Brasilian Highway Code.

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This topic contains 206 replies, has 104 voices, and was last updated by  ladyjbabe 12 years, 10 months ago.

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  • #60525

    phsp23
    Member

    I hoped to start a useful thread for those who drive or are hoping to drive in Brasil. Whether it is taken seriously though will be at your own risk.

    Please feel free to add to the list.

    Under no circumstances should you allow anyone to overtake. That includes police cars, ambulances and fire engines.

  • #60530

    jatoba
    Member

    Horns are all manner of car language.
    Comming from behind you could mean
    “I’m going to pass you, so don’t change lanes!” ,
    “Hey, pick a lane buddy!” ,
    “Move out of my way!” or
    “Hey, I’m your friend! Look at me!!!”
    Comming from beside you could mean
    “Hey, just because you have a turn signal on doesn’t mean you can just come into my lane!” ,
    “Hello! I’m your friend, look at me!” or
    “Get off your cell phone!”
    Also, one can use the number of honks and duration to imply meaning.
    Two short honks
    “Here I come behind/beside/in front of you.”
    “Thanks!”
    “Go ahead and merge in front of me!”
    One long honk
    “Pick a lane!”
    “Look out!/ Get out of my way!” (flicking of highbeams can imply this also)
    “Move! The light changed already!”

  • #60533

    Crybeaddy
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]

    Please feel free to add to the list.

    Under no circumstances should you allow anyone to overtake. That includes police cars, ambulances and fire engines.

    [/QUOTE]
    Under no circumstances should you indicate when changing lanes.

  • #60536

    Anca
    Member

    Only use indicators to show off or if you are looking for the horn. If possible use hazards to enhance confusion.

    Ignore all traffic lights especially at night.

  • #60537

    phsp23
    Member

    The second you get a centimetre in front of me its ok to pull in front of me without any notification. I fact I expect it now and no longer have a problem with it. What would be the point of me getting pissed off??

    When I’m driving along it’s ok to pull out of you driveway in front of me causing me to stop or slow down and then having to wait for you to finally get going. If you’re a truck or 4WD do what the heck you want.

    What do stop signs mean here? Where I’m from it means stop, wait 3 seconds and then proceed with caution. In Brazil it means drive straight though.

  • #60539

    toastwise
    Member

    Always drive as close as possible to the car in front, especially when driving at speed or in the rain.

  • #60541

    Xavier
    Member

    It’s ok of you’ve forgotten to turn you indicator off while driving along at 80km or more, you’re deaf from having your car stereo turned up and blind and can’t see the light flashing on your dash.

    Motorcycles included.

    Edit: that was meant to be 80km, not 8km

    Camzao39134,4960532407

  • #60542

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]Motorcycles included.[/QUOTE]

    Motorcycles must overtake on any side of another vehicle and can only drive the opposite way up a one way street.

    motorcyclist must not break the wing mirror of a car. He must remove it completly.

    A stationary car driver must wait until a car is just about to pass, then open the door and jump out infront of passing traffic.

  • #60543

    demiurge
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Motorcycles included.

    [/QUOTE]
    Helmets are for wimps.

  • #60545

    sphiatt
    Member

    If you’re a Motorcyclist: rather than ride in the middle of the lane like you should, ride on the white line between cars so we can’t see you. What you’re telling is that you’re not important enough to use the lane like other vehicles. Hey it‚Äôs your life not mine.

  • #60546

    Sampa2009
    Member

    [QUOTE=Polvo] [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Motorcycles included.

    [/QUOTE]

    Helmets are for wimps.
    [/QUOTE]

    don’t wear shoes at all, not even thongs.

  • #60548

    floripa
    Member

    If two motorcycles wish to overtake the same vehicle they shall do so simultaneously, on opposite sides, in a controlled intersection, at a rate of speed in excess of the posted limit.

  • #60549

    floripa
    Member

    If on a bicycle, make sure to ride the wrong way down a 4 lane road, ideally in the outside lane, with someone on your handlebars.

  • #60550

    dalmata
    Member

    In a pedestrian crossing the pedestrian shall have absolute right of way over all vehicles; except motorcycles, tractor trailers, trucks, buses, cars, carts (both push and horse), bicycles and tricycles

  • #60553

    jatoba
    Member

    Bumping into cars when reverse parking is obligatory. There is ALWAYS enough room to park.Polvo39134,5143055556

  • #60554

    jatoba
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]In a pedestrian crossing the pedestrian shall have absolute right of way over all vehicles; except motorcycles, tractor trailers, trucks, buses, cars, carts (both push and horse), bicycles and tricycles [/QUOTE]

    Mostly find out what a pedestrian is.

  • #60555

    jatoba
    Member

    Don’t worry about seatbelts cause if you do you wont be able to fit all your kids, your brothers family and the neighbours kids in the back seat and the floor space.

  • #60557

    jatoba
    Member

    Dont use any form of lighting unless its to read your paper. tamashin39134,52

  • #60558

    jatoba
    Member

    Use your celular whenever and wherever you are driving. And drive slow while doing it holding up all traffic in your lane.

  • #60562

    dundee
    Member

    When making a left hand turn, always slow down in the right hand laneand then cross 2 lanes of on comming traffic. Also, if you missthe turn, be sure to do a U-turn without any warning what so ever, alsofrom the right hand lane.

  • #60572

    testresource
    Member

    If, when driving along the road, you happen upon another car in front of you, do everything in your power to harrass and push the car out of the way, this can include lights flashing, beeping of horn and the touching of bumpers (fenders), if this does not work and if there is oncoming traffic and the car ceases to yield and move off the road, do everything in your power to mount the car and simply drive over the top of it, this is especially effective if you are in a higher, larger or more expensive vehicle than the one in front of you.

    Huckleberry39134,6324305556

  • #60573

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=AkuTyger]When making a left hand turn, always slow down in the right hand lane and then cross 2 lanes of on comming traffic. Also, if you miss the turn, be sure to do a U-turn without any warning what so ever, also from the right hand lane. [/QUOTE]

    Also, when making a left hand turn, always swing the car as far over to the right hand side of the road before stopping dead back in the left hand lane, in the exact position you would have been had you have just stopped.

    When overtaking, make sure there is a car coming in the opposite direction, then feel free to proceed, the oncoming car should take evasive action and swerve out of the way to avoid collision and possible loss of life. Dont under any circumstances wait patiently behind anyone for the road to become clear and safe to overtake.

    Huckleberry39134,6365625

  • #60586

    lenine
    Member

    Do overtake on the brow of a hill

    Do overtake when there is a long line of cars and there is nowhere to pull in.

    When on a hill stay in the overtaking lane so that faster moving traffic will be uanble to overtake.

  • #60588

    carlataylor
    Member

    . Bahiana7739143,4861689815

  • #60590

    Benjamin86
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]

    Do overtake on the brow of a hill

    Do overtake when there is a long line of cars and there is nowhere to pull in.

    When on a hill stay in the overtaking lane so that faster moving traffic will be uanble to overtake.

    [/QUOTE]
    Any lane shall be considered an overtaking lane.

    Polvo39134,6692361111

  • #60596

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    When pulling out from a side turning, do not under any circumstances bother to look, keep the momentum of the car going and just pull straight out, if there is a vehicle passing at the time and who beeps the horn in dissaproval, just look at him, blankley like he‘s a fool . If you do bother to look, never mind, pull out anyway straight into the path of the oncoming car.

    When the car in front is indicating/signalling to make a turn, do not under any circumstances see this as a signal to slow down, remain calm and allow him to turn, you must immediately and with aggression accelerate to optimum speeds in order to sideswipe his vehicle as you pass.

    Do not under any circumstances show any forms of courtesy or patience on the road.

    Always drive at optimum speeds, especially in built up or dangerous areas.

    Feel free to play chicken with other oncoming vehicles, if you swerve first, then you‘ve lost.

    When you have other passengers in the car, pay no attention to anyone else on the road, continue your conversation as if you you were sitting in your own living room, you may feel free to swerve the car from left to right as you converse or just sit in the center divider.

    Huckleberry39134,709837963

  • #60609

    Badcam
    Member

    Always be first away from the lights (if you have stopped in the first place) whether there are people still crossing or not

  • #60614

    Badcam
    Member

    When overtaking a cyclist leave as much room as possible crossing to the otherside of the road and clipping the mirrors of the cars on the other side. Continue driving on that side of the road till you get home, or 10 km or both.

  • #60615

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Bahiana77]I wish I could afford to send everyone on a week’s driving vacation around Turkey. Afterwards, you’d be singing the praises of the safe and sane Brazilian motorist and his/her well-maintained roads. [/QUOTE]

    Ahh, but we could all do that. What we want to do is offer a real life, short read perspective of the unofficial Brasilian highway code. Read on;

    Road signs

    Branches discarded haphazardly in the centre of the road mean danger ahead (True;in Minas anyway) especially if you hit said branches and skid off the highway.

    tamashin39134,7704861111

  • #60616

    Badcam
    Member

    If you are the second or third car in line at the traffic lights toot the horn to the car in front within three milliseconds of the lights turning green, never wait one or two seconds, that is far too long. Camzao39134,7724884259

  • #60617

    demiurge
    Member

    Or ideally, start tooting the horn even when the lights are red, to make sure everyone’s prepared.
    Then when the lights go green, amble slowly out of the junction.

  • #60618

    Badcam
    Member

    [QUOTE=Huckleberry]When you have other passengers in the car, pay no attention to anyone else on the road, continue your conversation as if you you were sitting in your own living room, you may feel free to swerve the car from left to right as you converse or just sit in the center divide

    [/QUOTE]

    When encountering a friend or anyone who could be a friend or just anyone stop your car in the middle of the road and talk to them through the window ignoring the bursting blood vessels of the other motorists popping around you. Wave a minimum of three times to all around you, weak grin is obligatory.

  • #60622

    Anonymous

    Also when dropping off or picking up your kids from school or creche, stop in the middle of the road for a few minutes instead of parking or pulling over closer to the kerb.

  • #60623

    Anonymous

    I can honestly say I have had a good laugh at some of these posts but it was the last one by Camzao that made me think that some of these occurr in England too.

  • #60624

    Badcam
    Member

    On the most darkened, bumpy, twisty, potholed, windy, obstacle filled roads, please feel free to construct a Speed Hump, (Lombarda), that is virtualy invisible to the naked eye from a distance of 5 meters or more, this should facilitate in an accident occurring, especially at night when there are no lights around and no sign posts, the Lombarda will come into view at the last few seconds before impact, banging all the rear occupants heads against the ceiling of the car and thus breaking your suspension.

    Huckleberry39134,8298032407

  • #60627

    Badcam
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]I can honestly say I have had a good laugh at some of these posts but it was the last one by Camzao that made me think that some of these occurr in England too.[/QUOTE]

    Yep true, in Australia too. Last one affects me more now cause I spend more time at the school, thought I’d throw it in.

    Camzao39134,8010648148

  • #60628

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    [QUOTE=tamashin]I can honestly say I have had a good laugh at some of these posts but it was the last one by Camzao that made me think that some of these occurr in England too.[/QUOTE]

    Yep true, in Australia too. Last one affects me more now cause I spend more time there, thought I’d throw it in.

    [/QUOTE] Which in turn reminded me of another “rule”.

    When parking ensure that you park as close as possible to the person in front. If unable to find a space, double or triple park as required (let ’em wait).

  • #60632

    Sian
    Member

    If you live or drive in somewhere like Brasilia then all the above mentioned rules need not apply, especially the use of your horn. Don’t even use it to say hello to a friend, someone may mistake it for abuse.

    Of course once you’re out of the city revert back to “our” Standard Brasilian Highway Code.

  • #60636

    testresource
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    If you live or drive in somewhere like Brasilia then all the above mentioned rules need not apply, especially the use of your horn. Don’t even use it to say hello to a friend, someone may mistake it for abuse.

    Of course once you’re out of the city revert back to “our” Standard Brasilian Highway Code.

    [/QUOTE] Are you saying that driving in Brasilia or, say, Curitiba, is more or less perfect?

  • #60640

    Sian
    Member

    I can only comment on Brasilia. We spent three or four weeks there late last year and in that time I didn’t see or experience any of the things we are talking about. I saw one guy swerving in his lane but I think he was dodging the grated grill drains they have in the roads there. Yep it was pretty much perfect.

    I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that it’s a planned city. A lot of the roads have entry/exits called scissors. They are shaped like scissors funnily enough and you have to get on and off them to do a left or right turn.

    Bit hard to get used to at first but makes it easier and stops cars crossing over each other. Also every street block is coded with letters/numbers. Once you work out how that system works its easy to get to where you’re going.

    I was told the driving manner is a cultural thing too but in saying that a lot of people that live there aren’t from there originally.

    Camzao39134,9661689815

  • #60641

    Badcam
    Member

    [QUOTE=Huckleberry]…………….this should facilitate in an accident occurring, especially at night when there are no lights around and no sign posts, the Lombarda will come into view at the last few seconds before impact, banging all the rear occupants heads against the ceiling of the car and thus breaking your suspension. [/QUOTE]

    This is why they are also called: quebra mole

  • #60643

    demiurge
    Member

    Yes, branches in the road indicate a road hazzard, here in the citytoo! Also, they can indicate a man hole cover that has gonemissing, in which case the branches are usually stuck into the hole,like a large shrub growing out of the street.
    Lanes may come and go as they please and without warning.
    At any time, a lane of traffic may become a place to parellelpark. Should all the spaces nearest to the curb be full, the nextlane over should be used.

  • #60649

    analivia
    Member

    Whilst conducting your conversation on your cellphone in the car, whilst driving along, under no circumstances drive at normal speed, slow down to about 5 kmph and stay in the outside lane, ensuring the vehicles behind cannot pass and under no circumstances pull over to conduct your telephone conversation in safety.

    When driving along and you spot a road sign stating 30 kmph under no circumstances does it mean the number stated, understand that this means 60 kmph we multiply every speed sign by x2 or if it indicates 70 kmph then that means accerlerate to the limits of your vehicles capacity, if it is at all possible, try to get your car airborne.

  • #60652

    Badcam
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]I can only comment on Brasilia. We spent three or four weeks there late last year and in that time I didn’t see or experience any of the things we are talking about.

    I think a lot of it has to do with the fact that ……[/QUOTE]

    ….there are cameras everywhere that take pictures of your license plate and then you receive a ticket in the mail for a HUGEfine! SOooo everybody is verycareful.

  • #60654

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    Tell me about it!!! My brother in law is visiting at the moment and told us that whilst I was driving his car in Brasilia I copped one of these fines (speeding I suspect but he didnt give details)

    You could be right but I think they could both be contributing factors. I mean from what I saw people just do nothing wrong at all on the road, its not just speeding or red lights. It’s almost as if your not in Brasil. I’ve never seen anything like it anywhere.

  • #60655

    Anonymous

    Well, the cameras have turned my friends, who when living in Minas were your usual Brazilian drivers following all the above-mentioned rules, into little lambs who don’t even thinkof speeding anymore. Nobody can sustain fines of hundreds of reis at a time for long. The cameras and fines are the first things they warned me about when loaning me their car in Brasilia–which loan they wouldn’t even have dreamed of in Minas.

  • #60657

    knowbot
    Member

    If a motorcycle is trying to overtake you, with two (or more) passengers on board, let them get parrelel to your car, then swerve hard left (or right) thus running them off the road. You have probably just saved yourself from an armed assault.

  • #60658

    Badcam
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Tell me about it!!! My brother in law is visiting at the moment and told us that whilst I was driving his car in Brasilia I copped one of these fines (speeding I suspect but he didnt give details)

    [/QUOTE]
    He probably received points on his driving record as well…

  • #60663

    Badcam
    Member

    Driving manners are in no way helped bij the design of the roads also.

    In the Netherlands I failed the drivers exam once, because I slowed down on the highway when preparing for getting off at the next turn. You should do so on the sideroad, given that fact that this is long enough. This is seldom the case in Brazil.

    In the neighbourhood where I live, the gasstation is just behind a “retorno”, everybody that stops at the gasstation should take the next retorno (which is about 10 km further) in order to get home, but obviously nobody does. Result: you drive into the traffic, on the left side, in order to catch the return that is near.

    The worst security measure (or is it an invitation to accidents ?) I ever saw is a zebra crossing over the highway. What are you supposed to do here, when a pedestrian tries to cross ? A full stop ? To make matters worse, they recently added a double row of cat-eyes across the road, giving you at night the impression that you run into a sort of fence. And a plate: respect life. Yeah

  • #60668

    dalmata
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Tell me about it!!! My brother in law is visiting at the moment and told us that whilst I was driving his car in Brasilia I copped one of these fines (speeding I suspect but he didnt give details)

    You could be right but I think they could both be contributing factors. I mean from what I saw people just do nothing wrong at all on the road, its not just speeding or red lights. It’s almost as if your not in Brasil. I’ve never seen anything like it anywhere.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nip up the road to Joao Pessoa. There are cameras on most main streets that I travelled on as well as speed warning lights that indicated your speed and if you are exceeding the limit they would take your photo.

    Now my first time in JP I actually went through one of these indicators slightly over the speed limit. To date (it will probably come today) I have not received a fine. So there may be a few kms tolerance.

  • #60669

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    [QUOTE=Polvo]

    Any lane shall be considered an overtaking lane.


    [/QUOTE]

    Including the hard shoulder, whether there is a hard shoulder or not!

  • #60670

    [QUOTE=tamashin] I actually went through one of these indicators slightly over the speed limit. To date (it will probably come today) I have not received a fine. So there may be a few kms tolerance.[/QUOTE]
    I *think* tolerance is 7 km/h (precision tolerance).

  • #60675

    demiurge
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA] [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Tell me about it!!! My brother in law is visiting at the moment and told us that whilst I was driving his car in Brasilia I copped one of these fines (speeding I suspect but he didnt give details)

    [/QUOTE]
    He probably received points on his driving record as well…
    [/QUOTE]

    I didn’t think we had the demerit point system here in Brazil, how long has it been in? When I was here in 2003 I got a couple of speeding fines in my now wifes car and she didn’t get any points off here licence.

    Yep I’ll aks him later, I’m curious. You know he won’t even let me pay the fine.

  • #60676

    THEROCK
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin][QUOTE=Camzao]

    Tell me about it!!! My brother in law is visiting at the moment and told us that whilst I was driving his car in Brasilia I copped one of these fines (speeding I suspect but he didnt give details)

    You could be right but I think they could both be contributing factors. I mean from what I saw people just do nothing wrong at all on the road, its not just speeding or red lights. It’s almost as if your not in Brasil. I’ve never seen anything like it anywhere.

    [/QUOTE]

    Nip up the road to Joao Pessoa. There are cameras on most main streets that I travelled on as well as speed warning lights that indicated your speed and if you are exceeding the limit they would take your photo.

    Now my first time in JP I actually went through one of these indicators slightly over the speed limit. To date (it will probably come today) I have not received a fine. So there may be a few kms tolerance.

    [/QUOTE]

    Yep we have them here too and everywhere between Recife and the beaches south of the city – Porto de Galinhas etc

    I’m a good boy now

  • #60678

    THEROCK
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]There are cameras on most main streets that I travelled on as well as speed warning lights that indicated your speed and if you are exceeding the limit they would take your photo.

    [/QUOTE]

    Here in MT the photo/infraction comes with the windshield blacked out so our wife can’t see your girlfriend sitting at your side. That’s our legislators working in our behalf.

    [QUOTE=tamashin]Now my first time in JP I actually went through one of these indicators slightly over the speed limit. To date (it will probably come today) I have not received a fine.

    [/QUOTE]
    I believe you can check for ‘multas’ on your state’s Detran site with the info off your car reg., but I think you have to go in to check points on your license. These can add up quick.
    Good Luck!

  • #60679

    analivia
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]
    I believe you can check for ‘multas’ on your state’s Detran site with the info off your car reg., but I think you have to go in to check points on your license. These can add up quick.
    Good Luck!
    [/QUOTE] This happened when I first arrived in JP in December 2006. I have a feeling these things are sent out quickly (they want your money) so I should have received it by now.

  • #60680

    Leonidus
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]When I was here in 2003 I got a couple of speeding fines in my now wifes car and she didn’t get any points off here licence.[/QUOTE]
    When these devices were first installed in the state capital, well before 2003, I got several in a short period. I was one infraction away from losing my license on points. I had to make an inquiry at Detran to find this out though. Maybe they don’t/didn’t know or maybe it differs by state.
    Cheers!!!
    DUNGA39135,4255324074

  • #60716

    lenine
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao][QUOTE=Polvo] [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Motorcycles included.

    [/QUOTE]

    Helmets are for wimps.
    [/QUOTE]

    don’t wear shoes at all, not even thongs.

    [/QUOTE]

    Took me a while to catch on to this but isnt a thong a peice of thwimware, sorry swimware. I should think it would be round your feet if you were going too fast

  • #60729

    claudio/UK
    Member

    Well I wouldn’t complain if the rider was female and wearing a thong/fio dental.

    No I mean flip flops, havaianas…

    A lot of guys ride their motos barefoot here in the nordeste. I wonder if they do in the south too???

  • #60737

    Benjamin86
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]

    Here in MT the photo/infraction comes with the windshield blacked out so our wife can’t see your girlfriend sitting at your side. That’s our legislators working in our behalf.
    [/QUOTE]

    These jokers like to throw a curved ball once in a while. For the last two years I’ve frequently driven between Rio and Novo Friburgo where there are at least half a dozen speed cameras on the roads. They are all clearly marked and with plenty of warning signs so they are duly respected resulting in ticket-less travels up to now.

    Just received a double whammy in the mail from the Prefeitura Municipal de Itaborai, two tickets for R$102.15 and 5 points on each. The included photo is of the REAR of my car which means the camera could be either a mobile unit or a sneaky fixed one which is unmarked, they got me both coming and going doing 80k in a 60k zone.

  • #60738

    carlataylor
    Member

    [QUOTE=Denise] [QUOTE=tamashin] I actually went through one of these indicators slightly over the speed limit. To date (it will probably come today) I have not received a fine. So there may be a few kms tolerance.[/QUOTE]
    I *think* tolerance is 7 km/h (precision tolerance).
    [/QUOTE]

    It may vary between states but the two tickets I just received have the description of the infraction being “Velocidade superior em mais de 20% ate 50% da permitida” along with advising that the infraction is “Grave”

    I guess the above means speeding at more than 20% of the limit but less than 50% with the offence being considered serious, so in RJ it looks as though they work on a percentage basis and step up the fine accordingly.

  • #60740

    Anonymous

    The percentage is to determine the gravity of infraction & subsequently, fine value … the 7 km (I think it’s 7) is the tolerance for radar’s precision (it’s not 100% precise).

  • #60744

    Anonymous

    Thanks Denise, on the bottom of the ticket is;

    Velocidade considerada 073, Velocidade regulamentada 060, Velocidade aferida 080.

    I guess the 73 is the tolerance before a ticket is issued which makes it 13 km/hr, would this be correct?

  • #60747

    knowbot
    Member

    Velocidade aferida = what the machine read = 80
    V. considerada (the speed they are considering for the fine) = 80 – 7 = 73
    Velocidade regulamentada = speed limit

  • #60748

    Bruninha
    Member

    Could be? 61km/h to 72 km/h: ‚Äòsuperior √† máxima em at√©vinte por cento‚Äô; and 73km/h to 90 km/h:‚Äúsuperior em mais de 20% ate 50% da permitida”.
    You might be lucky;they can suspend your license for some of the ‚Äògravíssima‚Äô infractions.

  • #60788

    dalmata
    Member

    Motorcyclists shouldnt wear helmets, rather they should fix the helmet precariously on the back of the head allowing it to flip off at the slightest knock.

  • #60791

    Anonymous

    It’s okay to strap your helmet on your elbow…that’s wearing it, right?

  • #60792

    johnsonia
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]It’s okay to strap your helmet on your elbow…that’s wearing it, right? [/QUOTE]

    Yes, illegal in many countries but here it’s the preferred option

  • #60797

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=Denise]Velocidade aferida = what the machine read = 80

    V. considerada (the speed they are considering for the fine) = 80 – 7 = 73

    Velocidade regulamentada = speed limit
    [/QUOTE]

    Denise, you are an absolute genius…the above is for the first ticket and I just checked the second ticket (the one I got on the way back), the clocked speed is 82 and the V. considerada is 75 which had me a little confused, however it all makes sense now as V. considerada is 82 – 7 = 75

    You should be running against Lula next time

  • #60812

    ajmh
    Member

    I noticed here when motocycles pass by those cameras, the rider willusually put his hand across the back of the plate to cover thenumber. Smart!
    Another important detail to note in terms of points on your license -you loose points for PARKING VIOLATIONS. Actually, I believe Iwas told that it’s the same number of points for parking violation asit is when you hit someone. There’s justice for you…

  • #60817

    Anonymous

    Brazil does not have driving laws, only suggestions.

    Seriously though, I like that cars do not slow down at crosswalks when the pedestrian is jay-walking. In the sue-happy EEUU people dare the cars to hit them. I also respect the good horn work in Rio.

  • #60834

    The greatest cause of death among European travelers to Brasil, I am told, is being hit by a car while crossing streets while visiting here. Europeans instinctually expect cars to yield and completely stop for esteemed pedestrians wherever they venture. God rest the souls of those that visit Brasil.

  • #60847

    carlataylor
    Member

    [QUOTE=AkuTyger]I noticed here when motocycles pass by those cameras, the rider will usually put his hand across the back of the plate to cover the number. Smart!
    [/QUOTE]

    Smart? What was he doing with a number plate?

  • #60848

    carlataylor
    Member

    [QUOTE=AkuTyger]

    Another important detail to note in terms of points on your license – you loose points for PARKING VIOLATIONS. Actually, I believe I was told that it’s the same number of points for parking violation as it is when you hit someone. There’s justice for you…

    [/QUOTE] So its even worse if you run over someone while parking?

  • #60913

    Bruninha
    Member

    Only if they have money.

  • #60967

    lenine
    Member

    At no time should you use the brakes as it wears out the brake linings, shoes,pads which are expensive to replace. Stop by using oncoming vehicles and/ or pedestrians.

  • #60978

    demiurge
    Member

    If when driving along you happen upon a Traffic signal changing from Green to Red, under no circumstances bother stopping, please continue as normal, passing the last 10 seconds of the change, if you happen upon a car smashing into the side of you, dont worry, just lie your a*se off

  • #60989

    leedhouse
    Member

    [QUOTE=Huckleberry]

    If when driving along you happen upon a Traffic signal changing from Green to Red, under no circumstances bother stopping, please continue as normal, passing the last 10 seconds of the change, if you happen upon a car smashing into the side of you, dont worry, just lie your a*se off [/QUOTE]

    I have seen this time and again in our city as cars and buses go through the red lights for as long as possible even as the traffic from the other roads nudges in to the flow of traffic. Really crazy.

  • #60999

    Anonymous

    City bus drivers must wait until all seats are full and thirty passengers are standing in the aisle before accelerating as fast as possible to maximum speed followed by putting both feet on the brakes.

    This is probably why Brazilians are so friendly, all this intimate body contact early in the morning on the way to work and again in the evening.

  • #61000

    floripa
    Member

    I think it’s a safety thing with all the passengers. What happens is should the bus crash, or at least brake suddenly, the impact is softened by the bodies. Sort of like a human air bag

  • #61040

    Speaking of radar and cameras, a colleague got fined, this was the picture sent on the form:

    <IMG src="http://www.gringoes.com.br/forum/“>

    Bit hard to see, it was actually the truck carrying his car and not he who was driving.

    Diarmuid39139,5109606481

  • #61042

    At no time should a motorist put rubbish in a convenient bag in the car. Rubbish should be thrown out of the window in vast quantities and especially in front of cyclists and pedestrians.

  • #61365

    blue
    Member

    [QUOTE=Diarmuid]Speaking of radar and cameras, a colleague got fined, this was the picture sent on the form:“Bit hard to see, it was actually the truck carrying his car and not he who was driving.[/QUOTE]

    OMG

    you mean, he drives a Palio just kidding

    Huckleberry39157,943587963

  • #61371

    floripa
    Member

    When carrying out road maintenance work and digging a hole in the road, under no circumstances bother to level it off or place a reflective warning sign nearby, fix the problem and pile the earth into a 2 foot high pile, ready for a car to drive into, once it gets dark.

    Huckleberry39142,9800578704

  • #61525

    mark3960
    Member

    Buses must always travel very close together so that when a car gets in between them, a sudden stop remodels the car….This guy was lucky, he walked away with just a scratch on his head…last seen heading for the lottery shop.

  • #61547

    jatoba
    Member

    Always good to have photo to back up your logic.

    well done

  • #62141

    demiurge
    Member

    Saw something this morning outside the school gates that sort of fits in here.

    Picture the scene.

    Cars parked on both sides of the road though one space right outside school gate. Two cars approach from either side and reach space at same time.

    Both cars drive into space at the same time parking diagonally stopping traffic on bothsides.

    Brasil Highway code says that you shouldnt use reverse gear.

    Cars in queue drive right up to the two cars in the one space. Women drop off their treasured ones and cant reverse out because of the other cars (and because of code). Though its only 7.00am its very hot. No one is going to reverse to let the cars out so that the other cars can get past. We left them, with my good lady wife saying she would never do that.

    The same morning a man drove several hundred metres down the wrong side of the road and passing everyone in the traffic queue to turn left at the set of lights.

    Later that morning a car took a turning too fast and was only stopped from driving into oncoming traffic by a conveniently placed concrete post.

    Yesterday, a little old lady looking through the steering wheel slowly took a corner and slowly drove into the side of our car. Now that could be Buckinghamshire.

  • #62149

    Ottawarony
    Member

    You have really touched a nerve in starting this forum tamashin. Here are my conclusions to date:
    Use of the horn is madatory for any manouvre.
    Car manufacturers might consider that they could make a big saving on costs by eliminating the pointless indicator lights
    There is no driving test here – if you can afford a car you can drive it!
    More soon……..

  • #62158

    curitiba777
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback]

    Car manufacturers might consider that they could make a big saving on costs by eliminating the pointless indicator lights
    [/QUOTE]

    Dont forget savings on brake linings!

  • #62164

    phsp23
    Member
    1. If you forget the exit on the highway, don‘t wait for the next exit to return, put your car in reverse in order to make the exit anyway.
    2. Before taking an exit on the highway, make sure to be in the right lane, which obviously is the left lane. have your passenger stick his arm out of the window and cross all lanes quickly to make the exit. In case you miss it, see rule 1.
  • #62167

    Pastel
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]It’s okay to strap your helmet on your elbow…that’s wearing it, right? [/QUOTE]

    Yes, illegal in many countries but here it’s the preferred option

    [/QUOTE]
    That does not make it less illegal.

  • #62171

    sean patrick
    Member

    While riding your bike home at night in the rain. Make sure to take the higway in the oposite direction, do not use light, wear dark clothes and swing back and forth between lanes.

  • #62345

    Igloo
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]While riding your bike home at night in the rain. Make sure to take the highway in the oposite direction, do not use light, wear dark clothes and swing back and forth between lanes. [/QUOTE]

    and make sure you are wearing a T-Shirt that is emblazoned with the words – Death Wish

  • #62353

    If out and about in your Hummer and you happen upon another car

    World In View

    just drive over it.

  • #62361

    koteg
    Member

    If you must insist on keeping your black tinted windows rolled up all the time, then it won’t be practical for you to consider purchasing . . .

    88_2.jpg

    . . . the new 2007Ford Jacuzzi

  • #62362

    aimhigh.jpg

    When driving in Brasil, remember “watch out for the other guy… especially over air passage ways.”

  • #62363

    Remember that in Brasil, it is the custom to wait patiently on the auto route before passing another vehicle, so as not to startle them

  • #62364

    12482764_1b1147b592.jpg

    As there have been reported cases of car theft in Brasil, protect yourself by hiding your vehicle in an unlikely place.

  • #62365

    Al Morrison
    Member

    gatomecanico.jpg

    While in Brasil, alway ensure that whoever is repairing your car is both honest and qualified.

  • #62366

    Al Morrison
    Member

    And PLEASE gringoes! Before driving on Senna between Sao Paulo and Rio. Understand why it has been so named!!

    redneck.jpg

  • #62376

    Anonymous

    Congratulations Cary, loved the photos

  • #62377

    Anonymous

    When carrying out the 3 point turn manoever ensure that you use as many manoevers as possible showing your dexterity with the steering wheel. If at all possible wait for cars to approach from either side and stall frequently while waving at the assmbled throng. Accept no assistance from unauthorised officials.

    Happened to me yesterday. I wish I had had a camera and dictionary.

  • #62391

    THEROCK
    Member

    Oh, and I loved this one!
    http://www.gringoes.com/articles.asp?ID_Noticia=1702
    6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?
    Somany. I remember taking a cab through Rio in the middle of the nightwhen a man stepped out in front of the cab with a huge gun. My cabbyslammed on the brakes and did the most amazing 180 maneavur I’ve everseen, before cutting through side streets, all without looking, andwith one hand on the gun hidden below his seat. My hero – best tip Iever gave.

  • #62860

    rolundo
    Member

    Leave the car door open for as long as possible when getting in and out of the vehicle. Especially when you are opposite someone else doing the same thing.

  • #62866

    Anonymous

    While driving at night on dark roads, do not use the lights of your car since this costs gasoline.

  • #62873

    demiurge
    Member

    Sounds like you guys have all been driving down here in Santos… you need definite life insurance when you get in the car down here.. It took me forever to figure out why they dont use the left or right lanes, only staying in the middle… Its because they enjoy scaring the hell out of you when they turn right or left in front of you AND THEN GIVE YOU THE UNIVERSAL SIGN (THE BIRD) FOR EVEN BEING ON THE ROAD….

  • #63150

    demiurge
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringa SSZ]Sounds like you guys have all been driving down here in Santos… you need definite life insurance when you get in the car down here.. It took me forever to figure out why they dont use the left or right lanes, only staying in the middle… Its because they enjoy scaring the hell out of you when they turn right or left in front of you AND THEN GIVE YOU THE UNIVERSAL SIGN (THE BIRD) FOR EVEN BEING ON THE ROAD…. [/QUOTE]
    Then theres the wandering rule. When driving in the middle lane do not let anyone pass on either side. Swerve to impossible angles to include for sweeping into the cycle lane should a cyclist attempt to pass. Called the wandering rule because you wanders and others wonder what you are doing.

  • #63188

    anderstorm
    Member

    Saw another rule being implemented in full this morning.
    When approaching traffic lights at flashing orange/amber (in the morning/late at night this means all trafffic can proceed with caution) accelerate as fast as possible, with horn blasting out and dont look either side for oncoming traffic. Race through lights and pray.

  • #63203

    Sian
    Member

    Here‘s a rule I have not seen in this topic yet:
    As a pedestrian alwais walk in the middle of the street, even if there is a sidewalk.
    And a related rule:
    Since pedestrians should not use the sidewalk, Park your car on the sidewalk.

  • #63247

    Aaronk
    Member

    For those of you who live in Sao Paulo and use Ancheita or Imigrantes to come down the mountain watch out… They have new radars installed and you cant see them, they are inbedded in the guard rails .. I have a picture i just dont know how to get it on here.. DUMB DUMB DUMB

  • #63304

    Sampa2009
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringa SSZ]For those of you who live in Sao Paulo and use Ancheita or Imigrantes to come down the mountain watch out… They have new radars installed and you cant see them, they are inbedded in the guard rails .. I have a picture i just dont know how to get it on here.. DUMB DUMB DUMB [/QUOTE]

    Continuing with cameras, the English police force are trying out cats eyes with cameras in them embedded in the road. Worth remembering when you go back for a spin

  • #66318

    Brazzilliann
    Member

    Yesterday I was driving home from work. At a set of lights I waited behind a small van. Then I noticed a faint line across the front of my windscreen. It took a few moments to work out that a sheet of glass was projecting from the back of the van and across the bonnet of my car to within a few feet of the windscreen.

    Can you imagine what would happen if a motorcyclist had ridden up to the back of the van instead?

    tamashin39192,7119560185

  • #66324

    irragEverma
    Member

    And I’m betting the van driver would have deemed the motorcyclist to be at fault.

  • #66377

    USABRA
    Member

    It’s just too hard to tie some rags or material to whatever hangs over the back of a truck or diagonally out of a car window.

  • #76413

    x32792
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA]In a pedestrian crossing the pedestrian shall have absolute right of way over all vehicles; except motorcycles, tractor trailers, trucks, buses, cars, carts (both push and horse), bicycles and tricycles [/QUOTE] I stopped at a Zebra crossing today to let some youngsters cross. A car from about 4 cars behind me pulled out and overtook us, driving into the group of people crossing and forcing the car in the opposite lane to reverse. I actually flicked through a copy of the Brasilian Highway code the other day. I found it in the fiction section of the bookshop. Its nearly an inch and a half thick.

  • #76718

    Anonymous

    If traffic’s looking heavy- stop diagonaly across two lanes. Alternitivley, use all availible space, including gas station forecorts and pavements as short-cuts. If the car infront refused to move over, subject them to a free audio/ visual test, regardless if they are adjacent to a lorry. Whilst on a long lorry drive, sleep at the wheel. Regular naps will increase your driving time. Keep death off the road- drive on the pavement! Clap

  • #76721

    Neilu
    Member

    If you’re a taximan with 7 people in your fiat uno, shake your fist at the guy who wakes you up as you negotiate a tricky turn on the motorway and demand the fare be doubled for interference with driving technique. You know nothing you dumb gringos, I was always in control! I was only resting my eyes and no I don’t have change of a 20.

  • #76724

    Escocia
    Member

    I didnt think anything could surprise me anymore until this morning when I saw a car driving down the wrong way on one of the busiest roads in Joao Pessoa (Retao de Manaira) OK its only one way and he was only going one way but I think he had just lost the will to liveLOL

  • #76748

    chrisSP
    Member

    My friend loves driving on the wrong side of the road to take shortcuts… and it drives me mad because 90% of the time he does that when I’m in the car, I see another car coming the other way and I close my eyes to avoid seeing the worse. So far I’m still alive, thankfully, but he is nuuuuuuuuuuuuts.

  • #76758

    brettsmith
    Member

    [QUOTE=supermary]My friend loves driving on the wrong side of the road to take shortcuts… and it drives me mad because 90% of the time he does that when I’m in the car, I see another car coming the other way and I close my eyes to avoid seeing the worse. So far I’m still alive, thankfully, but he is nuuuuuuuuuuuuts.[/QUOTE]
    I wouldn‘t get into a car with someone that drives like that. NEVER EVER.

  • #76761

    neil1972
    Member

    he’s my neighbor, and when going out my choices are him, cab (which i cant afford on a regular basis), and public transport, that rarely run at times I’m out (I’m a night owl). He has never ever been in a car accident before, which makes me feel a bit better… but it gets annoying. I remember in new years, going to the beach, and my other friend yelling at him for him to drive like a normal person and him going “if you don’t like it, leave my car” and her saying “it’s my beach house, so you either slow down and drive on the right lane or you sleep outside on the road”. that worked… i love that guy though. hehehe. You almost get used to it after a while.

  • #76787

    Sian
    Member

    Yeah I was scared at first with the people driving in the wrong lanes to get shortcuts… I always wear my seatbelt CoolEven when the Brazilians (at least the Brazilian people I was specifically with) told me not to, as if to be “carefree”

  • #76807

    Farhan
    Member

    I find that gettin into a taxi/car in Brasil is akin to getting on an aeroplane. Whether you leave the car a functioning human is out of your hands. At least on the plane you can’t see the pilot, only hear his soothing voice reassuring you… Friend o mine won’t get into a taxi lest he’s had a stiff drink. Only time he’ll drink too, the mentalist.

  • #76819

    phsp23
    Member

    At least my crazy friend tells me to put on the seat belt LOL

  • #77500

    Greenback
    Member

    Should you be unfortunate enough to have an accident, stop your car in the middle of the road and impede all traffic from whatever direction it may be coming in. Let as many people know as possible of your plight and of course your innocense, including all those involved. Do not, under any circumstances move your car or any other car for at least an hour. Gesticulate wildly should the need arise. Yes, I was stuck in a traffic jam this morning because of an accident.

  • #77507

    afforcini
    Member

    I‘m stuck in a traffic jam every morning. Half the time, it‘s for no good reason.

  • #77511

    brettsmith
    Member

    Define “good reason” Wink

  • #77514

    brettsmith
    Member

    Planes running themselves into the middle of the street and big disasters (I‘m not joking either. That day, the traffic was more than justifiable. The days after though, in the alternate routes, not so much…), and big accidents & pile-ups too. Also, floods (although that could probably be fixed somehow, but that‘s another story).

  • #77521

    [QUOTE=Russell]Define “good reason” Wink[/QUOTE]
    Taking a leak….

  • #77590

    Back to the Zebra crossings (they were mentioned a few pages back I think). I honestly thought these things only existed in urban region, low maximum speed roads, where braking to give the pedestrian free way is not so much a problem. But no, the stretch of the interstate highway BR040 between Petropolis and Itaipava has three of them. Marked with two rows of cat-eyes (really scaring when dark) and a big plate saying “respeite a vida”. Everytime I pass there (twice a day) I wonder what one is supposed to do if a pedestrrian steps on the zebra in order to cross. If you brake and come to stand-still, chances are that the car behind you joins you on the front seat, or he just misses you and passes, killing the pedestrian anyway. What would a Brazilian do? I dunno, it did not happen yet. Perhaps hunking the horn, windshield wipers on and hope for the best ?

  • #77615

    danpatel
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten]Back to the Zebra crossings (they were mentioned a few pages back I think).I honestly thought these things only existed in urban region, low maximum speed roads, where braking to give the pedestrian free way is not so much a problem.But no, the stretch of the interstate highway BR040 between Petropolis and Itaipava has three of them.Marked with two rows of cat-eyes (really scaring when dark) and a big plate saying “respeite a vida”.Everytime I pass there (twice a day) I wonder what one is supposed to do if a pedestrrian steps on the zebra in order to cross.
    [/QUOTE]
    According to the brazilian highway code, you are obliged to brake Confused
    [QUOTE=maarten]
    If you brake and come to stand-still, chances are that the car behind you joins you on the front seat, or he just misses you and passes, killing the pedestrian anyway.What would a Brazilian do? I dunno, it did not happen yet. Perhaps hunking the horn, windshield wipers on and hope for the best ?[/QUOTE]
    Considering the Laro you drive, to be able to do that to you, the car behind you must be a big f****ng car Wink

  • #80615

    Nurfoff
    Member

    Quote from a recent rag. 82000 deaths on the roads of Brasil to date since January 2007. Seems a lot.

    Take it easy out there.

  • #80621

    bg1601k
    Member

    Most countries have what we call “Sunday Drivers” right? Where are they all hiding in Brazil?

    Being Sunday today I thought I’d ask the question. Are they only found in small towns or in the country? If there was an equivalent of a ‘Sunday Driver” in Brazil, would it more likely b a drunk person driving back from a day at the beach than an annoyingly slow driver?

  • #80623

    Nurfoff
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]Quote from a recent rag. 82000 deaths on the roads of Brasil to date since January 2007. Seems a lot.[/QUOTE]
    Tamashin, here is what I found, its a 5 year average.
    A cada ano, cerca de 35 mil pessoas morrem em acidentes de tr√¢nsito no Brasil, n√∫mero comparável ao da guerra no Iraque que registra em torno de 37 mil mortes anuais desde o início da ocupa√ßão norte-americana.
    Ed

  • #80627

    Nurfoff
    Member

    I must try and find the article again. Its hell when my good lady wife decides to clean my desk!!Confused

  • #80628

    [QUOTE=Camzao]

    Most countries have what we call “Sunday Drivers” right? Where are they all hiding in Brazil?

    Being Sunday today I thought I’d ask the question. Are they only found in small towns or in the country? If there was an equivalent of a ‘Sunday Driver” in Brazil, would it more likely b a drunk person driving back from a day at the beach than an annoyingly slow driver? [/QUOTE] A Sunday driver in Brazil is someone who doesn’t cut up other cars, doesn’t drive too close to the car in front, always indicates, only overtakes on the outside and only when it’s safe to do so, doesn’t just drive onto a main road from a side road irrespective of whether there is other traffic on the main road, and understands the correct way to behave on a traffic roundabout. That’s why you seldom see Sunday drivers in Brazil!!! LOLglobetrotter2007-10-21 20:46:49

  • #80629

    Dionello
    Member

    yes yes very good Thumbs%20Up

  • #83543

    Al Morrison
    Member

    Avoid going round the round a bout !) drive across it. 2) drive round it in the opposite direction to get to your exit. 3) When emerging from a central crossover in the middle of the road do not look into the startled eyes of approaching drivers as they stand on their brakes. Look staight ahead very purposfully and pray, hoping the cars wont hit you. Happend to me yesterday, not on a rally but on a normal road.

  • #83610

    Byroncraver
    Member

    If it’s early morning, say around 7am or just before then its ok to fly up the wrong way of the one way street outside Bom Pre√ßo because you want to get across to Av Boa Viagem but would rather drive the wrong way up one way streets than drive one block further and do the right thing. And if you’re the car behind him why don’t you just follow him, two wrongs are no different than one wrong. I’m just about to cross the road with my baby in the pram, fricken lucky I looked both ways and saw you pricks, you didnt even slow down.

  • #83625

    ranjob
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]If it’s early morning, say around 7am or just before then its ok to fly up the wrong way of the one way street outside Bom Pre√ßo because you want to get across to Av Boa Viagem but would rather drive the wrong way up one way streets than drive one block further and do the right thing. And if you’re the car behind him why don’t you just follow him, two wrongs are no different than one wrong. I’m just about to cross the road with my baby in the pram, fricken lucky I looked both ways and saw you pricks, you didnt even slow down. [/QUOTE] Like I said on another post; you would have to be mad not to look both ways on a one way street. That said cyclists ride anywhere they like. One rode up on the drivers side yesterday as I was turning left. I nearly squashed him but couldnt he see me turning left before pulling along side? Even Brasilians get frustrated by the bad driving of others. I was on a zebra crossing with my daughter. A car had stopped, the lights were red too but another car continued across the crossing in front of us and through the red light. The guy who had stopped was livid, “I am trying to set your daughter an example” he fumed and then shared his contempt with another driver. He shouted a palavrao at the long gone driver. My daughter had, by then, disappeared in to the bread shop, to tell all to the shop assistants.

  • #83634

    tavyintagma
    Member

    Before leaving the depot for the days rounds, make sure the undercarriage is secure…

  • #83635

    Sampaman
    Member

    This belong to anybody ??? Check out the tread (or lack of) on the inside tire..

  • #83637

    tavyintagma
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2]

    This belong to anybody ??? Check out the tread (or lack of) on the inside tire..

    [/QUOTE] Bald tyres are an issue but there is a healthy second hand market for them. Nevertheless, we were stopped at one of the police check points and the only thing the police checked was the tyres.

  • #83640

    wonderlustBR
    Member

    What I find remarkable about this photo is that the people lining-up to buy the fruit are standing in the middle of the road!

  • #83645

    AnnaO
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback]What I find remarkable about this photo is that the people lining-up to buy the fruit are standing in the middle of the road! [/QUOTE] A new meaning to fruit squashLOL

  • #83655

    vbyz1
    Member

    that thing of the car reminds me of the buses in sao paulo… the one that lost a wheel and killed a guy and the other one that lost the entire back axle thing, just like in that pic. both in the same corner too, near my house, at similar times, within a week of each other. weird stuff.
    since then, the bus lines have been crazy round here. its all changing. they completely eliminated the Ana Rosa line (both faulty buses were ana rosa buses) and are redoing all the other routes. Because everyone knows that the blame is on the route, not the actual maintenance…

  • #83664

    Greenback
    Member

    Well, the culprit coudn’t be preventive maintenance, as this does not seem to exist. You just wait until something seriously breaks, and only if it is impairing the further use too much, you repair it (preferable with a spare part that is not new either). In the case of the springs (those things that also prevent the axle to go its own way), I suppose they were already long gone. That is what the quebra mole is designed to do, no ?

  • #83691

    Anonymous

    Excellent fotos !
    Perhaps some gang tried to steal the back tyres while the guards were inside with the bread bags.

  • #83736

    Anonymous

    Are there any cities in Brazil where there is street racing/hoon problems with young drivers and their hotted up cars? If so here’sthe answer http://video.msn.com/video.aspx/?mkt=en-au&brand=ninemsn&fg=rss&vid=d5f70ff3-48f2-40eb-84d7-058a80a6262b&from=imbot_en-au_general&wa=wsignin1.0

  • #83739

    Greenback
    Member

    I’ve never had any problems driving in Brazil, just use common sense but I had a great driving instructor; a wonderful Popuzuda, and she just so happened to be my GF. So, I killed two birds with one stone!

  • #83751

    [QUOTE=Gringos.com]

    I’ve never had any problems driving in Brazil, just use common sense but I had a great driving instructor; a wonderful Popuzuda, and she just so happened to be my GF. So, I killed two birds with one stone!

    [/QUOTE] If she was that good she must be a Paribana !!Cool

  • #83775

    dmbteach
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringos.com]

    I’ve never had any problems driving in Brazil, just use common sense but I had a great driving instructor; a wonderful Popuzuda, and she just so happened to be my GF. So, I killed two birds with one stone!

    [/QUOTE] You needed a Driving Instructor to drive in Brazil? Are you a teenager?

  • #83821

    liaillweado
    Member

    [QUOTE=Gringos.com]

    I’ve never had any problems driving in Brazil, just use common sense but I had a great driving instructor; a wonderful Popuzuda, and she just so happened to be my GF. So, I killed two birds with one stone!

    [/QUOTE] You dont drive kites you fly themConfused

  • #85016

    Sampaman
    Member

    does anyone know what the minumum age requirement is for a brazilian citizen to rent a car in brazil?

  • #85018

    liaillweado
    Member

    [QUOTE=abovethelaws]does anyone know what the minumum age requirement is for a brazilian citizen to rent a car in brazil?[/QUOTE]
    A good question. I once saw a toddler drinking an ‘electronica’ (pinga & lime) in a bar here. I hope he wasn’t getting behind the wheel of a rental car later … a potential menace.

  • #85019

    clairemaggie
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao][QUOTE=Gringos.com]

    I’ve never had any problems driving in Brazil, just use common sense but I had a great driving instructor; a wonderful Popuzuda, and she just so happened to be my GF. So, I killed two birds with one stone!

    [/QUOTE] You needed a Driving Instructor to drive in Brazil? Are you a teenager?[/QUOTE]
    Heeeeeeeeeeeey…. I’m an adult (according to the law at least. In my head I still have trouble with the concept LOL) and if I want to get back on the road again I will need a driving instructor (or some brave soul to come drive with me)!!! In SP at least, as in TX I drive pretty okay and I don’t fear death when I’m behind the wheel, although I do need Gianni to point out where to turn, as I’m not good with where to go there yet.

  • #85020

    sphiatt
    Member

    [QUOTE=abovethelaws]does anyone know what the minumum age requirement is for a brazilian citizen to rent a car in brazil?[/QUOTE]
    18. But it could be pricey.

  • #85022

    sphiatt
    Member

    [QUOTE=abovethelaws]does anyone know what the minumum age requirement is for a brazilian citizen to rent a car in brazil?[/QUOTE]
    21 yrs. at Hertz and Avis … but hey, this is Brazil …

  • #85264

    Anonymous

    [QUOTE=DUNGA][QUOTE=abovethelaws]does anyone know what the minumum age requirement is for a brazilian citizen to rent a car in brazil?[/QUOTE]
    21 yrs. at Hertz and Avis … but hey, this is Brazil …
    [/QUOTE]
    you wouldnt also know how much it costs for a brazilian to obtain a license over there? inc driving lessons exam fee’s etc?

  • #85265

    demiurge
    Member

    Would you want that number to include Portuguese lessons to reach a proficiency to be able to understand the examiner’s questions?

  • #85270

    Tenzin
    Member

    [QUOTE=abovethelaws]you wouldnt also know how much it costs for a brazilian to obtain a license over there? inc driving lessons exam fee’s etc?
    [/QUOTE]
    More than you might expect … like maybe R$1200 or more … and you have to take the lessons, or pay for them at least. That is why I commented once that I think that most Brazilians don’t have them.

  • #85274

    phsp23
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback]Would you want that number to include Portuguese lessons to reach a proficiency to be able to understand the examiner’s questions?[/QUOTE]
    You used to be able to pay a guy 50 to go into the exam room and do the reading part …

  • #85275

    bocokzoy
    Member

    I think I posted a while ago that the Brazilian driving licence isa 50 – taken out and given as required!

  • #85277

    Lucyb
    Member

    Try searching the main website articles for Brazilian Driving Licence, written by Tamashin. He wrote about his experiences with this.

  • #85278

    Lucyb
    Member

    [QUOTE=DUNGA][QUOTE=abovethelaws]you wouldnt also know how much it costs for a brazilian to obtain a license over there? inc driving lessons exam fee’s etc?
    [/QUOTE]
    More than you might expect … like maybe R$1200 or more … and you have to take the lessons, or pay for them at least. That is why I commented once that I think that most Brazilians don’t have them.
    [/QUOTE]
    1200 R$, I‘d say 1200 rupees. For R$ 450 you pay the lessons, the theory exam and the exam. Add 150 for the medical and psyc and you have a license.

  • #85280

    Greenback
    Member

    [QUOTE=sven]
    1200 R$, I‘d say 1200 rupees. For R$ 450 you pay the lessons, the theory exam and the exam. Add 150 for the medical and psyc and you have a license.
    [/QUOTE]
    Which then gives you permission to get behind the wheel of a rusty death-trap that required no officially monitored maintenance or checking!

  • #85282

    Benthecabbie
    Member

    [QUOTE=nevergoingback][QUOTE=sven]
    1200 R$, I‘d say 1200 rupees. For R$ 450 you pay the lessons, the theory exam and the exam. Add 150 for the medical and psyc and you have a license.
    [/QUOTE]
    Which then gives you permission to get behind the wheel of a rusty death-trap that required no officially monitored maintenance or checking!
    [/QUOTE]
    You know of course that “officially” there do not exist rusty death traps in Rio since it‘s the only state that actually requires owners to have their cars checked each year.
    Besides that, it also gives you permission to drive a ferrari.

  • #85331

    demiurge
    Member

    For those of you who follow F1 and have done it since a few years back, do you wonder why Fittipaldi, Piquet and Senna were chanpions? They have had the best training in São Paulo (never mind Barrichelo, he must be from Brasilia). I have had the best laugh reading all 17 pages of this topic. Lat April, when returning to São Paulo from Riviera, after signing the contract of my house, I stopped at a red light in Mogi das Cruzes and when the traffic moved I started moving, then traffic stopped and I stopped. Thar was when a older car pushed my trunk into the rear seat of my car. He got off his car, and came to me really offended demanding “why did you stop?!” I said that I did to avoid doing to the car in front of me what he did to my car, but he couldn’t understand the concept. Being a rental, I ended up paying the repair (3,000 R$) and never being reimbursed. Ah Brazilian drivers…

  • #85347

    I know its over and done with but I always thought the person who ran into the back of you had to pay up. Common sights in Brasil are “crabbing cars” and “concertina cars”.

    tamashin2007-12-15 05:52:19

  • #85415

    pvr1983
    Member

    I thought so too, and that s how it works in the US, hoewver, after filing for a police report and going back to the rental place, I had to return to the US and they had my credit card so they simply charged me. I left the police report with a cousin who did nothing to collect from the guy… that was that. The brasilian gringo got the bad end of it.

  • #85607

    brettsmith
    Member

    Does anyone know what the codes cover on the driving licence? Do you have to take a special test for motorbike for example or can you ride one on your car licence?

  • #85613

    Young One
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]Does anyone know what the codes cover on the driving licence?Do you have to take a special test for motorbike for example or can you ride one on your car licence?[/QUOTE]
    It‘s basically the same as in europe. Classes A, B, C, D & E. You need an exam for each class

  • #86430

    Sian
    Member

    Stop at the traffic lights when they are green to answer your mobile phone thereby confusing waiting pedestrians into thinking they can cross into on coming traffic. Happened today, got the fright of my life as I watched people on the other side of the road walk across the crossing even though the lights were green and traffic was passing them.

  • #87193

    mileoff
    Member

    Bus drivers are now being given swimming lessons.

    Passengers, your lifejacket is under your seat !!

  • #87200

    Barbaraftc
    Member

    Are these swimming lessons cheaper than the Adidas trainers they used to give to help them flee from traffic accidents?

  • #87203

    clairemaggie
    Member

    [QUOTE=Terry_2]

    Bus drivers are now being given swimming lessons.

    [/QUOTE]

    Bus drivers? more like passengers. He probably thought he‘d test the new bus in aqua-terrain conditions, see how it would handle the less congested shortcuts LOL

  • #87208

    mileoff
    Member

    I’d be more worried about what I’d catch in that water, hope everyone is up to date with their shots.

  • #87243

    Aiyana
    Member

    [QUOTE=Camzao]I’d be more worried about what I’d catch in that water, hope everyone is up to date with their shots.[/QUOTE]

    Absolutely, a veritable cesspool, they were very lucky it hadn’t been raining heavily prior to the accident, the canal would have swallowed the bus….

  • #87246

    Aiyana
    Member

    Although it looks a bit cleaner than the canals here in Recife, which are used as rubbish bins for the favela type houses that are in front of some

  • #87249

    Actually, this is Leblon (Rio) and the canal (one of the two) that links the Lagoa de Freitas with the sea.

    No favela there, but I would not be too sure about the water quality of the Lagoa, there were problems in the past.

    The bus driver died, BTW.

  • #88415

    Jerry38
    Member

    [QUOTE=maarten]Actually, this is Leblon (Rio) and the canal (one of the two) that links the Lagoa de Freitas with the sea.

    No favela there, but I would not be too sure about the water quality of the Lagoa, there were problems in the past.

    The bus driver died, BTW. [/QUOTE]

    Maarten, the location is correct, however the only fatality in this incident was the driver of the car which collided with the bus causing it to end up in the canal. The bus driver walked (swam) away from this one. I understand there have been other mishaps where the bus driver has not been so fortunate.

  • #88416

    jayjoseph
    Member

    Watch out for large pot-holes after heavy rain….this one didn’t get a “tree” in it before the car found it…..ouch.

  • #98430

    [QUOTE=AkuTyger]I noticed here when motocycles pass by those cameras, the rider willusually put his hand across the back of the plate to cover thenumber. Smart!
    Another important detail to note in terms of points on your license -you loose points for PARKING VIOLATIONS. Actually, I believe Iwas told that it’s the same number of points for parking violation asit is when you hit someone. There’s justice for you…

    [/QUOTE]
    There has a been a dramatic increase in the number of fixed speed cameras on the main roads of Joao Pessoa but motorcycles ignore them.
    I dont think they register on the speed camera.

  • #98442

    Brenno
    Member

    This is how to deal with speed cameras, they are more about revenue collection than they are about road safety.
    ClapClap
    Clap

  • #98464

    elis
    Member

    [QUOTE=London Lad]This is how to deal with speed cameras, they are more about revenue collection than they are about road safety.

    ClapClap
    Clap[/QUOTE] Well, along Paralela in Salvador they DO actually affect road safety. They help keep most drivers at 80 kph – I have been reliably informed that before their installation most people drove at 120-140 kph. Bearing in mind the poor standard of most Brazilian driving I’m glad that they’re there. It gives me a fighting chance of getting to my destination in one piece. Big%20smile

  • #98470

    jazzi
    Member

    On the road to Mogi das Cruzes, right after leaving Ayrton Senna, they always have a camera unattended there, at least during the day. They also have another camera, equally unattended, in the stretch of road between the Highway Police and the point where the Mogi-Bertioga road turns from 4 into a 2 lane road. I often dream of getting out of the car with a 20 Lbs hammer and letting it have it. Lucky that my driver’s license is still from California… at least no points. RTPinto2008-06-26 19:44:46

  • #103252

    beijaflor
    Member

    When driving down a slip road on to a main road stop suddenly to check traffic and allow all the other cars behind you to perform stimulating stopping maneuvers and exaggerated swerving techniques.
    Brake lights; the motorists laxative.

  • #103259

    beijaflor
    Member

    One of the latest traffic rules: When equiped with the xenon headlights (I guess that is the name of the white lights), make sure that you add powerfull fog lamps to your vehicle, turn them all on, and keep them ligned in such a way that you will not need high beams to see one mile ahead of your car. The effect that it will have on the oncoming drivers is not of significance to you nor to the traffic laws enforcement authorities.

  • #103268

    Al Morrison
    Member

    [QUOTE=RTPinto]One of the latest traffic rules:When equiped with the xenon headlights (I guess that is the name of the white lights), make sure that you add powerfull fog lamps to your vehicle, turn them all on, and keep them ligned in such a way that you will not need high beams to see one mile ahead of your car. The effect that it will have on the oncoming drivers is not of significance to you nor to the traffic laws enforcement authorities.[/QUOTE]
    So true, what is it with these people, sitting on your back bumper, lights on full its like that scene from “Close encounters” (an old sci fi film) and is it xenon or is it some other even brighter light?
    Already I can hear “Clear white light” from Lindisfarne.

  • #103352

    [QUOTE=globetrotter][QUOTE=London Lad]This is how to deal with speed cameras, they are more about revenue collection than they are about road safety.
    ClapClap
    Clap[/QUOTE] Well, along Paralela in Salvador they DO actually affect road safety. They help keep most drivers at 80 kph – I have been reliably informed that before their installation most people drove at 120-140 kph.Bearing in mind the poor standard of most Brazilian driving I’m glad that they’re there. It gives me a fighting chance of getting to my destination in one piece. Big%20smile[/QUOTE]
    Is it the cameras or the heavy traffic flow? At night, where there are less cars, these “chupacabras” effectively cause motorists to slam on their brakes when passing them, and then continue at their previous speed once clear of the line of fire. During the day, especially during the 7 a.m. – 9 a.m. or 6 p.m. – 8 p.m. shot, you are lucky to drive 60 kmh without stopping every 100 yards or so.
    I don’t particularly enjoy the traffic in Salvador either. I wonder, with all the construction in the Pituba and up to the northern end of Parallela areas how we will actually continue to move around on our 1 or 2 lanes in each direction roads.

  • #103377

    Dakotaee
    Member

    My drives in Brazil were varied. I own a Fiat Brava HGT (red).
    I loved the Immigrantes hwy. I loved the 160, the Banderantes to Campinas and a few others. The coastal highway along Litoral Norte and Sul are stunning.
    The bad news: I was side swiped by a very aggressive driver outside Mangagua. He refused to stop, so I chased him and finally confronted him and told him to either give me 500.00 R or I’ll call the cops and make a report (of course, he had no insurance) so I followed him to a ATM. He forked over the cash.
    That was about my only incident besides a carjacking attempt by a motorcycle pair outside Ubatuba. I ran one guy over, then took off.
    Anyway, driving in Brasil is alot of great fun…wait, did I mention the dirty cop the waved me over on the Anchieta highway and extorted $50.00 bucks from me?
    Really though, I enjoy driving in Brazil most of the time.
    Just don’t drive from Morumbi to Tatuape on Friday afternoons. I’ve been stuck on the Marginal for hours (one time there was a fevela war that stopped traffic for 6 hours). Marginal Pinheiros is a freak show during traffic hour.
    Thankfully, every 100 metres or so, you can buy a cold beer and munchies (which I did alot of) to support the local business entrepeneurs.

  • #103379

    SmonryVon
    Member

    They’re not true Xenon lights. They are cheap copies that are white, bright and hazardous. Very annoying indeed.

  • #103706

    Tenzin
    Member

    [QUOTE=Larry LaRose]The bad news: I was side swiped by a very aggressive driver outside Mangagua. He refused to stop, so I chased him and finally confronted him and told him to either give me 500.00 R or I’ll call the cops and make a report (of course, he had no insurance) so I followed him to a ATM. He forked over the cash.

    That was about my only incident besides a carjacking attempt by a motorcycle pair outside Ubatuba. I ran one guy over, then took off.
    [/QUOTE] Larry, do you think these incidents had anything to do with the robberies at your home. We gringos are‘nt very inconspicuous you know and in local communities, everyones knows everyone, whether they like each other or not they talk.

  • #103707

    Tenzin
    Member

    Another good driving experience is when your driving at night through the wilderness and you see 2 pairs of lights side by side on the road ahead, the only problem is its a single carriageway and the 2nd pair are infront of you, you flash your lights to signal danger and they start flashing back as if to say I am coming through, as they are overtaking a long truck so you just move onto the hardshoulder in the darkness hoping that there‘s nothing there.

  • #105415

    blarabian
    Member

    The three point turn. (or the Austin Power moment)
    Wait until road is clear.
    From the right hand side of the road, turn the steering wheel sharp left and ease out gently driving the car to the other side of the road, turning Wheel gradually to the right.
    Car appears at high speed.
    Dont panic.
    Ease back into reverse and when you reach half way start to first straighten wheel then turn to the left.
    Stop to avoid vehicle trying to edge past you while you reverse.
    Smile over your shoulder and move forward gently to let him pass.
    Stop.
    Avoid another vehicle trying to pass you in front.
    Say hello to man driving large white transit who has pulled alongside front car and up to drivers door.
    Be equally polite to lady driving school mini bus who has pulled up to the passenger side.
    Thumb enthusiastically at the white van man who is now trying to guide car out of cross road position because cars stopped at front and at back will not move.
    Go in opposite direction because the only person to have found reverse gear was the lady mini bus driver and she didnt have several cars parked behind here.
    A victory for common senseClap
    tamashin2008-10-25 09:22:43

  • #106689

    Aussie Kim
    Member

    Without a doubt you must overtake on the brow of a hill should you wish to experience that exhilarating moment where your life passes in front of your eyes as well as those of the driver in front of you. The thought did cross my mind after this mornings experience “did the other driver carrying out that quite risky manoeuvre not realise how many lives he was putting at risk???

  • #106711

    aussiegold
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]Without a doubt you must overtake on the brow of a hill should you wish to experience that exhilarating moment where your life passes in front of your eyes as well as those of the driver in front of you. [/QUOTE] exhilarating moment where your life passes in front of your eyes LOLor a blind bend Shocked[QUOTE=tamashin] The thought did cross my mind after this mornings experience “did the other driver carrying out that quite risky manoeuvre not realise how many lives he was putting at risk??? [/QUOTE] I think I know the answer to that one.. Nope, not a pennies thought ConfusedSardukar2008-11-17 12:41:37

  • #108146

    815
    Member

    Rule 43;3.2a
    Always carry fuel in an appropriate container.
    So there I was driving down the BR230 when I happened upon a slow moving vehicle (think red flag) pulling out of a garage with the passenger dangling a bucket out of the window. It was liquid because it was splashing everywhere and it could have been water. It could have been.

  • #111202

    phsp23
    Member

    [QUOTE=Larry LaRose]They’re not true Xenon lights. They are cheap copies that are white, bright and hazardous. Very annoying indeed.
    [/QUOTE]
    And there is a new law out concerning the use and installation of those lights
    effective from 1-1-2009Shocked
    http://www.paraibanews.com/brasil/nova-regra-sobre-uso-do-xenon-em-carros-e-motos-esta-em-vigor/
    tamashin2009-01-11 10:51:24

  • #111220

    markcp55
    Member

    Yes apparently they have made those lights illegal so i am told and good riddance. Approaching a Green Car?…. think another Red Flag Approaching a Green Car and driver wearing a Hat, preferably trilby. ….think 2 Red Flags SmileSardukar2009-01-11 15:11:16

  • #111384

    markcp55
    Member

    When turning right, stay in the lefthand lane, don’t indicate and move across at least 2 lanes of traffic at the last minute.
    At a roundabout, occasionally stop and give way when you’re on the roundabout. When entering a roundabout don’t look either way and use your horn.
    When washing your car always remember to tidy away the rear seatbelts as they can be an eye sore.
    When passing bars or restaurants on the weekend drive at 5km per hour or preferably stop and look at everyone.
    Always make sure that your beer can is secure.
    When overtaking, drive extremely close to the car,bus/lorry in front that is also overtaking and is therefore acting as a crash shield. (More applicable to bus or lorry drivers)

  • #111394

    Aaronk
    Member

    [QUOTE=TheCellist]
    Always make sure that your beer can is secure.
    [/QUOTE]
    This is very true! They have a tendency to spill when going uphill, and sometimes downhill. Sometimes I forget to take it out of the canholder in the door of the car. It breaks my day Confused

  • #111987

    815
    Member

    [QUOTE=TheCellist]
    When overtaking, drive extremely close to the car,bus/lorry in front that is also overtaking and is therefore acting as a crash shield. (More applicable to bus or lorry drivers)
    [/QUOTE] I enjoyed your post Cellist, Crash shield LOLWhen being overtaken by a fast moving gringo Embarrassedalways wait for him to get alongside you then push your accelerator pedal into the carpet just to see if a potential crash will ensue. LOLWhen driving along with your bottled specticles and being followed by a gringo, dont bother looking at the road ahead, whats behind you is far more important, so keep your eyes transfixed in the rear view mirror and keep applying the breaks for absolutely no reason whatsover every 10 yards or so. When driving down a narrow street with parked cars either side, accelerate to try and break the sound barrier whilst playing chicken with the oncoming gringo, when the gringo does‘nt yield and continues towards you, put on a surprised face and nod your head up and down for no particular reason that i can think of, the gringo should appear to frown surprisingly. When driving in busy traffic and you are impatient, dont worry about the car that is to the side of you when changing lanes, just badger and force the car out of the way and into the next lane. When driving along dont worry about taking your litter and rubbish home with you, just hurl it all out of the window into the path of the traffic behind. Tear up paper into small confetti size pieces and throw that out aswell for better effect. Sardukar2009-01-16 22:35:10

  • #115800

    ginaferminio
    Member

    [QUOTE=tamashin]

    I hoped to start a useful thread for those who drive or are hoping to drive in Brasil. Whether it is taken seriously though will be at your own risk.

    Please feel free to add to the list.

    Under no circumstances should you allow anyone to overtake. That includes police cars, ambulances and fire engines.

    [/QUOTE]
    On two separate occasions this week I have seen cars pull over on Epitacio Pessoa to let an ambulance and fire engine through. I thought this only happened in London traffic so I am pleased to see that it is eventually catching on here.

  • #115811

    phsp23
    Member

    okay, this is crazy……going uphil visibility is nill from the oncoming traffic and of course it is a double yellow line, car pulls out to pass another right at that point. have seen this so many times. once a car was oncoming and they shared the road, other times no oncoming cars have come. what is this stupidity? thrill seeking?

  • #118413

    ladyjbabe
    Member

    When roller skating in the opposite direction of the fast lane of the motorway towards oncoming traffic you MUST wear high visibility clothing to avoid oblivion.
    There is something very surreal about driving down an unlit stretch of motorway and seeing a tall, dark figure swaying silently towards you, silhouetted against the night sky. As I swerved to pass him, I noticed he was wearing sunglasses; for the dazzling headlights presumably.

  • #9661

    Greenback
    Member

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