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  • #275553

    Oaktree
    Member

    Hello all!
    I’m a recent arrival in Brazil, living in a town outside of Sao Paulo. I need to get a car suitable for a family of five and I’m unsure where to begin. I could really use advice on the following:
    * Which brands are most reliable in Brazil? We drove Hondas (minivan and SUV) in the US, to give you an idea of the kind of car I like.
    * Where is the best place to shop for a car? I assume online is best, but what sites do you recommend?
    * Is financing possible? We have income here in Brazil and all major documents (CPF & RNE for me, wife has passport, RG & CPF), but no credit history here.
    Thank you very much for any pointers!

  • #275554

    Sid
    Participant

    The Honda Civic and Toyota Corolla are probably regarded as the best bang for your buck despite being ridiculously overpriced compared to the US. If they are too small then I’d still stick to a Honda or Toyota although Hyundai seems to be offering some interesting options in the SUV range, silly money mind.

    I’d personally buy the lastest Honda Fit with 30,000km on the clock but I doubt that is what you had in mind.
    An American guy I know on a budget was shocked by prices here having been used to shuttling his kids around in a minivan and bought a Renault Logan Automatic, comparable in size to the aforementioned Civic and Corolla but considerably cheaper.

    Geezer2015-06-09 00:46:55

  • #275580

    jeb2886
    Member

    I made a mistake when I purchased my car, it’s been good, but it was a mistake. Look up the safety ratings for any cars you’re looking at and get something decent. I would recommend getting an SUV, the Kia or Soul aren’t bad. The ssanyong looks ok, I have a friend with one.

    The problem is the other drivers, SP isn’t anywhere near as bad, but these cars are tin cans. The reinforcing bar that goes through the door in my vw gol, is a thin hollow tube. If I took it out of there, I could probably bend it with my hands pretty easily. If anything hits that door, like a motorbike, it’s coming right on through most likely.
    While an SUV isn’t any more safe than other cars in the US and often causes more fatalities when you consider rolling accidents, it’s safer in brazil. These small cars won’t meet you 1 on 1 when they hit, and there is simply more metal in these cars because they’re designed for a foreign market and will have most of those safety features in tact still. Motorbikes will have their wheels hitting the lower portion of your door, rather than striking midway up and hitting your legs/hips and possibly breaking them.
    In natal, 7 out of 10 accidents are with motorcycles, and 7 out 10 hospital visits are from motorcycle accidents!
    Don’t bother with financing here, you’re looking at 3-4% a MONTH, or about 40% a year. Find another way to pay for it, don’t become a sucker like the rest of the people here.
    Buy used. Try olx.com to see if you can find anything there. Probably steer away from before 2010, but at that point, cars seem to have depreciated quite a bit. If you have no car now, you’ll likely need to hit up a dealership because of time constraints.
    Diesel engines should last forever, I’m not sure about here. If you can find a truck with a diesel engine, you’re probably better off. Try and get a water separator if you do, they’re about $40-60 in the US and will help with bad gas.
    You’ll need documents to register the car, most likely bills in your name. So get yourself a couple of those immediately, cell phone, water, electricity. Get them in your name asap because everyone is going to ask for them.
  • #275585

    Anonymous

    Anyone here who tried to register a car at Detran without RNE?

  • #275592

    kenalag
    Member

    Please note that a CNH is required to register the car.

  • #275594

    David Denning
    Participant

    Not sure about needing RNE or CNH as I have registered both a car and a motorbike as a tourist without either of these documents! As long as you have a CPF that should be sufficient – it was for me! Car was done in 2010 and bike in 2012, and neither proved difficult (other than the Detran system being down when I went in – both times! Just meant I had to go back a few days later). Afraid I cannot remember the full procedure – the bike was arranged by the dealer (Honda) and I just had to go to the Forum to register my signature (remember to take long trousers as they won’t let you in wearing shorts!), same with the car but I had to visit Detran personally to change the address as it was originally registered (in my name) but with the second-hand dealers address as I didn’t have a permanent address at the time of purchase.

  • #275595

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=WilliButz]Please note that a CNH is required to register the car.[/QUOTE]

    With all due respect, this is not true or at least wasn’t up to two years ago. I had both moto and car in my name with CNH. I only broke down and got it so I could put inusrance on the car. Good thing I did because after years of driving without sans incident, I’ve passed through many blitz’s WITH the license.
  • #275596

    Serrano
    Participant

    I echo Dave’s and Abbot’s statements. Unless this is a very new requirement (which isn’t logical), the CNH isn’t a requirement (nor RNE). Like Dave, I purchased my first car while still on a tourist visa, and I only had that cheesy AAA “International” driver’s license. CPF should be all you only need.
    Try the DETRAN site for your state, for specific info: http://www.detran.** (**state abbreviation code)

  • #275597

    kenalag
    Member

    I was wrong, no CNH required.

