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  • #261776

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    After collected some my food items at a local supermarket, I tried to pay with a 100 BRL note. The left margin was torn away (about 1mm) but the numbers on the note along with all the “security” aspects were still maintained. The note looked like it got caught in the ATM or counting machine. Anyway, the supermarket refused to accept the note and asked me for another means of payment (another note atm ect). To the surprise of the cashier and the manager, I left the carriage full of groceries and walked out saying if they refused to take the 100 BRL note I will take my business elsewhere. They still refused and I left. I shopped at another grocery store nearby which took the note but not after calling the manager over to look at it.

    This situation has made me curious. Is there a reason these people were so over cautious accepting a torn note? I’ve looked on-line for stories on counterfeit notes but have not found anything recent. Furthermore, in the US, leaving a cart of groceries because I am unhappy about not accepting the money I presented is fine. Is it a crime here? The people in the store were really upset! This would be good to know as the store does have my CPF!
    -Marc
  • #261778

    myrna
    Member

    Counterfeiting is a big deal here. I personally lost R$800 selling a TV on the internet to fake bills. The culture here is super ‘cover your ass’ and never take responsibility for anything, so Im not suprised some middle manger wouldn’t accept your bill even if he was 99% sure it was real because he was scared of getting in trouble.
    People have also not wanted to take my 100s because they were too lazy/didnt want to give out all of their change. But this was at smaller places not a big grocerie store.
    Leaving the cart isn’t illegal they just didn’t want to work. There is a bin beside every register for items to be put back out. f**k em.

  • #261779

    Luca
    Member

    It comes out of their salary if they accept a false bill or a bill that the bank won’t accept because it is too damaged. For someone making 700 reais, losing 1/7th of that is a big deal.

  • #261786

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    [QUOTE=tbird]It comes out of their salary if they accept a false bill or a bill that the bank won’t accept because it is too damaged. For someone making 700 reais, losing 1/7th of that is a big deal. [/QUOTE]

    Wow, now that’s incentive not to accept something you feel is 100% legitimate! I’m surprised the idea for insuring the supermarket for that potential loss isn’t customary. Making people working for 700 reais per month responsible for counterfeit bills is rough!
    -Marc
  • #261791

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    I just wanted to comment how entitled and… Well.. I mean, of COURSE the supermarket takes the money they lose out of their check! Is this your first country? Have you ever traveled literally anywhere outside your home country but here? You give us all a bad name. Let your empregada do the shopping from now on, please? So you don’t throw a tantrum in the middle of the store like a child and make other people clean up your mess. You should be embarrassed and ashamed for your behavior. I cringed just reading this.

  • #261795

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    Haha, love it! In a former life I too was a cashier at a supermarket. The chain I worked for turned over counterfeit checks/cash ect to the police for prosecution and did not make the poor person earning minimum wage pay for the stores losses. That was covered by the stores loss prevention policy.

    As for throwing a fit, I find that is counterproductive. I gave the manager an option and she chose for me to go elsewhere, simple and straight forward. Furthermore, based on your post above, I’ll leave the fit throwing to you! Wink
    -Marc
  • #261806

    wtdknknm
    Member

    A 100 Real note LOLi’m amazed if the shops have change for a 10 Real note! I went to the Post Office once and had to pay R$2.50 for a small letter, and they couldn’t change a 5 Real note Shocked
    growler2014-01-06 17:50:42

  • #261809

    Caio Andretta
    Participant

    [QUOTE=growler]I went to the Post Office once and had to pay R$2.50 for a small letter, and they couldn’t change a 5 Real note Shocked
    [/QUOTE]

    What a joke. I once tried to pay with 20 reais for a 3.10 bus fare, the guy looked at me tiredly and asked if I did not have smaller. No I said. He asked again. I said no again. Then he opened his wallet in his pocket and he had close to thirty bills for 5 and 10 reais and a few for 20 reais.
    To this day I still do not understand his hesitance to change my note… Danger for being robbed after somebody sees they have so many notes?
  • #261810

    ejboyd
    Member

    You could probably go to the bank and exchange your R$100 damaged money to a new one. I have a torn R$20 too that I thought I’d drop by the bank to exchange too since they won’t accept it here if I put tape on it.

    Once, in a small grocery near our condo, the cashier also refused to accept a guy’s R$10 and told the old man it was fake.
  • #261812

    Kathy2012
    Participant

    [QUOTE=mmaser]As for throwing a fit, I find that is counterproductive. I gave the manager an option and she chose for me to go elsewhere, simple and straight forward. Furthermore, based on your post above, I’ll leave the fit throwing to you! Wink[/QUOTE]

    Damn right I throw a fit when I see another gringo acting like an entitled jackass in a supermarket. I live here, and guess what? They judge all of us by the behavior of one of us. I throw a fit because when I go into that supermarket, I’ll get terrible service because the last gringo brought a cart full of stuff up to the register with the largest denomination bill available, damaged (couldn’t be bothered to take it to the bank like a normal person), left his cart full of doritos and snickers bars at the register and ragequit the store. It gives us all a bad name when you do stuff like this.
  • #261814

    Marc Maserati
    Participant

    [QUOTE=Stellar]You could probably go to the bank and exchange your R$100 damaged money to a new one.

    [/QUOTE]
    As I finally have an account I’ll simple have to make sure the bills I withdraw are perfect.
    -Marc
  • #261826

    Anonymous

    stolen notes have the pink ink on them and if it was ripped off on the edge, that would be the first thing i’d think– it had the ink and they just tried to rip off that part.

    we get a lot of notes in through the shop and have gotten our share of counterfeit bills. twice i’ve gone to the bank and told them i got that note out of the machine, but i don’t like the way it looked, please change it for another. they’ve done it without blinking. it’s no fun to be paying for stuff and be told that your note is counterfeit or stolen. most places use the pens, but if it has a tiniest bit of pink, you’re screwed.
  • #261837

    Anonymous

    the 50s are usually the problematic ones. we see few 100s– they’re usually not in the cash machines and don’t circulate as much.

  • #27053

    jorgecafe24
    Member

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