November 15, 2011

This is our regular column called Ask a Brazilian”, the idea being that you can quite literally ask a question of a Brazilian – for those issues you aren’t sure about but perhaps dare not ask someone else. It is meant as a bit of fun and answers should not be construed as expert opinion or the definitive reply on the matter. For that reason we ask you to please send your own comments and experiences in order to add to our replies.

I have been dating a Brazilian in my home country for 6 months, and he proposed to me on the phone while he was in Brazil. Then we had a problem and he just disappeared without any notice, not even saying goodbye. I was checking his Facebook page and found out that he is/was going out with other women while he was in Brazil. This was also while I was in my home country and I was on a business trip outside my home country, and he was working in my home country where we met for the first time. Is it so common that once Brazilian men are left alone for short or long period they start going with other women? Is it so common for Brazilian men to say I love you and I want to marry you so fast to any foreign women and just disappear with no hint? I would like to know about Brazilian men’s manners and way of thinking, because all that he did sounds so strange. Is divorce so common and easy in Brazil? He was divorced twice.

— Sarah

Dear Sarah,

I guess it’s part of life, we sometimes fall for the wrong person, right? As far as being common or not for a man to be a perfect idiot… if not common for you then of course it isn&#145t something you should live with. Again and again, there’s no such thing as Brazilian man are all idiots, there are different people everywhere. Is it common in Brazil that man are idiots? Yes. And apparently you just picked one of those. Send him to hell, and don&#145t quit believing there is also heaven, here or wherever you are.

About divorce, it is not easy to divorce in Brazil, I mean there are papers, lawyers, money spent and lots of bureaucracy, aside from the emotional damage… but apparently cheaters don&#145t get any of that.

Good luck in the future,

Vanessa

Are there any burning questions you have about Brazil, or other issues that you’re curious about, such as Brazilian culture? If so, send your questions to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Ask a Brazilian” in the subject. We will forward to our Brazilian experts, and publish the best questions (and replies) on the site.

Previous articles in this series:

Ask a Brazilian: Renting
Ask a Brazilian: Couples and Separate Rooms
Ask a Brazilian: Investments and Lateness
Ask a Brazilian: São Paulo Safety
Ask a Brazilian: Family Closeness
Ask a Brazilian: Jealousy
Ask a Brazilian: Waxing and Electronics
Ask a Brazilian: Nails and Spanish
Ask a Brazilian: Easter and Surnames
Ask a Brazilian: Tipping
Ask a Brazilian: House Buying and Apartment Entry Problems
Ask a Brazilian: UK Visa Issues
Ask a Brazilian: Dating in Brazil
Ask a Brazilian: Gossip
Ask a Brazilian: A Question of Race
Ask a Brazilian: Real Estate Scam
Ask a Brazilian: Corruption and Lula
Ask a Brazilian: Lacking Change and I Touch Myself
Ask a Brazilian: Leather and Telephones
Ask a Brazilian: Tampons
Ask a Brazilian: Treatment of Animals
Ask a Brazilian: A Brazilian CV
Ask a Brazilian: Well-to-do Ladies
Ask a Brazilian: Gender Stereotypes
Ask a Brazilian: All Souls Day and Halloween
Ask a Brazilian: Answering a Question
Ask a Brazilian: Revoked Visa
Ask a Brazilian: Pedestrian Problems
Ask a Brazilian: Trash
Ask a Brazilian: Tiles
Ask a Brazilian: Headlights
Ask a Brazilian: Differences and Love
Ask a Brazilian: What Do the Police Do?
Ask a Brazilian: Contractor Frustrations
Ask a Brazilian: English Books and Brazilian Boys
Ask a Brazilian: Cold Cahaca
Ask a Brazilian: Interruptions
Ask a Brazilian: Travel and Security Concerns
Ask a Brazilian: Gestures and Toys
Ask a Brazilian: Hispanics or Latinos, and Duvets
Ask a Brazilian: Overbearing Sogros
Ask a Brazilian: Hotels and Bank Transfers
Ask a Brazilian: Swimming, Showers and New Year’s
Ask a Brazilian: Making Friends
Ask a Brazilian: Female Etiquette
Ask a Brazilian: Washing Machines
Ask a Brazilian: Picking Teeth
Ask a Brazilian: Lozenge or Candy?
Ask a Brazilian: Liberal or Jealous?
Ask a Brazilian: Truck Wheels
Ask a Brazilian: Tolerance
Ask a Brazilian: Screens
Ask a Brazilian: Brazilian Wax
Ask a Brazilian: Flashing Lights
Ask a Brazilian: Lemon and Limes
Ask a Brazilian: Shocking Showers

By Alison McGowan
November 15, 2011

Pousada Maris is situated right next door to Pousada Vivenda and was built by the same architects so boasts the same beautiful high ceilinged spacious whitewashed bungalows, but this time decorated in owner Stela’s impeccable style.

