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  • #256110

    Soledadole
    Member

    Brazil: Major Cities vs other regions, relative to Argentina, Peru, etc. I’ve been to Argentina (Buenos Aires & Bariloche/Mountains) 2006, Costa Rica (all over for 2 weeks) 2007, Peru (Lima and Highlands)1995 & 2000, Belize (City, Islands, inland) 1992. Plus I was married to a Peruvian from 1995 to 2006. I’m from NYC area, on Long Island.

    My experiences in the non urban environments in Latin America have been much better than in the major cities. I’m very curious, and I like seeing and knowing things, but I also take my trips with an eye towards potential future seasonal retirement locations. That, as in living there for 3 months or so. And what I know is that I don’t like the hassle, stress, crime/violence and tension of major Latin American cities. I don’t like it in American ones either, so I don’t live in those areas. And haven’t liked it when I’ve had too. So while I’m certain Rio and SaoP have lots to offer, etc. I’m pretty sure I won’t want to move there for any extended period of time.


    I’ve have traveled extensively in SE Asia, and in general I much prefer it over Latin America, as I perceive its citizens to have much less latent aggression than Latin America. With that said, for folks who know what I’m talking about/ understand my sentiments, (even if they are not in agreement) AND have spent time in Brazil what have been your experiences in the various parts of Brazil? What are the places that one can imagine living for 3 months at a time? Criteria being (to start): low crime, relatively cosmopolitan, beautiful natural environment, and friendly enough to gringos, not too expensive, low latent aggression content.

    The only place that might qualify from what I’ve seen in Latin America is Bariloche in Argentina. I’d didn’t see anty places I could handle for three months in Costa Rica or Belize. In Peru I only saw Lima, Huarez, and a few small towns in the highlands. The Highlands are great, but I don’t think I could handle them for 3 months.

    Thanks,
    Doug

  • #256115

    Anonymous

    do a search for the best cities thread, and another one that has an index of crime in cities (or something similar).

    or, if you would rather not, i can give you the quick summary: if Costa Rica is too violent for you, don’t waste your time coming to Brazil.
  • #256117

    Schmbraz: I’m reticent to beat the tourism drum for Floripa (Florianì≥polis), because the situation here in summer is out of control. Winter is rather dull, but if the three months you’d be interested in are Spring or Fall (the latter season the better choice), then Floripa has lots to offer, and fulfills most of your criteria, except low cost (IMO). Yet reasonable accommodations can be found outside of the peak summer months.
    From the other locations you mentioned, it sounds though like you prefer the mountains over the beach. And if so, Floripa would be a good base camp to explore the serra here in SC as well as northern RS. Google the term “campo dos padres” and select the image option to get an idea of what’s up there.

  • #256118

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    Using “low cost” and “Brazil” in the same sentence doesn’t make much sense. Brazil is absurdly expensive, unless you are willing to live in a favela and chew on rice and beans everyday, especially if your needs include “Cosmopolitan”.

  • #256119

    Anonymous

    A great deal depends upon how you propose to spend your time during theseseasonal months of retirement: lazing around in a hammock, beach combing,reading, golfing, enjoying ethnic food, sampling the local dusky fauna,engaging with fellow tourists, or whale watching as you soak up beer and baskin a sub-tropical climate while waiting for God? If this has appeal you should investigatePraia do Forte or Costa do Sauì≠pe in the north eastern state of Brazil’s Bahia. You’ll besafe enough there. < ?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

  • #256122

    Steven
    Participant

    As pointed out you have somewhat conflicting objectives when it comes to Brazil. The major cities all have crime rates higher than the U.S. cities. “Eyes in the back of your head” is the rule rather than the exception.

    The south of Brazil, where those of German and Italian heritage are clustered tend to be the most advanced. However the Northeast as noted by Esprit is the place to go if you hope to crash but not burn. There are some extraordinarily beautiful areas in Brazil such as the Amazon or the Pantanal but English is not widely spoken and the stress level might be a little higher than you bargain for.
  • #256131

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    Stress in the Pantanal? Just go fishing …

  • #256154

    Soledadole
    Member

    Thanks for all the responses.

