Michael Magera

May 4, 2016

Meet Michael Magera who moved to Brazil at the start of the year. Read the following interview in which Michael tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I’m a New Yorker, an almost real New Yorker, born in the city (Queens. not Manhattan) but grew up out on Long Island before returning as an adult. I work in telecommunications but essentially I am a cabling guy. If your Internet works at work, I’m behind it.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I came to POA in 2003 for my first time for just a month, but began spending more time in 2005. I’d say that the balance has become nearly 50/50 since then.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Brazil as a whole struck me much harder than I expected. Being married to a Brazilian, I had certain expectations. Foremost was the beauty, which my wife did not exemplify through her speech; however the beauty and cultural diversity made me gasp. WONDERFUL!

4. What do you miss most about home?

Although Brazilian food keeps me “fat enough”, I miss my New York City pizza, bagels and Chinese food. Of course, I miss my family and friends as well.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Frustrating? Brazil? Brazil has lent me to believe that frustration is not possible. Early on, adapting to the coffee culture was difficult as I’m used to gulping down a few cups before noon. Now, occasionally, I get uptight by the relaxed nature of the country when I am in a personal rush.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Stepping on the Internacional field with my late father-in-law. Colorados!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The food is huge but the culture is my favorite part. I love the family value and the acceptance of friends.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Pimguim! Lima e Silva e Republica.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

I went to Mulligan’s one night and met some Americans who thought I was Brazilian and spoke to me slowly. They talked to me for a while and ultimately told me about a spot in NYC that I knew. When I rattled on about it, my NYC accent kicked loose and we laughed for hours.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

Culture. When in NYC can you have someone say “Good morning?”

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My Portuguese is pretty good now. I am learning the tenses now. I’m often found speaking around the bush so to speak in order to complete a thought. I’m getting better.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Be quiet. Enjoy. Look. Learn. When you try to be yourself and speak, you miss subtleties and cues that Brazilians offer. Watch and learn.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Do what you want, just be mindful about appearing ostentatious. Watches, bracelets, rings and sharp sunglasses at the hotel. Never been outside of an airport in SP, but a close friend was robbed there. Rio is awesome! Gotta do it! just use common sense.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

MatthewWard250

Meet Matthew Ward, from the UK, who has travelled to and is now living in Brazil. Read the following interview where he tells us about some of his most memorable experiences from Brazil and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I’m 36 years old, British, from the Bournemouth area, where I was an English teacher for foreign students, though here in Brazil as well as teaching I’ve worked in Human Resources – mainly dealing with training and development for a large Brazilian metallurgical company until earlier this year.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I arrived here to live on 1 June 2002, though I’d already been for three weeks holiday during each of the previous three years, so I kind of knew what I was getting into – or thought I did! Mine is a classic EFL teacher’s story – I married one of my students (Brazilian of course) and though we lived in Bournemouth for just over four years, my wife found it hard to settle and so we decided to try life here.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

