Entries by Mark Taylor

Brazil Through Foreign Eyes – Michael Magera

Michael Magera

May 4, 2016

Meet Michael Magera who moved to Brazil at the start of the year. Read the following interview in which Michael tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I’m a New Yorker, an almost real New Yorker, born in the city (Queens. not Manhattan) but grew up out on Long Island before returning as an adult. I work in telecommunications but essentially I am a cabling guy. If your Internet works at work, I’m behind it.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I came to POA in 2003 for my first time for just a month, but began spending more time in 2005. I’d say that the balance has become nearly 50/50 since then.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

Brazil as a whole struck me much harder than I expected. Being married to a Brazilian, I had certain expectations. Foremost was the beauty, which my wife did not exemplify through her speech; however the beauty and cultural diversity made me gasp. WONDERFUL!

4. What do you miss most about home?

Although Brazilian food keeps me “fat enough”, I miss my New York City pizza, bagels and Chinese food. Of course, I miss my family and friends as well.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Frustrating? Brazil? Brazil has lent me to believe that frustration is not possible. Early on, adapting to the coffee culture was difficult as I’m used to gulping down a few cups before noon. Now, occasionally, I get uptight by the relaxed nature of the country when I am in a personal rush.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Stepping on the Internacional field with my late father-in-law. Colorados!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The food is huge but the culture is my favorite part. I love the family value and the acceptance of friends.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Pimguim! Lima e Silva e Republica.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

I went to Mulligan’s one night and met some Americans who thought I was Brazilian and spoke to me slowly. They talked to me for a while and ultimately told me about a spot in NYC that I knew. When I rattled on about it, my NYC accent kicked loose and we laughed for hours.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

Culture. When in NYC can you have someone say “Good morning?”

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My Portuguese is pretty good now. I am learning the tenses now. I’m often found speaking around the bush so to speak in order to complete a thought. I’m getting better.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Be quiet. Enjoy. Look. Learn. When you try to be yourself and speak, you miss subtleties and cues that Brazilians offer. Watch and learn.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

Do what you want, just be mindful about appearing ostentatious. Watches, bracelets, rings and sharp sunglasses at the hotel. Never been outside of an airport in SP, but a close friend was robbed there. Rio is awesome! Gotta do it! just use common sense.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

Review: StudioBar Karaoke (São Paulo)

By Mark Taylor
January 18, 2012

I have a confession to make: I like karaoke. In fact if I’m being completely honest I should say that I love karaoke. There’s nothing quite like being slightly tipsy and standing on a stage singing to a group of mostly strangers for getting the adrenaline going, although I appreciate it’s not for everyone.

On my infrequent visits to São Paulo I always seek out some karaoke. The alternative in the UK is either pub karaoke (yeesh!) or bespoke establishments such as Duets.

The owner also stated that he is a huge karaoke fan, and was so sick of singing in poor establishments that he decided to open his own. His fandom is proven, if by nothing else, by the staggering list of songs on offer (around 200,000). You can search for music on two strategically placed computers, but a tip is to just ask (or write on the piece of paper) as a lot of tracks aren’t on the computers. There are of course plenty of Brazilian tracks, but also a huge number of international tracks as well. StudioBar also regularly run competitions and theme nights, so keep an eye on their website and Facebook page for updates.

There are a handful of downsides to StudioBar. Firstly, the service can be a little slow. Secondly, you need to have patience when arriving – the front gate is locked, and as a tip it can require some persistent ringing on the bell. Thirdly, beware the holiday season versus closing dates. When visiting before Christmas we were told they reopened on January 5th. When we turfed up though they were still closed, albeit the owner had just returned from holiday. A tip to StudioBar would be to add clear closing dates on their website, that they ideally stick to.

Other than that it’s an excellent venue which ticks all the boxes for me. If you’re lucky you will arrive on a quiet night when there’s a small audience, and plenty of singing time.

StudioBar is open Wednesday, Thursday, and Sunday from 6pm to 1am. The entrance fee is R$20, unless you consume that much in food/drink. It’s open Friday and Saturday from 8pm to 4am. At these times the entrance fee is R$25, of which R$20 can be consumed food/drink. At weekends there is valet parking for R$10.

Av. Paes de Barros, 3164. Móoca. São Paulo. 03149-000.

