By Alison McGowan
February 28, 2012

What an extraordinary privilege to wake up in the Casarão Alto Mucug – to the early morning sun streaming through the windows, to the sound of the waves breaking on the beach below and to the uninterrupted view of the sea stretching out in front of you. But then the Casarão (or Big House) is extraordinary in many ways. Designed by world renowned architect Luciano Soares this is a place where rustic meets chic, where Portobello road kitsch meets handmade Indian fabrics and Indonesian and Brazilian handicrafts, all the evidence of owner Eloisa’s world travels and eclectic taste.

Perched on top of the cliffs of Alto Mucug, only a few minutes walk to the beautiful deserted beach of Pitinga in one direction and the town centre of Arraial d’Ajuda in the other there are just 8 apartments here divided between the main house and a separate building just across the grass where many suites have verandas and sea views. In between the two and strategically situated is a heated ofuro perfect for lounging on long evenings just looking out to sea.

I came in low season when everything is quieter, the beaches deserted and the best restaurants more relaxed. But for anyone who just wants to chill the pousada is the place to be. A little piece of paradise and another wonderful addition to the Hidden “special collection”.

Arraial d’Ajuda was just a sleepy Indian fishing village called Santo Amaro when it was discovered by the Portuguese in the early 1500s. And it probably would have stayed that way had it not been for the discovery of a certain statue and rumours of miracles, which encouraged visitors from far and wide.

These days Ajuda has become a mecca of a different sort – for predominantly college students spreading out from nearby Porto Seguro, attracted by the beaches, bars, boutiques and clubbing. In high season the place buzzes with crowds of young people hanging out and loud music playing in the main street, Rua do Mucug, and on the beach. If that is not your scene make sure you come off-season, and outside major holidays when the beaches are deserted, the town reverts back to its normal sleepy beautiful state and a much more gentle style of music accompanies your evening.

Not To Be Missed
– Pitinga beach, fabulous pink cliffs and great seafood in the beach bars
– Stuffed filet of fish on the Praia do Pescador (Fisherman’s beach)
– Aipim restaurant for a dinner with a ginger caipirinha
– Igreja d’Ajuda (the main church)

Starpoints
* Location, close to village and beach
* Sea views from suites and ofuro hot tub
* Huge breakfast table where you can work looking straight out to sea
* Personal service from the owner and staff

Try a different place if…
… luxury means flat screen TVs or power showers. Here the luxury is in the atmosphere and the views

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Capim Santo, Trancoso, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Guesthouse Bianca, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d’Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airão, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Chão, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casarão da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

By Joe Naab
February 28, 2012

Do You Have an Income Strategy?
The most important practical” part of life, no matter where you live, is supporting yourself financially. For most of those who brave the path to start a new life in Brazil, having an income and work strategy in mind before arriving is essential. The Brazilian job market is not like the U.S. job market nor is the mindset of an American immigrant to Brazil like the mindset of a Mexican, Puerto Rican or other latin american immigrant who moves to the U.S. Americans tend to have higher expectations for income and standard of living. There are many jobs in the labor market that they simply won’t do. Further, even the better paying jobs for illegal immigrants in the U.S. aren’t available here to foreign immigrants to Brazil in the same form and compensation.

The Most Common Income Strategies for Foreigners in Brazil
I will list here and briefly explain the most common income strategies I’ve seen foreigners employ here in Brazil. This will be followed by what I think is actually the most important strategy of all – which is to first design the most inexpensive lifestyle you can to reduce the amount you need to earn.

Independent Wealth
Obviously, having oodles of money already makes living in Brazil the most fantastic thing in the world. The issue that arises here is to manage your investments well, whether you bring your money into Brazil or not. The next important issue is getting permission to stay in Brazil. For those who don’t qualify for a marriage visa or other type of permanent visa, the most likely course is to create a small business to get Brazil’s Business Investor Permanent Visa. A wealthy person may not want to run a business. That’s okay. You can create a business that invests in land, for example, buy land in the name of this business and you’ve got your permanent visa. This is how I got mine.