  • #275598

    Sid
    Participant

    Great advice from jkennedy, if money was no object i’d be driving a Hilux or similar.

    As for diesel is it true you have to justify that it will be used for commercial use? Or to put it another way, you can’t own a diesel purely for private use.

    Geezer2015-06-10 16:44:43

  • #275599

    Finrudd
    Participant

    I would get a Fiat Ducato Van because every bloody week I seem to be packing the car up to the rafters with stuff and driving it backwards and forwards at my wife’s beck and call, who doesn’t have a driving license. She seems to have an irrational fear of the car being empty, and likes to sing a little ditty about it being a sunny domingão, and everyone is in the VW Beatle with Grandpa in the front and Grandma in the back..or something like that..
    Like my car when it is full to bursting point with sacks of dog food and interesting throw-outs from departing Gringoes Facebook pages that ‘will come in handy when ___ (insert your own craziness here), the Van also does not have a rear-view mirror. It is not necessary to know what is going on behind you, apparently.
    The Van also has anchor points in the back, so once I have gagged and bound aforementioned wife (who at this stage is apoplectic because there is almost 0,5 cubic foot of space free, I can tie her to one of those points and get on our way.
    Fiat Ducato. And only because the Ford Transit does not seem to be readily available here.

  • #275600

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Sorry.

    What JKennedy said is about right.
    (Although I bet my wife could get a family of ten in a Fiat Ducato and STILL have room for a bazillion bags of stuff).

  • #275611

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Geezer]Great advice from jkennedy, if money was no object i’d be driving a Hilux or similar.

    As for diesel is it true you have to justify that it will be used for commercial use? Or to put it another way, you can’t own a diesel purely for private use.

    [/QUOTE]
    No! I have some friends with diesel Hilux (how do you make that plural? lol) and none of them use them for commercial use and I’ve never heard of them having to justify.

  • #275614

    Serrano
    Participant

    [QUOTE=shedd]I’m a recent arrival in Brazil, living in a town outside of Sao Paulo. I need to get a car suitable for a family of five and I’m unsure where to begin. I could really use advice on the following:
    * Which brands are most reliable in Brazil? We drove Hondas (minivan and SUV) in the US, to give you an idea of the kind of car I like.
    * Where is the best place to shop for a car? I assume online is best, but what sites do you recommend?
    * Is financing possible? We have income here in Brazil and all major documents (CPF & RNE for me, wife has passport, RG & CPF), but no credit history here.
    Thank you very much for any pointers![/QUOTE]

    Shedd,

    Didn’t realize until muchlater that you started a new thread; thought the comments were arunning continuation of an older thread. This topic must come up atleast twice a year. If you try the Search function, you’ll find lotsof chatter on the ins and outs of buying a car in Brasil.

    But I’ll add a fewcomments here, some might be fresh, some might be a rehash of what’sfound in previous threads on the topic.

    Webmotorsis probably theprincipal national on-line site. Meucarronovoisalso fairly well known. There might be some regional ones too forSP, which I’m not aware of.

    I purchased two vehiclesfrom private owners using Webmotors, and both were positiveexperiences. Both vehicles were located in SP metro area (I live inSC). Given it’s size, SP certainly has more inventory, but that alsomeans more to look through. If you’re not in a hurry to buy, that’sthe better scenario. I spent about a month checking out certainmodels, and then watched which ones sold fast and which ones satunsold. That gave me a realistic idea of a reasonable price, andalso some bargaining power with those that still had their vehicleunsold after 30 days.

    Buying from a private owner yields a betterdeal, but no guarantee. Buying ‘semi-novo’ (used) from a dealer willcome with a guarantee of at least 30 days. But my mechanic told methat he knows, as do many other mechanics, how to put a band-aid onmost problems, sì≥ that they won’t flare up within 30 days.

    People in SP are ratherparanoid when it comes to privately selling their car, especially anice one, and understandably so. This is what worked well for me. YMMV…. I stayed in a hotel right across from Morumbi Shopping. Ihad previously contacted several sellers by e-mail, informing themthat I would be in SP and would like to see their vehicle. They allreplied they’d be happy to meet with me, but in a public place. Thatwas fine by me. That way they came to me, rather than me running allaround town (which can be pure hell to drive in, if you’re not fromthere!).