StudioBar at Facebook
Review: TomTom Navigator 7 Brazil
Around Brazil: Boiucanga
Brazil: São Paulo – The Forgotten City
Brazil: Mythbusting!
Brazil: Enough of the “Estrangeirismos”
Understanding Brazil: Sense of Humour
Brazil: The “Turistas” Storm in a Teacup
Understanding Brazil: Christmas and New Year’s Traditions
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 5
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 4
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 3
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 2
Brazil: An Interview with Marcia Loebick
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 2
Brazil: Google Maps Gets an Upgrade
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 1
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 1
Brazil: Daylight Savings Time
Brazil: Carjacking and Theft
Brazil: Airport Delays Grow Among Crash Speculation
Brazil: São Paulo’s International Film Festival (and The Fountain)
Brazil: Single Gringo Beware!
Brazil: The House of Coffee Comes Home
Brazil: Film Review
Brazil: The Portuguese Language Museum
Brazil: Election Time! Part 2
Brazil: Election Time! Part 1
Brazil: Torrent TV
Brazil: Book Review
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 2
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 1
The PCC Shows a New Level of Organisation
Brazil: Metr-ettiquette
Brazil: Trading Places
Brazil: São Paulo’s Pinacoteca
Brazil: Don’t Forget, You’re in Another Country!
Brazil: PCC Violence Returns to São Paulo
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 5
Brazil’s World Cup Defeat Party
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 4
Brazil: Japanese Standard Chosen for Digital TV
Brazil: NET Petition Feedback
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 3
Brazil: Football Love
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 2
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 1
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 3
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 2
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 1
GPS in Brazil
Brazil: PCC Attacks in São Paulo
Brazil: Tips on Buying or Renting an Apartment or House
Brazil: A Critical Sensitivity
Cleanliness is next to Brazilianiness
Brazil: Manners
Brazil: No Change, No Sale
Brazilian TV
Brazil: Ubatuba
Brazil: Professional Children
Brazil: We deliver… everything!
Brazil: Terrao Itlia
Brazil: A Layman’s Carnival Guide
Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?
Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese

By Mark Taylor
October 20th, 2005

When I first arrived in Brazil, other than battling with Portuguese, there was also the battle of trying to understand other colloquialisms that are used to communicate.

One example of this is the commonly used interjection psiu” (pronounced “pseeuu” or something like this). It is primarily used when someone’s trying to catch your attention, although at first I thought they were trying to shoot me with a blowdart or do an impression of a flat tyre.

Another similar sounding interjection is “shiu” (pronounced something like “sheeuu”). Rather than trying to catch your attention this is usually the opposite, and is a lighthearted attempt at basically telling you to “shut up”. In Britain at least there’s a a similar noise “shoo”, mostly for quite literally shooing say an animal away.

Usually used as an exclamation there’s “opa” (pronounced something like “op-ah”). It can be spoken in many situations, for example if you almost trip over, or even if you’re showing happiness as your mug of beer arrives. Of course it might be mistaken for a hiccup.

It’s also interesting to see how onomatopoeic words vary between English and Brazilian Portuguese. For example birds don’t go “tweet tweet” or “cheep cheep”, they go “piu-piu” (pronounced something like “peeoo-peeoo”). Piu-Piu is also the character that English speakers will know as Tweety, from the cartoon with Sylvester the cat.

Some more examples of this. A dog doesn’t bark “woof woof”, he goes “au au”. As my wife often reminds me in reference to our dog, he does speak Portuguese after all. Ducks go “qu qu”, a somewhat similar version of “quack quack”. A rooster does a somewhat similarly complex “cocoricó” as opposed to a “cockledoodledoo”. Last but not least, a pig goes “croinh croinh” which again is similar to an “oink oink”.

Can you think of any more interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia to educate us with? If so send an email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com.

Readers Comments:

When my wife first arrived in the US she would sneeze differently than Americans. When Americans sneeze “Ahhh-Cheww!!!”, but when Brazilians sneeze it sounds like “ha-chinha”!!! something about those “inhus” and “inhas” it always needs to be added!!!

— Eric Czerwinski

Re your article on exclamations and animals sounds- ‘ufa’ means ‘phew’. You didn’t put that one in. Also, “aie”, means “ouch” or’ah!’ (imagination helps with the second meaning!)

— Justin Fredrickson

Apparently, “ups” is used instead of “oops.” My Brazilian girlfriend sent me an email the other day that included the sentence, “ups….and you?” I was thinking of the package delivery company and couldn’t understand what the hell “Brown” had to do with me asking her how she slept. She quickly cleared things up and now I’m a smarter man.

— Bradley

Very interesting article. It’s so fun to learn about the slang in different languages. I especially love learning about onomatopoeias in other languages. I’ve been learning Spanish for about a year and a half now, and I speak it pretty well, so now I’m trying out Portuguese. I think it’s absolutely beautiful. Sometimes I will go into a Portuguese chat room and I’ve seen some really interesting onomatopoeias. For example, when they want to express laughter, they will say one of three things… “rsrsrsrs”, “kkkkkkkkk”, “kskksks”, or (the strangest one) “auhsauhsauhs.” I can understand how the first three could be laughter, but not the last one.

— Daren

Previous articles by Mark Taylor:

Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Portuguese Tip: Interjections and Expressions

By Mark Taylor
October 20th, 2005

When I first arrived in Brazil, other than battling with Portuguese, there was also the battle of trying to understand other colloquialisms that are used to communicate.

One example of this is the commonly used interjection psiu” (pronounced “pseeuu” or something like this). It is primarily used when someone’s trying to catch your attention, although at first I thought they were trying to shoot me with a blowdart or do an impression of a flat tyre.