Working Remotely Online
The next best strategy is to work online. This doesn’t necessarily mean that you have to be a technologist, such as a web designer or a professional blogger, etc. These are great, of course, but it can be simpler than that. Many jobs now in the U.S. economy allow for “telecommuting”, taking advantage of email, skype and other web technology to allow them to work from home. Your home can be anywhere. Today, stock brokers can live anywhere in the world, for example. Part of my work is in coaching and small business consulting. My clients all live overseas. With this strategy, think less about finding work in Brazil and more about finding something in your home country or elsewhere that you can do from anywhere in the world. Keep your earnings there and draw it out from an ATM machine here.

Live Here Half the Year and Work at Home Half the Year
I have several friends who have designed their lives such that they live and work in their home country half the year and come to live in Brazil without work the other half of the year. Some of them may do some work remotely from here. This is a great strategy.

Creating a Legal Small Business in Brazil
You can create and run a small business in Brazil and you don’t need a permanent visa to do it. You need the visa to live here more than six months out of the year. So, you can have a manager run your business while you’re away, you can gamble and stay year-round and hope you don’t get caught. The best permanent solution for this, however, is to invest the R$150,000 minimum and get your business investor’s permanent visa in the process. This business can be anything you like- a caf, restaurant, language school, real estate company, web design, construction, etc. Choose wisely. If you’ve never started a business before in your own country expect it to many times more difficult and challenging here.

Getting a Salaried Job in Brazil
Any salaried job requires either a work visa directly from that employer, or that you have a permanent visa that allows you to work, such as a marriage visa. Outside of the major international corporations in São Paulo and other metropolitan centers, the best paying jobs in Brazil are public sector jobs, and you must have a Brazilian passport to qualify (i.e. more than a permanent visa). Further, in order to qualify for a work visa, your employer will have to demonstrate that you have a specialty that requires that they employ you and not a Brazilian. These types of jobs are often lined up in advance.

I wouldn’t encourage anyone to come here thinking that they could get married real fast, get a permanent visa for it, then suddenly find a decent paying salaried job. You’d have to be exceptionally skilled at something to earn a decent wage and in that case you’d likely be an entreprenuer.

Working Under the Table
Working under the table is the career of choice (i.e. necessity) for immigrants all over the world. In order to make this work you must read the next section below to understand how reducing your cost of living can make this work. This type of work doesn’t pay well, but if it didn’t pay enough to live off of, half of Brazil would be living in the streets. Can you teach something- English, music lessons, etc.? Can you build something, such as homes or part of a home? Can you work in a restaurant or bar? People don’t tip here and the pay is very low.

I want to share a caution with teaching English. Just because you speak it, doesn’t mean you teach it well. And if you don’t teach it well you will eventually lose your students and word-of-mouth referrals. The best way to gain clients is to market like crazy, with flyers all over town. This is a double-edged sword. Any great place for you to put a flyer is a great place for a Brazilian individual or language school that offers English lessons to put their flyer. In no time at all they will see your promotion, they will not want you there competing with them, they will assume you are working illegally and they will rat you out right away. You’ll have to leave the country. I’ve seen this happen several times here. You have to be stealth about it.

It is Essential to Lower Your Cost of Living Profile
I have only a small space to touch on this here. A section of my book is devoted to this. The less you spend, the less you need to make. Can you live in a tiny apartment? Can you have roommates? Can you buy whole food at a food market and make your meals at home? Can you go without television? Can you find fun things to do that don’t involved eating out at restaurants and partying at bars? For those who don’t yet know how much money they’ll make, it’s critical to design a low cost lifestyle, and Brazil is a good place to do this.

In Closing
I hope you got some value from this article and video. Brazil is a fantastic place to live and for those with the determination to do what’s necessary to start a new life here, all is possible. Good luck to you in all you do.

Joe Naab is the author of Brazil for Life!, a how-to living guide for those who want to start a new life or have a second home in Brazil. He offers a two-hour private phone consultation for those who want more specialized information to suit their specific needs. He also coaches people through the entire expatriation process and can help those interested to obtain Brazil’s Business Investor Permanent Visa. He can be found at http://brazilforlife.com and reached by email at info@brazilforlife.com.

