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  • #65688

    I know Mark Taylor wrote an articleon this but I don’t think we have discussed it and I have come across a few that Mark didn’t mention.

    I’ll try to explain as best as I can and hopefully I have the explanations/meanings correct (if not please correct me)

    1) Hand closed like a fist but with the thumb between the Index and Middle fingers. My understanding is that this means good luck. I dont think you see many people doing it but you see wood carvings or ornaments/key rings of this (at least in the nordeste)

    2) Hold the Middle and Ring Fingers with the thumb but keeping the Index and Baby Fingers pointed. Its called Corna(meaning Horns) this gesture is given to a guy that’s wife is cheating on him, or it is suggested that she is even if it’s not true. The guy is called Corno. Years ago I was driving along and there was a guy on the sidewalk who was a bit loopy. A guy driving past in the opposite direction put his hand out the window and made the Corno Gesture in the air. I think this one is funny as!!!

    Here’s a picture of a corno embrace

    Corno Abraçado

    Camzao39186,2175462963

  • #65689

    uphoplept
    Member

    @ the picture

  • #65690

    printese
    Member

    Funny as huh

  • #65703

    emaikebes
    Member

    Its funny that you mention that because sometimes you see the extended middle finger being used to indicated misunderstandings in traffic situations.

    I had some towel hooks like this and when my old Mum saw them she said that was the sign drivers made to her in England because she drives so slow.

    She asked what it meant. I told her he was saying”you need a towel hook, Missus” Innocence aboundswe still laugh about it. We dont get out much.

  • #65711

    I just remembered the other one I was going to mention but forgot in the wee hours this morning.

    The waving of the open hand next to your ear. As I understand it, it means what you are eating is muito bom.

    My inlaws do this with my little boy when he is actually eating something and liking it. He’s a fussy eater and doesn’t eat a alot but I think that’s beside the point.

    Has anyone else seen this one? I don’t know if its a nordeste thing or used in all of Brasil.

    Camzao39186,865775463

  • #65728

    x32792
    Member

    1) There is the upside down come here wave/beckon; palm up in US, palmdown in Brazil.

    2) Don’t forget that the USOkay thumb and forefinger circle is you‚Äôrean a**hole in SA…I thought Dan Quayle made sure everyone knew this.

    3) For Corno music, try Falcão…there is a Teste Corno on hiswebsite.

  • #65742

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] Don’t forget that the USOkay thumb and forefinger circle is you‚Äôre an a**hole in SA…I thought Dan Quayle made sure everyone knew this[/QUOTE]

    In our local “CasaTudo” you can buy kitchen towel hooks which display this very sign. Does that mean you are an axxxhole for buying them?

  • #65756

    jezza
    Member

    Dunga, with regards to your number one wave/beckon with the palm down. I know this one here in Brazil if it’s the same one – they have the palm faced down and kind of just wave the fingers towards the palm, to get your attention to come here. Is that it?

    The “Okay thumb and forefinger one. Yep very funny if you don’t know it’s different here. Years ago when I was backpacking and passing through SP a fellow Gringo in the local bar near our hostel was chatting away to a brazilian girl, he didn’t speak a word of portuguese, she had no english. She was talking away, (I’m pretty sure he didn’t understand much) but the few times he did he would do the okay jesture to her. We were laughing about it all night cause he didnt realise what it meant

  • #65761

    printese
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]Dunga, with regards to your number one wave/beckon with the palm down. I know this one here in Brazil if it’s the same one – they have the palm faced down and kind of just wave the fingers towards the palm, to get your attention to come here. Is that it?[/QUOTE]
    Yes, in the states its opposite, palm up, with the fingers acting more in unison.

  • #65763

    Yep same in Australia but I was just making sure we were talking about the same Brazilian version. Its almost like your making a talking puppet with your hand

  • #65765

    THEROCK
    Member

    Of course there are the never ending Brazilian thumbs-ups…

  • #65766

    Sian
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] Don’t forget that the USOkay thumb and forefinger circle is you‚Äôre an a**hole in SA…I thought Dan Quayle made sure everyone knew this[/QUOTE]

    In our local “CasaTudo” you can buy kitchen towel hooks which display this very sign. Does that mean you are an axxxhole for buying them?

    [/QUOTE]
    Tamashin, maybe sometimes a towel hook is just a towel hook.

  • #65964

    Aaronk
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] [QUOTE=tamashin]

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] Don’t forget that the USOkay thumb and forefinger circle is you‚Äôre an a**hole in SA…I thought Dan Quayle made sure everyone knew this[/QUOTE]

    In our local “CasaTudo” you can buy kitchen towel hooks which display this very sign. Does that mean you are an axxxhole for buying them?

    [/QUOTE]
    Tamashin, maybe sometimes a towel hook is just a towel hook.
    [/QUOTE]

    I hate that ok sign thing because I can speak portugues ok and I use that sign once in a while. I always try to catch myself before its too late, so its usually a brief or half of an “OK’ sign. Do brazilians know that to americans, the brazilian “a-hole” sign is basically the america equivalent of the brazilian “thumbs up” sign?

  • #66326

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    I know Mark Taylor wrote an articleon this but I don’t think we have discussed it and I have come across a few that Mark didn’t mention.

    I’ll try to explain as best as I can and hopefully I have the explanations/meanings correct (if not please correct me)

    1) Hand closed like a fist but with the thumb between the Index and Middle fingers. My understanding is that this means good luck. I dont think you see many people doing it but you see wood carvings or ornaments/key rings of this (at least in the nordeste)

    [/QUOTE]

    Funny that you should mention. In Singapore, this is actually a bad sign! When my mum came to visit, she received a pendant with this sign from my jeweller. Upon opening up the gift, she was so shocked and thought that the jeweller was being very rude. Then of course I had to explain to her the difference in meaning. Last I checked, she NEVER used the pendant and it‘s still in her safe.

  • #66329

    Ahhh, the infamous “ok” sign. It was in the beginning when I first stepped into Brazilian ground. We were invited by my husband‘s ex-partner for a grand dinner in Cuiaba. Dinner was supposed to be at 8pm and of course we were the first to arrive, at 8.30pm. Only by about 10pm, did the table slowly filled up. It was a big group of about 15 people with some Americans and German as well. A Brazilian man at the other end of the table spoke English and asked me if everything was ok, but using “the thumbs up sign”, and I replied with the “ok” sign, and the foreigners began to laugh out loud while the Brazilian ladies felt uncomfortable. Then my husband told me the meaning and I was really embarrassed for the rest of the evening. I never used this sign again, even in S‘pore!

    Question is, what do Brazilian divers do when they are under water? What sign do they use to replace the “ok” sign??

  • #66344

    phsp23
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]Of course there are the never ending Brazilian thumbs-ups… [/QUOTE]

    I actually don’t remember ever seeing this in the US. When I went to Brazil, everyone was doing this thumbs up routine. Brazilians really like it.

    Nancee39192,4818518519

  • #10049

    LandAmerica
    Member

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