    We’d first rendezvous inthe mall in front of a Starbucks or some such joint. After a briefchat and sizing me up, deciding I wasn’t going to car jack and/orkidnap them, we’d go to the parking deck where their vehicle wasparked. I let them pull it out of the parking deck (pay the parkingfee for them), then they’d pull over somewhere near the mall and letme test drive. You have main highways as well as quiet side streetsin the Morumbi area to do your test drive. I allowed two hours perpotential seller, which was cutting things close, but to my surprise,no one showed up late, or canceled. You can see a lot of vehicles inone day this way.

    There are also a few large dealers not far fromMorumbi, so if something really impresses you, make that part of yourtest drive, to swing by the dealership and pull in the service area. For a R$50 tip, you should be able to get a mechanic to look it over,and spot/hear any problems that you might not initially be aware of. One vehicle I decided I really liked, just happened to have had allthe scheduled services performed at the dealer I drove to. That wasa huge plus and strong selling point, to have a printout of all themaintenance performed.

    Oh yeah, this was a tip Iread somewhere, which is a good one. Put one of those flexiblerefrigerator magnets from the local disk pizza, etc in your pocket. Then while looking at the vehicle, stick it on the doors, fenders,etc. If the car has been wrecked and repaired with filler, themagnet will fall off. Not a deal breaker, but you’ll then want toinvestigate further to make sure there’s no damage to the frame orchassis, as well as expect the price to come down some.

    As JK mentioned, forgetfinancing! I’d say buy down, with what cash you have, rather thanbuying up and paying absurd interest out the nose. While the 3.0something rate will make things easier for you (if you still havefunds to bring in), prepare for sticker shocker, if you haven’talready experienced it! That Honda you like sì≥ much (a goodvehicle) will cost in Brasil approximately what you’d pay for a Lexusin the US!

    Also as JK mentioned, onceyou buy, to title it in your name, if you already have a power orwater bill that is also in your name, that will make the process mucheasier. Yet aside from that, just your CPF is all that’s necessary.

    One other tip: Onceyou’ve narrowed down your choices, ask the seller to pull up a reporton the vehicle on DETRAN’s site, and give you a printout. This willshow you if they have any outstanding traffic citations and/orremaining car payments (if financed). You too can do this. Ask themfor the RENAVAM number on the car title; you’ll also need the tagnumber. With these two numbers you can pull up your own report.

    Boa sorte!

  • #275615

    Anonymous

    Make this a sticky.
    Useful, actionable info from GF/GS.
    We are fortunate to still have him here on the forum, sharing tips.

  • #275654

    Oaktree
    Member

    Thanks a lot for all of the advice, particularly from jkennedy and gringo.serrano. I ran out and got cell phone service so I’ll have a bill to help me with registering the car. Fortunately I do have time because my wife’s company is paying for a month of rental. I’ll study the websites to get a good idea of prices and what’s moving.
    I was a big fan of Consumer Reports back home to help me select reliable appliances, cars, etc. for my money. Does any such thing exist in Brasil?
    Thanks again for the help everybody!

  • #275655

    jeb2886
    Member

    Oh I can act as your consumer reports. Ask me whatever car/year/make and model and I’ll tell you what I think of it!

    PS: My response will always be “It’s a sh*tty car, and will break down all the !@#$ time, it will leak oil and sh*t will rattle all over it”
    They’re all terrible, people don’t pay for proper maintenance, the radiators come with water and rust, oil filters aren’t changed with the oil. People believe that they’ve spent enough on the car, why are they constantly having to spend all this OTHER money… Isn’t buying it enough?
    I would still look at an SUV. Buy something in the 2010 range and it will have issues, but at least run ok. It will primarily be for safety. I made the mistake of getting a common car to blend in, but had I know what I was buying, I would have put more in, and gotten an SUV. These roads are extremely dangerous, we have some of the highest death rates here!
    Granted, I’m assuming SP has a lower rate because it’s a big city and has to maintain a bit more semblance of normality. The south is full of germans who obey the laws better, so I’m assuming the northeast is probably the highest by far and pulling the overall country averages up :(
    But none the less, get something a bit higher, so those motorcycles aren’t coming through the doors and getting your children, and to give you a slightly better crumple zone, which will hopefully put you slightly higher than the other vehicle so it should prevent the cabin from being completely crushed. Then obviously don’t drive like an idiot and roll it, since that’s the danger from an SUV.
    If after 6 months of driving here, you feel comfortable, trade it in for something smaller — but for starters, get something decent. These cars are essentially 100% made for Brazil, so whatever safety shortcuts they can take, they will. You’ll notice that in homes as well. They appear so nice.. but then you realize they’ve essentially blown their budget on making things look nice instead of installing common sense items to make the house last.
    I think the best example of this is when we were renting a house, and they said the electrical had just been changed! It was a big selling point for them. I was like WTF? Why would you do that? And my wife translated this back to me “How often do you replace your wiring in the US?” I was just floored, like what do you MEAN replace? Never. Not after 10 years, not after 70.
  • #275658