February 28, 2012

This is our regular column called Ask a Brazilian”, the idea being that you can quite literally ask a question of a Brazilian – for those issues you aren’t sure about but perhaps dare not ask someone else. It is meant as a bit of fun and answers should not be construed as expert opinion or the definitive reply on the matter. For that reason we ask you to please send your own comments and experiences in order to add to our replies.

Why don’t Brazilians ask for things politely, rather than demanding (Give me a coke. I want beef. Get the keys. Get the towel.) ? I rarely hear please, thank you, I would like, can I have, etc. And when I say these things in Portuguese, people giggle a little sometimes.

— Jennifer

Dear Jennifer,

That’s funny. I guess being polite in Brazil is more about the tone than the words. Depending on how you ask for something, “please” and etc. are automatically implied. Understand what I mean?

For example: Jennifer, pega uma coca pra mim? (Bring me some coke), wouldn’t need a “por favor” at all. Even in a restaurant (for us Brazilians) if you say, “Eu queria uma coca”, (I would like a coke), in a very nice tone, that also has the “please” implied and no one would get mad.

I don’t know… maybe what your ears don’t get in Portuguese are the variants of that tone I’m talking about. Or, if you hear it in a rude sense, “Me d uma coca”, than it’s impolite not to use “por favor, etc”.

As for “thank you”, that also can be substituted by a wink or a smile.

Let me know what you think,

Thank you for coming by,

Vanessa Agricola

I have been living with a Brazilian lady who is incredibly insecure and jealous. Her ex-husband married her and brought her to America and then he cheated on her. His actions destroyed our relationship before it even started.

She gets completely irate if I miss her calls or do not respond to a text immediately. When I call her or text her I do not get mad or upset as I understand that she is working and is busy or she would answer. I have to work, and on the rare occasion I’m in a meeting and can’t answer or respond she literally freaks out. She calls me names, says I’m not where I said I am, always has to know were I’m at exactly at all times, not that it matters. It’s the Spanish inquisition I have to go through. She has accused me of looking at other women when she is, and has been, the apple of my eye since the day we met, and would if we lived to be a thousand. I cannot even go to the gym and workout it’s unbelievable… What’s worse, she is absolutely beautiful and I tell her that everyday as many times as possible… I am not trying to paint a perfect picture of myself because I am not. I do wrong, but I do not lie or cheat period. We do not do things with other couples or in groups because she always finds something to get upset about. It really doesn’t bother me that we do everything together as I enjoy her company immensely. If I tell her to go shopping with her friends she automatically thinks I have something planned.

I do almost everything for her. I do all the cooking, I pick up after myself, clean things that need to be. I come from a strong military upbringing where duty, honor, integrity, loyalty, health, & respect are the foundation of my beliefs.

I have never experienced this insecure, jealous, & possessive behavior in my entire life. I can’t take it anymore.

— Matt

Hello,

Your trust is overwhelming, Matt, thank you.

I will try to tell you about Brazilian jealousy. I say try because to be honest I don’t know much about it.

I can see Brazilian man aren’t trusting with blind eyes, also that Brazilian woman are in a state of alert, I can see that going on here, but what you describe, to me, is much more than I can see.

Let’s say women are emotional, have hormones, can go mad, and Brazilian women can go twice as emotional than that… Even so, again, no one is the same. If your girlfriend has some bad history with some bad man (Brazilian or not), you are not that man (you’re not even Brazilian! :). As a human, she should be able to move forward and trust someone, humans should be able to do that, don’t you think? Even Brazilian woman should be able to find peace in a relationship, I think.

