December 7, 2011

Meet Elaine Vieira who moved to Brazil at the start of the year. Read the following interview in which she tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

We are a family with one child from South Africa currently on a 2 year assignment in Brazil, São Paulo with a South African based company newly established in Brazil, doing contract work with Unilever.

I am a qualified Food Service Manager with a Diploma from Hotel School. I specialise in food franchising New Product Development as well as Menu Design and Development.
My passion is teaching young children to cook and develop social and kitchen skills together in a group environment as well as fun social adult and couple cookery lessons.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

Jan 2011 with my husband and daughter. He is under contract with a South African company called Smollans, who is contracted to Unilever to implement merchandising and sales systems.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Busy and big. City of contrasts. Well developed in some areas yet so underdeveloped in others. A lot of similarities to South Africa but so many more people.

I expected more of a European feel to the city much like Buenos Aires and more English spoken.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Communication and last minute plans and weekend getaways with friends and family as well as the attitude of can do” without bureaucracy and language communication barriers.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Trying to load airtime onto my phone and not understanding the instructions. Telephone calls trying to make doctor bookings. Applying for the RNE and waiting for hours for no apparent reason other than slow systems. Finding black leather school shoes. Mostly getting different responses from different people on the same enquiry or process. No consistency – outcome depends on who you ask.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Taking our first drive to the beaches of Guaruja and ending up at the Sofitel hotel for two days on our first weekend in Brazil.

It was fabulous and so unexpected. A world class experience and such a treat.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

Variety of world class restaurants and the love and tolerance for children and animals.

Restaurant Week.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Tea connection in Jardins

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Asking the security guard for a massage instead of a message and taking the ferry to Guaraja from Santos then in error driving back onto the ferry to Santos so having to take it straight back to Guaraja. Three trips in 45 minutes.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

For such a busy city with so many people and traffic, I find the drivers considerate and respectful. Driving in South Africa is an aggressive experience as well as the crime levels are quite high. As a family we feel safer here in Brazil than South Africa despite everyone’s views that Brazil is so dangerous. That all depends where you are coming from. Perspective.

Price of wine from South Africa is outrageous.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

Coming on slowly as I do not do lessons.

Language is the most frustrating barrier to living a life of semi normal semblance in Brazil and a must. I confuse verbs and male female words and in fact lots of words and days of the week. Oh dear. My daughter will end up teaching me.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Learn Portuguese before coming and get to the beach often to get out of the city. Explore the city and get behind the wheel as soon as possible. If you wait too long you will get the fear.

Also make sure you drive everywhere with your GPS on so you can save interesting locations or shops or restaurants you drive by cause you may never find them again.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Sofitel hotel for a night in Guaruja. Argentinian restaurant like 364 in Itaim. Local Lanchonette for lunch at peak hour lunch time. Good cup of coffee in well known coffee shop like Suplicy or Santa Grau. Walking Avenida Paulista. Experiencing lunch on a Saturday in Vila Madalena. Walking around the shops in Vila Madalena. Hot Chocolate in Tok n Stok. Frozen yoghurt. Walking shops on Alameda Lorena and Oscar Freire between Haviana and Emporium Santa Luiza.

You can contact Elaine via elaine.kitchen.essentials@gmail.com.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

November 15, 2011

This is our regular column called Ask a Brazilian”, the idea being that you can quite literally ask a question of a Brazilian – for those issues you aren’t sure about but perhaps dare not ask someone else. It is meant as a bit of fun and answers should not be construed as expert opinion or the definitive reply on the matter. For that reason we ask you to please send your own comments and experiences in order to add to our replies.

I have been dating a Brazilian in my home country for 6 months, and he proposed to me on the phone while he was in Brazil. Then we had a problem and he just disappeared without any notice, not even saying goodbye. I was checking his Facebook page and found out that he is/was going out with other women while he was in Brazil. This was also while I was in my home country and I was on a business trip outside my home country, and he was working in my home country where we met for the first time. Is it so common that once Brazilian men are left alone for short or long period they start going with other women? Is it so common for Brazilian men to say I love you and I want to marry you so fast to any foreign women and just disappear with no hint? I would like to know about Brazilian men’s manners and way of thinking, because all that he did sounds so strange. Is divorce so common and easy in Brazil? He was divorced twice.