The pousada hosts a maximum of 4 people so things are as intimate or busy as you want them to be. Have breakfast in your suite, or on the veranda or with the guests in the other bungalow, whichever you prefer. Check out the local restaurants or fix a light meal for yourselves and chill out at home” with one of the 300 DVDs on offer. Everything here has clearly been thought through with the individual guest’s needs in mind. From the high thread white linen sheets to the coffee making facilities and small oven, the fabulous bathroom, the information on where to go and what to do, and not least the adaptor you will need for your foreign appliance to work with the new uniquely Brazilian 3 pin plugs!

I arrived in light rain, super stressed out to a wonderful welcome by Stela who showed me around and immediately booked me a massage at the fabulous Shambhala spa round the corner. After that we ambled round the corner to the Cafe do Canal which serves great pizzas and bruschetta, then back to the pousada for a few cool beers by the floodlit pool. As the stress receded I thought “time for visiting the historical centre tomorrow”. Chilling out at Maris in good company was just fine for the foreseeable future.

The official history of Paraty dates back to 1667 when the Portuguese colonizers took over land originally inhabited by Guarani indians and established the town which would become the chief trading port for the gold coming down from the adjoining state of Minas Gerais. The gold rush of the early 1700s brought with it the construction of the Caminho do Ouro (gold trail) a cobbled highway of some 1200 kilometres and many of the beautiful mansions in the historical centre of the town are testament to the incredible riches gained at this time.

With the decline in gold trading so the importance of Paraty declined until the early 1800s when coffee trading once again made it an important place to be. After that the town fell largely out of site until the construction of the beautiful Rio-Santos coastal road in the 1970s when the first pousadas restaurants and boutique type shops started to appear and tourism became the main source of revenue.

The historical centre of Paraty is now traffic free and with all cables now underground it is possible to appreciate the place as it was in the 18th and 19th centuries, with fabulous colonial mansions flanking the original cobbled streets. This is rightly a Brazilian national monument, and one which is definitely worth visiting.

Not To Be Missed
– A tour round the museums, churches and streets of the historical centre
– Restaurants – Voil (French chic), Cafe do Canal (local Brazilian) and Ditinho’s (right on the sand under the Amendoeira trees)
– Schooner trip with Lucas or traineira boat trip with Marcinho
– A massage at Shambala spa
– Chilling out by the pool at the pousada

Starpoints
* exclusive informal luxury
* lush tropical gardens with pool
* personalized attention from owner Stela

Try a Different Place if…
… you want to be right in the historical centre, or if you have mobility problems- the cobbles in town are uneven and can be slippery if wet.

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Guesthouse Bianca, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, So Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d&#145Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airo, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Cho, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casaro da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

November 15, 2011

This week in our continuing Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes series we have an interview with Tatiane Silva. Read on as Tatiane tells us about her impressions of foreigners, and gives some helpful advice also.

1. Where are you from in Brazil and what do you do?

I&#145m an English teacher and university student (Tourism) who was born and currently lives in São Paulo.

2. What are the main obstacles for foreigners in Brazil?

The language. Especially for those who are learning Portuguese and can&#145t stand people teasing or laughing at their accent. It happens a lot here in São Paulo. People either make fun or think it’s cute. There’s also the driving and directions, which I think is even tough for us Brazilians. Traffic here is crazy and some simple rules are not respected like stopping at the stop sign, like they do in most civilized countries.

3. What are common mistakes that foreigners make in Brazil?

They think Brazilians are all warm and cheerful despite the difficulties, which is not true. We have all kinds of people here too, no matter what region. Well, maybe Bahia is an exception to this case… lol … they do have very warm, cheerful and welcoming people indeed… even the grumpy ones are not that grumpy.

4. What characteristic of other nationalities strikes you as the most different (eg. sense of humour, formality, dress)?

I think Brazilians are much more explorers than foreign people. I think we&#145ve got less fear of the unknown. We go further on getting to know people, places, cultures, etc, beyond what’s laid out in front of our eyes. Therefore, creativeness is also our great asset.

5. Which English accent do you prefer and why (eg. Scottish, American, Australian)?

I love to hear the British accent, especially when they&#145re male voices…
it’s really charming and refined, but I&#145m more used to speaking the American accent, which is more continuous and more melodic (seems like).

6. Favourite place travelled abroad and why?

I&#145m stuck between three places because there’s a different feeling about each of them: Switzerland – England – Thailand. Switzerland’s natural beauty, England’s variety of cultural places to visit and Thailand’s welcoming vibe.

8. Favourite foreign band, book and movie?

Im in love with most British things in the showbiz area. Keane is my favorite band nowadays, but I also love Elton John. I read the whole Harry Potter book series when I was going through a tough phase of my life, so those put me out of my misery whenever I need a break from it. Evita is my favorite movie ever.

9. What is the difference between dating a Brazilian and Foreigner (if this applies to you or perhaps a friend)?

I believe it’s mostly the language (laughs). Based on personal experience I can tell they are very much alike and it’s relative. It depends on age, background and whether you&#145ve met them in your country or theirs. The ones who go abroad have, obviously, a more easy-going and determined nature.

10. Can you share an incident, misunderstanding or &#145culture shock&#145 that you have experienced with a foreigner?

Once in the US a man dropped a bill by the cashier and I instantly bent down to pick it up to return it to him, but he took my nice gesture as completely rude, as if I was intending to keep the money for myself. And back to the language differences, my family is very used to creating weird nicknames for intimate people, especially newcomers (boyfriends/girlfriends).

They gave some nicknames to my ex-unitedstatian” boyfriend and that ended up being a topic for further discussions between us because he took it as very offensive. I remember once in India someone came up to me and told me “You look like a wealthy Hindi person, except you&#145re way too fat”… I obviously would take it as very rude if I had heard it in Brazil, but I had observed before the incident that Hindi people are normally very frank (way frank… lol).

Another time, also in India, the landlord would come into the house we had rented without even knocking. Sometimes he even went in when nobody was home. So we decided to write a note so he could ring the bell and we also changed the locks. One day the people I lived with (Brazilian and British) left for a walk while I stayed in my room with the door locked from the inside. In India they normally use locks both inside and outside the door instead of keys.

I decided to leave the room when I found myself locked from the outside. I peeked under the door and I saw the landlord’s feet. He had locked me inside my room so I wouldn&#145t come across him checking the house.

11. What are 2 things you would recommend for a visitor to do in Brazil to better understand Brazilian people and their culture?

Id recommend them to meet real Brazilians and stick to them while here, get to know them, their families and friends. Most Brazilians are very eager to make people feel at home and they surely would be pleased to welcome new friends into their circle. By real Brazilians I mean the ones who work hard and yet have fun. I would also suggest they try and search for the best gathering places (we call them “Points”) in town, since theyll always find there large groups of good friends. Every town in Brazil has one for sure, whether it’s a pub, a restaurant, a park or even a gas station! There’s also volunteering for those who like to donate a little bit of their time to make someone happy. And if they&#145re in São Paulo, I&#145d be glad to help them with that ;). You can reach me at tati.ri.silva@gmail.com.

If you are Brazilian, or know a Brazilian, who has traveled abroad or has considerable experience with different nationalities here in Brazil, we would like to hear from you. Please send an email with contact details and a brief description of yourself to gringoes@www.gringoes.com.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Regina Scharf
Rebecca Carvalho
Augusto Uehara
Ana da Silva
Daniel Bertorelli
Marco Cassol
Ana Clark
Vanessa Agricola
Ubiratan S. Malta
Brescia Terra
Renata Andraus
Ana Vitoria Joly
Helio Araujo
Adriano Abila
Anderson Ferreira
Sandra Partridge
Samara Klug Szachnowicz
Flavius Ferrari
Daniela Ribeiro
Adriano Gomes
Alexandre
Elizabeth Sacknus
Geberson Coelho
Rosaly Loula
Andreas Saller
Elvis Renato Barbosa Lima
Bruno Santos
Maria Cecilia Schmidt Maluf
Marta Dalla Chiesa
Cludia Ramis De Almeida
Vivian Manasse Teixeira Leite
Fernando Saffi
Gabriela Kluppel
Patrcia C. Ribeiro
Fabiano Deffenti

By Alison McGowan
November 15, 2011

The choppers started coming over Leblon thick and fast at 6am on Sunday 13th November 2011, heralding, as we thought then, the start of the battle to retake the nearby favela (slum) of Rocinha. As it turned out the significance was something much greater: not only Rocinha but also the neighbouring favelas of Vidigal and Chacar do Ceu were already back under government control, in a 2 hour operation involving tanks, armoured vehicles and 3,000 troops, during which not a single shot was fired.

To understand the importance of this operation aimed at pacifying” the areas concerned and implanting the latest UPPs or police pacification units, it is important to look at the strategic importance of the favelas concerned. Rocinha and Vidigal are vertical shanty towns which have developed on either side of the mountains of Dois Irmos, an area of difficult access which divides the super upmarket neighbourhoods of Leblon and Gvea from similarly sought after areas of So Conrado and Barra. Originally a farming area which provided fruit and vegetables for the lower lying areas of Rio in the early part of the 20th century, people starting settling there in the 1950s when Leblon and Gavea started to grow and then at an ever increasing speed from the 70s on with the huge influx of migrants from the northeast. Now cities in their own right these ramshackle communities have a combined population of over 120,000 living mainly in simple brick built houses linked by a complicated series of alleyways and stairways. Most houses have TVs and fridges but often lack basic facilities like sanitation and rubbish collection. The exception to this of course is the houses owned by the drug barons and hitherto rulers of the favelas, many of which have fixtures and fittings such as swimming pools, Jacuzzis and bars which would not be out of place in the houses of the nouveau rich below.

The fact that all these favelas have developed in such a chaotic way, and have been effectively ruled by drug lords charging protection fees and imposing total allegiance on the local population for the last 4 decades, has much to do with the tacit and not so tacit support of municipal authorities in Rio. From the time of governor Brizola in the early 80s they have actively preferred to leave the existing system alone in the interest of votes rather than get involved. During the same period there has also been a corresponding proliferation of corrupt cops, ever more eager to accept bribes from those in control, and an army of lawyers contracted by the ruling faction happy to play the system in return for liberal pay-outs.

The occupation of Rocinha and Vidigal right now is a strategic move by municipal authorities towards controlling local communities in the run up to the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics 2016. In the beginning it seemed a little senseless to announce the operation 36 hours in advance thereby giving drug lords ample time to escape, but this turned out to be a meticulously planned and executed operation. Some traffickers did escape but many of the key figures such as Peixe (Fish) and drug supremo Nem were caught in blitzes, and the early announcement ensured that there was no resistance when the armoured vehicles went in. Nobody is under any illusion that the next few months will be easy. House to house searches are already taking place for arms and munitions, stolen motorbikes and drugs. However the rest will take much more time – the implementation of basic sanitation, utilities, refuse collection, schools and healthcare. What is certain is that a parallel universe, in existence for decades, has ceased to be, a fact which gives no small sense of relief to those who live nearby and is definitely cause for celebration for those living in the favela communities themselves.

“Se Deus quiser” or “God willing” a new era of peace has begun in the south zone of Rio de Janeiro.

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Maris, Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Guesthouse Bianca, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Cool Beans, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Aratinga Inn, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chez les Rois, Manaus, Amazonas
Five Exceptional Beach Destinations in Brazil
Brazil: Relaxation and Rejuvenation in Bahia’s Eco-paradises
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Taruma, Conceicao de Jacarei, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Tanara, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Vila dos Orixas Boutique Hotel, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa da Carmen e do Fernando, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Lagoa das Cores, Chapada Diamantina, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Naturalia, Ilha Grande (Abraao), Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ilha de Toque Toque Boutique Hotel, So Sebastiao, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Eco-Rio Lodge, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Amazon Tupana Lodge, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Luar do Rosario, Milho Verde, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d&#145Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Chal Oasis, Galinhos, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airo, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijo do Vento, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Artjungle Eco Lodge & Spa, Itacare, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Cho, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casaro da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

The holiday season is quickly approaching and we would like to invite the community to join us at the annual Graded PTA Thanksgiving Celebration A World of Thanks”, an event open to all within the São Paulo international community.

This celebration will take place on Saturday, November 19, 2011 at Graded School in Morumbi from 11:00am to 4:00pm. The day’s activities will include musical performances, a traditional Thanksgiving feast, children’s activities and a mini-praa featuring artisans and vendors.

Children will be able to take part in a host of games and activities throughout the day. Everyone will have a chance to start Christmas shopping at the mini-praa which will feature 70+ vendors as well as local charities selling handmade items to raise funds.

The highlight of the day will be the traditional Thanksgiving meal, complete with succulent roast turkey and all the trimmings (including cranberry sauce). Graded’s famous homemade pumpkin and apple pies will be served for dessert. The meal starts at 12:30pm (continuous seating) and leftover food will be available for sale after 4:00pm.

Be sure to circle November 19th on your calendar and bring friends to Graded and share in this American tradition with a Brazilian twist. The Graded PTA has a long-standing tradition of sharing and giving thanks within the community and this event will be no exception.

Tickets go on sale November 7, 2011. Adults: R$30. Children: 5-12 years R$15. Children 4 years and under free. Tickets will be sold at the door. For more information please send e-mails to pta@graded.br

http://www.graded.br