I think the people made the greatest impression when I first visited. I was very lucky in that I had my wife’s huge extended family to welcome me, but I’ve always found the hospitality and warmth of Brazilians overwhelming. Another thing was the scenery – it was much greener than I expected, at least in the interior of São Paulo where I live. Being a hot country, I expected it to be brown and arid, rather like Spain. And of course the huge gap between rich and poor, which doesn’t exist on the same scale in Europe any more. It’s Dickensian, writ large.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Actually, I’ve just returned from my first holiday in England since I arrived just over four years ago. I miss family and friends the most, watching cricket and rugby, British comedy and the fact that people at home are instantly in tune with you, because of their similar backgrounds and cultural experiences. The hardest part in the beginning here was having no history with people, the fact that everyone I met was a total stranger who had very little in common with me. The longer I stay and the more I’m building a history here, the easier it’s becoming, but it was really difficult in the beginning.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Firstly, bureaucracy – it took me over a year to get my RNE and Carteira de Trabalho, despite legally being entitled to both by marriage. And secondly, the lack of information – especially signs. This has become something of an obsession. Though I lack political ambitions, one post I’d accept is Minister for Signs, I’d make sure everything was adequately indicated both in public places and in public buildings, especially outside São Paulo city. I simply can’t understand why people don’t think about these fairly basic necessities. At the company I worked for there was a bus station owned by the factory for all the coaches bringing workers to and fro all day on the various shifts, and none of the buses ever had any indication on them of their destination. Either you had to ask somebody, who often didn’t know either, or wait and follow someone you recognised who took the same bus daily, and had somehow gained access to privileged information.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Singing in the Teatro Carlos Gomes in Blumenau, Santa Catarina, during the Encanta Blumenau” choir festival in November 2005. By chance I saw the company’s male voice choir perform one evening and decided to audition, was accepted and we travelled to Blumenau to perform. I can’t imagine life without singing now. Having since left the company, I now sing with another male voice choir in Sorocaba. I blame my mother – she’s Welsh.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The warmth of the people, the warmth of the climate, the fruit (especially papaya) and the general racial and religious tolerance.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

One restaurant stands out – Bar do Alemo in Itu, in the interior of São Paulo state. The same chef has been there for 45 years, and their “bife a parmeggiana” is second to none.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Whilst I was working in the factory, one day I was called to my boss’s office by his secretary, who said it was urgent. When I got there I was introduced to an English engineer who was working at the factory on a short-term contract and who was having difficulty negotiating his way through the trials and tribulations of renting a flat, as he spoke little Portuguese. He was only the second Englishman I’d met in Brazil. After helping him out we started chatting and I asked him where he was from. It turned out he lived in Wallisdown, in Bournemouth, about a mile from where my old flat was. And as if this weren’t coincidence enough, his wife was also an English teacher for foreign students in Bournemouth.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

One thing I found difficult working for a large Brazilian company was how hierarchies seem very rigid and people are very aware of their status. It was never really clear how I should address people, it was something I had to feel my way through. It’s ironic, because Britain is a much more class-ridden society, but at the same time work relationships I had there were much more informal – respectful, but informal. My British bosses used to ask me to do things – my Brazilian bosses told me to do things.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

I’m lucky in that I have a background in languages. I read Italian at University and also spoke fluent French and Spanish at one time. Working in a Portuguese-only environment also helped enormously, everyone in my department used slang so I picked up some very useful, if not always socially acceptable, expressions. So, I guess I’m pretty comfortable in most situations now. Knowing Spanish can be confusing – many words are similar or the same, but many are different too. You can’t simply use the Spanish word all the time.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Ride the culture shock. I went through the classic phases – loving everything because it was different, hating everything because it was different, then reaching a point where I just accepted everything was different, without the strong emotions. Also, be patient with the language. Pay attention to what people are saying and try to use expressions you hear. Concentrate on what you can understand and say instead of what you can’t – you are making progress, honest! And immerse yourself in the language, watch the appalling soaps, listen to the news, read. You’ll be learning all the time, even if you don’t notice it. Also, if possible, look into legalising your situation in Brazil via the Embassy or Consulate in your home country, which can often be much quicker than leaving it until you arrive. And joining a male voice choir is a great way to meet people…

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

As I’m not a city slicker, I can only indicate what I’ve enjoyed. If you like football, catch a game, it’s cheap and the atmosphere’s great (avoid the “classicos” though, which can suffer from crowd trouble). Eat at a churrascaria, if you like meat. Visit Ilhabela and the north coast of São Paulo state.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

October 6, 2014

Meet Yolanda Rother who moved to Brazil 2 months ago. Read the following interview in which Yolanda tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.? My name is Yolanda, and I am half German half Jamaican. I was born and raised in Berlin, where I am completing my masters programme at the Hertie School of Governance.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here? I arrived in São Paulo exactly two months ago to start my graduate exchange semester in International Business and Public Administration.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil? My first impressions were the flow of life reminds of Jamaica, São Paulo is massive, and I like the people.

