HugAcaba(Censored)bou!!! My wife said she was dissappointed with the ending although I’m sure she will suffer withdrawal now that it is (finally) over.

  • #130253

    Just to give some authentic info on this novela, I list down the facts below from the questions that have been put to me:
    1. Are there dalits in India?
    Fact: Yes there are Dalits in India, we call them now scheduled casts.Still in some places in India they are discriminated. But as India isbig (1.1 billion) I think if you talk about percentage it is very lessnow. In the new age India the castes are becoming irrelevant. In thecountry side it is prevalent a bit more.
    On top of there are lots of laws and reservations to protect dailts in India now.
    2. Is there a phrase called “Arre baba” and what does it means?
    Yes we have this phrase in India and it means “Oh my god”. But we dont use the that much as is being shown in soap opera.
    3. What does “Thik Hai” and “Nahin” means?
    “Thik Hai” means its ok.
    “Nahin” means NO.
    4. Is there child marriage in India?
    Yes we used to have child marriages in the past. Now it might be like afew hundred odd happening in some remote part of India. But nothingmore than that. It is punishable by law.
    5. Does India has strong family values?
    In India we value family a lot, more than you can even imagine. It is very normal for an Indian guy to live with his parents all his life, even after marriage!! But there are exceptions as in any other case sometimes there is a fight between two brothers, mother and daughter in law etc etc… then they also live seperate. But we really have strong family relations. Its very different to the west, Im not sure about Brazil.
    6. Does arranged marriages happen in India?
    Yes still 90% of all marriages are arranged in India in some manner or the other. But its not like that the girl and boy cant say NO. They can but these days parents take their consent first and then speak to the other people. So its kind of a deal you can say!!
    BTW I haven’t seen this soap opera just heard it from some friends and was questioned million times by people i met. So thought I should list down the facts.
    Having written all of this i think it is a soap opera and not a documentary so dont count on it for facts!!
    Last thing to Brazilians, India is like the opposite side of a coin, you have only seen one side and the other side is something u cant even imagine. So think about it with an open mind!!

  • #130308

    815
    Member

    Nitinhungama-
    Excellent post!

  • #130400

    I think I’m going to miss “Com a minha na India” much more than the extra novela. What are Tuesday nights going to be like without the hora da dancinha? ;)

  • #135392

    micko
    Member

    ‘Caminho das Indias’ (India – A Love Story) won an International Emmy!

  • #14118

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