Hope you find yours,

Vanessa Agricola

Readers comments:

First off, it sounds like Jennifer is working here in Brazil as a waitress or in some other area of the hospitality industry and secondly has not yet got a full grasp of the Portuguese language and the very subtle nuances in its day-to-day use. I’ve been living in Brazil for ten years and I do not agree with her in the least. I find Brazilians extremely polite. It is not always what the individual says as much as the manner and tone in which it is spoken that gives it a sense of politeness or rudeness. Having said that, I also can’t count the thousands of times I’ve heard Brazilians saying “por favor, por gentileza, fazendo favor, pode, lamento mas… and obrigado or obrigado eu”. The way that many Brazilians say some things clearly implies ‘por favor’ as you rightly pointed out, others still use it anyway. In many English speaking countries conservative tradition and a sense of properness have a much more rigid influence on the spoken language – please and thank-you almost become obligatory. I would suspect that Jennifer is from one of those cultures. I believe that her misunderstanding is more likely based on the cultural differences than any other factor. She’ll catch on in time, I’m sure.

— William

In my own personal experience I have found Brazillian men to be extremely jealous, and for the first time in my life having to ‘lay down the law’ in relation to how I expect my man to behave. (For example, you cannot punch the man serving you at the petrol station simply for looking at you!) I have had to explain that jealousy is unacceptable, insulting to our relationship, the honour and love we have grown, and that it is a sign of a less aware and developed personality. It’s not as prevalent now… such situations don’t upset him like they used to. I guess that’s what security in a relationship delivers. I choose to trust my partner when we are apart, for 3-4 months on end, and it has served us well. I don’t think all Brazillian men are cheaters… I think this is changing, with younger men anyway… but the jealousy thing is widespread across the entire social group of men I have met here. They openly admit it. They even admit that their own jealousy has ruined their relationships to people they love! Oh, and in relation to the other post… I am one of the lucky ones… I have my car door opened for me, my door locked from the inside if he sees the door is unlocked as we are travelling, and my wonderful ‘number’ insists on paying for our meals and outings. But he is lucky too… because I have taught him that it’s OK to be modern and let me pay sometimes also. There’s nothing sexier than a person who still has their integrity, inner power and does not allow their relationship to define their life… these wonderful things are what brought them together in the first place.

— Anon

Are there any burning questions you have about Brazil, or other issues that you’re curious about, such as Brazilian culture? If so, send your questions to gringoes@www.gringoes.comwith “Ask a Brazilian” in the subject. We will forward to our Brazilian experts, and publish the best questions (and replies) on the site.

Previous articles in this series:

Ask a Brazilian: Men
Ask a Brazilian: Couples and Separate Rooms
Ask a Brazilian: São Paulo Safety
Ask a Brazilian: Jealousy
Ask a Brazilian: Nails and Spanish
Ask a Brazilian: Tipping
Ask a Brazilian: UK Visa Issues
Ask a Brazilian: Gossip
Ask a Brazilian: Real Estate Scam
Ask a Brazilian: Lacking Change and I Touch Myself
Ask a Brazilian: Tampons
Ask a Brazilian: A Brazilian CV
Ask a Brazilian: Gender Stereotypes
Ask a Brazilian: Answering a Question
Ask a Brazilian: Revoked Visa
Ask a Brazilian: Pedestrian Problems
Ask a Brazilian: Trash
Ask a Brazilian: Tiles
Ask a Brazilian: Headlights
Ask a Brazilian: Differences and Love
Ask a Brazilian: What Do the Police Do?
Ask a Brazilian: Contractor Frustrations
Ask a Brazilian: English Books and Brazilian Boys
Ask a Brazilian: Cold Cahaca
Ask a Brazilian: Interruptions
Ask a Brazilian: Travel and Security Concerns
Ask a Brazilian: Gestures and Toys
Ask a Brazilian: Hispanics or Latinos, and Duvets
Ask a Brazilian: Overbearing Sogros
Ask a Brazilian: Hotels and Bank Transfers
Ask a Brazilian: Swimming, Showers and New Year’s
Ask a Brazilian: Making Friends
Ask a Brazilian: Female Etiquette
Ask a Brazilian: Washing Machines
Ask a Brazilian: Picking Teeth
Ask a Brazilian: Lozenge or Candy?
Ask a Brazilian: Liberal or Jealous?
Ask a Brazilian: Truck Wheels
Ask a Brazilian: Tolerance
Ask a Brazilian: Screens
Ask a Brazilian: Brazilian Wax
Ask a Brazilian: Flashing Lights
Ask a Brazilian: Lemon and Limes
Ask a Brazilian: Shocking Showers

February 28, 2012

Meet Scott Hudson who has visited Brazil, and is planning to move soon. Read the following interview in which he tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

My name is Scott. I’m 38 from Perth, Australia. I will be moving to Brazil very soon to be with my fiance full time after visiting there a couple of times.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

My first trip to Brazil was only in March 2011 to visit my then girlfriend’s homeland. I loved it and knew I had to go back again. So after the first 3 weeks there I went back in December 2011 for 2 months to spend the Christmas and New Year period there with her.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

First impressions? Amazing food, people and vibe. The vibe I felt was something I can’t explain.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Well I am not a ‘homesick’ person. But having dealt with some of the bureaucracy here, I’m sure it will be the ease of things at home. Oh and of course the family will be missed.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Definitely the bureaucracy and red tape. Frustration of tying to open a bank account. Getting my foreigners ID was a painful day, but seeing the Brazilians accepting certain things about the government that you would never see in Australia. I don’t mention it, but it’s definitely in your face everyday.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

I would say it’s every moment I spend with my fiance. Hahahahaha! Visiting Rio and seeing the amazing views and sights from the Christ statue and Sugar Loaf mountain. Meeting and spending Christmas with my fiance’s family who don’t speak and English, and us meeting for the first time was certainly memorable!

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

I love the country and how warm and friendly the people are. the food is so good and how it teaches me to slow down and learn to wait. Hahahahahaha.

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Well most of my experiences with going to a restaurant or place on a few occasions would be Panelinha in Goiania. They do traditional Brazilian food and being very close to where we stay we tend to go a bit. I’ve been to so many in Rio or Brasilia or São Paulo but only ever once during a trip there.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

I have so many funny stories. From forgetting that the ‘OK’ gesture doesn’t mean the same thing there. I did it in a restaurant to the waiter. He was horrified! My fiance needed to quickly explain what I meant. The little differences and forgetting some things makes for some funny moments.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

So many things! Language aside, things like the showers and kitchen sinks. I’m used to hot and cold taps. Hahahahhahaha. Glad wrap doesn’t come in the cardboard box with the cutting edge. Trivial things mainly. Of course what the government does for people in Australia compared to Brazil that is really noticeable. Red tape and bureaucracy is well know in Brazil.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

Well I’ve been lazy with my Portuguese. I know 100 words but I can’t construct sentences or pronounce some properly. When I move (May 2012), I’m going on a student visa to study Portuguese so hopefully in a year or two I can say I’m pretty good at it.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

From what I’ve seen, and most other foreigners say is don’t expect it to be like home. Accept it for what it is. The good and the bad. The good outweighs the bad. Enjoy it and learn some of he language and try different foods. Experience as much of it as you can. Visit different places and see that Brazil has so much to offer.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

I don’t know much about São Paulo but I do with Rio, Brasilia and Goiania. The three places I’ve spent most of my time in. We all know about the things in Rio to do. Christ statue is an amazing view of Rio. Of course Sugar Loaf mountain has some amazing views too. Go to the beaches and also Lapa on a Friday or Saturday night. The many restaurants there are on offer in Rio.

Brasilia has some good restaurants and sights to see. I prefer the smaller towns. Pirenopolis in Goias is a favorite of mine. Cobblestone roads, waterfalls everywhere. I find it a nice break from the bigger cities.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Elaine Vieira – South Africa
Rich Sallade – USA
Michael Smyth – UK
Chris Caballero – USA
Wiliam Stewart – USA
Meredith Noll – USA
Mike Smith – UK
Jan Hillen – Belgium
Arne Rasmussen – Denmark
Don Fenstermaker – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

By Alison McGowan
February 8, 2012

The golden light streams through the windows of my high-ceilinged whitewashed suite at the Pousada Calypso and once again I smile, knowing I have found another hidden gem: a beautiful Portuguese/Brazilian owned place with great accommodation, set in lush tropical gardens, only minutes from all the action of the famous Quadrado square.

There are 10 suites here, including lofts, bungalows and more standard rooms and all are well maintained with air-conditioning, fans, flat screen TVs and excellent bathrooms. There is also a great sitting/breakfast area full of local art and handicrafts. No pool though?” “On purpose” replies owner Mari. “We are really close to some of the best beaches in Brazil and that’s the place to be”. For those who have to be near water there is a lovely gazebo with a whirlpool surrounded by tropical plants and birds in the centre of the pousada but I for one would take Mari’s advice and take the short stroll down to the sand.

Trancoso lies forty five minutes drive to the south of Arraial d’Ajuda and an hour from the balsa or ferry which brings you over from Porto Seguro. Originally an Indian fishing community it was founded by the Jesuit priests in 1583 and the famous church of St John the Baptist of the Indians was built on the site of the original 16th construction, at the top of a cliff overlooking a never-ending turquoise sea. From here it is just a short walk down to the beaches and beach bars of Nativos, Trancoso and Coqueiros

This is a place which manages to combine the best of the old and the new, the chic and the laid back. Boutique shops now inhabit the colourful former fishermen’s cottages round the quadrado or main square which is the focal point of the town and restaurants spread out onto the grass with pretty table cloths and candles and pretty prices to match.

This is a place where you can get as much action as you want – from snorkelling, golf, tennis, mountain biking, horse-riding, surfing and kitesurfing to capoeira and forró dance lessons. The nightlife also offers choice with restaurants vying with bars and all night dancing places. But Trancoso also has its gentle side. It is a super friendly place where people talk to you in the streets and the pace of life is much slower than a normal beach resort. For me one of the best things to do is just to go with the flow, sleep in (with earplugs!) and chill out, soaking in the beauty of an extraordinary place as yet unspoilt by mass tourism.

Not To Be Missed
– shopping for artesanato (local handicrafts)
– the quadrado at full moon when it often rises full red
– restaurants : Capim Santo, Maritaka and Cantinho Doce
– portinha kilo restaurant at lunchtime
– Jonas’ beach bar
– beaches of Rio da Barra and Biribiri

Starpoints
* Location right near the quadrado
* Excellent value, beautiful accommodation
* Friendly knowledgeable owners

Try a different place if…
… you need a pool or if you don’t want to be near the action

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Maris, Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, São Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Chão, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casarão da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

By Steven Nelson
February 8, 2012

One of the most adventurous activities that you can do in Brazil, or anywhere else for that matter, is to take a Tandem Hang-Gliding lesson in Rio de Janeiro that has you taking off from the mountain and landing on the beach.

The flights are done as a first lesson in hang-gliding with a fully qualified instructor with many hours experience of flying in the area and elsewhere around Brazil and the world. Full safety instructions and practice take-offs and landings are done before you are strapped into your equipment. Helmets and safety harness are included for every learner, and videos make part of the instruction as you sign up for your lesson at the west end of São Conrado Beach in Rio. This beach is on the other side of the Dois Irmaos (‘Two Brothers’) peaks that can be seen in the background of most photos looking along Ipanema and Leblon Beaches, and in the shadow of the mighty Pedra da Gavea.

The take-off ramp sits near the top of Pedra Bonita, a 696m/2,297ft high mountain set in the Tijuca Forest National Park, and covered with Atlantic Rainforest on its slopes. There is a R$15 entry fee to pay to access the ramp inside the park, and this makes part of the instructions at the bottom of the hill. Once you have signed up, you and your wings will be whisked up through the steep, winding roads of Vila Canoa and into the forest. After you have climbed up the mountain to the ramp at 636m/2,099ft, you will begin the process of jumping off it.

As the instructor finalises the preparations of the wings, you will also be helped with the putting on of your helmet and safety harness, just in case your hands are not working as they should! The spectacular view, way down to the high-rise buildings of São Conrado may induce a few nerves at this point. A couple of practice runs at the top of the ramp give you the idea of how to take off and overcome any nerves. It really is quite simple, all you have to do is to run and look to the horizon. Most people can manage that!

The first moment of take off is of course the one that induces most adrenaline as your feet begin to run on fresh air and your stomach drops with the wings. You soon begin to soar high above the forest, circling above the hillside houses Vila Canoa and São Conrado, with the Gavea Golf & Country Club below you. Your eagle-eye views take in the spread of the Rocinha Favela, the Avenida Niemeyer leading to Leblon and the Joa Flyover and Tunnels that take traffic around the rocks to Barra da Tijuca.

If the winds are favourable, you can take the controls as you wind slowly downwards, before you head out over the clear Atlantic Ocean, swooping again to gain your landing course. Your final descent comes into the wind on the sands of Praia Pepino, with your legs unharnessed to enable you to run with the hang-glider. One final push and your wings rear up and pull to a stop, with your feet safely on the sand once more.

You will find the smile doesn’t leave your face as you discuss the flight with your friends, and look over the photos and video from the wing-cam with your instructor, who may well also be smiling. Your happiness is their spiritual food as they say.

Even if your first lesson is your only flight, you are guaranteed at leave one very special memory of your time in Brazil after your tandem hang-gliding experience in Rio de Janeiro.

Activity Information: Tandem Hang-Gliding Lessons are limited by the weather of course. Heavy rain, strong winds and low clouds can all mean that flights are not possible at certain times.

Weight Limit: There is a 95kg/209lb maximum weight limit for the tandem hang-gliding flights in Rio de Janeiro. If conditions are perfect, flights for slightly larger people may be possible.

Age Limit: 16 Years Old is the lower age limit. There is no upper age limit, and we’ve flown with senior citizens approaching their 70th birthdays! If people of advanced years can manage with no fear, then anyone below 40 years old has no excuses at all not to fly!

You can visit Steve’s blog at Around Brazil: The Botanical Gardens, Rio de Janeiro
Around Brazil: Praia do Pontal, Macumba, Prainha & Grumari (Rio de Janeiro)
Around Brazil: Tijuca Forest, Rio de Janeiro

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February 8, 2012

Meet Bill Holloway who moved to Brazil over 20 years ago. Read the following interview in which he tells us about some of his most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I am an actively retired physician. Vila Mariana in São Paulo has been my home for the past 23 years. I initiated my medical practice in Akron, OH. Then, in 1977, I moved to the desert city, Hemet, in southern California. Since moving to Brazil I’ve had the freedom to do what I enjoy. I no longer practice medicine. I continue my personal education through the Internet. Occasionally, I make presentations at the www.billholloway.com

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

For residence, I arrived in December 1988. What brought me here is a long story. In 1976, I was invited by the Instituto Brasileiro de Anlise Transacional to begin a program of teaching and supervising a group of psychologists and psychiatrists about newer methods in psychotherapy. During the ensuing 10 years, I made more than 25 visits to continue that activity. In 1982, I made the connection with a marvelous woman, now my wife, Maria de Lourdes Alves Vidal, a clinical psychologist. When I closed my medical practice, it made sense to live in São Paulo where my wife was well-established as a professional. All in all, I had a great experience in my years of traveling here and the decision to move was easy and continues to be rewarding.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

My first impression was many years ago, prior to reestablishment of democracy. I loved the people I met and the importance of relationships, music, dance and artistic expression. In spite of difficult political and economic policies, people managed to find their happiness. Of course, my first impressions were formed in São Paulo, which certainly is different from most of Brazil. I’m certain that those who initially see the interior” of Brazil have a very different experience.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Infrequent direct contact with my seven children and their families. Happily, the video options on the internet afford me frequent opportunities to “visit” with them. Second most, I occasionally miss conveniences and quality that exist in the US.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Several years ago, after having been prey for a pickpocket, who immediately used my American Express card, I had the unauthorized charges to my account. Though I had reported the theft within one hour, AMEX refused to delete the illicit charges. I then found that the SAC operation was very secretive and no one would divulge the physical location. Determined as I was, it took about two-months and much persistence to find the office, (concealed within a credit rating company). The first question asked was, “How did you find us?” After a very short discussion, they agreed to cancel the illicit charges.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