4. What do you miss most about home? Surprisingly, shopping is way cheaper in Europe than it is here. But this has a good consequence, I spend less money ;-)

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil? Attempting to find the Policia Federal to register for my RNE/CPF. I made to the Policia Federal Rodoviaria, to the Civil Policia, and only on my third try the actual Policia Federal. But they, this way I got a chance to discover new parts of the city.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)? Enjoying Gilberto Gil at Parque Ibirapuera – so freaking awesome!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)? I love the Brazilian mentality of sharing – share a beer, share a feijoada, share a kiss.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here? I love to hang out at the new Hospital Matarrazo exhibition – there’s always something new to discover there.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil? Everyone thinks I’m Brazilian – until they realise I can hardly speak Portuguese.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking? German is all about punctuality and efficiency. Here it may take three people and up to 8 minutes to get a Pao de Queijo.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse? Portuguese is not as easy as I thought. Currently I am speaking a mix of Spanish, French, Portuguese and sign language. But I know that it will improve soon!

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil? São Paulo is more expensive than you’d expect! But so worth it. You can follow Yolanda at Twitter: @yolandatweets.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email. To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below: Dave Rooney – Australia
Bina Bina – USA
Mike Jewell – USA
Niki Wang – Singapore
Sheldon Feingold – USA
Vitor Salas – Portugal
Joseph Low – USA
João Ferreira – Portugal
Hunter Peak – USA
Priya Ferreira – UK
Ryan Griffin – USA
Rami Alhames – Syria
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Rob McDonell – Australia
Jennifer Souza – USA
Scott Hudson – Australia
Bill Holloway – USA
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

June 23, 2014

Meet Dave Rooney who moved to Brazil around 6 months ago. Read the following interview in which Dave tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I’m from Australia, sold up everything and left 3 years ago for South America after the end of a fairly serious relationship and deciding I simply wasn’t enjoying life there any more. Luckily I am a website designer & developer so can work online (zavadesign.com) and live anywhere, as I am now doing. I have also previously spent a fair number of years travelling & living overseas, 5 years backpacking in my 20s, and two years first in Sri Lanka volunteering after the 2004 tsunami, and then in Kenya with an NGO working with street children. Very rewarding and educational experiences as you might imagine.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

When I headed to South America three years ago it was always my intention to spend some time in Brazil around the time of the World Cup, and with an open mind that it could suit me as a place to live longer term. I arrived here just before Carnival, was in Recife for the celebrations, and also Salvador for the last two days here, before heading down to Rio were I’ve been living for the few months. The jury is still out about calling Brazil home for the longer term…

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Hot, fun, lots of bum flesh on the beaches… but also dirty, at least in the northern cities. Since being here a little longer and understanding the lack of funds that get put towards local services I am beginning to understand why. I found the people were very friendly in the north, always wanting to help with directions and the like, though my friend and I used to joke about their willingness to offer directions even when they had no idea of the correct answer. We would ask three different people, get three different answers, and eventually find out they were all wrong. Funny!

4. What do you miss most about home?

Vegemite. Going out for drinks with friends in the period leading up to Christmas. Good, cheap sashimi. But all things I can survive without too many dramas.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

The number of expats here who seem to do nothing but complain about Brazil constantly. I just have to wonder why on earth do they stay?

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Carnival in Recife, words can’t adequately describe the fun it was! Much better than Salvador, though I have yet to experience Carnival in Rio.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

Beach life, live music and dancing, and the beautiful women! And football. I play football, so being able to play on or near the beach two or three times a week with a bunch of locals is a slice of heaven for me!