— Sarah

Dear Sarah,

I guess it’s part of life, we sometimes fall for the wrong person, right? As far as being common or not for a man to be a perfect idiot… if not common for you then of course it isn&#145t something you should live with. Again and again, there’s no such thing as Brazilian man are all idiots, there are different people everywhere. Is it common in Brazil that man are idiots? Yes. And apparently you just picked one of those. Send him to hell, and don&#145t quit believing there is also heaven, here or wherever you are.

About divorce, it is not easy to divorce in Brazil, I mean there are papers, lawyers, money spent and lots of bureaucracy, aside from the emotional damage… but apparently cheaters don&#145t get any of that.

Good luck in the future,

Vanessa

Are there any burning questions you have about Brazil, or other issues that you’re curious about, such as Brazilian culture? If so, send your questions to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Ask a Brazilian” in the subject. We will forward to our Brazilian experts, and publish the best questions (and replies) on the site.

Previous articles in this series:

Ask a Brazilian: Renting
Ask a Brazilian: Couples and Separate Rooms
Ask a Brazilian: Investments and Lateness
Ask a Brazilian: São Paulo Safety
Ask a Brazilian: Family Closeness
Ask a Brazilian: Jealousy
Ask a Brazilian: Waxing and Electronics
Ask a Brazilian: Nails and Spanish
Ask a Brazilian: Easter and Surnames
Ask a Brazilian: Tipping
Ask a Brazilian: House Buying and Apartment Entry Problems
Ask a Brazilian: UK Visa Issues
Ask a Brazilian: Dating in Brazil
Ask a Brazilian: Gossip
Ask a Brazilian: A Question of Race
Ask a Brazilian: Real Estate Scam
Ask a Brazilian: Corruption and Lula
Ask a Brazilian: Lacking Change and I Touch Myself
Ask a Brazilian: Leather and Telephones
Ask a Brazilian: Tampons
Ask a Brazilian: Treatment of Animals
Ask a Brazilian: A Brazilian CV
Ask a Brazilian: Well-to-do Ladies
Ask a Brazilian: Gender Stereotypes
Ask a Brazilian: All Souls Day and Halloween
Ask a Brazilian: Answering a Question
Ask a Brazilian: Revoked Visa
Ask a Brazilian: Pedestrian Problems
Ask a Brazilian: Trash
Ask a Brazilian: Tiles
Ask a Brazilian: Headlights
Ask a Brazilian: Differences and Love
Ask a Brazilian: What Do the Police Do?
Ask a Brazilian: Contractor Frustrations
Ask a Brazilian: English Books and Brazilian Boys
Ask a Brazilian: Cold Cahaca
Ask a Brazilian: Interruptions
Ask a Brazilian: Travel and Security Concerns
Ask a Brazilian: Gestures and Toys
Ask a Brazilian: Hispanics or Latinos, and Duvets
Ask a Brazilian: Overbearing Sogros
Ask a Brazilian: Hotels and Bank Transfers
Ask a Brazilian: Swimming, Showers and New Year’s
Ask a Brazilian: Making Friends
Ask a Brazilian: Female Etiquette
Ask a Brazilian: Washing Machines
Ask a Brazilian: Picking Teeth
Ask a Brazilian: Lozenge or Candy?
Ask a Brazilian: Liberal or Jealous?
Ask a Brazilian: Truck Wheels
Ask a Brazilian: Tolerance
Ask a Brazilian: Screens
Ask a Brazilian: Brazilian Wax
Ask a Brazilian: Flashing Lights
Ask a Brazilian: Lemon and Limes
Ask a Brazilian: Shocking Showers

By Alison McGowan
November 15, 2011

Pousada Maris is situated right next door to Pousada Vivenda and was built by the same architects so boasts the same beautiful high ceilinged spacious whitewashed bungalows, but this time decorated in owner Stela’s impeccable style.

The pousada hosts a maximum of 4 people so things are as intimate or busy as you want them to be. Have breakfast in your suite, or on the veranda or with the guests in the other bungalow, whichever you prefer. Check out the local restaurants or fix a light meal for yourselves and chill out at home” with one of the 300 DVDs on offer. Everything here has clearly been thought through with the individual guest’s needs in mind. From the high thread white linen sheets to the coffee making facilities and small oven, the fabulous bathroom, the information on where to go and what to do, and not least the adaptor you will need for your foreign appliance to work with the new uniquely Brazilian 3 pin plugs!