    Serrano
    Participant

    [QUOTE=jkennedy]They’re all terrible, people don’t pay for proper maintenance, the radiators come with water and rust, oil filters aren’t changed with the oil. People believe that they’ve spent enough on the car, why are they constantly having to spend all this OTHER money… Isn’t buying it enough?[/QUOTE]
    LOLLOLLOL
    Spot on JK! My neighbor in Floripa NEVER changed the oil in her car. And when it finally crapped out on her, she simply bought a new one.
    I recall the first time I went to change my oil here inBrasil, and the guy asked me if I also wanted him to change the filter. It was then I, who had that deer staring into the headlights look….

  • #275661

    jeb2886
    Member

    I went to a parts center and asked for spark plugs, the guy looked up my car, found them and asked if I just wanted one…

    Who gets one spark plug? They weren’t cheap, so I ended up re-gapping them :) That took care of that problem. I always did oil + spark plugs, because it was a 5 minute job while waiting for oil to come out, so why not. $5 in plugs every 4K miles, whatever. I couldn’t justify the R$80 for plugs every 10K km :P
  • #275663

    Sid
    Participant

    Jkennedy, when you mention downsizing after 6 months would the best options in that case not be the Corolla and Civic? And smaller still the Honda Fit.

    Deer in headlights moment for me “New apartment, now earthed!” oh, so you didn’t use to bother with an earth wire? What next? Windows that let light in? Walls that stop you getting blown off the 18th floor? Elevators less likely to plummet said 18 floors..

    Geezer2015-06-14 11:39:31

  • #275664

    jeb2886
    Member

    I’m assuming he won’t downsize after 6 months. He will at least have the option and a better understanding of what he’ll want at that point. If he buys something small now and realizes it’s not what he wants, it will be a headache to dump it quickly and get something better. He might not even be able to sell it, during which time he’s stuck with something he doesn’t want. At the very worst, a large truck will provide safety, if it’s not what he wants, he still gets the extra safety. The reverse may or may not be true though, he might find he needs something bigger, and meanwhile he’s stuck with something that is terribly unsafe.

  • #275666

    Finrudd
    Participant

    I have to agree – I bought a used Pajero Sport with low mileage and a good service history (for what that is worth) and will run it until it drops, with a sensible maintenance plan. It wasn’t the cheapest, but it does offer a degree of safety being higher up, and has space for four adults when I need it. The boot is not big enough, according to my wife.

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    >>>but you should really let your wife sit in the passenger seat!
    Thank you! I am here all week. Try the Salmon. Big smile
  • #275667

    Sid
    Participant

    By no means am I advocating the smaller option over a SUV but if we were to remove the SUV from the equation isn’t the Corolla/Civic head and shoulders above say a top of the range VW Gol or any other “carro popular” for that matter.

    I’m not sure if I’m brave enough to test it out for myself but I can see the logic when i hear of people choosing to spend 30-35k on a used Corolla/Civic over a zero kilometre tin can.
  • #275668

    kevin owen
    Participant

    I have a 5 year old Civic and my wife has a 1 year old Palio.
    I bought the Civic new and it has been, and still is an excellent car. The Palio feels cheap and nasty in comparison and I imagine will be almost on the scrap heap when it is 5 years old.
    If you can stretch your budget a bit I would certainly recommend a 2 or 3 year old Civic.

  • #275678

    Anonymous

    Scope out where you live and see if a Corolla is going to make you a target. Unfortunately, it is a luxury car here.

    Also, parts may be hard to find.
    As for the service thing. if I had a nickel for every time I heard in the shop “But I spent $XXXXXXXX on this car! You’re telling me I was supposed to spend more on (changing oil, maintenance, tires, fluids, belts, filters)?” [usually said after oil was not replaced and block cracked from being bone dry]
    Clients don’t want to change the filters. Clients will try to change one spark plug if you give them the option. Most of these clients get educated and if they don’t want to listen, sent to the jerk down the road- in fact last week Mr 3 gave a discount to a guy doing a head gasket on the condition he never set foot on the shop again (he wanted it done in two days and started harassing the guys to work faster).
    But besides the normal lack of good sense (you tell them, the Chinese headlight costs $2 and will last two hours, or you could buy the good one that costs $7 that lasts 6 months. They will buy the $2 one and come back over and over again) with the economic downturn, more and more people are having a harder time paying for service, so when they do come to the shop, it is usually just a hair away from catastrophic.
    Car buyer– ask for maintenance records!!! If it is relatively new (1st 3 years), to maintain the warranty they have to get receipts for service from a real shop, and they should have them.
  • #275681

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=kevbo]The Palio feels cheap and nasty in comparison.[/QUOTE]True.
    I drove a friend’s nearly-new Fiat for a day and can wholly agree.
    In my humble opinion, the locally-assembled Fords from Brazil are in the same low category, whereas the French cars (yes, shocking!) that are made here or imported from Argentina just somehow feel sturdier and better made overall.
    Off-topic:
    An article in this week’s VEJA reveals that car sales are down 20% across the board and poised to get even worse, with massive layoffs in the sector.
    However, a few companies are doing much better than average. Sales in Brazil, albeit still modest, are actually up for Volvo and Jaguar.
    Apparently not everyone is equally affected by the economic downturn.

  • #275683

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringo.Serrano][QUOTE=jkennedy]They’re all terrible, people don’t pay for proper maintenance, the radiators come with water and rust, oil filters aren’t changed with the oil. People believe that they’ve spent enough on the car, why are they constantly having to spend all this OTHER money… Isn’t buying it enough?[/QUOTE]
    LOLLOLLOL
    Spot on JK! My neighbor in Floripa NEVER changed the oil in her car. And when it finally crapped out on her, she simply bought a new one.
    I recall the first time I went to change my oil here inBrasil, and the guy asked me if I also wanted him to change the filter. It was then I, who had that deer staring into the headlights look….

    [/QUOTE]
    LOLI had the same reaction to this.

  • #275684

    ffm
    Member

    I rented a Celta in the NE. Jesus that was a HORRIBLE car. I had bikes in the US that felt more stable and handled better.

  • #275685

    Serrano
    Participant

    [QUOTE=3casas] Unfortunately, it is a luxury car here. Also, parts may be hard to find.[/QUOTE]
    And that’s the catch 22 isn’t it? The reliable vehicle, which rarely needs repairs (assuming one does regular basic maintenance), when it does need repairing parts are quite expensive, and/or hard to find. The WTF vehicle wears out quickly, but parts are cheap and readily available. It’s a coin toss really, until you factor in safety. IMO, if you buy the WTF, no need for the expense for a coffin for the funeral if in a bad accident. Just bury the vehicle with the deceased occupants still inside.
    Torrential rains here over the weekend. Saw three remnants of accidents. Don’t think the Golzinho 1.0 or the Celta people made it out alive. The Volvo occupants, while probaby quite shaken, lived to tell about it.
    Edit: While not a revelation to those who live here, I’m guessing at least 50% of the cars I saw on the road yesterday, in steady rain AND fog, didn’t have their headlights on! I guess they didn’t want to pay a few reais anytime soon for another headlight made in China….
    Gringo.Serrano2015-06-15 10:52:33

  • #275688

    Sid
    Participant

    Wow, I didn’t realise parts for a Corolla or Civic could be hard to find! I just assumed they’d be trickier to find out in the boonies but relatively easy to find in the big cities.

  • #275753

    Oaktree
    Member

    Thanks again to everyone for their input. We’re closing in on a Chevrolet Zafira. It’s affordable and will fit the family well, plus our beagle when needed. I think we’ll be able to transport groceries and other purchases easily as well. I’m not sure about the reliability of Chevy here, I think I’m being influenced by the fact that our rental is a Chevy Spin, which I believe is the newest incarnation of the Zafira.
    Anyway, now that we’re about ready to get the car, the next step will be buying seguro. Any advise on getting the best deal on seguro? Any particular companies that offer good rates and will be around when I need to make a claim? Is it recommended (or even possible) to buy online?
    Thanks again everybody!

  • #275755

    Serrano
    Participant

    It’s quite common in Brasil to buy insurance (car and homeowners) through your bank. Allianz, Porto Seguro, and SulAmerica are independent companies you could consider too. I’m not aware of any on-line companies, but maybe they do exist.

  • #275761

    jeb2886
    Member

    A friend of ours gave us a recommendation, no idea what the quality is like, or how paying out is. I just know that if it comes down to it, I can probably get a lawyer to get them to pay, if that is an issue.

    I would increase liability insurance, I think I put it up to 300K because our friend said that was about the highest death lawsuits get. You’re apparently liable for their salary, or a salary for those you hurt for life?! So don’t go too cheap.
    What they gave me was a quote for a whole slew of bloody extras. I threw like 30% of the value of the quote out. There were lots of little add ons. I think it came with 250km of towing, they had it jacked up to 500. There was no out of pocket for windshield/mirrors? they had the minimum out of pocket if you do need it. I got rid of all that, and jacked up the base rates. It’s insurance after all, it’s not to cover minor dings and dents.
  • #275767

    Anonymous

    we also fiddled with our policy and made the deductible high, maybe 1000, same thinking as you, jk. Our insurance is so that if i get carjacked i don`t have to think twice about handing over the keys, not for paying for a tow truck.

    We have had azul, liberty, and porto seguro, have had to use them all for accidents, all were about the same except i think porto seguro actually required inspections at their super-inconvenient location while the other people came around to do them.
    I think more important is finding an agent that you want to deal with (maybe this is not the usual experience, since we use this agent for our business insurance as well, but we deal directly with her, not the companies, when things happen.)
  • #275788

    Sid
    Participant

    [QUOTE=shedd] Chevy Spin, which I believe is the newest incarnation of the Zafira.
    Thanks again everybody![/QUOTE]

    Interesting choice, I’m sure it will do the job. I believe the Spin is the hideous lovechild of the discontinued Meriva and Zafira.
  • #275791

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Geezer][QUOTE=shedd] Chevy Spin, which I believe is the newest incarnation of the Zafira.
    Thanks again everybody![/QUOTE]

    Interesting choice, I’m sure it will do the job. I believe the Spin is the hideous lovechild of the discontinued Meriva and Zafira.

    [/QUOTE]

    Biggest boot there is – car of choice for nearly every taxi driver in Sao Paulo right now!
  • #275801

    Sid
    Participant

    Finrudd just to clarify, are you referring to the Spin? The Meriva was much praised by many a taxi driver in Recife too.

    I had a Zafira for a company car back in 2000, great seating configuration but I wouldn’t like to think what would happen to anyone sitting in the back two seats if it was ever rear ended.
  • #275809

    ffm
    Member

    [QUOTE=Geezer][QUOTE=shedd] Chevy Spin, which I believe is the newest incarnation of the Zafira.
    Thanks again everybody![/QUOTE]

    Interesting choice, I’m sure it will do the job. I believe the Spin is the hideous lovechild of the discontinued Meriva and Zafira.

    [/QUOTE]
    Brazilians love themselves some butt ugly cars!

  • #275817

    Finrudd
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Geezer]Finrudd just to clarify, are you referring to the Spin? The Meriva was much praised by many a taxi driver in Recife too.

    I had a Zafira for a company car back in 2000, great seating configuration but I wouldn’t like to think what would happen to anyone sitting in the back two seats if it was ever rear ended.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yes – the Spin has the biggest boot available at the moment from what I understand, or the option of some extra seats in the back. Some taxi drivers don’t like it, because while it does have good carry space, it’s pretty uncomfortable (hard seats etc) and doesn’t have much in the way of luxury in the way the high-end model Zafira did.
  • #276477

    Anonymous

    There are many car companies that provide best deals at low prices. You can choose according to your needs and preference.exoticcarrentals2015-07-27 08:03:02

  • #276487

    gengibre
    Member

    Be extremely careful if you buy a seminovo. As far as I’ve seen, the average Brazilian has zero respect for his car. Most Brazilians drive like a retarded version of an F1 ‘piloto’ and couldn’t care less about maintenance etc. They accelerate like they are taking part in some sort of race and brake extremely hard and late. Aside from risking their lives, they also do untold damage to their cars. The smaller the car, the more it gets thrashed by some guy who is pis*ed off because he’s driving that sh*t little car.
    Then you have the 1 billion potholes in the Brazilian roads which smash the wheels and suspension to sh*t. On top of all that, I wouldn’t trust a Brazilian salesman as far as I could throw him.

  • #28435

    Oaktree
    Member

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