By Alison McGowan
June 21, 2011

Just a couple of hours south of Rio, down the beautiful coast road to Paraty, there is the most wonderful surprise – the Casa Tarum, an indigenous name which means literally a coisa boa” or “good thing”. Not a pousada as such, more of a tropical B&B, with a difference – Tina! The place is beautiful – a colonial style house set in 1,500 metres of luxurious plants and exuberant green foliage. There’s a super large (12ft diameter) Jacuzzi to lounge in and the only noise you will hear is of birds, cicadas, frogs and the brook which runs down to the deserted beach, 2 minutes walk away.

Tina herself is Uruguayan/Brazilian, quadrilingual, super well-travelled and an expert, not only in the local area, but also in where to go and what to do in the southern cone of South America. Staying here is an alternative choice for those who want to chill out for a couple of days in peace and quiet and comfort, away from any other tourists.

You would probably miss the Condominium Portal do Verde Mar, if you didnt know it was there. Situated right on the bay of Angra dos Reis, in between Mangaratiba and Jacare de Conceião, right on the BR101 highway, it is one of a series of closed condominiums running down the coast just after Club Med.

Tina’s Place is in a condominium of around 30 houses, all different, and all privately owned. There are no shops or bars on site and the nearest village, Jacarei, is 2 kms away, so all essentials need to be brought in- except food which is provided and drinks which are available for purchase.

For those who cant live without action, however, there is no problem. Taxis can easily be arranged and Paraty is only 2 hours away. (See December 07 blog on Pousada Vivenda) You can also visit Angra dos Reis (32 kms), Porto Galo, (10kms) and Porto Real, only 500 mtrs. From all of these places there are boat trips round the bay, either to Ilha Grande or smaller islands like Cataguazes, Botinas and Gipoa. Well worth it for a day out when the weather is good!

Not To Be Missed
– chilling out in pousada gardens by the pool
– schooner trip over to Ilha Grande island from nearby village port
– side trip down to historical Paraty – 2 hours away

Starpoints
* family atmosphere
* tropical gardens, deck & Jacuzzi
* dinner/snacks and drinks available at extra cost
* personal service from fabulous hostess – Tina

Try a different place if…
…you want to be close to bars and restaurants and don’t have a car, or if you don’t like dogs

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Encanto da Lua, Marau, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Baia Grande, South Pantanal (Miranda), Mato Grosso do Sul
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Palafitas Lodge, Rondonia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mangueira, Boipeba (Morere), Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Cote Sud, Porto da Rua, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Spa Casinha Branca, Bananal, nr. Paraty, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Castelinho 38, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Capao, Serro, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada d’Oleo de Guignard, Tiradentes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Bela Vista, Novo Airão, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Agua de Coco, Ceara
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Chão, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casarão da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

June 21, 2011

This week in our continuing Foreigners Through Brazilian Eyes series we have an interview with Ana da Silva. Read on as Ana tells us about her impressions of foreigners, and gives some helpful advice also.

1. Where are you from in Brazil and what do you do?

I’m from Campinas. I’m a freelance writer and copyeditor.

2. What are the main obstacles for foreigners in Brazil?

The language and the slowness of things, particularly if you’re from a country where things get done quickly. If a foreigner lives in a big city in Brazil he’s likely to find English speakers, though probably not many, but even in big cities there’s a lot of bureaucracy for every procedure and Brazilians generally have no sense of timeliness anywhere. I lived in the USA half my life and I’m struggling with this myself!

3. What are common mistakes that foreigners make in Brazil?

The biggest mistake foreigners make is assuming that in Brazil we speak Spanish and the second biggest mistake is believing Brazil has a Hispanic culture. We speak Portuguese here because we were colonized by the Portuguese and our culture is our own though it comes from a mix of European, African and native cultures.

4. What characteristic of other nationalities strikes you as the most different (eg. sense of humour, formality, dress)?

Sense of timing of Northern cultures. For Americans 9am means 9am, the Swedes consider 2 weeks to last 2 weeks and so forth. In Brazil 9am could be 9:45 and 2 weeks could take 6 months.

5. Which English accent do you prefer and why (eg. Scottish, American, Australian)?

I’m a sucker for the English accent (Hugh Grant-sy, not Ricky Gervais-y) because it’s got a sort of sweet rhythm and the dragged vowels make it sexy.

6. Favourite place travelled abroad and why?

Norway for its fjords. I’m a beach person but the fjords feel magical with its snow-covered mountains and waterfalls and mirror-like water. Going around a bend it felt like a Viking boat could come by any time.

7. Favourite foreign food?

Japanese.

8. Favourite foreign band, book and movie?

The National, Me Talk Pretty One Day” by David Sedaris and “There’s Something about Mary.”

9. What is the difference between dating a Brazilian and Foreigner (if this applies to you or perhaps a friend)?

Wow, this is a broad topic but I’ll limit it to the two countries where I’ve lived longest. I lived in the USA from the time I was 14 years old and I have rarely dated Brazilian men since but overall I find Brazilians to be macho, too possessive and pushy and they’re too serious about being in a couple; one guy was horrified that I’d made plans to go out without him and we were only dating for a couple of months. Americans are my favorite to date because they are courteous and generous and they can be such gentlemen though most are terrified at the thought of being in a relationship, even if the woman’s not even thinking that far. In my experience Americans are very appreciative of women, especially foreign ones and especially if the foreign ones aren’t chasing a husband.

10. Can you share an incident, misunderstanding or ‘culture shock’ that you have experienced with a foreigner?

I’m practically a foreigner in Brazil though technically I am Brazilian. A few years ago, after spending six years without coming to Brazil, I went to a supermarket to get fresh milk but all I saw was tons of that boxed milk so I asked a clerk, “Tem leite sem preservativo?” because I was thinking of the English “preservatives;” I’d forgotten that “preservativo” means “condom.” The clerk glared at me and I thought she was being rude by not answering until my aunt came over and told me I was asking for milk with condoms.

11. What are 2 things you would recommend for a visitor to do in Brazil to better understand Brazilian people and their culture?

1. Stay with a Brazilian family to experience how warm and hospitable Brazilians are.
2. Dress poorly and go into a fancy store to experience the existence of social class division.

You can follow Ana’s blog at Daniel Bertorelli
Marco Cassol
Ana Clark
Vanessa Agricola
Ubiratan S. Malta
Brescia Terra
Renata Andraus
Ana Vitoria Joly
Helio Araujo
Adriano Abila
Anderson Ferreira
Sandra Partridge
Samara Klug Szachnowicz
Flavius Ferrari
Daniela Ribeiro
Adriano Gomes
Alexandre
Elizabeth Sacknus
Geberson Coelho
Rosaly Loula
Andreas Saller
Elvis Renato Barbosa Lima
Bruno Santos
Maria Cecilia Schmidt Maluf
Marta Dalla Chiesa
Cludia Ramis De Almeida
Vivian Manasse Teixeira Leite
Fernando Saffi
Gabriela Kluppel
Patrcia C. Ribeiro
Fabiano Deffenti

By Ricky Skelton
June 21, 2011

A lot has been made of Brazil’s strong economy, and complete avoidance of the 2008 Global Economic Crisis. Some put it down to Lula’s skilful handling of the economy, although as his policy was just to hope that Brazil didn’t catch the cold, then it was clearly nothing to do with him. Many people far more knowledgeable than me, including some on www.gringoes.com’s very own forums, have been predicting if not a crisis, then certainly a downturn in Brazil’s economy. It seems to be about to come to pass, although bearing in mind that hardly any Global Economic Experts predicted the biggest crash in decades a couple of years ago, I wouldn’t bet the house on their advice just yet.

There are signs though. The Real is supposedly the most over-valued currency on the planet (read the forums…), and the strong economy has been a disaster for Brazil’s exports, as far cheaper Asian substitutes take over the business. One huge pointer as to the economic situation was Dilma’s refusal in February to raise the salario minimo higher than R$545 after promising on being elected that it would rise to a whopping R$600 in 2011. Economic indicators state that Brazil’s economy cannot afford such an increase in order to stay competitive. The downturn in exports is beginning to kick in, with many manufacturers of goods such as cars now having surplus stock. Car prices are expected to drop as a result.

At the sharp end of the wedge are the Brazilian workers, especially the public employees. With inflation maintained at around 6%, the average wage of your average Brazilian has been effectively dropping for the last few years, as prices increase far more than salaries. Something has to give, the economy cannot stay so strong if not everybody benefits, and clearly there is no trickle-down effect. Perhaps the likes of Sergio Cabral and Antonio Palocci’s consultancy fees have meant that there is no money available for everyone else.

Recent posts circulating on Facebook have given the idea that Brazilians may be finally getting shaken out of their shoulder-shrugging, ‘what-can-you-do’ torpor, and about to protest.

BOPE: R$2.260,00 pr arriscar a vida!
Bombeiro: R$960,00 pr salvar vidas!
Professor: R$728,00 pr preparar para a vida!
SRGIO CABRAL: R$17.000,00 pr ‘bagunar’ a VIDA dos outros.
Vergonha Nacional.

Brazilians as a population have always been curiously reluctant to protest about anything, unlike their neighbours in Argentina, Bolivia and Peru. Strikes and protests just don’t happen here, whether through fear of reprisals that stem from the period of Military Dictatorship or something deeper in the Brazilian psyche.

The surest sign of an economy hitting trouble is an increase in the protests of workers. The first ones in Brazil are here, with the Bombeiros of Rio protesting about an increase in their salary from a paltry R$960, most of which is made up in benefits rather than wage. It is good to see such protests in Brazil, less good to see the dictatorship-style way that Cabral ordered BOPE to put an end to the situation. The protests have now spread to more public areas, such as outside Copacabana Palace, with more people involved. Who knows how long they will continue.

It would be nice to think that any downturn in the Brazilian economy could lead to an increase in this type of protest. If Brazil’s coming ‘crisis’ could help waken the dormant Latin American Protest gene, then Brazil as a whole might benefit in the long term. Citizens more willing to protest against the excesses of the country’s political elite. Citizens from other walks of life, other communities prepared to follow Marina Silva’s lead and move into politics perhaps, and help dilute the influence of those in power at the moment, the wealthy, land-owning elite. If you watch any of the Brazilian Parliament footage, it is quite staggering how unrepresentative of the Brazilian population the overwhelmingly white, male congress remains, despite having a female president. Surely a country ruled by a more representative cross-section of Brazilian society would result in a fairer sharing of the wealth, and help Brazil become the country it already imagines itself to be.

I don’t expect it to be honest, but I can still hope.

You can visit Ricky’s blog at http://redmist-redmist.blogspot.com/

Previous articles by Ricky:

Understanding Brazil: General Elections
Around Brazil: Oktoberfest Parade in Blumenau
Cultural Brazil: The Alambique
Around Brazil: Whale-Watching in Santa Catarina
Brazil: Tainha Time
Deported from Brazil? Part 2
Deported from Brazil? Part 1
Brazil: The President in Florianópolis
Swine Flu in South America?
The Best Club in Brazil…?
The Great Brazilian Animal-Off (Land)
Understanding Brazil: Giving Directions
Understanding Brazil: Driving
Understanding Brazil: Farra do Boi
Brazil: Catching Flu’
Around Brazil: Garopaba
Understanding Brazil: Funerals
Brazil: Bernie the Berne
Around Brazil: Journey to the Amazon Jungle
Around Brazil: Crazy Town Ceremonies
Around Brazil: Crazy Town
Around Brazil: Manaus
Around Brazil: Santarem & Alter do Chao
Around Brazil: Amazon Swarms and Amazon Storms
Understanding Brazil: Playing Pool
Around Brazil: Gurup
Around South America: Peninsula Valdes
Around South America: Patagonia
Around South America: Montevideo, Uruguay
Around Brazil: The Amazon
Around South America: Bariloche, Argentina
Understanding Gringoes: Drinking
The Great Brazilian Fruit-Off Part 2
The Great Brazilian Fruit-Off Part 1
Understanding Brazil: The Kids
Brazil v Argentina: Buying Beer
Understanding Brazil: Mosquitoes
Around Brazil: São Luis
Teaching English in Brazil
Around Brazil: Lenois Maranhenses
Understanding Brazil: The National Anthem
Around Brazil: Barreirinhas
Around Brazil: Jericoacoara to Barreirinhas
Understanding Brazil: Shopping Centres
Around Brazil: Jericoacoara
Around Brazil: Chapada da Diamantina/Lenois
Brazil vs. Argentina: Statues of Christ
Around Brazil: Salvador
Brazil vs. Argentina: The Buses
Around Brazil: Morro de São Paulo (& Itabuna)
Understanding Brazil: The Workmen
Around Brazil: Praa Pateo do Colegio
Around Brazil: Porto Seguro
Around Brazil: Rio de Janeiro to Porto Seguro
Around Brazil: Cristo Redentor
Understanding Brazil: The Sellers
Around Brazil: Ilha de Gigoia
Brazil Journeys: São Paulo to Rio de Janeiro
Understanding Brazil: Dogs Part 2
Brazil: A Lie-In in Downtown São Paulo?
The Best Job in Brazil: Ankle Specialist?
Understanding Brazil: Dogs
Brazilian Places: Ilha do Santa Catarina (Floripa)
Classic Brazilian Journeys: South to Florianopolis
Understanding Brazil – The Shower
Brazil: Boats on the Amazon
Brazil: Understanding Novelas
Brazil: Bus fires in São Paulo – always a bad thing?

By Josmar Lopes
June 21, 2011

What hasn’t musician, composer, singer, jazz-soul aficionado, multi-instrumentalist, and all-around nice guy Ed Motta done in his professional life?

At its beginning – indeed, before there was even a beginning” to speak of – and long before Dancing with the Stars was born, Motta made his mark on the music scene as a disco-dance contestant. He later dropped out of high school to become a vocalist with a hard-rock band named Kabbalah. He also worked as a DJ and magazine contributor; was a co-founder of the group Conexão Japeri who eventually went solo; and was a serious (and I do mean, SERIOUS) book and record collector, as well as a prolific recording and performing artist.

He’s even done some animated movie work, the most conspicuous of which was providing the Brazilian-Portuguese translations (along with the singing voice) of British pop star Phil Collins’ songs for the Disney feature Tarzan. He did the same for Sting in The Emperor’s New Groove, also from Disney.

But all these extracurricular activities are well known quantities to his fans.

What they might not say about the wildly eclectic 39-year-old, a nephew of the late, great Brazilian soul singer Tim Maia, is his unconventional excursion into the realm of the legitimate theater – specifically, the Broadway musical theater. Well, not exactly Broadway per se, but the next best thing: the fabulous new world of Rio musicals, courtesy of the successful production team of Meller-Botelho, the acknowledged “Kings of Brazilian Musicals” (Os Reis dos Musicais).

Could The Music Man’s Professor Harold Hill have done it any better? No way!!! For one thing, Ed Motta is no charlatan: he’s the real deal when it comes to pure music-making. For another, it’s what he was meant to do all along.

“I love soul, funk and jazz,” Motta told British journalist John L. Waters, of London’s The Guardian, in December 2003. “But I simply adore Broadway musicals, and I love the London cast versions. My ambition,” he went on to elaborate, “is to write a musical so that I can hear the English singers do my music…” Let’s say that he’s halfway home.

On September 1, 2007, at the João Caetano Theater in Rio de Janeiro (Motta’s hometown), Brazilian audiences bore witness to the world premiere of Seven – The Musical, its first completely original, homegrown musical hit in recent memory. Not since the bygone days of Chico Buarque’s Roda viva (“Live Roundtable”) and Calabar, or Gota d’gua (“The Last Straw”), his classic collaboration with writer Paulo Pontes, or even the Brecht-Weill inspired pera do Malandro (“The Street Hustler’s Opera”), has there been such buzz about a musical play.

As the offspring of proud parents Ed Motta (music), Charles Meller (book and direction) and Claudio Botelho (lyrics and musical direction), Seven would go on to become a multi-award winner and box-office champion in both Rio and São Paulo. Who would’ve guessed?
So how did this extraordinary project come to pass? In February 2011, I corresponded with the work’s composer, Ed Motta, to discuss the genesis of his groundbreaking musical and how he arrived at this major turning point in his career.

Josmar Lopes – Thank you, Ed, for taking time off from your busy schedule to correspond with me.
Ed Motta – Wassup, Joe?
JL – First off, when did you write the music for Seven – The Musical?
EM – I began to write some of these songs almost four, five years before the musical.
JL – Did you have any idea of its dark and somber nature?
EM – I think some of the tunes do have this dark atmosphere, but there are happy waltzes and classic Broadway “Can-Can” as well. I have been writing these musical-esque tunes for a long time, usually it was just for my pleasure since my main audience knows me because of my soul-jazz tunes.
JL – I’ll say! When did you decide to have Claudio Botelho and Charles Meller build a musical play around your tunes? Whose idea was it to do this?
EM – I went to see their version of Stephen Sondheim’s Company [in 2000]. I loved not just the perfect Charles timing and direction, but Claudio’s acidic and cynical lyrics that reminds me of Donald Fagen’s words and stories inside the Steely Dan architecture.
JL – Is this something you always wanted to do, to write a musical-theater piece?
EM – I like Broadway. I called Claudio and asked him that I really would like to show my Broadway-inspired tunes for them. They liked the atmosphere and they know the language very well, so it makes me more than proud and happy [what they did].
JL – Who got the idea of doing a story based on a modern version of Snow White? Did you have any input in the development of the plot or songs?
EM – This idea was Charles and Claudio’s; I just wrote the tunes before and made some suggestions about the music. I remember the day they went to my house with the whole thing: it was God’s gift to me.
JL – Fantastic! There are only six musicians in the orchestra pit, who play piano, violin, cello, drums, alto sax and bass. With the conductor, that’s seven musicians. Was there a reason such a limited number of instruments was chosen for such a big musical?
EM – First of all budget, LOL. But a musical like Marry Me A Little from Sondheim has this [same] kind of minimalism regarding the orchestration. Delia Fischer, who used to be my music teacher in the 1990’s, did a wonderful job [of orchestrating Seven]. It’s like some low-budget 40’s and 50’s movie soundtracks, with a little piece of the orchestra. It has a special drama and enhances the composition without the butter, LOL.
JL – Describe your collaboration with Charles and Claudio, and what exactly you guys did to shape Seven into a musical.
EM – My thing was strictly musical, Charles [did] the direction and Claudio, like the Renaissance man that he is, did everything else. I wrote some instrumental passages and overture, underture, etc. I worked a little bit with the original cast, singing together and playing piano.
JL – Speaking for myself, I love this music! It’s so instantly recognizable and memorable!
EM – Wow, God bless!
JL – When I first heard the songs, I immediately knew this was Broadway material. What inspired you to write this music, especially the marvelous and catchy songs?
EM – Inspiration? My record collection with more than 30,000 vinyl LPs, and of course loads of Broadway material. And composers Marc Blitzstein, Jule Styne, Cy Coleman, Frank Loesser, Vernon Duke, and so on. Of course, Stephen Sondheim is a super influence.
JL – I’m glad you mentioned Sondheim. Do you agree with the criticism that Seven sounds more like a Sondheim-type of musical rather than a typically “Brazilian” piece?
EM – Ha ha! We have to remember Bernard Shaw’s words: “Who knows does, who doesn’t know teaches, and who cannot do either works as a critic.”
JL – That’s true even today!
EM – Brazilian journalists do not know a dime about Broadway, and then people come up with these crazy statements. But commercial and cheesy things have bigger audiences all over the planet, right?