Without hesitation, I must say that my most memorable experience was meeting my wife. Next to that was my hospitalization for kidney surgery at Albert Einstein, where I found the quality of medical care equal to any university hospital in the US. Thirdly, I had the opportunity to participate with two samba schools in Rio, once in costume, the other as a “director” during the parade – amazing spectacles both.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The “warmth” of the culture. In spite of the fact that São Paulo is a huge and impersonal city, relationships with friends is equal to that I have with my family and friends in the US. I am sometimes surprised to read in this newsletter about the problems ex-patriots have encountered in relationships. What many Americans do not understand is the difference in cultural values derived from the very different origins of Latin Americans (obedience to authority) and that in the US (question authority).

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

I prefer more modest restaurants that serve very good food. There are several that we frequent. As Mineiras (Saturdays & Sundays best) and Dr. Tche (Argentinian) on Frana Pinto in Vila Mariana. Arte Esfiha, Rua Tumiar in Paraiso. Churrascaria Boi na Brasa (baby beef) on Marqus de It. Caf Girondino near São Bento monastery. As Veia on Estrada Inez in the Cantereira mountains (velhao.com.br).

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Initially, while learning Portuguese I had difficulty understanding the difference between “ser” and “estar.” My wife carefully explained about the difference between the permanent and the temporary, which made sense until one day I was reading the newspaper. There I read that, “fulano est enterrado.” Then on another occasion, I learned that, “fulano casado.” So, being buried is temporary and being married is permanent.

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

To oversimplify, in the US it is “what you know” that is more important. In Brazil, it is “who you know” that is more important. But that is not all. Brazilians, having lived for so long with oppression of one kind or another, have developed the ability to “roll with the punches” and find pleasure in the simple arts of everyday life. That may be a bit difficult to detect in São Paulo, but if you allow yourself to participate in the life of families, it is apparent. On a more mundane note, highways and byways. Having to dodge huge defects in the pavement of many federal highways was a shocker.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

While I am understood by Brazilians, I have not been able to accurately reproduce the nasal quality of the “a” and “o” with a tilde. When to use the “” also remains a mystery. I am comfortable with everyday use of Portuguese, but there is much that I lack. Because my wife is fluent in English, at home we use a mixed language that serves us well. One of my challenges is to remember that possessive pronouns must match the gender of the object, not the owner. Conversation in groups frequently leaves me out of touch because I cannot follow several topics, as I might in English. Another challenge is related to the regional differences in the way the language is spoken.

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

If you will be living here, establish a relationship with an English-speaking physician and dentist that are available to you for urgencies. Additionally, don’t expect things to work as smoothly in Brazil as they do in the US – prepare to live without all the conveniences or you will be perpetually unhappy. Socially, the various ex-pat groups may be most appealing because they are “like you.” However, when you have the opportunity, cultivate friendship with Brazilians and learn to enter their social world – you will be rewarded with their warm acceptance of your newness to the culture. Brazilians that know some English often want to talk with you, even if they only know a few words. Do the same, when you only know a few words in Portuguese. I have learned one useful phrase, “Por favor, fale mais lento.”

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

If you must stay in or near São Paulo, visit the various art museums, they have beautiful collections. The botanical garden is another nice afternoon. If possible, visit Embu das Artes on a weekend. If not possible, visit Praa da Republica on a Sunday. A day trip to Campos do Jordão in the mountains or to Guaraj on the coast are OK if you start early. If the time you have is more generous, first I suggest traveling to Rio using the Rio-Santos coastal highway, stopping for an overnight in Paraty. With even more time, Iguazu Falls or the older regions of Minas Gerais – Ouro Preto and Mariana are attractive choices.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Pieter Kommerij – Netherlands
Robyn and Willem Van Der Merwe – South Africa
Danielle Carner – USA
Jaya Green – USA
Andrew Dreffen – Australia
Marcus Lockwood – New Zealand
Jonathan Russell – USA
Jeff Eddington – USA
Rod Saunders – USA
Ken Van Zyl – South Africa
Angus Graham – UK
Anne Morddel – USA
Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia