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Business Opportunity

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This topic contains 0 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Tony 6 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #275143

    S.A.
    Participant

    Hi
    There is an opportunity to invest as a partner in an american fast food restaurant , already established and successful. Need a partner to open a new branch preferably in the south of Brazil in SC. Lucrative gains. Only genuine and reliable are requested to contact on : nygfloripa@gmail.com or pm me.
    Regards.

  • #275144

    myrna
    Member

    Seems legit.

  • #275149

    celso
    Member

    I think a health food restaurant could do well in Brazil.

  • #275151

    S.A.
    Participant

    Yes , it’s a genuinely good opportunity. Health food stores in south of Brazil are definitely popular but a good all out american burger is something all Brazilians appreciate. And that’s exactly the niche this restaurant is catering too. Will expand into other internatiinal cuisine as well soon.

  • #275152

    [QUOTE=daffodils]Yes , it’s a genuinely good opportunity. Health food stores in south of Brazil are definitely popular but a good all out american burger is something all Brazilians appreciate. And that’s exactly the niche this restaurant is catering too. Will expand into other internatiinal cuisine as well soon. [/QUOTE]
    I just remembered there’s a wannabe sports bar close to where I live that has American burgers. I wouldn’t order it bc the last time I went there the fries that I ordered were burnt. Most people I know have never been there, and have no desire to go b/c of the cost. The only Brazilians I know that DON’T b*tch about McDonalds or Burger King are usually people I see eating one of their burgers. The rest complain and talk about how bad they are, or how they’ve never tried it and never want to try it. There’s a lot of envy in Brazil if you haven’t noticed that already….
    I see a great opportunity for a particular sort of food here in Brazil, but I wouldn’t want to deal with employees, high rent, taxes, etc… You really have to consider these things before going into business. One salary is not one salary. You have to take the salary and multiply it by at least 1,5. Keep in mind, the work ethic is so bad that there’s an article about importing Filipino nannies into Brazil in the Folha de SP. http://www1.folha.uol.com.br/cotidiano/2015/05/1627108-empresa-importa-babas-e-domesticas-das-filipinas-para-o-brasil.shtml
    My recommendation: start a mini-food truck. If it works out, then expand. I read about a “success story” of an American selling the most BBQ at a big event. I hope he’s still doing well.

  • #275153

    Anonymous

    keep in mind that floripa is a very unique market. you are focusing on a very narrow tourist window, some very strange tourist niches (tight fisted argentineans, brazilians who have traveled around the world, foreigners) and not much local resident potential. The burger and fried chicken thing has exploded all over the south and if i recall Madero has a presence there (and is trying to dominate the market). Food trucks here, you need to investigate as regulations in most places are still in flux.

  • #275155

    Finrudd
    Participant

    Forget American – Australian seems to be where it’s at for the up-and-coming indebted middle classes in Sao Paulo. Outback Steakhouse– never have I seen such desire for deep-fried and grilled pap as this, since Aberdeen Angus Steakhouse first graced our streets in London. Formula, easily reproducible, straight-from-freezer to table. It’s a winner and those deep fried onions knock them dead (almost literally, as time will tell).

    “Things are different today,”
    I hear ev’ry mother say
    Cooking fresh food for a husband’s just a drag
    So she buys an instant cake and she burns her frozen steak
    And goes running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper
  • #275158

    S.A.
    Participant

    True, we have Madero. We are definitely not as big yet, but we have people telling us we are better. We have outback here as well. I dont like their food personally, but its ALWAYS full. So bingo! I guess its a matter of taste and luck both together.

    Yes , floripa fluctuates on the basis of tourism. Now that winters is starting its virtually dead at times. Argentineans spend a lot of money, they actually dont care about the prices when they are here ,compared to the locals. The locals have to suffer buying a 2 L coke at R$ 7.5 or even more sometmes in the season ( usually you get it for around 3.5 ish ). But thats another topic. Floripa also has this tendency of attracting a lot of people who eventually settle here and usually buy a house, rent it in the season, and then sip lemonade the year through ( or whatever they fancy more ;)). A lazy retired life.
    Anyways, coming back to food, theres not much to chose from in indian or mexican cuisine here as well. And the ones that are have a brazilian version of the cuisine. I am sure that if the real genuine taste is introduced, it would be well received. What do you guys think?
  • #275159

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=finrudd]Forget American – Australian seems to be where it’s at for the up-and-coming indebted middle classes in Sao Paulo. Outback Steakhouse– never have I seen such desire for deep-fried and grilled pap as this, since Aberdeen Angus Steakhouse first graced our streets in London. Formula, easily reproducible, straight-from-freezer to table. It’s a winner and those deep fried onions knock them dead (almost literally, as time will tell).

    “Things are different today,”
    I hear ev’ry mother say
    Cooking fresh food for a husband’s just a drag
    So she buys an instant cake and she burns her frozen steak
    And goes running for the shelter of a mother’s little helper

    [/QUOTE]

    What exactly about Outback steakhouse is Australian??? I always found that to be laughable. Like Taco Bell is Mexican. And are hamburgers somehow American? What about hot dogs? Plenty of Brazilians I know eat hot dogs, yet I can’t name a single one of my American friends who eats hot dogs, because my friends are not insane.
    Can somebody do the Brazilians a favor and bring them: Thai food, Mexican food, Korean food, Indian food? Maybe these exist in SP, but certainly not very common in Rio.
  • #275174

    gengibre
    Member

    Outback is a goldmine in Brasilia. The place is always jammed and people will wait 3 or 4 hours for a table. At weekends it’s crazy, they are still serving food after midnight and people are still arriving in the hope of finding a table. I heard that the place makes over R$ 1 million a month – and I can believe it.
    They make a lot of money on the drinks – they serve beer in a glass that looks big, like one of those German glasses. But in fact its only 300ml; the glass itself is very thick and there’s a large indentation underneath. At R$ 7 or 8 a pop they must make a killing. The food’s great but you can run up a pretty hefty bill.

  • #276274

    Tony
    Participant

    Most U.S. Based franchisors do follow a path to develop their territory.
    1. They establish what the financial commitments are in terms of franchisee net worth.
    2. They outline what might constitute a potential successful franchisee. Did you know Dunkin Brands at one point refused lawyers in their franchise fold? They wanted hands on operators.
    3. They have a clear real estate strategy for site development. Actually with floor plans , footage, ideal location.
    4. They already have a track record. In many cases franchisors held a number of stores of their own which they might eventually sell off. So then were owner operators before they became franchisors.
    5. Their field manager is highly identifiable. And gainfully employed by the franchisor.
    Fast food sells. Healthy food also sells , however the appeal and sales are in fast food. The pressure due to public opinion and government regulations imputed upon fast food chains on North America and Europe is equivalent to
    what Tobacco manufacturers once endured.
    Third World Countries, Brazil included, are the new frontier for fast food chains. . Look at the proliferation of McDonald’s and Burger King stores in Brazilian metro areas. Starbucks are charging R$8 a cup if Joe and folks are lining up at cash register more I could witness back stateside. This is a country were a cup of fancy Java does top @R$ 5 a pop. And you can get coffe at the counter for less than R$2 !

  • #28401

    Julie
    Member

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