Another similar sounding interjection is “shiu” (pronounced something like “sheeuu”). Rather than trying to catch your attention this is usually the opposite, and is a lighthearted attempt at basically telling you to “shut up”. In Britain at least there’s a a similar noise “shoo”, mostly for quite literally shooing say an animal away.

Usually used as an exclamation there’s “opa” (pronounced something like “op-ah”). It can be spoken in many situations, for example if you almost trip over, or even if you’re showing happiness as your mug of beer arrives. Of course it might be mistaken for a hiccup.

It’s also interesting to see how onomatopoeic words vary between English and Brazilian Portuguese. For example birds don’t go “tweet tweet” or “cheep cheep”, they go “piu-piu” (pronounced something like “peeoo-peeoo”). Piu-Piu is also the character that English speakers will know as Tweety, from the cartoon with Sylvester the cat.

Some more examples of this. A dog doesn’t bark “woof woof”, he goes “au au”. As my wife often reminds me in reference to our dog, he does speak Portuguese after all. Ducks go “qu qu”, a somewhat similar version of “quack quack”. A rooster does a somewhat similarly complex “cocoricó” as opposed to a “cockledoodledoo”. Last but not least, a pig goes “croinh croinh” which again is similar to an “oink oink”.

Can you think of any more interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia to educate us with? If so send an email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com.

Readers Comments:

When my wife first arrived in the US she would sneeze differently than Americans. When Americans sneeze “Ahhh-Cheww!!!”, but when Brazilians sneeze it sounds like “ha-chinha”!!! something about those “inhus” and “inhas” it always needs to be added!!!

— Eric Czerwinski

Re your article on exclamations and animals sounds- ‘ufa’ means ‘phew’. You didn’t put that one in. Also, “aie”, means “ouch” or’ah!’ (imagination helps with the second meaning!)

— Justin Fredrickson

Apparently, “ups” is used instead of “oops.” My Brazilian girlfriend sent me an email the other day that included the sentence, “ups….and you?” I was thinking of the package delivery company and couldn’t understand what the hell “Brown” had to do with me asking her how she slept. She quickly cleared things up and now I’m a smarter man.

— Bradley

Previous articles by Mark Taylor:

Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Brazilian TV

By Mark Taylor

Those who’ve watched the BBC’s comedy programme The Fast Show, which consists of rapid fire comedy sketches hence the name, will be familiar with the sketches about Channel Nuevo”. For those who haven’t seen it, “Channel Nuevo” is a series of sketches about a non-specific TV channel, set somewhere hot and sunny (South or Central America, or even Spain perhaps) and involves low productions values, scantily clad women, peculiar devices for sale, weather reports that are always “scorchio!” (hot!), and regular breaks to salute El Presidente! This sketch often comes to mind for me when watching Brazilian TV, at least it did when I first started watching.

Of course it’s a comedic stereotype, although pretty much all the Brazilian TV channels are not surprisingly struggling with low production values. But it’s not uncommon to see scantily clad women (usually in the background of a less scantily clad male presenter), and it’s also common to see various items (some a little strange) being sold at various hours on some channels. No saluting El Presidente though, at least not any more.

So aside from the stereotypes how is Brazilian TV characterised and how does it differ from TV in other countries? To start with, in Brazil there are several major television networks, such as Globo. Globo essentially has two channels, one traditional and one for news. The remaining channels can be a peculiar mix, such as those related to Evangelical Christianity, or others such as the Rural Channel where it seems to be 24/7 cow auctions.

Like any country, Brazil has its popular programmes, but these can be markedly different from other countries. One popular style of programme runs an entire afternoon during the weekend, and are designed as entertainment for all the family e.g. “Faustão” or “Caldeirão do Huck” (Huck’s Cauldron). The programmes are headed up by very well paid and famous celebrities, and are often a mix of quizzes, celebrity interviews, and popular music. Another peculiar favorite is a late night programme called “Ratinho” (Little Rat) referring again to the nickname of the male presenter who heads up the programme. It’s a mix of surreal and slapstick comedy, jokes, sometimes mixed up with political comment coming from Ratinho, usually to lascivious applause from the audience. One programme that is recommended, and an unusual and intelligent departure from some of the former, is Fantastico, if your Portuguese is up to it. Showing Sunday evening on Globo’s channel, it’s a news magazine programme covering both national and international items which are presented in relatively quick succession with often incisive reporting and interesting stories, more so than most if not all similar programmes I remember from the UK. The news programmes here as well are generally quite good, and aside from the national news are often internationally focused.

A group of programmes that aren’t markedly different, and would be hard to miss after just a few hours of channel surfing, are the “Novelas”, namely soap operas. These couldn’t be absent from a discussion of Brazilian TV. These are produced in an almost factory-like regularity from the likes of Globo, and like Mexican soap operas are famed around the world (for soap opera fans of course). A large number of Brazilians will be sitting in front of their TV at the appointed time, 5 days a week for some of the more popular soap operas, to try and catch up on the latest goings on. Soap operas can be lavish affairs, and are increasingly lavish often in the first few episodes. The recent soap opera “Senhora do Destino” featured an opening recreation of 60s Brazil, including sets, cars etc. all done to great effect. Then the story moved to present day and it became somewhat more normal and similar to its predecessors. There’s a cadre of celebrity actors and actresses who will move from one soap opera to the next, often reprising similar types of roles.

So if your Portuguese is up to it, and you want to while away a Saturday or Sunday afternoon, then you might want to tune into Caldeirão do Huck or Faustão. If you are missing your country of origin’s soap opera(s), then perhaps you can cure the absence with a dose of say Belissima. For some decent comedy try Casseta Planeta, or if you want something a little more intellectual then try tuning into Fantastico.

I should add that my experience is based on the typical viewing of a lower to middle class Brazilian family, namely my in-laws that I stayed with for over a year. I’m sure experiences will vary, and there are many channels out there to be surfed and explored.

What programmes do you enjoy watching on TV in Brazil? Send me an email and I’ll add your comment to the article.

Reader’s Comments:

…you forgot, in your article about Brazilian TV, to mention Jo Soares, TV Globo, every night from Monday to Friday, one of the best talk shows on Brazilian TV, well, at least, I think so.
— Mailha

Hi, Mark, liked your article. One correction about ‘The Fast Show’ – it’s called ‘Chanel 9’ (‘pronounced ‘shanel nain’). It’s more likely to be set in a southern European country than a Latin American one, as it is frighteningly similar to Spain’s TVE and Italy’s RAI.

I’ve watched bits of Record TV on satellite in the UK, and it’s nice to be able to see telenovelas in the original Portuguese (growing up in Southeast Asia I’ve seen them dubbed in Chinese, Malay and Indonesian!)

I haven’t been to Brazil yet, but know that it ain’t like Portugal, where people will offer to speak in English if you can’t understand them. That said, at least Brazilians actually pronounce vowels, which makes listening comprehension so much easier.

Abraos

— Ken

Previous articles by Mark Taylor:

Brazil: Ubatuba
Brazil: Professional Children
Brazil: We deliver… everything!
Brazil: Terrao Itlia
Brazil: A Layman’s Carnival Guide
Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?
Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Review: TomTom Navigator 7 Brazil

By Mark Taylor
January 16th, 2009

It was back in April 2006 that I first reviewed satellite navigation software for Brazil: TomTom‘s entrance into the Brazilian satnav market, primarily because TomTom were offering one of the best core programs in terms of usability and interface. Things have not changed much in almost 2 years and TomTom are still arguably at the head of the pack, so I was happy to see around the middle of last year that TomTom released their dedicated devices with preloaded maps in Brazil. I was even happier to see in December that they released downloadable maps for Navigator, their PDA/mobile product which is the platform I prefer to use. Although I’m away from Brazil most of the year I did have a chance to visit São Paulo state in mid-December, so it was an ideal opportunity to try out the map.

For those who aren’t familiar with TomTom at all, it’s typical of most satnav programs in that it offers a 3D view while driving, spoken directions, 2D maps, and various other features, such as points of interest. Where TomTom tends to excel is that both the 3D view – which you spend most of your time using – and other features are a good balance of simple yet useful.

In practise the Brazil map was a similar experience to those I’ve used elsewhere. For the most part the map was accurate and informative. I already had some points of interest installed e.g. speed cameras, so I am unsure which actually came with the TomTom map (if anyone can advise on that I would be curious to know). A tip for those that use it, that Rua is shortened to R”, and Avenida is shortened to “Av”, although Alameda is still “Alameda”.

It wasn’t all gravy though. There were two major errors that would crop up repeatedly in São Paulo city:

1. Suggesting U-turns could be made, typically in avenues, when it was not actually possible or prohibited.

2. Suggesting left-hand turns, again typically onto avenues, when it was prohibited.

Both the above would be a pain for a relatively savvy driver who was used to Brazilian roads, but could lead to an accident in extreme circumstances for those who are not so savvy.

Ironically though while writing this review I received an email from TomTom that stated “na versão 8.15 2095, que foram baixados nas ltimas 6 semanas de 2008 podem apresentar erros de navegaão, em particular sugerindo de virar ou fazer curvas e retornos em lugares não permitidos.” (in version 8.15 2095, that was downloaded in the last 6 weeks of 2008, there were navigation errors, in particular that suggest you can turn or make U-turns in places that are not permitted). The instructions then stated to download the latest map in TomTom Home.

So hopefully TomTom have spotted the above problems and corrected most if not all of them, particularly due to their serious nature for drivers unfamiliar with Brazilian roads. I would be interested to hear from anyone who has the map update.

The only other problem I experienced seemed to be due to “map fidelity”, as when travelling to the countryside I purportedly came off the toll road, according to TomTom, and was driving in a neighbouring field. This happened for sufficiently long that it didn’t seem to be a satellite error, and more so a slight error in the location of the toll road. Not a showstopper, but again it might have proved confusing for an inexperienced driver.

Two caveats with the review:

1. I was only using TomTom in and around São Paulo city. I would certainly be interested to hear from others who use TomTom elsewhere in Brazil, as one of the useful features of TomTom is a fully integrated Brazil map, that doesn’t require map changes while driving across the country.

2. TomTom is not the only satnav product out there. Garmin is another manufacturer that I frequently see recommended, along with STI, and Airis, although I have not had a chance to try these. I am sure there are others, and it will pay to shop around. Again, if I can ask readers to let us know their experiences, either good or bad.

Readers comments:

Have a look into the following link, if you do not know it already.

http://www.tracksource.org.br

Recent forays into Uruguay and Argentina were also accomplished by the maps provided by another Peer user group in Argentina:

mark@www.gringoes.com.

Previous articles by Mark:

Around Brazil: Boiucanga
Brazil: São Paulo – The Forgotten City
Brazil: Mythbusting!
Brazil: Enough of the “Estrangeirismos”
Understanding Brazil: Sense of Humour
Brazil: The “Turistas” Storm in a Teacup
Understanding Brazil: Christmas and New Year’s Traditions
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 5
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 4
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 3
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 2
Brazil: An Interview with Marcia Loebick
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 2
Brazil: Google Maps Gets an Upgrade
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 1
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 1
Brazil: Daylight Savings Time
Brazil: Carjacking and Theft
Brazil: Airport Delays Grow Among Crash Speculation
Brazil: São Paulo’s International Film Festival (and The Fountain)
Brazil: Single Gringo Beware!
Brazil: The House of Coffee Comes Home
Brazil: Film Review
Brazil: The Portuguese Language Museum
Brazil: Election Time! Part 2
Brazil: Election Time! Part 1
Brazil: Torrent TV
Brazil: Book Review
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 2
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 1
The PCC Shows a New Level of Organisation
Brazil: Metr-ettiquette
Brazil: Trading Places
Brazil: São Paulo’s Pinacoteca
Brazil: Don’t Forget, You’re in Another Country!
Brazil: PCC Violence Returns to São Paulo
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 5
Brazil’s World Cup Defeat Party
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 4
Brazil: Japanese Standard Chosen for Digital TV
Brazil: NET Petition Feedback
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 3
Brazil: Football Love
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 2
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 1
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 3
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 2
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 1
GPS in Brazil
Brazil: PCC Attacks in São Paulo
Brazil: Tips on Buying or Renting an Apartment or House
Brazil: A Critical Sensitivity
Cleanliness is next to Brazilianiness
Brazil: Manners
Brazil: No Change, No Sale
Brazilian TV
Brazil: Ubatuba
Brazil: Professional Children
Brazil: We deliver… everything!
Brazil: Terrao Itlia
Brazil: A Layman’s Carnival Guide
Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?
Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?

By Mark Taylor
As is inevitable with the English language, it tends to creep into other languages. Of course this slow ingress of English into other languages is well known, having coined the term Franglish”, to describe those words adopted by the French language. English is supposed to have roots in French though, among other languages, so there’s a form of irony over one ingressing back into the other.

Portuguese and everday life in Brazil have not escaped the “contamination”. For good or for bad, the English language seems to be viewed as having this chique quality by some. Perhaps because the US and even the UK have or had such a great influence all around the world, hence it’s seen as the language of power.

One example of this English contamination here in Brazil are fashion T-shirts, that will often have peculiar expressions emblazoned across the front in English. I wonder if the wearer has any idea what they’re “saying” to everyone? English words are often used to accentuate as well, forming a peculiar combination. For example, “Big Limp” is written in 6 foot letters on a wall near our house to advertise the cleaning services of a local firm (“Limp” coming from the Portuguese verb to clean, Limpar. Hence we have “Big Clean”). The firm’s name conjures up, to me at least, the image of a pirate, replete with wooden leg and associated limp, turning up at the door with his vacuum cleaner. Big is an adjective that’s often used, a couple more examples being a local Bingo to us, Big Bingo, and the now extinct supermarket simply called “Big”.

Examples of noun forms can also be spotted, such as “Mega Sleep” (a bed shop). Sleep is the word in question of course, as although Mega is slang for great, cool, or amazing, in Portuguese it actually means large. Let’s not forget “Shopping Centers” as well, which is often contracted to “Shoppings” by Brazilians (“Voce quer ir ao shopping?”, which automatically translates to me with a bemused smile as “Do you want to go the shopping?”). Curiously though this is more British English than US English, who tend to refer to shopping centres as malls. Although in a twist of irony Brazilians use the US English form of centre: center.

What other English terms have you found in your day-to-day dealings in Brazil? I’m sure there are many! Let me know by email and I’ll add them to this article.

Readers comments:

I’m a Brazilian and I’m studying English. When I read your article about Portunglish or Engluguese I started to think in all English words we use in Brazil.

Many verbs in English were modified in Portuguese words. We use “deletar” (apagar) to say “delete”; “escanear” (olhar) to say “scan” ; Other words are used all time here in Brazil like: motoboy (a man who rides motorcycle), Free (for sale).

Therefore, many English words are present in our vocabulary

— Patricia Goncalves

I am an Irishman in Brasil, and I too find great bemusement and pleasure in observing the way english words have crept into the lingo here.

One I have noticed a lot of is “brother”, as in “e ai meu brother” = “whats up my brother”, using the english word instead of the portuguese “irmao”. Reminds me of an Irish mate back home who has started a trend of using “gringo” as a term of endearment instead of “mate” or “dude” etc…

— Dave

I recently read your article on the use of English in everyday Portuguese.

I find the most annoying instances to be the contractions of two-word English terms. You mentioned “shopping centers” becoming shoppings. Here are a few others:

top (top model)

home (now used by store sales staff as a contraction of “home theatre.”)

outdoor (outdoor sign or billboard)

note (notebook computer)

desk (sometimes used to describe a desktop computer, particularly in newspaper headlines)

miss (anyone who has won a beauty pagent, such as Miss Brasil, Miss America etc.)

Put them all together, and in English it might come out something like: I saw a top, who also happened to be a former miss, advertising a note on an outdoor. I was thinking about buying one, but I really needed a a desk. Plus, I didn’t have a lot of money because I had just purchased a home.

— David

Previous articles by Mark Taylor:

Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Understanding Brazil: Sense of Humour

By Mark Taylor
I’ve often heard it said that when you understand the sense of humour of a nation, then you understand it completely, as if it were the final piece in a puzzle. So with that thought in mind, is it possible to understand the Brazilian sense of humour? What forms of comedy do Brazilians enjoy? What programmes do Brazilians like? Is the Brazilian sense of humour any different from elsewhere?

It was as an English teacher several years ago that I first had these thoughts in mind. I was attending a pre-semester meeting at the school I worked at. All the teachers were gathered around the table, and I was the only non-Brazilian and native English speaker there. One of the teachers was criticising a book used to teach advanced English: The content isn’t particularly great”, she said, “even the jokes are rubbish, listen…”, and she thumbed to a page of the book and read. “What do you call an elephant with a machine gun?… Sir.” It was at this point that I burst out laughing. It wasn’t just the joke though, it was the rather surreal setting and the surprise. The co-ordinator beamed and said “well, it made Mark laugh, so I think the book’s OK.”

I was more fascinated by the reaction to the joke than the joke itself. Why was it that nobody else found it funny, did they simply not get it, or was it something deeper. We spent a few minutes discussing the joke, and explained the sense of “sir”, which most teachers didn’t quite understand. Even so, the joke simply wasn’t funny to the others even when translated to Portuguese.

When out with my wife’s family and friends the topic of conversation frequently turns to telling jokes, and I often wheel out the elephant joke to test their reaction, albeit translated to Portuguese: Como voce chama um elefante com uma metralhadora?… Senhor. Without fail the joke doesn’t get any laughs, but then I tell the story of the joke, which does get some laughs (also I finish the story off with the one and only Portuguese joke I can remember: “O que um peixe faz?… Nada”, particularly if folks aren’t that amused by the story).

In terms of other comedy, what is it that Brazilians enjoy? Of some interest is imported TV and film, which gives a clue that there is some overlap between Brazilians, and at least some of the rest of the world. I was bemused to discover that my mother-in-law, and many other Brazilians, love Mr. Bean (or “Meester Bin” as she calls him). For those who haven’t seen him, Mr. Bean is a childlike but adult character played by the British comedian Rowan Atkinson. The character gets into all sorts of odd situations, mostly self inflicted e.g. trying to use a paint can and a stick of dynamite to paint his living room. One advantage with Mr. Bean is that more or less there is no talking, as the comedy relies on visual situations. But here is one clue, that Brazilians seem to enjoy this style of slapstick comedy. This is reinforced by the extremely famous Brazilian comic, Didi, who relies on a lot of slapstick in his performances. From what I’ve seen of his films and shows I’m reminded a lot of another famous British slapstick comedian, Benny Hill.

One of the sharpest and funniest comedy programmes made for Brazilian TV is Casseta & Planeta. This features a core of comedians, who write general sketches, as well as sketches centred around current affairs. Not so different from programmes that are seen in North America and Europe. Casseta & Planeta relies on comedic forms like satire, particularly for its political comment. Whereas the other sketches rely on a mix of slapstick again, as well as anarchic and alternative styles. The Portuguese language often comes into play, where words are taken and modified to give some amusing meaning. This is something that’s particularly easy to do with Portuguese, and not so easy or often seen with English. An example that springs to mind is that of a sketch which centred around the word “cofrinho”. The word “cofre” means safe, in the sense of somewhere you lock away money and jewels. But the meaning had been perverted to refer to the cleft of someone’s buttocks, that can often appear when you need a belt for your trousers (so called “builder’s bum” in the UK). The idea was that you could keep things safe in your little cofrinho. I’m not doing a great job of explaining this in an amusing way. It would be much better to watch the sketch.

So these are some examples, but are there any overall conclusions to be made about understanding the Brazilian sense of humour? Well for starters slapstick is in. Other styles like anarchic, albeit close to slapstick, and parody are also popular, the latter particularly with politicians. What don’t tend to be as popular though are styles such as stand-up and improvisational. I’ve yet to see a stand-up comic on Brazilian TV, or some equivalent of the Comedy Club in São Paulo city at least. Ultimately though the devil is in the detail, and there are still situations and circumstances that Brazilians may not find funny. I certainly recommend avoiding anything involving elephants with machine guns.

What are your views on Brazilian comedy, do you think it’s markedly different from the rest of the world, or much the same? What are your favourite Brazilian comedians and programmes, or do you just have a good joke in Portuguese to tell us?

Readers Comments:

I really enjoyed reading your article, and generally agree with your observations. I think the Brazilians do have a good sense of humour, though sometimes it is seems a bit formula-like. What causes a lot of laughter is usually similar comedic contexts, situations… whether this be over a few beers laughing at the footballing antics of your fellow “pelada” friends or “A Grande Famlia” on the TV. Humour which is more, how can I put it, of the individualistic, bluff, or subtle variety (“stand-up” would fit here) such as sarcasm often fails to hit the mark. At least that is my experience! Humour is a significant part of that whole cultural dis-location which is part of many people’s experience of living abroad. I find I am sometimes quite misunderstood by a failure on my own part to modify my “style/humour”… e.g. people think I am being serious when I am joking (albeit, possibly in an acute/cynical/sarcastic way!) However, this “style” is, I guess, a part of my (more British?) personality… and hence humour is at the core of the quest of integration into another culture and understamding of it.

Well, my favourites are “A Grande Famlia” (though everyone seems to give me the impression it used to be better. Another friend cruelly says I only enjoy it because I can understand it, and in fact he makes an important point, it is very gratifying that I am now able to get a great insight into Brazilian culture through humour as locals enjoy it), and “Sob Nova Direão”, both on Globo.

Sorry I cant do jokes.

— Philip

Great Article. You have put into words what I have always felt about Brazilian humor. Their humor is much more physical than ours (in the USA) and they play on words quite a bit as you mentioned.

P.S. What did the elephants say when they saw Tarzan coming through the jungle? Nothing. They didn’t recognize him. He was wearing sunglasses!

— Hank

You are so right in your article! l’m a Brazilian living in London for the past 10 years. Married to an English guy with a very sharp sense of humour. This is where I learned the English sense of humour, which l’m very proud to have achieved.

Been back to Brazil to visit my family a couple of times, the English humour didn’t work. My mum thought I was serious, even with a smile on my face as a clue, and only ended up in tears trying to explain it was a joke!!

Anyway, love your article and good luck in Brazil.

— Lucy

If you have a comment on Mark’s article or would simply like to contact him then email mark@www.gringoes.com.

Previous articles by Mark:

Brazil: The “Turistas” Storm in a Teacup
Understanding Brazil: Christmas and New Year’s Traditions
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 5
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 4
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 3
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 2
Brazil: An Interview with Marcia Loebick
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 2
Brazil: Google Maps Gets an Upgrade
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 1
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 1
Brazil: Daylight Savings Time
Brazil: Carjacking and Theft
Brazil: Airport Delays Grow Among Crash Speculation
Brazil: São Paulo’s International Film Festival (and The Fountain)
Brazil: Single Gringo Beware!
Brazil: The House of Coffee Comes Home
Brazil: Film Review
Brazil: The Portuguese Language Museum
Brazil: Election Time! Part 2
Brazil: Election Time! Part 1
Brazil: Torrent TV
Brazil: Book Review
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 2
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 1
The PCC Shows a New Level of Organisation
Brazil: Metr-ettiquette
Brazil: Trading Places
Brazil: São Paulo’s Pinacoteca
Brazil: Don’t Forget, You’re in Another Country!
Brazil: PCC Violence Returns to São Paulo
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 5
Brazil’s World Cup Defeat Party
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 4
Brazil: Japanese Standard Chosen for Digital TV
Brazil: NET Petition Feedback
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 3
Brazil: Football Love
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 2
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 1
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 3
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 2
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 1
GPS in Brazil
Brazil: PCC Attacks in São Paulo
Brazil: Tips on Buying or Renting an Apartment or House
Brazil: A Critical Sensitivity
Cleanliness is next to Brazilianiness
Brazil: Manners
Brazil: No Change, No Sale
Brazilian TV
Brazil: Ubatuba
Brazil: Professional Children
Brazil: We deliver… everything!
Brazil: Terrao Itlia
Brazil: A Layman’s Carnival Guide
Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?
Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

,

Around Brazil: Boiucanga

By Mark Taylor
March 10, 2008

São Paulo state’s litoral norte (north coast) is popular with paulistas because of the cities, towns and associated beaches scattered along it that get them away from the hustle and bustle. Some are better than others though, so some time and effort in investigation is required in sorting the wheat from the chaff. I’ve written before about Ubatuba, another city and region along the litoral norte, and specifically Lzaro beach where I had a pleasant stay. I had my second stay towards the end of last year in Boiucanga, 3 hours drive away from São Paulo city.

Boiucanga isn’t as far as Ubatuba, situated before Maresias, São Sebastião, and Ilha Bela. It falls more into the town category, and has a smattering of shops including a small but relatively interesting shopping centre. The latter does a lot to lift the feel of the town, as it’s relatively clean and contemporary look is a bit at odds with some of the less clean back streets and run down areas – prefeitura take note. The shopping centre also has a small food court, and although it escapes having a McDonalds, it doesn’t escape a Bobs – although it appeared to be closed on our most recent visit. Further away from the shopping centre and on the main street, that runs parallel with the beach, there are a few more shops and restaurants which rapidly peter out as you go further away from the beach.

The beach itself is pleasant, about 1500m long, with a thick yellow sand – and perhaps most important of all is that it isn’t backed onto by towering hotels and apartment blocks. There’s plenty of shade in the eastern half with overhanging trees, and it doesn’t seem to attract anywhere near the level of hawkers that Guaruja and Santos do. At the very eastern end is a river, and if you’re as lucky as I was it’ll be populated by turkey vultures sunning themselves (pictured left). Swimming is only for the well practised, as the shore drops away dramatically causing you to be pounded by the waves near the beach, and there are currents to beware of as well. The other issue are borrachudos, a small black fly often found around water, both coastal and inland, that can leave a nasty bite, particularly to the allergic. Insect repellent is a must from the early evening onwards.

Although you’re unlikely to want to spend more than a day or two at Boiucanga it does provide a convenient jumping off point to places mentioned above, like Maresias, Ilha Bela, Ubatuba, and for those who don’t mind driving even places like Paraty (about 4 hours away). I recommend a stay at the pousada Tempo Rei, which is hidden away in some of Boiucanga’s unremarkable back streets, but is both pleasant and economic. Of course you can also use it as a jumping off point for investigating some of the less famous towns, cities and beaches of the litoral norte.

If you have a comment on Mark’s article or would simply like to contact him then email mark@www.gringoes.com.

Previous articles by Mark:

Brazil: São Paulo – The Forgotten City
Brazil: Mythbusting!
Brazil: Enough of the “Estrangeirismos”
Understanding Brazil: Sense of Humour
Brazil: The “Turistas” Storm in a Teacup
Understanding Brazil: Christmas and New Year’s Traditions
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 5
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 4
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 3
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 2
Brazil: An Interview with Marcia Loebick
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 2
Brazil: Google Maps Gets an Upgrade
Brazil: A Guide to Fernando de Noronha Part 1
Brazil: 14 Bis Centenary Part 1
Brazil: Daylight Savings Time
Brazil: Carjacking and Theft
Brazil: Airport Delays Grow Among Crash Speculation
Brazil: São Paulo’s International Film Festival (and The Fountain)
Brazil: Single Gringo Beware!
Brazil: The House of Coffee Comes Home
Brazil: Film Review
Brazil: The Portuguese Language Museum
Brazil: Election Time! Part 2
Brazil: Election Time! Part 1
Brazil: Torrent TV
Brazil: Book Review
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 2
Brazil: Whistle-stop Salvador Part 1
The PCC Shows a New Level of Organisation
Brazil: Metr-ettiquette
Brazil: Trading Places
Brazil: São Paulo’s Pinacoteca
Brazil: Don’t Forget, You’re in Another Country!
Brazil: PCC Violence Returns to São Paulo
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 5
Brazil’s World Cup Defeat Party
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 4
Brazil: Japanese Standard Chosen for Digital TV
Brazil: NET Petition Feedback
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 3
Brazil: Football Love
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 2
Brazil: A Recycled City Part 1
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 3
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 2
Brazil: 100 Things To Do in São Paulo Part 1
GPS in Brazil
Brazil: PCC Attacks in São Paulo
Brazil: Tips on Buying or Renting an Apartment or House
Brazil: A Critical Sensitivity
Cleanliness is next to Brazilianiness
Brazil: Manners
Brazil: No Change, No Sale
Brazilian TV
Brazil: Ubatuba
Brazil: Professional Children
Brazil: We deliver… everything!
Brazil: Terrao Itlia
Brazil: A Layman’s Carnival Guide
Brazil: Portunglish or Engluguese?
Brazil: Feira Food
Brazil: Bilhete Unico flexibility increases
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: U2 Ticket Chaos
Brazil: Finding Work
Brazil: Termites
Brazil: Queues, Queues, Queues
Brazil: Let’s Go Fly a Kite!
Brazil… the Film That Is
Brazil: The Bus to Nowhere
Brazil: Piracy
Brazil: Gestures
Brazil: Proclamation of the Republic
Brazilian Film Review
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Finados (Day of the Dead)
Interjections, exclamations and onomatopoeia in Brazilian Portuguese
Brazil: Halloween
Brazil says “No” to banning firearms
Brazil Humour: Phone Etiquette
Brazil’s Gun Referendum
Brazil: Scams
Brazil: Moby Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 5
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 4
Brazil: Avril Lavigne at Pacaembu
Moby in Brazil
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 3
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 2
Brazilian Film Review
Brazil: Keeping in touch via the Internet – Part 1
Brazil: First season of Lost repeated on AXN

Can’t make this up