JL – You’re right about that as well. You have a rather eclectic taste in music, with many styles and genres associated with your name, yet you’re a relatively young man. What is it that drove you to become such a versatile artist in such a short period of time?
EM – One more time I must give the credit to my record collection, to be an eBay freak buying records EVERY DAY and in many styles. Many soundtracks, musicals, rare soul, rare rock, rare reggae, but the most important thing in my collection is Jazz. My dream is to record an album with a Broadway influence [but] with a jazz viewpoint like Escalator Over The Hill from that musical genius Carla Bley.
JL – Your voice reminds people of the young Stevie Wonder. Are you flattered or embarrassed by the comparison?
EM – It’s a big honor for me, I love Stevie! But my main influence is Donny Hathaway, for me the best singer ever.
JL – Donny is a smooth-jazz legend! You’re also a huge record collector and, as you say, you have over 30,000 records. That’s really quite extraordinary! Of all the albums that you own, what is your favorite type of listening music? Do you have a favorite artist or band?
EM – Ennio Morricone is the artist that I have the most records, almost 300 LPs by him. And many, many interests, i.e. free jazz, 60’s and 70’s rock. Donald Fagen and Steely Dan are a high-water mark in my life from 25 years ago. In fact, I’m going to be 40 this year.
JL – Congrats! The music for Seven is so different from your pop-influenced or funk-based work. There’s only one song, “Leva essa mulher” (“Take This Woman Now”), that I would classify as bluesy or jazzy. The rest are highly theatrical, especially “Canão em torno do defunto” (“Dance Around the Dead Man”), “Esfregando o chão” (“Scrub That Dirty Floor”), and my favorite, “O coraão no bosque” (“A Heart in the Forest”). That last number was cut from the São Paulo production. I personally feel that song was a superb piece and should not have been dropped. What were your thoughts on that decision?
EM – Charles and Claudio know more about what to put into a musical than I do. I have experience, but my experience is regarding music and that’s it. But I do hope the English version [of 7] will have this Morricone-influenced tune back on stage.
JL – Along those same lines, it’s my understanding an entire scene was deleted from Act II: the scene of the baby. However, this is a really crucial scene. Without it, the story has a great big “gap” in the middle. There is a good deal of psychological insight in this play (thanks to Charles’ book), and this scene helps to explain much of the plot. Was there a particular reason the scene was cut?
EM – I think it was because Brazilian audiences sometimes could not like something more artistic, in other words, less Ingmar Bergman and more Francis Ford Coppola, LOL.
JL – Do you have any new music that you would like Charles and Claudio to adapt into a musical? Do you have any thoughts or ideas for a story? For example, would you be interested in a story based on Brazilian folklore or literature, such as Monteiro Lobato’s classic “O Sitio do Picapau Amarelo” (“The Ranch of the Yellow Woodpecker”)?
EM – No, this is not my cup of tea. I really would like to write something noir inspired, like a Jules Dassin movie [The Naked City, Rififi, Topkapi]. Something about detectives, femme fatales, etc.
JL – Since it’s obvious you enjoyed the experience, would you consider becoming a producer or director of stage musicals?
EM – Wow, a producer? Too much work… My “Jefferson Airplane” lifestyle will not work with it, LOL. But I really would like to work with [musicals] again.
JL – We hope you do. Once again, I want to thank you for your help in answering my questions.
EM – Cheers mate.

Copyright 2011 by Josmar F. Lopes

A naturalized American citizen born in Brazil, Joe Lopes was raised and educated in New York City, where he worked for many years in the financial sector. In 1996, he moved to Brazil with his wife and daughters. In 2001, he returned to the U.S. and now resides in North Carolina with his family. You can email your comments to JosmarLopes@msn.com.

To read previous articles by Joe Lopes click below:

Deep “Throats” and The Return of Gerald Thomas
Orpheus Ascending: Recent Revival of Orfeu in Rio
Brazil: Neither Fish nor Fado Part 3
Brazil: Neither Fish nor Fado Part 2
Brazil: Neither Fish nor Fado Part 1
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 17
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 16
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 15
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 14
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 13
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 12
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 11
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 10
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 9
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 8
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 7
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 6
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 5
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 4
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 3
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 2
Brazil: “Tristeza Não Tem Fim” (“Sadness Has No End”) Part 1
Brecht, Weill & Buarque: The Brazilian Play’s the Thing! Part 3
Brazil: “Opera” in the Amazon – Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo, or The Madness of Foreign Men Part 4
Brazil: “Opera” in the Amazon – Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo, or The Madness of Foreign Men Part 3
Brazil: “Opera” in the Amazon – Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo, or The Madness of Foreign Men Part 2
Brazil: “Opera” in the Amazon – Werner Herzog’s Fitzcarraldo, or The Madness of Foreign Men Part 1
The Brazilian Beat Goes On: My Own “Best-Of” List of Present-Day Bossa Nova Classics Part 5
The Brazilian Beat Goes On: My Own “Best-Of” List of Present-Day Bossa Nova Classics Part 4
The Brazilian Beat Goes On: My Own “Best-Of” List of Present-Day Bossa Nova Classics Part 3
The Brazilian Beat Goes On: My Own “Best-Of” List of Present-Day Bossa Nova Classics Part 2
The Brazilian Beat Goes On: My Own “Best-Of” List of Present-Day Bossa Nova Classics Part 1
Brazil: The “Italian” Composer from Campinas Part 4
Brazil: The “Italian” Composer from Campinas Part 3
Brazil: The “Italian” Composer from Campinas Part 2
Brazil: The “Italian” Composer from Campinas Part 1
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 6
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 5
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 4
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 3
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 2
Bringing People Together: Electronic Voyages to Brazil Part 1
Brecht, Weill & Buarque: The Brazilian Play’s the Thing! Part 2
Misunderstanding Brazil’s National Anthem: A Crash-Course in the Hymn of the Nation
Brecht, Weill & Buarque: The Brazilian Play’s the Thing! Part 1
Theater, the Brecht of Life: The Influences on Chico’s “Modern” Street Opera, Part II
A Walk on the Weill Side: The Influences on Chico’s “Modern” Street Opera Part 2
A Walk on the Weill Side: The Influences on Chico’s “Modern” Street Opera Part 1
Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Brazilian Bach Part 5
Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Brazilian Bach Part 4
Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Brazilian Bach Part 3
Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Brazilian Bach Part 2
Heitor Villa-Lobos: The Brazilian Bach Part 1
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 11
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 10
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 9
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 8
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 7
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 6
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 5
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 4
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 3
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 2
Two Brazilian Charmers Part 1
Teaching English In Brazil Part 21
Teaching English In Brazil Part 20
Teaching English In Brazil Part 19
Teaching English In Brazil Part 18
Teaching English In Brazil Part 17
Teaching English In Brazil Part 16
Teaching English In Brazil Part 15
Teaching English In Brazil Part 14
Teaching English In Brazil Part 13
Teaching English In Brazil Part 12
Teaching English In Brazil Part 11
Brazil: Thrills, Spills, and… Oh Yes, No Ifs, Ands or Head-Butts, Please
Teaching English In Brazil Part 10
Teaching English In Brazil Part 9
Brazil: A Fever Called Corinthians Part 4
Brazil: Taking Flight on Florencia’s Fragile Wings Part 4
Brazil: A Fever Called Corinthians Part 3
Brazilian World Cup Debacle: Just Wait Till 2010! Part 2
Brazilian World Cup Debacle: Just Wait Till 2010! Part 1
Brazil: Taking Flight on Florencia’s Fragile Wings Part 3
Brazil: A Fever Called Corinthians Part 2
Brazil: Taking Flight on Florencia’s Fragile Wings Part 2
Brazil: A Fever Called Corinthians Part 1
Brazil: Taking Flight on Florencia’s Fragile Wings Part 1
Teaching English In Brazil Part 8
Teaching English In Brazil Part 7
Teaching English In Brazil Part 6
Teaching English In Brazil Part 5
Teaching English In Brazil Part 4
Teaching English In Brazil Part 3
Teaching English In Brazil Part 2
A German Ring in the Brazilian Rainforest Part 4
A German Ring in the Brazilian Rainforest Part 3
Teaching English In Brazil – Part I
A German Ring in the Brazilian Rainforest Part 2
A German Ring in the Brazilian Rainforest Part 1
“Down in Brazil,” with Michael Franks Part 3
“Down in Brazil,” with Michael Franks Part 2
“Down in Brazil,” with Michael Franks Part 1
Brazil: A Candid Talk with Gerald Thomas
Getting to the “bottom” of Brazil’s Gerald Thomas
A Brazilian Diva Torn Between Europe and Brazil
The Enraged Genius of Brazil’s Maestro Neschling
A German Ring in the Brazilian Rainforest
Brazil’s Musical Polyglots: What Was That You Were Singing?
Did Bossa Nova Kill Opera in Brazil?