    First off I think I should give a my definition for “cosmopolitan” is so far as it applies to my idea of seasonal living: “A backpacker paradise, a place that is so awesome that it draws people from all over the world, yet it is to rustic/difficult/out of the way for too many regular tourists to go there. Great ski towns qualify. Hiking, windsurfing/kiteboarding/surfing, mountain biking, rafting, climbing meccas might qualify. Any place that has a very high level of an activity that I might be interested in.”So the Cosmo aspect is more in the people who go there, as opposed to big city-ness.
    Things I like: Dusky fauna, exotic foods, good parties/bars, outdoor activity: biking, running, windsurfing – my shoulders are a bit too screwed to surf anymore, good conversations….
    3Casas: Costa Rica too violent for me? I didn’t say that directly, but…. I’m my 2 weeks there I came across a lot of what I’d call freak-o drug related activity in relatively small towns like Cahuita, Jaco, and Montezuma. Plus my hostel in San Jose (the capital)was decked out like a prison/fortress with razor wire, spikes, iron door, etc. And I’m sure with good reason.
    My Brazil trip: I’ve got a flight to Salvador in mid October; unfortunately I’ll only be in country for 9 days.
    One appealing option (as a windsurfer) is, after checking out Salvador, fly up to Fortaleza and check out Jericoacoara, supposedly a windsurfing/kiteboarding mecca, and “backpacker paradise” according to the Lonely Planet.
    Or not go to Jeri, and just bop up the coast from Salvador to some of the places you guys are recco’ing:

    Praia do Forte, Costa do Sauì≠pe, along with others I’ve had recco’d from people on Lonlely Planet’s Thorn Tree site: Olinda, Pipa, Morro de Sao Paulo, Trindade, Itacare.

    Jeri sounds the best to me, but it will take two days of my short trip just getting to and fro.
    Steven: Pantanal / Amazon look amazing, but I’ve got to imagine they would be too isolated for me for 3 months. But I’m sure they are worth a trip.
    Gringo.Floripa: Off season Florianoloplis sounds like a good option, but unfortunately with my Salvador flight, that won’t be possible this trip.
    Gringo.Floripa: Campo dos Padres looks great, as does Lencois/Chapada Diamantina. Although, I think even Lencois which is relatively close to Salvador (6 hours) will be too time consuming a destination this trip. Do either of these locals have decent sized towns?
    BTW, I’m late in my late 40s and not able to retire for another ~10 years, so the 3 month seasonal retirement plan is just theory for now. But it does seem a useful framework in helping me make efficient use of the few trips I get to take every year.
    Thanks again for your help,
    Doug
  • #256155

    Anonymous

    You’re in your lateforties and are currently planning ten years hence about things that you dreamabout doing today? Jesus Doug, you’re on that downward slope toward those bingodays. WTF! Call back a little later when you’ll know more about your physical andlibido restrictions; a man should know his limitations.

    < ?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />LOLLOL

  • #256158

    Soledadole
    Member

    Espirit: Oh, I’m learning them already. I’m currently in physical therapy for my bad computer using posture. However, towards the other thing…. I’ve seen plenty of gringo gray hairs in Thailand escorted by mini skirt wearing cheerleaders to keep optimistic. Wink

  • #256159

    sven van ‘t Veer
    Participant

    [QUOTE=schmbraz] I’ve seen plenty of gringo gray hairs in Thailand escorted by mini skirt wearing cheerleaders to keep optimistic. ¬†Wink[/QUOTE]
    I’m missing the word “payed” in that line.
    You probably won’t find those mini skirt wearing ladies in Jericocoara.

  • #256161

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=schmbraz]

    Plus my hostel in San Jose (the capital)was decked out like a prison/fortress with razor wire, spikes, iron door, etc. And I’m sure with good reason.

    [/QUOTE]

    That’s what the houses, mine included, look like in Brazil for the middle class and higher! (And with good reason)
  • #256409

    Soledadole
    Member

    At what point does one not have to worry about the crime/violence stuff in Brasil?

    Meaning, when one is in Itacare, Grand Barre, or Florianopolis is there the same security situation as in the big city?
    My (naive/optimistic) guess is that in Florian it would be a pretty big issue, but that in Itacare and Grand Barre it wouldn’t be.
    I’m having a hard time getting my head around the beautiful beaches, laid back scene, combined with the high crime/violence.
    And as a USA East Coaster, I’ve never gotten how Californians can be laid back, and yet materialistic/superficial. Aren’t these things opposites?
  • #256412

    Liliqtozin
    Member

    @schmbraz … maybe your inability to understand people from California is due to that well reconized east coast birth defect … being born with your head up your arse … jacare2013-09-21 04:24:49

  • #256439

    jaenicoll
    Member

    Itacare, you can walk around at night no problem, however, being a gringo you will get people constantly trying to take advantage of you. This actually even happens to people from SP and Rio but as a gringo you will be seen as an even easier target.

    What you think about californians multiply that by 10 and you have most of Brazil, at least along the coast. Materialistic, superficial, while at the same time giving the impression of not wanting to put in the work to get the shiny things they covet so much.
  • #256441

    Ron
    Participant

    [QUOTE=sven]
    “I’m missing the word “payed” in that line.”

    One day while sitting around with little to do, probably after a divorce, I did some rough calculations. After 10 years of married/partnered bliss ending in a $300,000 settlement – every time you exercised your conjugal rights cost you about $200.
    It has always been ‘pay now’ or ‘pay later’ – either way you will pay.
    It is easier to think of it as not paying for ‘sex’ but paying to ‘go away’ after sex.
    Thailand beats Brazil hands down for one main reason – The FOOD!!!!!!!!!! LOL
  • #256449

    Steven
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Captain Ron]

    One day while sitting around with little to do, probably after a divorce, I did some rough calculations. After 10 years of married/partnered bliss ending in a $300,000 settlement – every time you exercised your conjugal rights cost you about $200.
    [/QUOTE]
    Yes, but confess – at $200 per, the first year’s contribution was about $100,000 and the last few years were $0.
  • #257589

    Soledadole
    Member

    Hi – I just got back from my trip.

    I went Salvador > Morro de Sao Paulo > Barra Grande > Itacare > Salvador in 9 days.
    And now I’ve got some questions for you all, if I may….
    1. Where is the middle class housing? The only bit of what I’d consider middle class housing
    was when I headed north from downtown Salvador back to the airport and when I was at Barra Grande. Most everything else looked like slave shacks – either in Salvador or as I headed south via boat and bus.
    Having said that, I was really impressed at the very active/popular health/fitness scene on Saturday morning at the beaches along the north/east side of Salvador as I headed to the airport. Looked like Venice beach.
    2. Why don’t the women make eye contact with me? I was in Turkey in 2011, and this Bahia Brazil experience was not too disimiliar. In the USA I experience what I’d consider relatively “normal” eye contact action. In Southeast Asia I’d consider rather aggressive or strong. I was in Argentina in 2006 and I think the women were pretty limited on eye contact, but not near as limited as in Bahia.
    I was told by one Italian heritage Brazilian that, in his opinion, it was an African culture thing. As a white guy in the USA, personally with black women, the eye contact is limited. But I think in Brazil, it is much more extreme, especially since I’m relatively foreign looking to them, so I should attract some inherent attention. But it is pretty much a non existent.
    3. Where were all the tourists at Morro from? Were they middle / upper class? And the hipsters I was partying with in Itacare at the Favela Reggae #1 bar? Do these folks live in the slave shack stuff? Or were they all Brazilian tourists staying in the Pousadas? I ask this seemingly stupid question because the people look so middle/upper class, yet I don’t see what communities they come from.
    Just a lot of dissonance in my head. Not meaning to offend by any of these questions.
    Thanks.
  • #257592

    Anonymous

    Schmbraz – Where are the middle/upper classes? Fire upGoogle Earth and look for the little blue spots then zoom in on the swimmingpools and associated upper class housing that is normally hidden behind highwalls. As to your question about eye contact, although sounding a littledesperate and other than the hookers, are you expecting the normal women on thestreet/beach to â‚ǨÀúget wet’ every time you’re gracious to glance their way? < ?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

  • #257593

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=schmbraz]Hi – I just got back from my trip.

    I went Salvador > Morro de Sao Paulo > Barra Grande > Itacare > Salvador in 9 days.
    And now I’ve got some questions for you all, if I may….
    1. Where is the middle class housing? The only bit of what I’d consider middle class housing
    was when I headed north from downtown Salvador back to the airport and when I was at Barra Grande. Most everything else looked like slave shacks – either in Salvador or as I headed south via boat and bus.
    Having said that, I was really impressed at the very active/popular health/fitness scene on Saturday morning at the beaches along the north/east side of Salvador as I headed to the airport. Looked like Venice beach.
    2. Why don’t the women make eye contact with me? I was in Turkey in 2011, and this Bahia Brazil experience was not too disimiliar. In the USA I experience what I’d consider relatively “normal” eye contact action. In Southeast Asia I’d consider rather aggressive or strong. I was in Argentina in 2006 and I think the women were pretty limited on eye contact, but not near as limited as in Bahia.
    I was told by one Italian heritage Brazilian that, in his opinion, it was an African culture thing. As a white guy in the USA, personally with black women, the eye contact is limited. But I think in Brazil, it is much more extreme, especially since I’m relatively foreign looking to them, so I should attract some inherent attention. But it is pretty much a non existent.
    3. Where were all the tourists at Morro from? Were they middle / upper class? And the hipsters I was partying with in Itacare at the Favela Reggae #1 bar? Do these folks live in the slave shack stuff? Or were they all Brazilian tourists staying in the Pousadas? I ask this seemingly stupid question because the people look so middle/upper class, yet I don’t see what communities they come from.
    Just a lot of dissonance in my head. Not meaning to offend by any of these questions.
    Thanks.

    [/QUOTE]
    Let me see now..!
    Your whole trip comes down to a question of where do the middle class reside and something having to do with looks.
    You are equating the Turkish woman with our Bahian hotties, and both will not look at you. Could be that the ones you came across in Bahia were muslim? just guessing.
    The Argie woman think they piss perfume and sh*t diamonds, so there is an explanation for you.
    The bar scene you describe in a favela, and you expect to meet a higher class of slaves?
    I think you wasted your money on your trip if that`s all you can come up with.
    As another poster described you that you have your head up your arse.

  • #257597

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=agri2001]

    Bahian hotties
    [/QUOTE]
    In general, I find this term to be a George Carlin-esque oxy moron, like “Military intelligence”.
  • #257598

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=agri2001]

    Bahian hotties
    [/QUOTE]
    In general, I find this term to be a George Carlin-esque oxy moron, like “Military intelligence”.

    [/QUOTE]

    Bahian hotties are alternatively known as, The paper baggers. Shocked
  • #257606

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=Esprit][QUOTE=Paulistano USA][QUOTE=agri2001]

    Bahian hotties
    [/QUOTE]
    In general, I find this term to be a George Carlin-esque oxy moron, like “Military intelligence”.

    [/QUOTE]

    Bahian hotties are alternatively known as, The paper baggers. Shocked

    [/QUOTE]

    LOLSo true. Bahia is home of thee butter face.
  • #257615

    Soledadole
    Member

    Bahia Hotties?

    1. Other posters are correct – Bahia women are not that hot. That is another thing I came away with. Sorry I didn’t list that for you. But, then again, I was posting questions. And, “why are Bahian women not that hot?” really isn’t a very interesting question.
    2. Are you suggesting that many/most Bahian women are Muslim?
    3. Please, tell me, what would have been “better questions”?
  • #257616

    Soledadole
    Member

    And also, The bar in Itacare is called “Favela #1 / Reggae Bar” or some such. It was not a favela bar, it was on the main tourist strip in Itacare. I guess you’ve never been there, so you probably don’t know what I’m talking about.

    I in fact know I don’t know what I’m talking about with respect to Brazil. That’s why I’m asking questions. I’ve seen things, and now I’m asking questions about them.
    It may appear I have my head up my ass. And it may indeed be so.
  • #257634

    jaenicoll
    Member

    That bar is still around? Most of the people you will find there are just staying in pousadas they dont live in itacare. Itacare was a poor little town with a dirt road before tourism ran it over. As far as middle class housing, Bahia is a poor state, and on top of that very disorganized. I haven’t spent that much time in Salvador proper but I imagine a lot of the new housing is mostly gated apartment complexes. In Itacare most of the nice houses are in compounds outside of town. In some of the other towns I have gone to in the south of Bahia it is mostly mixed in with crappy houses not separated like you would find in the USofA. For example I went to a house in Itabuna in a totally mixed use and ugly neighborhood. But the house was large, 4-5 thousand square feet, and had a swimming pool. Bahians are not great at organization.

    As far as the women not looking at you. Two reasons. If they look at you that is seen as an open invitation for you to approach them. If you were a Bahian man that would mean you would come up to them and probably start trying to get them in the sack right way by saying stupid crap such as how beautiful they are and whatever. Since you are a gringo and it sounds like obviously so (and it seems you are mostly talking about black or mixed girls), it is going to make them look like a hooker.
  • #257640

    agri2001
    Participant

    I can see that sarcasm escapes some of you, but on the otherhand there are some beauties in Bahia.
    Case in point is the one below that I have dated in the past, a former modelfrom Salvador.
    I am sure some of you may have had better, but most of you for sure have hadworse…LOL Normal0falsefalsefalsefalseEN-USX-NONEX-NONE
    Click for a larger view
    agri20012013-10-23 08:28:17

  • #257652

    Anonymous

    I love a tease but won’t you tell us whatshe was modelling? Life without the Burka, Sulphur-free diesel, feminine hygieneproducts, Thunder thigh slimming tights or Afro-curl shampoo? < ?: prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

  • #257654

    agri2001
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Esprit]

    I love a tease but won’t you tell us whatshe was modelling? Life without the Burka, Sulphur-free diesel, feminine hygieneproducts, Thunder thigh slimming tights or Afro-curl shampoo? [/QUOTE]
    All of the above and then some.LOL

  • #257682

    jaenicoll
    Member

    I always love the former “models”.

  • #257684

    lynchem
    Member

    Wow, we’re all racist, hotties from Bahia! I have met some, though not of the nature we’re considering them.

  • #257699

    Soledadole
    Member

    Thanks for the informed reply. Much appreciated!

    BTW, yes, I’m white American.
    Hookers? That was another question I had. I’d heard that prostitution was legal, and that there was ~ 1 million hookers in Brazil. I’m certainly no expert on what Brazilian hookers look like, but I’d estimate that I saw all of 3 hookers in all of my 10 days. And the 3 were all on a boat between
    Morro de Sao Paulo and Camamu. They were distinctly dressed sexier than everyone else, though not super raunchy, had the little handbag, cellphone. Traveling light and efficient. This fits the type in SE Asia, at least.
    But only 3, is this possible?
    BTW, of the few people I met in that bar, 2 were surf instructors, 1 was a former surfer instructor who now worked for some local municipal thing. But yeah, a few of the others I talked to definitely looked like Pousada stayers, dressed very well.
  • #267667

    ellis
    Member

    My friends are planning a tour. So, we are interested to visit Brazil, but this is the first time for me to go that place. Where can I find the best information about the tips, best places and some more related info about that the place? If anyone knows, please share my this information.
    istanbul tours

  • #26553

    pamelashik
    Member

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