I arrived in light rain, super stressed out to a wonderful welcome by Stela who showed me around and immediately booked me a massage at the fabulous Shambhala spa round the corner. After that we ambled round the corner to the Cafe do Canal which serves great pizzas and bruschetta, then back to the pousada for a few cool beers by the floodlit pool. As the stress receded I thought “time for visiting the historical centre tomorrow”. Chilling out at Maris in good company was just fine for the foreseeable future.

The official history of Paraty dates back to 1667 when the Portuguese colonizers took over land originally inhabited by Guarani indians and established the town which would become the chief trading port for the gold coming down from the adjoining state of Minas Gerais. The gold rush of the early 1700s brought with it the construction of the Caminho do Ouro (gold trail) a cobbled highway of some 1200 kilometres and many of the beautiful mansions in the historical centre of the town are testament to the incredible riches gained at this time.

With the decline in gold trading so the importance of Paraty declined until the early 1800s when coffee trading once again made it an important place to be. After that the town fell largely out of site until the construction of the beautiful Rio-Santos coastal road in the 1970s when the first pousadas restaurants and boutique type shops started to appear and tourism became the main source of revenue.

The historical centre of Paraty is now traffic free and with all cables now underground it is possible to appreciate the place as it was in the 18th and 19th centuries, with fabulous colonial mansions flanking the original cobbled streets. This is rightly a Brazilian national monument, and one which is definitely worth visiting.

Not To Be Missed
– A tour round the museums, churches and streets of the historical centre
– Restaurants – Voil (French chic), Cafe do Canal (local Brazilian) and Ditinho’s (right on the sand under the Amendoeira trees)
– Schooner trip with Lucas or traineira boat trip with Marcinho
– A massage at Shambala spa
– Chilling out by the pool at the pousada

Starpoints
* exclusive informal luxury
* lush tropical gardens with pool
* personalized attention from owner Stela

Try a Different Place if…
… you want to be right in the historical centre, or if you have mobility problems- the cobbles in town are uneven and can be slippery if wet.

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Guesthouse Bianca, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, So Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d&#145Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airo, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Cho, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casaro da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

By Alison McGowan
November 15, 2011

The choppers started coming over Leblon thick and fast at 6am on Sunday 13th November 2011, heralding, as we thought then, the start of the battle to retake the nearby favela (slum) of Rocinha. As it turned out the significance was something much greater: not only Rocinha but also the neighbouring favelas of Vidigal and Chacar do Ceu were already back under government control, in a 2 hour operation involving tanks, armoured vehicles and 3,000 troops, during which not a single shot was fired.

To understand the importance of this operation aimed at pacifying” the areas concerned and implanting the latest UPPs or police pacification units, it is important to look at the strategic importance of the favelas concerned. Rocinha and Vidigal are vertical shanty towns which have developed on either side of the mountains of Dois Irmos, an area of difficult access which divides the super upmarket neighbourhoods of Leblon and Gvea from similarly sought after areas of So Conrado and Barra. Originally a farming area which provided fruit and vegetables for the lower lying areas of Rio in the early part of the 20th century, people starting settling there in the 1950s when Leblon and Gavea started to grow and then at an ever increasing speed from the 70s on with the huge influx of migrants from the northeast. Now cities in their own right these ramshackle communities have a combined population of over 120,000 living mainly in simple brick built houses linked by a complicated series of alleyways and stairways. Most houses have TVs and fridges but often lack basic facilities like sanitation and rubbish collection. The exception to this of course is the houses owned by the drug barons and hitherto rulers of the favelas, many of which have fixtures and fittings such as swimming pools, Jacuzzis and bars which would not be out of place in the houses of the nouveau rich below.

The fact that all these favelas have developed in such a chaotic way, and have been effectively ruled by drug lords charging protection fees and imposing total allegiance on the local population for the last 4 decades, has much to do with the tacit and not so tacit support of municipal authorities in Rio. From the time of governor Brizola in the early 80s they have actively preferred to leave the existing system alone in the interest of votes rather than get involved. During the same period there has also been a corresponding proliferation of corrupt cops, ever more eager to accept bribes from those in control, and an army of lawyers contracted by the ruling faction happy to play the system in return for liberal pay-outs.

The occupation of Rocinha and Vidigal right now is a strategic move by municipal authorities towards controlling local communities in the run up to the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics 2016. In the beginning it seemed a little senseless to announce the operation 36 hours in advance thereby giving drug lords ample time to escape, but this turned out to be a meticulously planned and executed operation. Some traffickers did escape but many of the key figures such as Peixe (Fish) and drug supremo Nem were caught in blitzes, and the early announcement ensured that there was no resistance when the armoured vehicles went in. Nobody is under any illusion that the next few months will be easy. House to house searches are already taking place for arms and munitions, stolen motorbikes and drugs. However the rest will take much more time – the implementation of basic sanitation, utilities, refuse collection, schools and healthcare. What is certain is that a parallel universe, in existence for decades, has ceased to be, a fact which gives no small sense of relief to those who live nearby and is definitely cause for celebration for those living in the favela communities themselves.

“Se Deus quiser” or “God willing” a new era of peace has begun in the south zone of Rio de Janeiro.

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Maris, Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Guesthouse Bianca, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, So Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d&#145Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airo, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Cho, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casaro da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

The holiday season is quickly approaching and we would like to invite the community to join us at the annual Graded PTA Thanksgiving Celebration A World of Thanks”, an event open to all within the São Paulo international community.

This celebration will take place on Saturday, November 19, 2011 at Graded School in Morumbi from 11:00am to 4:00pm. The day’s activities will include musical performances, a traditional Thanksgiving feast, children’s activities and a mini-praa featuring artisans and vendors.

Children will be able to take part in a host of games and activities throughout the day. Everyone will have a chance to start Christmas shopping at the mini-praa which will feature 70+ vendors as well as local charities selling handmade items to raise funds.

The highlight of the day will be the traditional Thanksgiving meal, complete with succulent roast turkey and all the trimmings (including cranberry sauce). Graded’s famous homemade pumpkin and apple pies will be served for dessert. The meal starts at 12:30pm (continuous seating) and leftover food will be available for sale after 4:00pm.

Be sure to circle November 19th on your calendar and bring friends to Graded and share in this American tradition with a Brazilian twist. The Graded PTA has a long-standing tradition of sharing and giving thanks within the community and this event will be no exception.

Tickets go on sale November 7, 2011. Adults: R$30. Children: 5-12 years R$15. Children 4 years and under free. Tickets will be sold at the door. For more information please send e-mails to pta@graded.br

http://www.graded.br

October 25, 2011

Meet Pieter Kommerij who has studied and worked in Brazil on and off for over 20 years. Read the following interview in which he tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I was born in the Netherlands, on the island Ameland. I hold a BSc degree in Tropical Animal Husbandry, and have travelled to various countries (Australia, New Zealand, and all countries in South America, and also the USA…). Two years ago I kicked the proverbial bucket at a large multinational, and decided to dedicate time for myself and something I like. As my passion is sailing, I live aboard a 40ft Sailing Catamaran and do charters in the Rio de Janeiro region (Angra, Paraty and Buzios).

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I’ve known Brazil since 1983 (when I studied here). I stayed a year. Then in 1986 I returned and stayed for two years. The economy then was really bad, and I tried my luck in Australia (which didn’t go well either). In 1997 I got the opportunity to return to Brazil to work for a multinational, first in São Paulo and later I moved to Curitiba.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

So, I have known Brazil since 1983, when I came back in 1986, and the last time in 1997. I can say I am most impressed with the way of life, the way the Brazilians view life.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Good cheese, and plain yogurt…

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

The time it took (takes) to get the divorce procedure over and done with. So, basically frustrated with the lame judicial system in Brazil.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

That is a hard question. I guess I wouldn’t know which one to choose…

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The space, the freedom, and the lack of social control – just be yourself and you will be OK.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Currently: Coqueiro Verde (Saco do Ceu, Ilha Grande ) and place to hang out: my boat.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Like question 6, that will take some time…

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

The weather, the people, the food (fruits).

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

After so long in Brazil, I would have to say that my Portuguese is fluent. Of course the usual slips (mixing the o and the a and all that stuff…). I learned a lot back in 1983 watching TV.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Go with the flow, learn asap/urgent the language and enjoy the good stuff

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

I am not a fan of São Paulo (sorry guys). Yes of course the restaurants etc are great, but in general it sucks up a lot of energy to try to live in this city.

I would recommend some days on board my boat, exploring near Paraty and Ilha Grande.

You can contact Pieter at contato@luminacharters.com.br

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

By Ricky Skelton
October 25, 2011

There was a time, perhaps 40, 50 years ago, when a young gentleman would take a young lady out to the cinema and he would walk her home afterwards. His aim for the evening would be to hold her hand on the way back, perhaps not on the first date, maybe not even the second, but eventually. This would be the first sign that she was or was not interested in him, and things may progress from there. The Beatles wrote a whole song just about that moment when the boy would make a gentle grab for the girl’s hand. Things move a little faster these days, and it doesn’t happen like this anymore, especially not in my town. I’m not sure it ever happened in Brazil like this at all.

Holding hands in Brazil happens at the other end of the relationship spectrum, not when you’re about to embark on a relationship (a mercifully short stage in Brazil, often only about 10 minutes long), but when you are a solid, functioning, living, breathing relationship entity.

Couples in Brazil hold hands relentlessly, obdurately, defiantly, at all times and under all circumstances. They sit side by side in restaurants, holding hands while eating, the half on the left wielding the garfo, the half on the right cutting with the faca, like Siamese Twins joined at the digits. Brazilian couples desperately cling to each other like a middle-aged western tourist clings to her handbag while walking the streets of large Asian cities. They never let go, nor leave each other’s side, which causes all kinds of confusion when two couples walk towards each other in a corridor and neither refuses to budge or let go or walk in single file. I have witnessed situations where two couples faced off for hours, a Brazilian version of the Mexican Stand-Off. It only finished when a third couple walked down the corridor to the toilets, passed straight between them all, and went to separate toilets, still holding hands above the partition walls. I swear this is true. They will go to any lengths at all to maintain the same position, walking sideways like crabs along single-track forest trails, going around in circles for hours sitting side-saddle like The Queen while paddling kayaks or canoes, that kind of thing. It is no accident that forr developed as a dance for couples in Brazil, it was just a natural progression.

Now you may think that this demonstrates the more romantic side of Latin American behaviour, the sweet couples who can’t bear to be apart from each other for more than a few seconds and prove the depth of their love for each other in this simple way. You would be absolutely wrong though, don’t believe any of that nonsense. The only reason that Brazilians hold each other’s hands Until Death Do Us Part is because nobody trusts anybody else in Brazil.

Couples in Brazil hold hands for one reason only – because they know that if they let go for so much as half a second, turn their backs and take their eyes away, their other half will be laughing and joking with a member of the opposite sex, hands touching arms, stroking hair off faces, dancing closely, swapping phone numbers and all kinds of extra-marital horrors. It can happen this quickly, and often does.

So next time you are a stuck at a table with a couple seemingly glued together at the wedding ring, apparently wrestling with both hands clasped under the table, staring into each other’s eyes, all while seemingly talking to their gringo acquaintance, don’t take it too personally. It isn’t that they don’t like you, don’t want you in their company or don’t trust you; it is just that they don’t trust each other.

You can visit Ricky’s blog at http://redmist-redmist.blogspot.com/

Previous articles by Ricky:

Understanding Brazil: Mosquitoes Part II
Understanding Brazil: The Pub
Understanding Brazil: Protesting
Understanding Brazil: General Elections
Around Brazil: Oktoberfest Parade in Blumenau
Cultural Brazil: The Alambique
Around Brazil: Whale-Watching in Santa Catarina
Brazil: Tainha Time
Deported from Brazil? Part 2
Deported from Brazil? Part 1
Brazil: The President in Florianpolis
Swine Flu in South America?
The Best Club in Brazil…?
The Great Brazilian Animal-Off (Land)
Understanding Brazil: Giving Directions
Understanding Brazil: Driving
Understanding Brazil: Farra do Boi
Brazil: Catching Flu’
Around Brazil: Garopaba
Understanding Brazil: Funerals
Brazil: Bernie the Berne
Around Brazil: Journey to the Amazon Jungle
Around Brazil: Crazy Town Ceremonies
Around Brazil: Crazy Town
Around Brazil: Manaus
Around Brazil: Santarem & Alter do Chao
Around Brazil: Amazon Swarms and Amazon Storms
Understanding Brazil: Playing Pool
Around Brazil: Gurup
Around South America: Peninsula Valdes
Around South America: Patagonia
Around South America: Montevideo, Uruguay
Around Brazil: The Amazon
Around South America: Bariloche, Argentina
Understanding Gringoes: Drinking
The Great Brazilian Fruit-Off Part 2
The Great Brazilian Fruit-Off Part 1
Understanding Brazil: The Kids
Brazil v Argentina: Buying Beer
Understanding Brazil: Mosquitoes
Around Brazil: So Luis
Teaching English in Brazil
Around Brazil: Lenois Maranhenses
Understanding Brazil: The National Anthem
Around Brazil: Barreirinhas
Around Brazil: Jericoacoara to Barreirinhas
Understanding Brazil: Shopping Centres
Around Brazil: Jericoacoara
Around Brazil: Chapada da Diamantina/Lenois
Brazil vs. Argentina: Statues of Christ
Around Brazil: Salvador
Brazil vs. Argentina: The Buses
Around Brazil: Morro de São Paulo (& Itabuna)
Understanding Brazil: The Workmen
Around Brazil: Praa Pateo do Colegio
Around Brazil: Porto Seguro
Around Brazil: Rio de Janeiro to Porto Seguro
Around Brazil: Cristo Redentor
Understanding Brazil: The Sellers
Around Brazil: Ilha de Gigoia
Brazil Journeys: São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro
Understanding Brazil: Dogs Part 2
Brazil: A Lie-In in Downtown São Paulo?
The Best Job in Brazil: Ankle Specialist?
Understanding Brazil: Dogs
Brazilian Places: Ilha do Santa Catarina (Floripa)
Classic Brazilian Journeys: South to Florianopolis
Understanding Brazil – The Shower
Brazil: Boats on the Amazon
Brazil: Understanding Novelas
Brazil: Bus fires in São Paulo – always a bad thing?

By Alison McGowan
October 25, 2011

Guesthouse Bianca came highly recommended by Alcino of Estalagem Alcino, one of our favourite pousadas in Chapada Diamantina, Bahia. So I was anxious to see the place, chat to owner, Guido, and sample one of his wonderful cachaas. (It turns out there is no Bianca after all – it is just the name of the house, but the wonderful cachaa did indeed turn out to be wonderful!)

This is simply a beautiful place, a lovingly refurbished, stained glassed, 1930s townhouse in the heart of Santa Teresa with a beautiful Moorish style terrace and Portuguese style tiles. There are only 3 guest suites all comfortable and individually designed but the best one (for me at least) is definitely the Sugar Loaf suite with its fabulous views. The idea here is for guests to be able to chill out in comfort and peace in the pousada but also to be part of the local community so although breakfast is included in the price it is actually taken in a local bar.

The whole feel of Santa Teresa is that of a bohemian artistic community and at Guesthouse Bianca you’ll only be a stone’s throw from some of the best restaurants and bars where spontaneous music mixes with local art exhibitions. Want something different? Then just take nearby transport down into Zona Sul for some beach or check out Lapa and the centre of Rio for some dancing. Altogether you couldn’t find a better place to stay in a wonderful location.

Santa Teresa is a wonderfully hidden part of Rio de Janeiro, perched on a hill between the centre of the city and Zona Sul, where most of the beaches are. Long known for its bohemian culture, famous for being Amy Winehouse’s last place of abode in Rio and infamous for being home for decades to Ronnie Biggs, of UK Great Train Robbery fame, the area is a delight of old colonial mansions, and cobbled streets, served by “bondes” or trams, most of which date back over 100 years.

The slower, more “alternative” pace of life here attracts artists, musicians and writers, many of whom hang out in the numerous bars and restaurants dotted about the place. For travellers who prefer laid back charm and history to being right close to a beach, it’s a wonderful place to stay.

Not to be Missed
– Visit to the historical centre
– Restaurants: Hotel Santa Teresa, Espirita Santa and Marc
– Bar do Arnaudo and Bar do Mineiro
– Dancing in Lapa (at the bottom of the hill!)
– Jazz at Triboz and Santo Scenarium, also in Lapa
– A buggy trip round Floresta da Tijuca with Dolores
– Parque das Ruinas a couple of minutes from the pousada

Starpoints
* Tranquil location in the heart of Santa Teres
* Sugar Loaf views
* Personal attention from owner, Guido

Try a Different Place if…
…you have any mobility problems or if you want to be walking distance from the beach.

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, So Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d’Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airo, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Cho, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casaro da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

Futebol Society is a night football tournament taking place in São Paulo, from 22h to 05:30h on 27th October. There will be 32 teams of 7 players competing all night. There is more information on the tournament here: www.virada-futebol.com.br

If you have a funny or unusual photo depicting life in Brazil please send it to gringoes@gringoes.com with ‘Photo of the Week’ in the subject line. Ideally we are after photos that are of something a little different, not traditional shots of beaches and sunsets. Please send relatively high resolution images (0.5 Megapixel / 640 x 480 or bigger), and let us know where you took the photo and if you have a title for it.

Statues

Brazil Photo of the Week: Statues
Taken by Jonathan Flaum in Recife, PE.

Curitiba

Brazil Photo of the Week: Curitiba
Taken by Jonathan Flaum.

Festa Junina For Everyone

Brazil Photo of the Week: Festa Junina For Everyone
Taken by Alan Grabowsky.

Ibirapuera Park Has Gone to the Dogs

Brazil Photo of the Week: Ibirapuera Park Has Gone to the Dogs
Taken by John Duhig in Sao Paulo.

Blessed Car

Brazil Photo of the Week: Blessed Car
Taken by Marcia Maul in Mercado Central, Fortaleza.

Amor Eterno I (in a series)

Brazil Photo of the Week: Amor Eterno
Taken by Mary Pierce in Paraty.

Special Cat

Brazil Photo of the Week: Special Cat
Taken by Marcia Maul, in a small village in the interior of Brazil (Ceará).

Anita Garibaldi

Brazil Photo of the Week: Anita Garibaldi
Taken by Kit di Pomi, a statue of local heroine Anita Garibaldi, the Brazilian wife and comrade-in-arms of Italian revolutionary Giuseppe Garibaldi, in Laguna, Santa Catarina.

Sampa Rugby

Brazil Photo of the Week: Sampa Rugby
Taken by John Duhig at Ibirapuera Park

Chevy

Brazil Photo of the Week: Statue
Taken by Chip Kishel on a road trip between Sao Paulo and Rio de Janeiro in 1962

Statue

Brazil Photo of the Week: Statue
Taken by Jeremy Clark photo outside a gift shop in Olinda. Jeremy says “It would make a great Bowsprit Statue on a Portuguese Caravel!”

Tough Times For Angels

Brazil Photo of the Week: Tough Times For Angels
Taken by Alan Grabowsky in Sao Paulo.

Look Out Below

Brazil Photo of the Week: Look Out Below
Taken by John Duhig at Juquehy beach.

Banda Só Bonecos

Brazil Photo of the Week: Banda Só Bonecos
Taken by Marcia Maul.

Shutters

Brazil Photo of the Week: Shutters
Taken by Olivia Coote.

Hangin’ In There

Brazil Photo of the Week: Hangin' In There
Taken by Martin Riordan in Santa Rosa, RS. Martin says, "Although Instituto Butantan says this frog is very common, I have yet to find anyone who has seen one as big as this one. It is about 9cm long. It took up residence in my house about a year ago and normally spends the day sleeping on top of a metal gate. But one day it decided to sleep on the metal mesh of the gate."

Teapot

Brazil Photo of the Week: Teapot
Taken by Marcia Maul at the restaurant Bodega do Sertão in Maceió.

Banda da Ipanema

Brazil Photo of the Week: Banda da Ipanema
Taken by Armando Rozario in Rio de Janeiro in 1969.

Teacher and Class

Brazil Photo of the Week: Teacher and Class
Taken by Maree Voller in Salvador.

Keeper of the Dunes

Brazil Photo of the Week: Keeper of the Dunes
Taken by Rebecca Borges in Canoa Quebrada, Ceara.

Colours

Brazil Photo of the Week: Colours
Taken by Randy "R Dub!" Williams in Recife.

Carnival 1963

Brazil Photo of the Week: Carnival 1963
Taken by Chip Kishel in Jardim Paulista, 1963.

Kids

Brazil Photo of the Week: Kids
Taken by Maree Voller in Salvador.

Hats

Brazil Photo of the Week: Hats
Taken by John Duhig at Juquehy Beach.

39 Degrees

Brazil Photo of the Week: 39 Degrees
Taken by Peter O’Neill at Flamengo, Rio de Janeiro.

Rio 2016

Brazil Photo of the Week: Rio 2016
Taken by John Hamilton at Copacabana Beach.

Terraco Italia Bar

Brazil Photo of the Week: Terraco Italia Bar
Taken by Ron Finely in Sao Paulo.






















Have you an interesting photo of life in Brazil? Would you like to see it posted here? Just email it to gringoes@gringoes.com with ‘Photo of the Week‘ in the subject line