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

I love the local botecos, hanging out with the locals over a beer and watching some football. I wish I spoke Portuguese to be able to join in with their conversations more but just watching and feeling their passion makes for a great way to pass an afternoon/evening.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Nothing I would want to share with strangers… ;)

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

Safety issues are the obvious one, though that could be said about a lot of places. Common sense will go a long way in avoiding any issues though.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

Nudda. I know a little Spanish, so have been getting by for the basics in what I know. I’m waiting until after the World Cup to decide how much longer I stay, if I decide to stay then I will start some classes.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Learn a little about Brazilian culture before you come, don’t overtly carry anything valuable, use common sense… and enjoy life like the Brazilians do.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Can’t say about Sao Paulo, but for Rio…
– Stay in the Copa or Ipa areas. Yes it’s a little more expensive, but to be able to walk along the beach as the sun goes down, sip a caipirinha, listen to live music backed by the sound of the ocean… this is the Brazil I want to experience. Other areas can be interesting, but it’s easy to head to Lapa or Santa Teresa for a night, but much better to be able to go for a morning swim.
– Go to botecos for drinks and not just to gringo/tourist bars, otherwise you’ll be missing out on another essential slice of Brazilian life.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Bina Bina – USA
Mike Jewell – USA
Niki Wang – Singapore
Sheldon Feingold – USA
Vitor Salas – Portugal
Joseph Low – USA
João Ferreira – Portugal
Hunter Peak – USA
Priya Ferreira – UK
Ryan Griffin – USA
Rami Alhames – Syria
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Rob McDonell – Australia
Jennifer Souza – USA
Scott Hudson – Australia
Bill Holloway – USA
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O&rsquot;Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

June 3, 2014

Meet Bina who moved to Brazil a year ago. Read the following interview in which Gina tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

My name is Bina. I am from Marlborough, Massachusetts in the USA. I am 36 years old and I am a ghostwriter on online. I am married and I have three children. We live in Vespasiano, MG. It&rsquot;s about 40 minutes by bus from BH. I like to see the humor in every situation. Brazil has been challenging for me in regards to this.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I moved to Brazil a year ago. I was well prepared mentally thanks to www.gringoes.com. I convinced my husband to move here because of his immigration problems. He was hiding from deportation at the time. But secretly, I am an adventurous person and I wanted to move to South America. I was sick of living in an apartment building with no yard and awful neighbors. With my husband&rsquot;s immigration problem, we were afraid to buy a house and then lose it.

I am happy to say that now our kids have a house, a yard, a dog, a cat. They are very happy only going to school five hours a day. (I&rsquot;m not). They also have a slew of cousins and family here that they didn&rsquot;t have in the States. My husband now has a real job and not just flipping burgers seventy hours a week.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

I have been to Brazil many times before, but never to live here. I was very excited to be in the warm weather all year and not shovel snow. Last year was my first Brazilian winter and I found it to be very cold at night and the homes don&rsquot;t have any heating. I had to learn to sleep with heavy blankets. The floor aren&rsquot;t carpeted anywhere and I had to learn to wear shoes in my home during cold nights.

4. What do you miss most about home?

The things I miss about home are few. I miss my favorite coffee, maple syrup and peanut butter. I miss drive-thru&rsquot;s. I really miss speaking English with people that don&rsquot;t think that English is a hobby or something cool. I admit it is fun to speak English to telemarketers until they hang up though.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

My most frustrating experience in Brazil was getting my driver&rsquot;s license. In Brazil when they need a copy of a document they don&rsquot;t just take a copy. They send you somewhere to get one. That place will have long lines and you will pay for the copies. Then when you go back, they tell you that you have to certify the copies in another location. Some more long lines and more money. Then when you go back again, instead of letting you pay a fee there, you have to go to a bank (More lines) and pay there and bring back the receipt. If you are lucky enough to have everything they ask for when you go back again, they ask you to get an exam by a doctor. Every time you go to Detran, you will wait in lines also.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Being from the north in America, and being white, I have to say that I have never seen racism. In Brazil, my most memorable moment was when I saw a woman walking up a very steep hill carrying a four month old. She stopped to take a rest and I was just a minute behind her walking up the same hill. I stopped next to her and asked how old the baby was. She turned around and looked at me and then smiled.

She said, Oh hi, she is four months old.” I say she is cute and has a cute smile etc. The woman says, “That&rsquot;s because you are white, she doesn&rsquot;t like black people. She cries at black people.” I found this very shocking, not only because it was a four month old that she was talking about but because the woman herself was not white. I still don&rsquot;t know what to think of this.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

What I love about Brazil? OK, I love riding the busses, I admit it. I also love that I can see birds that you only see in pet stores or in zoos just flying around free. There are toucans in Vespasiano! I love seeing the squirrel sized monkeys running along the telephone wire harassing the pigeons. I love walking down my street and seeing cows and banana trees. I love swimming and cookouts in December. My husband doesn&rsquot;t like me taking Moto-taxis but that&rsquot;s my favorite thing about Brazil. With one phone call, a sexy Brazilian shows up on a motorcycle and takes you for a ride. Most of them don&rsquot;t mind if you hold onto them (you have to pretend to be scared) and it only cost about $1.50… :D :D :D

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

My favorite places to hang out in Brazil are the places that have acai. I can&rsquot;t have ice cream because of allergies so I always felt left out when people would invite me to go for ice cream in the summers. I have to say that acai with bananas and granola in the town square on a Saturday is awesome and makes up for it. Acai is addictive.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Not answered.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

The most striking difference for me between Massachusetts and Brazil is the walls around homes. I also find that seeing people live in unfinished structures is a little shocking. The graffiti here is also out of control. There are no dog officers here and stray dogs rip apart trash and just yuck… they have these elevated baskets to prevent it in some places and that&rsquot;s where stray cats and birds come in. Brazil needs dumpsters with covers.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My Portuguese now is native level. I actually have a hard time faking an American accent when I&rsquot;m trying to get some patience from somebody when I don&rsquot;t know how something works (like a phone plan). I look American enough, but when I open my mouth, they assume that I am Brazilian of German decent or from Santa Catarina.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

My advice for people coming here is to bring your sense of humor. Bring some warm clothes for winter nights. The floors are cold! Get all your visas and CPF and anything you can get for Brazil done at the consulate in your country. Bring copies, translations everything you can think of. Don&rsquot;t count on police officers accepting an international driver&rsquot;s license. They all have different opinions on them. Throw away your watches, because here there is only night and day.

I also recommend joining the www.gringoes.com group on FaceBook. Those people are a mountain of information and a good shoulder to cry on after meeting your in-laws.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Not answered.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Mike Jewell – USA
Niki Wang – Singapore
Sheldon Feingold – USA
Vitor Salas – Portugal
Joseph Low – USA
João Ferreira – Portugal
Hunter Peak – USA
Priya Ferreira – UK
Ryan Griffin – USA
Rami Alhames – Syria
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Rob McDonell – Australia
Jennifer Souza – USA
Scott Hudson – Australia
Bill Holloway – USA
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O&rsquot;Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

May 13, 2014

Meet Mike Jewell who has lived in Brazil over 15 years. Read the following interview in which Mike tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I live in Sorocaba, São Paulo. My wife and I moved here in January of 1997. I am a pastor.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

We came to Brazil to help start churches.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Back in ’97; everything was an adventure. The language was definitely our biggest challenge. We spent nine months in language school that first year.

4. What do you miss most about home?

We miss our family. Our three girls and their families live there.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

As mentioned, the language has been the toughest. However, the way things are done here often drives me nuts. But we have learned to take each twist as it comes.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Our daughter met and married her husband here. I was privileged to do the wedding. Great fun!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The people and the weather! Both are lovely!

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

We don’t go out much. But we do enjoy churrascaria every now and then.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

I have a ton! Some dealing with the language and others dealing with culture. One short one I can share here. We had been warned about how bad the crime was here. One night we were sleeping and I heard a huge thump on our bedroom wall. My heart nearly jumped out of my chest as I lept from the bed and got this huge butcher knife! I crept from our bedroom and made my way to the backyard. Only to find that a big gourd had fallen off a vine near our bedroom wall! Whew!

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

The lack of legal recourse for the common guy. And the seeming, Oh Well. What can we do about it anyway?” attitude.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

I have been here for 17 years and am still discovering new words daily. For instance just today I learned that the word for cement mixer, betoneira is not pronounced, Bay-tor-nay-ra. I also have a lot of trouble with masculine and feminine. City names are often incredibly difficult. Examples are Barueri, Itanhaem and Itapetininga often stop me in my tracks!

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Be friendly, watch your wallet and be willing to learn the language and culture. Brazilians are more than willing to help.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

SP has a great Japanese district, The Italia building is the tallest and a must see. Just being in SP is overwhelming. Ride the Metro and train. Take a bus to the Praa da S to see the huge Catholic church and some cool trinkets booths. Go to Embu. It is trendy and a great tourist spot. The beach is just about an hour away too

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Sheldon Feingold – USA
Joseph Low – USA
Hunter Peak – USA
Ryan Griffin – USA
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Rob McDonell – Australia
Scott Hudson – Australia
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Rich Sallade – USA
Michael Smyth – UK
Chris Caballero – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Meredith Noll – USA
Mike Smith – UK
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

February 18, 2014

Meet Niki Wang who has lived in Brazil 8 months. Read the following interview in which Niki tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I am a Singaporean who is living in Belo Horizonte at the moment. My degree is in Finance and Economics and I speak English, Chinese, Portuguese, Cantonese and Hokkien. Mostly, I translate Asian drama serials from Chinese to English which are then broadcast on television. At other times, I teach English.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I stayed here for about a month in 2010. After obtaining my permanent visa, I came here again in July 2013 and I have been here ever since. I am here because I wanted to know what it is like to live in a different country.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

When I first visited in 2010, my first impression of Brazil is that its culture is a very interesting mix of East and West, which is very similar to where I came from. Soybean milk, sugarcane juice and fresh coconut juice are things that all Singaporeans grew up drinking, but they are also widely available here in Brazil. We have the same candied fruits and peanut cakes. Other than food and drink, our family values are also similar. Like Singaporeans, Brazilians are very family-oriented. Young people do not leave their homes until they get married, and even then, they tend to stay near to their parents and extended family.

4. What do you miss most about home?

I miss the convenience, safety and the lower cost of living in Singapore. Where else in the world could you walk out of your house to buy a cup of freshly-brewed coffee at 4 a.m. for less than a dollar and feel absolutely safe while doing that? That is something I will never take for granted again in my life.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

The most frustrating thing is probably the queues. Imagine queuing up at a pharmacy just to receive a piece of paper so that you could join another queue all over again!

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Once I boarded a bus in Contagem to go back to Belo Horizonte, unaware that my BHBus card did not work on buses in Contagem. A middle-aged man from the working class paid for my fare and he did not accept any repayment from me. I was deeply humbled by this unexpected act of kindness and generosity. I was especially touched because bus fares are extremely expensive over here.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

I love my family and the new friends I have made ever since I moved here. Food is awesome and the weather is simply the best! Even summer nights are cool and comfortable.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

I stay at home most of the time.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

At first I thought a lot of people are surnamed Correiro because I kept seeing postboxes with the word on them. It was later that I realized the word means postbox. And once I urged a rabbit to eat the senhora (lady) instead of cenoura (carrot). That was slightly embarrassing, but the rabbit did not laugh at me.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

In Singapore, you would see people wearing Havaianas everywhere you go. The situation is the complete opposite in Belo Horizonte. I saw a grand total of two persons wearing Havaianas during my past seven months here, one grandfather and one grandmother. Isn’t that a strange thing when Brazil is the birthplace of Havaianas?

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

I am able to hold simple conversations in Portuguese with old ladies… and my cat. Just kidding! Actually, it was easy to pick up the pronunciations and the grammar. The grammar is very similar to Singlish.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Bring money, lots of it. The cost of living over here is insanely high. Or bring everything you can. Bring all your electronics and their power adaptors and an extra for everything. Bring lots of English books and all of your shoes.
Of course, one should join the Gringoes Facebook group before coming here for support and information.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

When you are in Belo Horizonte, you must visit Pampulha Lake. It reminds me of Singapore’s Punggol Park. Over here at Pampulha Lake, there is a famous church called Church of Saint Francis of Assisi which was designed by Oscar Niemeyer. And if you are lucky, you can even spot capybaras, the largest rodents in the world.

Another must-visit place is Imhotim, a contemporary art museum located in Brumadinho, which is a one-hour drive from Belo Horizonte. It is like Singapore’s HortPark, Botanic Gardens and an art museum all rolled into one and the most wonderful thing is that admission is free on all Tuesdays!

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Vitor Salas – Portugal
João Ferreira – Portugal
Priya Ferreira – UK
Rami Alhames – Syria
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Jennifer Souza – USA
Bill Holloway – USA
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Danielle Carner – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jeff Eddington – USA
Rod Saunders – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

November 12, 2013

Meet Sheldon Feingold who has lived in Brazil over 40 years. Read the following interview in which Sheldon tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I’m an American from New York City, and my wife is Brazilian. I live in Recife and have been here since December 1970 – a long time, and so many people say that I’m now a Brazilian. As to my activity, I’m retired, although I would love to have something to do. I am a chemist and have an MBA in marketing and am fully bilingual.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

My first impressions of Brazil, so many years ago, were that Brazilians are basically very nice and friendly people – especially those from here in the northeast. I remember, as well, that I thought that all these crazy Brazilian motorists were out to kill this gringo.” After 43 years of driving in this country my opinion hasn’t really changed in this respect.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

My first visit to Brazil was in 1961 when I came to work with an American author who lived in Rio and I was sent by my company to help him edit his book.

4. What do you miss most about home?

What I miss most about New York is the theater, the museums, and all the other positive things that the city has to offer.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

My most frustrating experience has been getting things done when they are promised to be done… and not weeks and weeks later.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Without doubt my most memorable experience in Brazil was the birth of my daughter. What can be more important than that?

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

What I like most about Brazil is the diversity of the people and the various cultures, from north to south and vice versa.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

I don’t ‘hang out’, but I do like many restaurants in many places.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

No particularly funny stories to tell and of course the variety of climate is the most striking difference.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

My Portuguese is fine, thank you, and it should be after so many years.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My advice to newcomers is to learn the language ASAP – Brazilians, in the majority, don’t speak English.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

There’s much to see and much to do in São Paulo as well as in the rest of Brazil. See and do as much as you can.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Vitor Salas – Portugal
Joseph Low – USA
Joo Ferreira – Portugal
Hunter Peak – USA
Priya Ferreira – UK
Ryan Griffin – USA
Rami Alhames – Syria
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Rob McDonell – Australia
Jennifer Souza – USA
Scott Hudson – Australia
Bill Holloway – USA
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

October 22, 2013

Meet Vitor Salas who first visited Brazil over 10 years ago, and now runs his own business here. Read the following interview in which Vitor tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I am a Portuguese National, but I left Portugal in 1974, and lived abroad, in the UK, USA, Saudi Arabia etc. I arrived in Brazil in 2000. I am an ex-executive of Sheraton Hotels & Resorts, and other International Hotel Companies. In 2010, I set up my own Company, Kan Invesments Lda, Hotelaria, Consultoria e Turismo, and I provide services of Consulting Services for Hotel & Tourism Servio, in Rio Grande do Norte, Natal. In addition, with my wife Alexandra we have opened a deluxe Small Pousada, South of Natal, in Pirangi do Norte beach.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I came to Brazil, with an International Hotel Company to set up hotel operations, in Natal, Salvador da Bahia, So Luis do Maranho.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Great scenery, clear air, good tropical weather, the colour of the Sea in Natal, the White dunes, the buggy tours on the beach & dunes… And the tranquility of life, of a Northeast Brazilian City.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Some food & ingredients… and in business… punctuality!

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Even if I do speak Portuguese sometimes I do not understand Brazilians and they do not understand me! There are many different expressions, and Portuguese people do speak faster.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

The first buggy” rides in the White dunes and lagoons in Natal, a 4×4 Trip Natal to Fortaleza via the beaches, the first caipririnhas in BAR 51, in Jenipabu Dune, walking at Lenis Maranheneses, Morro de São Paulo, Bahia, and seeing Rio from Cristo Redentor… outstanding experiences!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

All the above , plus others places to visit like Amaznia, Foz de Iguau…

To be able to live more in contact with nature, a quieter way of life in the northeast of Brazil. I could not live in São Paulo, and Rio although a truly wonderful city to visit… to live in a city I would prefer Europe!

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

In Natal “Camares”, in São Paulo “Fogo de Cho”, and Rio “Marius”.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Again about the languages : the other day, I asked one of my staff in Portuguese, “Leandro did buy the White grapes from the market?”, “No Sr Victor they only have green ones!”.

The other day in a hotel I tried to test the staff’s skill in English. Arriving at the bar I said to the barman, “Good evening Jonatas, two beers please”. He replied, “Sorry sir, Tobias is off today.”

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

The language and in the northeast the lack of sense of urgency!

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My Portuguese is fine, but Brazilian pronunciation is a different matter. I have to pay attention as some words in Portuguese have a different meaning in Brazilian! For example girl in European Portuguese is “rapariga”, but in Brazilian Portuguese means “prostitute”. Girl in Brazilian Portuguese is “moa”. You see sometimes it is better do not speak the language of the natives!

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Enjoy the Country the way it is, with its good things. Do not try to change much, you might get frustrated. Be very patient in business with deadlines.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Avoid the traffic jams if you can, but it might be impossible, and enjoy the great restaurants. In business double check everything you can. Brazilians will often tell you that everything is possible, that you can do this way or that way… but beware.

You can contact Vitor via vitor.salas@hotmail.com or administrao@kanapousadadecharme.com.br.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Joseph Low – USA
Joo Ferreira – Portugal
Hunter Peak – USA
Priya Ferreira – UK
Ryan Griffin – USA
Rami Alhames – Syria
Maya Bell – New Zealand
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Rob McDonell – Australia
Jennifer Souza – USA
Scott Hudson – Australia
Bill Holloway – USA
Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Rich Sallade – USA
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Michael Smyth – UK
Danielle Carner – USA
Chris Caballero – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Meredith Noll – USA
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Mike Smith – UK
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Jeff Eddington – USA
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Rod Saunders – USA
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

July 8, 2013

Meet Joseph Low who lives in the USA but travels to Brazil often. Read the following interview in which Joseph tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I am originally from Missouri (USA), but now live in Florida (USA). After 20 plus years working for multinational corporations, I am now a management and marketing consultant and travel to Brazil quite frequently for business. In addition to my consulting, my wife (a Brazilian tax attorney) and I have just recently completed an 18 month book project focused on Brazil. The name of the book is João Ferreira – Portugal
Priya Ferreira – UK
Rami Alhames – Syria
Melanie Mitrano – USA
Jennifer Souza – USA
Bill Holloway – USA
Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Danielle Carner – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jeff Eddington – USA
Rod Saunders – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia