Portuguese Tip: The X Doubts

By Teacher Claudia
Dear readers, I finished our last tip with a song which blends Portuguese and English (Brazil: To Tell or Not to Tell
). Well, that will be the start of today&rsquot;s tip.

Many times foreigners live rather awkward situations because they can&rsquot;t perceive how much English there is around Brazilians, and how much Brazilians associate English to social status.

Want some evidence? Look at our billboards, read our advertisements, watch some tv, listen to the music played here, walk around. It&rsquot;s just amazing!

Last weekend I was at an Immersion Course in Belo Horizonte, MG, and learned the term “queca” (pronounced keka), standing for cake, a word brought by the English when they came to Brazil, in order to build the first railways.

Mineiros also say “Uai” (plain why) representing surprise or disbelief because they would hear the English engineers mentioned above asking “Why” all the time, so it was a question of time before they adopted the term.

In the northeast of Brazil there&rsquot;s “forró”, probably due to the open, “For all” parties Americans held while living in the region during the Second World War.

In the countryside of São Paulo in the area surrounding Campinas there&rsquot;s the unmistakable American accent, due to the American Immigration after the Civil War.

Here in São Paulo there&rsquot;s a wealth of Xs in our bakeries, bars and snack bars. In fact, a student of mine has had a wonderful experience on that. He was at a padaria thinking of ordering a cheeseburger, but could only see hamburger written on the wall menu. After that, there were many Xs; x-burger, x-salada, x-bacon. He wondered what that meant, and read it again, still looking for “cheese”. Dear Robert, you didn&rsquot;t find it because it was there all the time, simply misspelled and mispronounced, the way Brazilians would say it!

My students like to discuss several aspects of language and culture, and I often learn more than teach from their remarks.

On differences and similarities, I dare recommend a Brazilian movie, “Cinema, aspirinas e urubus”. It&rsquot;s the story of two men, a Brazilian and a German, who against all odds do become friends. Try to see it, dear students, and think about how far, yet so near we all are.

Teacher Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

To read previous articles by Teacher Claudia click below:

Brazil: To Tell or Not to Tell
Brazil: Ipiranga Museum
Portuguese Tip: Odd words
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
A Brazilian Holiday: October 12th
Portuguese Tip: Sounds
Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses
Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Portuguese Tip: Odd words

By Teacher Claudia
Part 1 – Mesmo”

Dear readers, in Portuguese, as in many other languages, there are some special, unique words which may have several meanings, depending on the context they are used.

Mesmo is such an example. Today we’ll take a look at it, but be aware, because you might discover something else, as language is indeed a living thing!

Activity 1

Read parts of two songs by Lulu Santos.

“Certas Coisas”
Não existiria som se não
Houvesse o silncio.
Não haveria luz se não
Fosse a escuridão.
A vida mesmo assim:
Dia e noite,
Não e sim.

(Certain Things
There wouldn’t be sound if
there weren’t silence.
There wouldn’t be light if
there weren’t darkness.
Life is like that;
Day and night,
No and yes.)


“Compaixão”
A gente exige respeito
E mesmo consideraão
(…)
A gente não tem compaixão
Se contenta com a razão
Nem com a gente mesmo
A gente não tem compaixão

(Compassion
We demand respect
And even consideration
We don’t have compassion
We’re satisfied with reason
We have no compassion
With our own self)


Activity 2

Identify and understand mesmo’s meanings.
In the first song mesmo means like, similar to, as; A vida mesmo assim.
In the second mesmo means even; E mesmo consideraão.

Activity 3

Learn other sentences where mesmo can be used.
isso mesmo! (That’s it!)
mesmo? (Is it true? / Really?)
Por isso mesmo. (Exactly because of that.)

Activity 4

There’s another situation which we speak mesmo, when we mean by oneself, on their own effort.
Eu mesma fiz aqueles Lemmingtons para voc. (I myself made those Lemmingtons for you.)
Eu lembro de voc mesmo cantando “No aphrodisiac” para mim. (I recall you yourself singing No aphrodisiac to me.)

Activity 5

See if you can understand the meanings of mesmo in “Iluminados” by Ivan Lins.
Dear student, do try first, please. Only after read the translation!

“O amor tem feito coisas
Que at mesmo Deus duvida
J curou desenganados
J fechou tanta ferida.
O amor junta os pedaos
Quando um coraão se quebra
Mesmo que seja de ao
Mesmo que seja de pedra.”

(Love’s done things
That even God doubts
It’s cured the dying
It’s closed so many wounds.
Love brings the pieces together
When a heart’s broken
Even if it’s made of steel
Even if it’s made of stone)


See you next class!

Teacher Cludia

Teacher Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br


To read previous articles by Teacher Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tip: Interjections and ExpressionsA Brazilian Holiday: October 12th
Portuguese Tip: Sounds
Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses
Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions

By Teacher Claudia
Dear readers, sorry for the absence and thanks for your e-mails. Hugs, South Africa!
As I’ve told you, due to our historical, social and cultural roots, Brazilian Portuguese has a myriad of interjections and expressions, and some may be tricky to comprehend.

In fact, they are the only linguistic elements which don’t need to connect to any other, and they express several emotional states, such as joy, admiration and surprise.

Quoting a student, Brazilians are too emotional”, it’s only fair enough the presence of these elements in our language.

Activity 1
Read part of a song, “O Meu Amor” by Chico Buarque, a master in using colloquial Brazilian Portuguese in his lyrics:
(.)
E me beija com calma e fundo
At minha alma se sentir beijada, ai
Eu sou sua menina, viu?
E ele o meu rapaz
Meu corpo testemunha
Do bem que ele me faz

(My Love
And he kisses me calmly and deep
Until my soul feels kissed, ai
I’m his girl, right?
And he’s my boy
My body is the witness
Of the good he does to me)


Activity 2
Recognize the various types of interjections and what they express:
Joy: Ah! Oh! Oba! !
Admiration or surprise: Puxa! Nossa! Viva! Caramba!
Greeting: Psiu! Oi! Ei! Ol!
Intention: Oxal! Tomara!
Pain: Ai! Ui!
Silence: Psiu!
End: Basta! Chega!

Activity 3
Know some expressions with interjections:
Puxa vida! Como voc demorou! (expressing anger)
Apesar do acidente, voc est bem. Graas a Deus! (gratitude)
Todos chegaram a tempo para a reunião. Ainda bem! (relief)
Nossa Senhora! Que frio! (surprise)

Activity 4
Understand some contractions:
Mandei e-mail para voc, viu?
The word viu might be the simple past of ver, but it isn’t. In fact, it’ the contraction of ouviu, and it means “Did you hear what I said? Did you pay attention to my words?”
O clima em São Paulo horrvel, n?
The word n is even clearer. It’s the combination of não and , “Isn’t it?”.
Xi, o relatório vai atrasar…
Now, xi is one of the most interesting. It’s the contraction of Virgem Maria, which has several branches; vixi Maria, xi Maria, and sometimes only xi.

Activity 5
Use you comprehension.
Find the word which is also used as an interjection, to emphasize denial.
“Só pro meu prazer”, by Leoni
(…)
Não vem agora com essas insinuaes
Dos seus defeitos ou de algum medo normal
Ser que voc não nada que eu penso
Tambm se não for não me faz mal, não
Não me faz mal, não.

(For my pleasure only
Dont come now with these insinuations
Of your flaws or some normal fear
Is it possible you’re nothing that I think of
But if you aren’t it won’t harm me
Don’t you harm me)


Answer: the word não, at the end of the sentences.

Practice your interjections and expressions, viu?
See you next class!
Teacher Cludia

Teacher Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br


To read previous articles by Teacher Claudia click below:

A Brazilian Holiday: October 12th
Portuguese Tip: Sounds
Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses
Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Portuguese Tip: Sounds

By Prof. Claudia

Part 1 – The lh” sound

One of my dear pupils has been having a hard time trying to speak words with the “lh” sound properly. Thinking of him, and also of others who may have the same difficulty, I’ve prepared today’s lesson. Prepare your tongue, and put your shyness aside, please!


Activity 1
Read this song, “Melhor pra mim”, by Leoni.

Olhando as estrelas
Nada no espao
Fica parado num lugar
(…)
Olhando o relógio
O tempo não passa
Quando eu me afasto de voc
(…)
Olhando pro cu
E a tudo muda
Penso em voc e eu”

(Looking at the stars
Nothing in space
Keeps still
Looking at the watch
Time doesn’t go by
When I’m far from you
Looking at the sky
Then everything changes
I think of you and me)



Activity 2
There is an “lh” underlined word, repeated three times to give you a chance to start your practice slowly. You should pronounce “olyandu”, separating the l from the h, because l and h together is like an l plus a strong i, giving us a ly sound, as in happily.

Some more examples:
Falha: falya
Escolher: escolyer
Milho: milyu
Entulho: entulyu
A little clearer now?


Activity 3
I’ve made a table with all possible combinations containing the “lh” sound in Portuguese.
Read my table out loud, as many times as necessary, ok?

alha: alya elha: elya ilha: ilya olha: olya ulha: ulya
alhe: aly elhe: ely ilhe: ily olhe: oly ulhe: uly
alhi: aly elhi: ely ilhi: ily olhi: oly ulhi: uly
alho: alyu elho: elyu ilho: ilyu olho: olyu ulho: ulyu
alhu: alyu elhu: elyu ilhu: ilyu olhu: olyu ulhu: ulyu


As you can perceive, there isn’t much difference between the pairs i-e and o-u, at least not in the Portuguese spoken in São Paulo.


Activity 4
I’ve also prepared a word list.
Read it too, with the same effort of the previous exercise, will you?
1. Falha
2. Talher
3. Telha
4. Joelheira
5. Milha
6. Folha
7. Olhinho
8. Molho
9. Pampulha
10. Mulher


Activity 4
Now, to finish our lesson, read and understand a piece of “Faltando um pedao” by Djavan.

“O amor um grande lao
Um passo pra uma armadilha
Um lobo correndo em crculo
Pra alimentar a matilha
Comparo sua chegada
Com a fuga de uma ilha

(Love is a great tie
A step into a trap
A wolf running in circles
To feed its offspring
I compare love’s arrival
To an island’s escape)



See you next class!
Teacher Cludia


To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses
Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

Portuguese Tip: Verb Tenses

By Prof. Claudia

Part 4 – An easy one

Dear readers, around June 13th, we worked with the simple future.
Similarly to what happens in English (the going to future), in Portuguese we also have an easier” future.
And that&rsquot;s what we&rsquot;ll see today.

Activity 1
Read this song, “Quem de nós dois”, by Ana Carolina.

“Eu e voc:
Não assim tão complicado
Não difcil perceber.
Quem de nós dois
Vai dizer que impossvel
O amor acontecer.
Se eu disser que j nem sinto nada
Que a estrada sem voc mais segura
Eu sei voc vai rir da minha cara.
Eu j conheo o teu sorriso
Leio o teu olhar.
O teu sorriso só disfarce
Que eu j nem preciso.”

(I and you;
It&rsquot;s not that complicated
Not hard to perceive.
Which of us
Is going to say love
Is impossible to happen.
If I say I don&rsquot;t feel anything
The road is safer without you
I know you&rsquot;ll laugh at me.
I know your smile
I read your eye.
Your smile is only a disguise
That I don&rsquot;t need anymore.)



Activity 2
There are 2 underlined examples of today&rsquot;s future, our easier verb tense.
Its form is the verb “ir” (to go) in the simple present, followed by a verb in the infinitive form.
Let&rsquot;s remember the verb “ir”, shall we?

Subject Verb “ir” in the simple present

EuVou
Voc, ele, elaVai
NósVamos
Vocs, eles, elasVão


Activity 3
In the following songs, I&rsquot;ve changed all the lyrics, writing them in the simple future form.
Your task is to rewrite them, in the future we have just learned.

1. …………
Descobrirei o que me faz sentir
Eu, caador de mim.
(Caador de Mim, 14 Bis)

2. ………………………………….
Eu cuidarei muito bem do seu jardim
Eu cuidarei do seu jantar
Do cu e do mar
E de voc e de mim
(Os Cegos do Castelo, Nando Reis)

3. ………………………………… , …………………………..
Ter sempre algum pra receber
Dizer pra esperar
Voc j chegar
(Canão pra quando voc voltar, Leoni)

Answers: vou descobrir, vou cuidar, vai ter, vai chegar


Activity 4
Read the following song, “Pega Vida” by Kid Abelha and try to find four examples of the verb tense we&rsquot;ve worked with today.

“Em alguns bilhes de anos
Vamos nos mudar daqui.
O sol vai explodir
E a terra vai sumir.
As idias muito simples
São difceis de aceitar:
Ir praia
E mergulhar no mar
Antes de tudo se acabar.
Quando o cu t carregado
sinal que vai chover.
Não tão complicado
Ter prazer em dar prazer.
Pega a vida em mim
Tenta a sorte em mim
Salva o que seu em mim.
Pega a vida em mim
Zera o jogo em mim
Cuida do que seu em mim.”

(In some billions of years
We&rsquot;re going to move from here.
The sun&rsquot;s going to explode
And the Earth&rsquot;s going to disappear.
The very simple ideas
Are hard to be accepted;
Go to the beach
And dive in the sea
Before it all ends.
When the sky is dark
It means it&rsquot;s going to rain
It&rsquot;s not that complicated
To feel pleasure by giving it.
Have life in me
Try your chance in me
Save what is yours in me.
Have life in me
Start again in me
Take care of what is yours in me.)



See you next class!
Teacher Cludia


To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua
Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

Portuguese Tip: The Mystery of Seu, Sua

By Prof. Claudia
Many of my students complain about the usage of the possessive adjectives in Portuguese. That’s probably because in English, identifying the owner is half the problem. The other half is relating to it properly.
In Portuguese, the owner doesn’t matter so much.
Therefore, my students are right when they say the words seu, sua, seus, suas” are a little confusing.

Activity 1
Read part of a song, “Como vai voc?”, performed by Roberto Carlos.

“Como vai voc
Eu preciso saber da sua vida
Peo a algum pra me contar sobre os seus dias
Anoiteceu e eu preciso só saber
(…)
Vem que a sede de te amar me faz melhor
Eu quero amanhecer ao seu redor
Preciso tanto me fazer feliz”

(How are you?
I need to know about you
I ask someone to tell me about your days
Night has fallen and I just need to know
Come because the thirst to love you makes me better
I want to wake up beside you
I do need to be happy)



Activity 2
Identify it.
If you’ve paid attention to the verses above, you saw three underlined words: sua, seus, and seu.
Now, the tip: the key is the owned object.
As you know, nouns in Portuguese may vary, according to number and gender.
Take a look: “vida” is a feminine word and it’s in the singular form; “dias” is masculine and plural; “redor” is masculine and singular.
So, the phrases are: “sua vida”, “seus dias”, and “seu redor”.


Activity 3
Understand it.
Summarize activity 2 in order to understand the topic.
Just to make sure, I’ll show you my summary:
Find what’s owned first.
Check its gender and number.
Apply the correct possessive adjective.


Activity 4
Remember it.
Most possessive adjectives follow the personal pronoun, for instance, “eu – meu, minha, meus, minhas” or “nós – nosso, nossa, nossos, nossas”.
But “seu, sua, seus suas” have a number of possibilities, so we must know what they mean (and that doesn’t change):
“Seu” is always used with a masculine, singular word, while “seus” is its plural.
“Sua” is always used with a feminine, singular word, and “suas” is its plural.
And these four possessive adjectives can be connected to voc, ele, ela, vocs, eles, elas.


Activity 5
Explore your knowledge.
Now read a tiny piece of another song, “Nem um dia”, by Djavan, and answer my questions.
What is the word “suas” relating to? And why is it suas, not sua?

“Longe da felicidade
E todas as suas luzes
Te desejo como ao ar
Mais que tudo)

(Far from happiness
And all its lights
I want you as the air
More than everything)



Activity 6
Expand your vocabulary.
Complete the text below with: seu, seus, sua, suas:
Bianca e o irmão em ………………….. apartamento no Brasil.
Tom e ……. paixão pelo futebol.
Ben e ……………………. reformas em Paraty.
Shayne e Lu em ………………….. casa na Austrlia.
Robert e …………………. cinco sobrinhas.
Michael e ……. ombro dolorido.

(Answers: seu, sua, suas, sua, suas, seu)


See you next class!
Teacher Cludia


To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

To Be in Portuguese: Ser / Estar

Aloha, Honolulu! Muito obrigada for reading my lessons!
Similarly to what happens to verb tenses, almost all of my students have real, deep questions concerning the verb To Be, due to its two meanings in Portuguese: ser and estar.
To illustrate our beginning, I’ve chosen two pieces of poetry, in fact two pieces of Brazilian masterpieces in poetry.
Let’s read them and try to comprehend the subtle semantics between ser and estar.


Activity 1
Read these excerpts, the first is Vou-me embora pra Pasrgada”, by Manuel Bandeira.


“E quando estiver mais triste
Mas triste de não ter jeito
Quando de noite me der
Vontade de me matar
– L sou amigo do rei –
Terei a mulher que eu quero
Na cama que escolherei
Vou-me embora pra Pasrgada.”

(And when I’m so sad
But way past sad
When at night I feel
As if killing myself
– There I’m friends with the king –
I’ll have the woman I want
On the bed I’ll choose
I’m leaving to Pasrgada.)

Now read the second, “Guardar”, by Antonio Ccero.

“Guardar uma coisa não escond-la ou tranc-la.
Em cofre não se guarda coisa alguma.
(…)
Guardar uma coisa vigi-la, isto , (…) estar acordado por ela, isto , estar por ela ou ser por ela.
(…)
Por isso melhor se guarda o vo de um pssaro
Do que um pssaro sem vos.”

(Keeping something is not to hide it or lock it.
For in a safe nothing is kept.
Keeping something is to watch it, that is, be awake by it, that is, to be or exist for it.
That’s why a bird’s flight is better kept
Than a flightless bird.)


Activity 2
Take a sec to think about the sentences.

“L sou amigo do rei” means something more permanent, we could call it a stronger state.
“Guardar uma coisa não escond-la…” and “Guardar uma coisa vigi-la.” have the same meaning, as they reflect thoughts or beliefs.
“.ser por ela” is perhaps the easiest example to find, as “ser” can be translated as the condition of existence; the poet exists because of his love.
“Estar” couldn’t be its synonym, as it means something temporary, as in “.estar acordado por ela”.


Activity 3
Understand a little more.
Fortunately, there are other cases (space, time and situations) when the differences between ser and estar are more evident.

Space
a. buildings, parks, streets, rooms or anything that can’t be moved:
A empresa no dcimo primeiro andar.
Onde o aougue que vende cordeiro?

b. people or things that can be carried (or moved):
Onde est o aluno?
Vocs estão com os cadernos?

Time
a. identifying a moment:
hora do lanche.
hoje o jogo?

b. indicating a moment:
J est na hora do lanche?
O jogo est marcado para hoje.

People and things
a. identifying something or someone:
Essa a proposta do curso de imersão.
Ele foi meu aluno por seis meses.

b. indicating a state of something or someone:
Como est o seu ombro?
O apartamento est venda.


Activity 4
Summarize it.

Ser is more absolute and estar is more relative.


Activity 5
Contextualize it.

Pay more attention to what you hear in Portuguese.
Try to spot the differences, as subtle as the might be.


See you next class!
Teacher Cludia



To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Future

By Prof. Claudia
Well, as planned, it’s time to take one more look at verb tenses. Today&rsquot;s lesson is on the simple future and I’ve chosen a song which is very relevant and meaningful.






Activity 1

Read the song Mantra” by Nando Reis and see if you can spot any verbs in the future tense.


“Quando
Não tiver mais nada
Nem chão nem escada
Escudo ou espada
O seu coraão
Acordar (…)
Quando se acabou com tudo
Espada e escudo
Forma e contedo
J então agora d
Para dar amor
Amor dar e receber”

“When
there’s nothing left
neither ground nor stairs
shield or sword
your heart
will wake
when everything’s gone
sword and shield
form and content
then it’s possible
to give love
love you’ll give and receive”


Activity 2

There are 2 future tense verbs in the song, acordar and receber. They are both regular verbs.


Simple Future
PronounVerbs ending in ‘ar’
Acordar
Verbs ending in ‘er’
Receber
Verbs ending in ‘ir’
Sentir
Root…………..EndingRoot…………..EndingRoot…………..Ending
EuAcord…………….areiReceb…………….ereiSent……………..irei
Voc, ele, elaAcord…………….ar eceb……………er Sent…………….ir
NósAcord…………….aremosReceb……………eremosSent…………….iremos
Vocs, eles, elasAcord……………..arãoReceb……………..erãoSent………………irão



Activity 3

Try to complete: more regular verbs in the simple future.




PronounAcabarAdormecerSorrir
Root………..endingRoot………..endingRoot………..ending
Eu
Voc, ele, ela
Nós
Vocs, eles, elas




Activity 4

Now use the simple future to answer these questions.

O que voc far no dia 13 de junho?
Com quem voc estar?
Quando o seu coraão acordar?


See you next class!

Prof. Cludia


Dear readers, I’ve lost my e-mail program, as well as all your addresses, messages etc.
So, if you’ve sent anything these past weeks please resend it.
Happy Birthday, my Angel



To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:

Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 2

By Prof. Claudia
As I was going through my lesson plan for gringoes, I found that there&rsquot;s just a small part left for plurals (not considering plurals of compound nouns). Therefore I&rsquot;ll finish basic plurals today and go back to verbs next lesson, ok?

Activity 1
Read part of a song, Fico assim sem voc, by Adriana Calcanhoto:

T louca para te ver chegar…..I&rsquot;m crazy to see you coming
T louca para te ter nas mãos…..Crazy to have you in my hands
Deitar no teu abrao…..To lie down in your embrace
Retomar o pedao que falta no meu coraão”..To retake my heart&rsquot;s missing piece

The part nas mãos is in the plural form. In case you&rsquot;ve forgotten, we need to know the word in the singular form to change it into the plural.

Activity 2
Take a look at this table:

Singular – Words Ending Add Plural
ão
e.g. a mão, o botão, o pão
aos, es, es
as mãos, os botes, os pes
s – with the stress in the syllable before the last
e.g. o tnis, o atlas
nothing changes
os tnis, os atlas
s – with the stress in the last syllable
e.g. o francs, o ms
es
os franceses, os meses
n
e.g. o cnon
es
os cnones
x
e.g. o tórax, a nix, a fnix
nothing changes
os tórax, as nix, as fnix


Activity 3
Write sentences using these words:

Mãos
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Pes
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Tnis
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Meses
………………………………………………………………………………………………………

Tórax
………………………………………………………………………………………………………


Activity 4
If you take a closer look at the table again, you&rsquot;ll see some words come after an “a” and others after an “o”. In Portuguese, there is still Gender, which we&rsquot;ll begin to learn after some more verbs. Meanwhile, try to practice what we&rsquot;ve worked so far.


See you next class!
Prof Cludia


To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:
A Brazilian custom: Kissing the Cheek
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br

Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Past

By Prof. Claudia
I&rsquot;d like to suggest you look for the words for complete songs and poems given in my lessons, as I only use part of them. Besides expanding oral understanding and vocabulary, I&rsquot;m sure you&rsquot;d also learn a great deal about Brazilian culture. Now let&rsquot;s go to our verbs, shall we?

Activity 1
Read this song, Refrão de Bolero, by Engenheiros do Hawaii.

Eu que falei sem pensar..it was I who spoke without thinking
E agora me arrependo..and now I regret
Roendo as unhas..biting my nails
Frgeis testemunhas de um crime sem perdão….fragile witnesses of an unforgiven crime
Mas eu que falei sem pensar….but I spoke without thinking
Coraão na mão….heart ii my hands
Como um refrão de bolero….as the chorus of a ballad
Eu fui sincero..I was sincere
Como não se pode ser.”….as one can not be

Activity 2
There are 2 pasts in the song, and falar is a regular verb. Observe and understand Pretrito Perfeito. simple past. Let’s take a look at the table below:

PronounFirst ConjugationSecond ConjugationThird Conjugation
ExampleAmarBaterPartir
EuAmeiBatiParti
Voc, ele, elaAmouBateuPartiu
NósAmamosBatemosPartimos
Vocs, eles, elasAmaramBateramPartiram


Activity 3
Try to complete: more regular verbs in the simple past.

PronounFirst ConjugationSecond ConjugationThird Conjugation
ExampleFalarVenderSorrir
Eu...
Voc, ele, ela...
Nós...
Vocs, eles, elas...


Activity 4
Now contextualize the song in activity one, by answering the questions using simple pasts.
1. E voc? J falou (ou fez) algo sem pensar?
2. E depois? Voc se arrependeu?
3. E o que voc fez? Voc roeu as unhas?
4. E por que falou sem pensar? Voc tambm foi sincero demais?


See you next class!
Prof Cludia

To read previous articles by Prof. Claudia click below:
Portuguese Tips: Plurals – Part 1
Portuguese Tips: Regular Verbs – Simple Present
Portuguese Tips
Portuguese Tips: Adverbs in Portuguese
Portuguese Tips: Comparative and Superlative
Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes

Prof. Claudia is available for private classes in São Paulo. She can be contacted at claudiafmla@uol.com.br