Brazil is the coolest, liveliest, most extravagant country in the world – whether you’re going there to relax or party, you’d better check in to a hotel worth showing-off about. Luckily, there are plenty of luxury hotels in Brazil that’ll satisfy the most demanding of needs – use this handy guide to find where to get great service, sleek design and absolutely beautiful views.

If you’re visiting Rio to get a taste of Brazil’s most colourful nightlife, hit the ground running by checking in to Rio Atlantica (Avenida Atlantica 2964 Copacabana). It’s right on Copacabana beach – perhaps the world’s most famous stretch of sand – and has a funky rooftop pool. There’s a bar up here too, so when you’re sick of taking a dip, start your night out in Rio with a couple of cocktails to a backdrop of stunning city-and-sea views.

La Suite (Rua Jackson de Figueiredo 501) is an altogether more private and intimate affair of just seven suites. Combining five-star service with tranquil surroundings, it’s the most pampered place to stay in Rio. Work on your tan at the private beach or by the secluded pool, and dine on gourmet meals inside close to Andy Warhol prints. Each room is uniquely styled, from dramatic all-black spaces in one to another with girly boudoirs with antique Chinese screens – grab a corner suite for the best views of the bay.

Rio’s an excellent introduction to Brazil, but if you’re travelling for longer or want to escape the tourist trail, there are plenty more luxury hotels to keep you bedding down in style. Pousada Maravilha occupies an island paradise on the archipelago of Fernando de Noronha, home of unspoilt shimmering white sands and swaying palms. Perfect for diving, the hotel’s beach-facing bungalow accommodations are fantastically private luxury outposts, all with their own Jacuzzis.

Tivoli Ecoresort in Bahia is a five-star hotel with plenty of green initiatives – come here to relax with a clean eco-conscience. Local guides put on rainforest tours; you can watch baby turtles hatch and – if you’re really lucky – see humpback whales from pristine white shores. Complete the heavenly hotel experience with a treatment at the Thalasso spa, or just lounge on your king-sized bed and watch the sunset from your suite.

All recommendations come courtesy of Travel Intelligence, a one-stop shop for top end accommodation, insightful travel writing and super-desirable luxury hotel deals.

January 26, 2010

Meet Anne Morddel who has lived in Brazil twice, and written a children’s book about an aspect of Brazil. Read the following interview in which she tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I am originally from northern California, but have lived outside of the US for almost 30 years, in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and South America.

I trained as a librarian and have a Master’s Degree in Library and information Sciences from UC Berkeley. While in Brazil, I worked in two separate English language schools as the librarian.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

I lived in Brazil on two separate occasions: 1995-1999 and 2002-2007. On both occasions, the reason for being there was my husband’s work with an automobile company.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

It was not my first new country, so the shock at things not being American that many people experience was not an issue. I first lived in São Paulo, which I found incredibly ugly. I like nature and the countryside, so the concrete everywhere depressed me. Then I discovered the parks. I think my favourite was the Parque de Agua Branca, with its organic market. Or perhaps the tiny Parque Burle Marx, with its marmosets running about.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Well, I cannot even say where is home” anymore. What I most missed was what I think I have missed in every place (except London) I have lived: affordable books in English. Then, I found the second-hand bookshop at the British church (St. Paul’s Cathedral) in São Paulo. I must have bought at least a thousand books there! Some of them are real treasures. When we moved to Curitiba, I used to fly to S.P. for a day, just to buy books. Now, I live in Paris and I miss that magical little shop in São Paulo.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Being stuck in TRAFFIC in São Paulo!!!!!

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

A trip to Superaguã was particularly magical, even more so than the trip to the Amazon region. We took a boat from Paranagu across the bay, and were the only clients in the hotel. I went birding on my own and found a flock of more than 30 white-shouldered fire-eyes. Brazil is a bird-watcher’s paradise. It is also a botanist’s paradise, and entomologist’s paradise, a botanical artist’s paradise, and on and on and on.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

THE NATURE!!!

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

In São Paulo – Bar des Arts was a place that was a bit fun, if not very original.

In Curitiba, I spent as many evenings as possible at my website.

I was very honoured that the book was selected to appear on the website of the Prince of Wales’s Rainforests Project last August.

My years in Brazil, especially those in Curitiba, changed my life, for the discovery of the beauty of the Atlantic Rainforest and of its urgent need for protection (a much greater need than that of the Amazon region, though both are in desperate straits) led to the book. The book is available in Portuguese as “O Grande Campo”. I am currently seeking funding to be able to donate copies of this Portuguese edition to as many schools and libraries in Brazil as possible, and I would greatly appreciate suggestions from your readers. I can be contacted about this via the e-mail address on the website above.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Jessica Mullins – Switzerland
Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia

By Alison McGowan
January 26, 2010

There are times in travel when you come across something which is so special that it literally takes your breath away. Maybe it was the sunshine after a week of rain; maybe it was the sweep of the bay with the swaying palm trees; maybe it was simply arriving after 30 kms of super potholed roads and lakes of water which challenged even a 4×4, but when we reached Pousada Agua de Coco in Icaraizinho de Amontada – a place which doesn’t even exist on the best maps – we realised we had arrived in a truly special place.

Pousada Agua de Coco is the archetypal hidden pousada. Indeed no address appears on their site – just the pointer that it is situated on the right hand corner of the beach. The 3 spacious wooden bungalows all face the sea, and all are super well appointed with mosquito netted beds, well designed bathrooms, minibar and a private terrace overlooking the sea complete with table chairs and hammock for relaxing. Across the wooden slatted bridge is the pousada restaurant which serves up the most fabulous food all with the gentlest of hospitality. Try the fish with roasted vegetables cooked on stone plate and one of their special caipirinhas, and you won’t want to go anywhere else for the duration of your stay.

The normal pousada wi-fi was having an off day when we arrived and nobody could get online. Thom and Helena, our delightful hosts, were worried for their guests, but I, for one, could happily forget the world in this wonderful, as yet undiscovered, paradise.

About the Location
So far I have not been able to find a map which shows the beach of Icaraizinho de Amontada, but I assure you it does exist, between Jericoacoara and Cumbuco/Fortaleza, hidden away at the end of 30 kilometres of a hugely potholed track. By the end of the the 20th kilometre you find yourself starting to say Are we nearly there?” And wondering if this was such a good idea. It is only when you get to the beach that you realise how much the trip was worth it. Icaraizinho is just a small fishing village, with a few shops and a bar and a tiny internet caf, the way Jericoacoaara was 25 years ago. The rest is beach, beach, and beach, with slowly swaying palm trees and a few jangada fishing boats. Idyllic and still totally hidden.

Not To Be Missed
– fabulous food at the thatched pousada restaurant across the tiny bridge
– chilling out on the bungalow veranda and on the deserted beach
– 6 hour 4×4 trip passing the beaches of Baleia and Fleixeiras, to Cumbuco

Starpoints
* beachfront location
* fabulous restaurant
* supercomfortable chalets
* wonderful hosts

Try a Different Place if…
… you want night life or choice of restaurants, or you want your phone to work

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Alcino Estalagem, Lenois, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Chão, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casarão da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

By Madeleine Wilson
January 26, 2010

Rio de Janeiro’s busiest time of year is definitely carnival. You will need to be savvy about booking a place to stay in time for this extravaganza, often months in advance. But with carnival just round the corner, help is at hand. Some of Rio’s best hostels still have accommodation to offer but do expect to book a minimum of six nights during the carnival period.

The city has excellent transport links with buses running through the night so whether you decide to camp on the doorstep of party central or shack up on the outskirts of town, you are never too far from the action. It’s a good idea to look out for hostels offering guests private lockers and air conditioning, even if it is only usually switched on at night. Most places have good kitchen facilities where you can rustle up a packed lunch, hot dinners or quick bites to keep you going throughout the day.

It’s always great to relax in a hostel garden, on terrace or balcony but it seems that most of Rio flocks to the beach at some point of the day so an outdoor area is one easy thing budget travellers can compromise on.

Beach Backpackers Hostel Rio de Janeiro
This hostel really has its finger on the backpacking pulse. On arrival, you will receive a hostel business card to keep with you during your stay, so there is no getting lost in this big city. The staff will also provide you with a nightlife guide and handy tips on where to visit if you are on a tight budget. Foreign cuisine can be a little daunting and they provide a local guide for this as well to help you order in restaurants.

This hostel is so in tune with travelers’ needs, don’t expect anything less than free wireless internet, 24 hour check-in, tv and dvd selection and a fully equipped kitchen. Only 2 blocks from Botafogo beach, the hostel is also located just 15 minutes walk from the Ipanema and Copacabana beaches so you really are spoilt for choice.

Vila CasaNova
Caught up in the hubbub of carnival, some of you might prefer to return to smaller, intimate lodgings instead of carrying on with the party back at a large hostel.

You will find Vila CasaNova down a quiet residential street in Santa Teresa. Only 10 minutes from the nightlife of Lapa, you are not far from all the goings-on in the city centre. You can choose from dorms of up to 8 people or private double and single rooms which have either air conditioning, a ceiling fan or a lovely balcony overlooking the green valley. This bed and breakfast also has a swimming pool if you fancy a dip. Shops and bars are all within walking distance.

Best Rio Hostel
If nowhere else than Copacabana will do, Best Rio Hostel is just three blocks from the beach on a tree-lined street. It has good transport links nearby should you wish to visit some of Rio’s well-known tourist attractions including Sugar Loaf, the Botanical Gardens and Christ the Redeemer.

Both the dormitory and private rooms have air conditioning, respectfully switched on between 10am to10pm and guests have access to Wi-Fi too. You can prepare some cheap and cheerful meals in the kitchen with shops nearby to stock up on supplies. Breakfast is included in the price but do go looking for the best Caipirinha in this neck of the woods.

Rio Surf n’ Stay – Backpackers
The main event is carnival but don’t forget Rio’s other attractions – the beaches. Rio Surf n’ Stay Backpackers is located about an hour’s coastal bus drive from Ipanema. This is the place to really put your tired dancing feet up, have a swing in a hammock and watch the local surfers. If however you don’t fancy jumping off the fun wagon just yet, this surf hostel can set you up with some lessons in riding the waves. The hostel is just a few steps from Macumba beach in Recreio but the instructors will drive you to several different beaches to make sure you are getting the best waves of the day.

They offer private and dorm rooms but those on a really tight budget can pitch a tent in the tropical garden out front. You get your own key you can come and go as you please. Quality home-cooked Brazilian meals and BBQs are available and the bar serves beers or a decent Caipirinha. If you book the 6 night carnival package they throw in a free surfing lesson and a ticket for the BBQ.

Yes, you have left it a bit late but don’t panic, all the Rio hostels covered in this article have accommodation available between the 11-17 February.

Madeleine Wilson joined HostelBookers at the end of 2009 and has experience in traveling to international festivals. On visiting Brazil, she recommends staying in 0 Comments/by

January 26, 2010

The 2010 Burns Supper will be an even bigger event than last year’s very successful 250th anniversary of Robbie Burns’ birth. The Burns Supper is a traditional Scottish event held every year across the world close to the 25th January, the date of Burns’ birthday. It celebrates the life and works of – Robert Burns – Scotland’s greatest poet. Burns was born in Ayrshire on January 25th 1759 and died at the early age of 37 years, following life long health problems

It is particularly fitting that we celebrate Burns birth in São Paulo, as his birthday coincides with the anniversary of the city of São Paulo. The 2010 Supper will be held on Feb 6th, just before Valentine’s day – Feb 14th and this is very appropriate, as Burns was a great romantic. His beautifully simple, but evocative love poem My love is like a red red rose”, is a testimony to his romantic spirit.

Through his poetry and song writing he helped keep the flame of patriotism burning in Scotland during a difficult period. At the time of his death he was a very popular figure in Scotland. However Burn’s appeal is universal; he left a message for all nations and for all times. It is a message just a relevant today as it was over 200 years ago “it’s coming yet for all that an ‘a’ that, that man tae man the world o’er, shall brithers be for all that.”

Tickets – R$ 180 (R$150 for <30 >70 yrs). Reservations and details of Scottish Dance Practices to brush up your favourite dances (not mandatory for the feint of heart!)

Sept 18 at the Rosa Rosarum – The 2010 Caledonian Ball – The glamorous “black- tie or kilt” Caledonian Ball is the premier event in the São Paulo ex-pat community calendar and a wonderful opportunity to enjoy a lively and high-energy evening. Our very own newly formed St. Andrew Society Pipe Band will “raise the roof” and lead us into dinner in a the traditional Grand March. The glittering event to celebrate Scottish culture will be crowned by the presence of the famous Ian MacPhail band which will fly in from Scotland. A full programme of Scottish country and ceilidh dances is planned which will have everyone (Scottish dancing experts or not!) on the dance floor.

The first Monday of each month is a time to brush up on your Scottish Country Dancing at no charge. The lively dance practices start at 8pm at the British Brazilian Centre in Pinheiros.

More details on 0 Comments/by

By Lee & Mariuza Safian
January 10, 2007

In July 2005, our niece brought a six month old miniature Schnauzer to my wife and me. This past December we decided to bring the dog with us when we went to Brazil for the holidays to visit her family. What a mistake! Let me tell you our story of what happened.

We learned that an international health certificate had to be obtained within ten days (December 1st) of our departure. Thus, my wife and I went to the veterinarian exactly ten days before departure to get the international health certificate. The document cost us US$60 and was about six pages long. We knew that we had to get it stamped by the Brazilian consulate, but first we needed to get the form stamped by the US Department of Agriculture. There is only one office in New Jersey, where we live. It is in the southern part of the state, near Trenton, seventy-five miles away from us.

Three days later (December 4th) my wife drove to the Department of Agriculture. Words cannot describe her anger after being told that the veterinarian had neglected to sign the document. She got in her car and drove the seventy-five miles back to the vet. After getting an apology from the doctor, and her signature, my wife drove back to the Agriculture Department. She paid the required US$24 and got the necessary signature on all copies of the International Health certificate. Then my wife drove into New York City to the Brazilian Consulate. She arrived at the consulate at 2 PM. She was told that in order to be processed, this paperwork had to be handed in before 1 PM. She was thus forced to return home.

On December 6th, at 10 AM, with only four days before our departure, I accompanied my wife to New York City so she would not have to park the car in one of the outrageously expensive garages. After handing in the forms, she was instructed to return in four hours to pick up the signed papers. We returned to New Jersey and went out to lunch with some friends. My wife then returned to the city by herself. She got the forms from the consulate, paid for one half hour of parking, and returned home.

On December 10, five days later, we left our home at 6:30 PM to go to Newark Airport. We arrived at approximately 7:30 PM. We checked in our bags and then took our dog, Jake, who was in a travel crate through security. We went to the gate and waited for our flight to be called. At 9:30 PM, our flight began to board. To our amazement, we were told that our dog was too large to go in the cabin, even though we had already paid Continental Airlines $190 roundtrip for a Pet-in-Cabin” fee. The supervisor was summoned. He told my wife that she could carry him on board in a duffle bag. She went scrambling around the airport looking to purchase for such a bag. Finally, she returned with one. However, she was told that it was not suitable. By this time, the plane had almost finished boarding. My wife insisted that I go to Brazil alone, and that she would follow the next day. With tears in her eyes, we parted. She will recount the rest of our nightmare:

After my husband, Lee, left, I melted down in despair. The Continental Airlines’ supervisor told me that the travel agency should have given us all of Continental Airlines’ information and policies before selling us a ticket for the dog. In addition, we should have been told at the baggage check-in that we could not bring the dog in the cabin with us. Furthermore, we should not have been permitted to cross through the metal detector with such a big crate. It turns out that I was supposed to have checked him in at a terminal called Quick Pack four hours before flight time and pay a $276 fee. The supervisor called for a golf style cart to drive me to where this place was. He told me that the company would pay for my cab ride home because of the inconvenience I had suffered as a result of the airline company’s failure to provide accurate information. I was still crying and feeling really depressed because I did not want to miss my mother’s birthday the following day.

Late the next afternoon, I did as the supervisor the day before had instructed me. I checked my dog, Jake, in at the Quick Pack at 7PM. I then went to the other end of the terminal and went through security. I hung around the terminal until my flight boarded at approximately 10PM.

My flight arrived in São Paulo at 10:30 AM, Brazilian time. I was very anxious to get my dog, see my husband, and go to my family’s home. My sister and her husband were waiting for me outside of Customs. I asked airport personnel where I could get my dog. I was told to leave the airport and drive almost two kilometers to a building called “Cargo”. However, I was instructed that first I had to bring all of my documents to a tiny Continental Airlines office, in a six story building. I initially waited in a huge line of people in order to receive a security identification pass. There was only one security guard handing out all of the passes, and it took me at least fifteen minutes just to receive the security badge. Once my sister and I arrived inside a very small Continental office, I was instructed to hire a “forwarding agent” to save me one hour of time. Unfortunately, it would cost US$160/R$350. I refused to pay all that money and decided to deal with the bureaucracy by myself. I was forced to walk back and forth like a puppet, taking Xeroxes of all sorts of forms. I had to go to many different offices to pay numerous fees. At every single place I went, the workers were either on their lunch break, or they were late. My saga had started at 11:30 AM and did not finish until 4:10 PM. I was hungry, angry, and sorry that my fellow Brazilians had to go through this every time they needed public services. They really made my life a Hell. However, I did not care. I refused to pay outrageous fees to a forwarding agent.

When we were ready to return to the USA, things did not get any easier. A suntanned, short haired, and rude female veterinarian at the Department of Agriculture at Guarulhos Airport, (unfortunately, I do not recall her name), refused to answer any of my questions because she said the office was not opened yet. It was not until I showed her a printout of the office hours that I had downloaded from the internet, that she answered my inquiries. The woman told me that she did not care about the Brazilian Consulate’s stamp on my dog’s international health certificate, which attested to his health history. She even mimicked my frustrated tone of voice. (I was shaking with anger and frustration.) After she wrote down what proof I needed to present to her, I had to return to my dog’s veterinarian in São Paulo and get another certificate stating what the lady in the Agriculture Department said I needed. My veterinarian saw no need to repeat shots that my dog had received in the States. She simply wrote down on Jake’s health form that he had received the necessary shots. I was so close to a nervous breakdown that I decided to go to another Department of Agriculture office in the center of São Paulo. I wanted to avoid dealing further with that nasty, impolite, rude and insensitive lady. The person I dealt with at this office could not have been nicer. He said that the person at the other office should have accepted my original documentation. He apologized for her behavior, but said that unfortunately each office acted independently.

Once I got the documents I needed, I called Continental Airline’s office again. They told me that I needed to get a “forwarding agent” in order to complete all of my paperwork. This time I decided to hire an agent. I called the agent referred to me and answered all of his questions so that he could complete the necessary forms. Then, at 2 PM, I brought my dog to a Guarulhos Airport cargo area. I met with the forwarding agent. I gave him all of my original documents. I paid him US$270 for Custom’s fees plus US$160 for his fee.

We took off at 11 PM and landed at Newark Airport at 5:40 PM, (American time) twenty minutes ahead of schedule. While the driver of the car service we had arranged to meet us waited, I walked to Quick Pack on the second floor of the airport terminal to get Jake. I was handed a map and told to pick him up at a cargo terminal right outside the airport. The limousine driver drove around until he finally found building 544, the cargo building. I went inside and had to wait half an hour because the computer system was down. At 7:30 they returned the forms to me and told me to take them to the building next door to the Customs Bureau. It was now 7:55 AM. The limousine driver said he would wait for us, but he had to charge us an additional $30. Of course, we had no choice but to accept. I waited from 8 AM until 8:30 AM for the Customs agent. When he arrived, the agent said he was sorry that I had had to wait, but many people were on vacation. He signed my papers and told me to return to the cargo building to pick up my dog. I finally saw my “baby” at 8:45 AM. I was so relieved to finally see him. He did not show me any affection. He was hungry, and tired, just like my husband and I. He was not himself – playful and happy. No wonder! He had spent almost twenty-two hours in his traveling crate.

Thank goodness, we are now finally back in our home, “safe and sound”. The nightmare has ended. Taking the dog to Brazil cost us close to $1,000 and almost three days of missed vacation time. Never again will we take Jake to Brazil.

Readers comments:

Mr. & Mrs. Safian – Wow. What a nightmare! We almost brought our dog to Brazil with us but changed our minds at the last minute when our “10 days” were up before we got all the paper work done. I’m glad we didn’t. I’m sure we would have suffered a similar experience. Thanks for sharing!

— Henry

I am so sorry for all the hassle that you two and Jake went through. I got tears in my eyes when I read your story. I have a dog and I imagine how you felt worrying and missing Jake and how Jake felt missing you in that dehumanized environment, being treated like ‘cargo’. Hopefully now he’s got back his playful and lovely way that all happy and loved dogs have.

I went through a similar situation when I moved from England to Brazil and sent all my personal belongings by ship. It was a huge, very heavy box and I thought it could be cheaper sending by ship. What a mistake. The collection in Brazil was a nightmare. It lasted 5 days all that bureaucracy and the contact with nasty and impolite people, going back and forth enormous distances. I spent loads of money with the stay, fees, papers, forwarding agent, fuel and time. In the stage which seemed to be the last one it was found out that my CPF had been mistyped. I had to go back to the beginning. Thank goodness I didn’t have PMT and a gun, otherwise I could kill.

I understand completely your feelings and I wish I was there with you to offer my support.

— Lilian

I read this article and would like to let these people know that if they had planned and got to know everything they needed before going to SP they wouldn’t have had so many problems. I have friends that travel to Brazil with their pets and they don’t have any problems at all. If you want to carry your pet with you, yes you have to spend money and PLAN it. It is nobody’s fault that the agents were on vaccation, or that they have to pay for a parking garage in NYC. Come on! Give me a break. If you want luxury you have to pay for it.

— Laize

I was very surprised to read this article as we brought over our dog and cat to Brazil and had absolutely no problem whatsoever! The people in the article simply left their travel arrangements far too late! It takes months of preparations and phone calls to the various agencies (embassies, vets, airlines, airports and pet travel agents!) involved to get an accurate picture of what to do. Our animals went in the cargo hold and came out this end just like any other piece of luggage. Their papers were checked by the state vet and we walked out the airport without any problems or delays.

Perhaps because our pets are well travelled we are used to the inevitable circus that surrounds it? I am surprised that “Jake” did not have to go into quarantine on arrival in the USA. Brazil seems to be a black hole to the rest of the world! There is talk of restricting animal travel in the future which I hope is not to our detriment! If anyone has any information with regards to exporting animals – that would be interesting to read (-:

Yes, it was an expensive and time consuming exercise to bring our animals with us – but the benefits far out way the costs! It was no more frustrating than trying to get our own papers organised and at least they don’t need a CPF number!

— Marcelle

The headline on this article shocked me so I read with interest as I am intending to bring my 2 dogs to Recife later this year.

It appears most of the problems this couple endured were of a bureaucratic nature in both the US and Brasil, quelle suprise!! However it also appears that the dog’s entry into São Paulo was the least problematic part of the whole procedure.

I would be very grateful to hear of any other cases so that I may prepare myself for the nightmare ahead. Thankfully my ‘girls’ will only be making a one-way journey from the UK to Recife.

Is it better to leave everything to the shipping experts and endure the extra cost ?

— John

What a typical Brazilian experience, anybody who has been here for a bit expects such ‘adventures’!

— Juliet

Another issue dog owners should be aware of, is climate at your entry port. I live in Brazil and take my dog back to the USA at Christmas and also did this ONE summertime, only. This is my American Airline experience, but I imagine other airlines have the same or similar policy. Let’s say you have to change planes once you are in the USA. When you arrive at Guarulhos (São Paulo), 4 hours early to start the dog checkin process, they will call your entry point. If the weather is too cold (45F or colder), you cant take your dog! This happened to me with a Dallas connection at Christmas, so now I go through Miami.

One summer I was returning to Brazil and was not allowed to take my dog back because at 7:30pm, it was 90F on the airstrip in Dallas. My dog stayed in the USA for 6 months with my daughter until it could return to Brazil at Christmas time. I had a letter from my vet, both times, giving authorization that the dog could fly regardless of temperature.

Another consideration. American Airlines wont let dogs fly in the cabin on international flights. AA national flights accept dogs in proper pet cloth carriers, IF they can fit under the seat.

Hint: Always ask airline representatives about pet rules, but always confirm on-line rules, too. Print out your findings in case the counter representative isnt up on pet rules.

— Marilyn

By Regina Scharf
January 7, 2010

Whenever you deal with foreigners – for business or pleasure – it is wise to match your tone to their cultures and habits. There are countless anecdotes of people who lost deals because they offered alcohol to an observant Muslim or couldnt negotiate with a Japanese for lack of understanding what yes” and “maybe” really mean in their world – “maybe” and “probably no”, respectively. So, what should you know about Brazilians to have a smooth dialogue with my countrymen?

The short and obvious answer is: it depends. The same way you cannot compare the behaviour of Frenchmen born in Paris and Guadeloupe, in the Caribbean, it is really tough to set up rules that apply both to an Amazonian and a gacho (someone from the southern state of Rio Grande do Sul). But the following observations might be a good guide to avoid faux-pas.

* Informality – If you know anything about the country, you probably could guess this one. We tend to be very informal and cheerful – in ways that may shock sterner tourists. This applies, for instance, to the dress code. It is not a problem to show some – not all – flesh in coastal cities and in warmer cities of the Amazon and Centro-Oeste region, which includes the capital, Braslia, and the Pantanal wetlands). Informality also applies to the high level of physical contact, which includes two or three kisses (less frequent) when you meet someone (woman-woman or woman-man, never man-man, unless among gays), or touching the arm or shoulder of someone else in the middle of a conversation (if it is persistent, there is flirt in the air). Naturally, you should avoid the kiss/touching routine in business meetings, unless you became somewhat more intimate. This informality is present, but attenuated, in the southern states (Rio Grande do Sul, Santa Catarina and Paran), and in the states of São Paulo and Minas Gerais.

* Lack of punctuality – We are not Swiss. If your meeting is at 9, it may happen at 9h30 or even at 10h. Just in case, go at 9, but be ready to wait. But if you are told a party begins at 9, arrive at 10, or you will find the host in the shower (it happened to me). If it is a diner party, you probably should stick to the proposed schedule. Pay attention to an interesting phenomenon: in certain circumstances, events will be scheduled after the storm (which falls everyday in the middle of the afternoon in the Amazon region), the soccer match or the soap opera (when these are particularly thrilling). Clubbing tends to begin late. In São Paulo, nobody leaves home before 10 – unless you are over 70. Vacationers or locals tend to go late to the beach. Unless you are really healthy and a sportsman, it is quite possible you will hit the sand at 11, have lunch at 3 or 4, go home for a shower and a nap and start partying at 10 pm.

* Love for foreigners – Brazilians have a genuine love for foreigners to a degree I have never seen in other countries. We make an effort to communicate, we give directions, we hug, we kiss. If you are American, you may bump into the occasional US-haters (most of them in universities and certain trade unions), but this shouldnt be frequent.

* Promises – They are not, necessarily, written in stone. If someone says: “I will call you”, it may happen or not. Once your acquaintance leaves the premises, you may realize he doesnt have your phone number. “I will send you the budget tomorrow”, may be or not be true. Expect the best, prepare for the worst.

* Food – Unless it is a business lunch, it is quite likely your company will offer you a bite of his dish and expect you to do the same. No hard feelings if you dont offer or accept, though. You will be also offered a cafzinho (one shot of coffee, no milk, in a small cup with saucer. It may be an espresso or made with paper filter). This will happen everywhere you go – homes and offices, poor or rich. Some people (probably not many) might be offended if you dont accept their caffeine. That’s how my mom was dragged to have a sip of coffee in a cortio (a squat, but not the hippie or glamorous type of squat) when she worked for the public health system – and got hepatitis.

Yes, I am sure you met cranky, formal, punctual, anti-foreigner Brazilians. The summary above only expresses tendencies that are frequent but not universal. Please, do share your experience, that might be very different from my own. Cool stories are welcome!

Republished with kind permission from

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By Eleanor Stanford
January 7, 2010

Since we’ve arrived in Brazil, I’ve been thinking a lot about enclosures.

We live in a walled condominium. It’s maybe one square mile: a cobblestone driveway that winds from the gate, up a slope to the block of attached houses where we live. There’s a swimming pool; a small playground and a bigger one; a soccer field at the bottom of a hill rimmed with cashew and banana trees.

Beyond is a world where cars and buses sit without moving on the Paralela, heat rising in waves from the asphalt, where a tourist is killed in his hotel room and a health department truck releases plumes of pesticide into the air.

I go days inside these walls, leaving only to go to work, driving from one gated space to another.

Early in the morning, I run laps around the soccer field, up and down the driveways. In the evenings, the men drink beer, women sit on benches and nurse their babies, older children swing from the monkey bars.

Everyone leaves their doors unlocked.

We have a Tuesday evening yoga class on the soccer field. There’s a seamstress who lives here, who’ll hem pants or patch a hole. A neighbor’s maid gives manicures. There’s a pharmacy that delivers. (One evening I came outside to see the neighbors sitting on the grass eating ice cream bars that they’d had delivered.) You can even call and have someone come to your house to vaccinate your kids.

Sometimes at night, after the children are asleep, I lie in the hammock and listen to the wind in the palm trees.

Behind the wall is the mato: the dunes of Abaet, a blank expanse. A horse grazes at its edge. A boy gathers firewood. A man who grabs the purse of a maid waiting at the bus stop disappears into the scrub. A vulture settles onto a high branch.

It’s a strange, suspended feeling, safety edged with broken glass.

How long can I live like this? Not forever.

But there are advantages. In the afternoon, when the sun is just beginning to dip behind the walls, I take the boys for a swim.

I tip my head back, and the splashing and shouting disappears, and for a moment I can enjoy floating in this calm, blue world.

Republished with kind permission from www.thegoldenpapaya.com.

Previous articles by Eleanor:

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By Alison McGowan
January 7, 2010

This morning I woke up in paradise. In a beautiful tree-house overlooking luxuriant gardens. Gazing out towards the Rio das Contas, half hidden in the mist. Listening to the roar of the distant ocean, the birdsong, the lone cock crowing. Watching the beijaflor humming bird tap against the window.

ArtJungle Eco-lodge, with its park full of wooden and ceramic sculptures, is the in” place for photoshoots, and many famous people have passed through here – Jade Jagger, Sean Penn, Al Gore, and Gisele Bunchen to name only a few. But this is not a place to be “seen” and definitely not somewhere for those who see luxury in terms of material things like TV, air conditioning or internet access. Lodges are comfortable with good hot showers and mosquito nets, and an ice box instead of a minibar – but that’s where it stops.

Itacare, and all the beaches, restaurants and bars you could want are only a couple of kilometres down the dirt track, but ArtJungle is where you will want to retreat to. This is a place for people who see luxury in nature, in art, in peace, and who support the idea of a social ecological cultural project which gives something back to the local community. I personally could have stayed forever.

About the Location
Itacare is situated on the Cocoa Coast of Bahia, the stretch which runs between Ilheus, 65km to the south and Salvador 230kms to the north, just where the Rio das Contas river meets the ocean. The town itself has indigenous origins but became known as Itacare as early as 1732 and countless grandiose mansions attest to the wealth of the town and region during the cocoa boom of the early 20th century.

Rediscovered some 40 years ago by surfers, the town has grown rapidly and there are now countless pousadas, bars, restaurants and nightlife. But for those who prefer more peace or who prefer more ecological tourism there are some wonderful trails and palm tree fringed deserted beaches nearby, many set in spectacular scenery, with mountains and atlantic forest as a backdrop.

Not to be Missed
– a canoe trip with Ney down the Rio das Contas at sunset
– trips to the waterfalls of Azevedo, Tijuipe, Pancada Grande, Tucleandro
– capoeira in Itacare at night
– beaches of Prainha, Engenhoca and Jeribucacu
– superb food at A Brasileira restaurant in the main street

Starpoints
* tree-houses and stilt houses
* carved wooden washbasins and freshly cut flowers
* park with wooden and ceramic sculptures
* large swimming pool
* views over the river

Try a Different Place if…
… you want to be right on the beach or can’t live without TV, air conditioning, or phone

Alison is a British writer, musician, and marketing consultant, based in Rio de Janeiro. She can be contacted on alison@hiddenpousadasbrazil.com. Visit her site at http://www.hiddenpousadasbrazil.com/.

Previous articles by Alison:

Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada 0031, Cumbuco, Cear
Brazil: Maguire’s Guesthouse, Manaus, Amazonas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel Casa do Amarelindo, Salvador, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel BeloAlter, Alter do Chão, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Fazenda Santa Marina, Santana dos Montes, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casarão da Amaznia, Soure, Ilha de Marajo, Par
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Mila, nr. Ubatuba, São Paulo
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Casa Beleza, Santa Teresa, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Bambu Bamboo Pousada and Spa, Parati, Rio de Janeiro
Random Ramblings on the Weather in Brazil
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Beijamar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Hotel 7 Colinas, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada dos Quatro Cantos, Pernambuco
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Estrela do Mar, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Vivenda, Rio de Janeiro
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Terra, Minas Gerais
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada Mirante de Pipa, Rio Grande do Norte
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada do Caju, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Pousada da Amendoeira, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Estalagem Caiuia, Alagoas
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Lagoa do Cassange, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Ponta do Muta, Bahia
Brazil: Hidden Pousadas – Santa Clara, Boipeba, Bahia

January 7, 2010

Meet Jessica Mullins who first visited Brazil 2 years ago, and recently moved here. Read the following interview in which she tells us about some of her most memorable experiences and gives some useful advice to newcomers.

1. Tell us a little about yourself, where are you from, what do you do etc.?

I was born in Switzerland, grew up there until I was 13, then moved to Madrid, Spain (which is where my mother is from), went to school there for five years, and then took off to Boston, USA for university (I attended Boston College), and my father is American, quite the world citizen. For the time being, I just graduated from university (this past May 2009) and now I am looking for a job. My degrees are in Communications and Human Development.

2. When did you arrive in Brazil and what brought you here?

Two years ago, when I was in my third year of university in Boston, I did an exchange program for 6 months in Rio de Janeiro at PUC. I fell in love with the place, and now that I’m finished with my studies I’ve come back to look for a job here. This time around I have been here for 2.5 months. So in total I’ve been in Rio for about 8 months.

3. What were you first impressions of Brazil?

My first impressions were wow this is REALLY different from Europe and the United States! Particularly in terms of scenery and then other details like the buses (very old and run down), things like people distributing ice and groceries by bike-carts, or like you always see markets of fruit or food somewhere on the street, things like that were the things that marked the biggest difference. Also the warmth of the people here struck me, almost everyone is willing to help you, or to chat with you, very friendly. I guess also the security factor is a big difference, but upon first impressions I didn’t think it was as dangerous or unsafe as people outside of Brazil made it seem like. I remember the first day I walked on the street, I was super scared and self-conscious of myself and what I was carrying on me, thinking that at any moment I would be robbed. Little by little I realized that that behavior was exaggerated and unnecessary.

4. What do you miss most about home?

Nothing, I didn’t miss home.

5. What has been your most frustrating experience in Brazil?

Bureacracy, it’s so difficult to get things done here. Everything is such a long and tedious process.

6. What has been your most memorable experience in Brazil (specific incident)?

There are too many… But I suppose the most valuable has been working on the beach in Rio de Janeiro as a ‘barraqueira’. I am the only girl who works on the beach, or at least in the barracas in my area, and on top of that I’m foreign, I’m white, I’m young… it apparently seems to draw a lot of attention, so it’s been interesting dealing with only men, and people all around commenting on the fact that I work on the beach, renting out chairs and umbrellas, and beer, etc. and men commenting on the fact that they are going to start coming to my barraca so that they can chat with me, and so on. It’s unusual to see a young girl in 40 degree sun carrying drinks, and cases of beer, etc. When people hear that I work on the beach, they think it’s simple, stress-free and easy, but one thing I’ve learned is that it’s definitely not! It’s really hard and strenuous work. Aside from that, and working in a totally masculine environment with people chit-chatting left and right, I’ve definitely learned a lot! More than I had ever imagined I would, but I LOVE working on the beach despite all that.

7. What do you most like about Brazil (in general)?

The people, the culture, the lifestyle, the mentality of people here, the weather, the scenery, everything!

8. What is your favorite restaurant/place to hang out here?

Ipanema, Posto 9 watching the sunset. My favorite restaurant is between Sushi Leblon or Bar da Praia or Capriciosa in Rio de Janeiro.

9. Do you have any funny stories/incidents to tell about your time in Brazil?

Again, far too many… innumerable

10. What difference between your homeland and Brazil do you find most striking?

The visible existence of poverty and favelas as well as the corruption of the police. Also, the prevalence of sex, drugs, and weapons is very noticeable, far more than in the countries I have lived in.

11. How is your Portuguese coming along? What words do you find most difficult to pronounce/remember or are there any words that you regularly confuse?

My Portuguese, according to people here is fluent, such that people don’t realize that I’m not Brazilian. But I always make this one mistake; instead of saying vou pra a” when I’m talking to someone that I’m going to meet up with, I say “vou pra l” and everyone always responds, “pra onde??”. When I got here the first time, when I came on the exchange program, I spoke NO Portuguese at all, I didn’t even know how to say ‘Hi, my name is Jessica’, but I did a 3-week intensive course as soon as I got here. Then I had about a month and a half vacation before classes started at the university, so everything that I had learned I put into practice during that month and a half of vacation, such that once the actual school year started at the university I was almost fluent. I had no choice but to learn because all my classes were in Portuguese. But what happened was that I learned a lot of street jargon because I didn’t hang out with the other kids on my program, instead I went out and met a ton of locals and so I started picking up the slang so when I had to speak in class it was difficult to leave out all the slang. But it was definitely fun!

12. What advice do you have for newcomers to Brazil?

Just be cautious, don’t walk on the street with a worried look on your face as if something bad is going to happen, just be normal, but keep an eye out for what’s going on around you. Don’t draw attention to yourself by wearing ostentatious clothing or jewellery, or if you’re at tourist, try not to look like one with the camera hung around your neck, with a hat and sunglasses and absolutely don’t carry large sums of money with you. Try and blend in with locals, observe their habits and what they do and you should be all set.

13. What are some things that you would recommend for a visitor to do in São Paulo (or anywhere else in Brazil)?

I don’t know São Paulo, but I would absolutely recommend going to Buzios and renting a buggy, I recommend going to Belo Horizonte and hopping from boteco to boteco trying each place’s special petiscos, I recommend hand gliding off the Pedra da Gavea in Rio de Janeiro, I HIGHLY recommend visiting Foz de Iguau, I also recommend visiting Ilha Grande and doing the trek to the Pico do Papagaio, I recommend Carnaval both in Rio de Janeiro and in Salvador and in Ouro Preto. I recommend a Baile Funk in one of the favelas (pra qum não parece gringo, n).

You can contact Jessica at jessicasaramullins@gmail.com.

Are you a foreigner who has lived in, or is living or travelling in Brazil? Are you a Brazilian who has a lot of contact with foreigners and/or lived outside of Brazil? Are you interested in telling your story? If you would like to volunteer for our interview series, or if you would like to recommend someone, please send a blank email to gringoes@www.gringoes.com with “Interview” in the subject. We will send you the interview questions by return email.

To read previous interviews in the Brazil Through Foreign Eyes series click below:

Evan Soroka – USA
Mary de Camargo – USA
Brendan Fryer – UK
Aaron Sundquist – USA
Jay Bauman – USA
Alan Williams – USA
Derek Booth – UK
Jim Shattuck – USA
Ruby Souza – Hawaii
Stephan Hughes – Trinidad and Tobago
Louis van der Wiele – Holland
Drew Glaser – USA
Barry Elliott – Canada
Joel Barsky – USA
David Drummond – Canada
Liam Porisse – France
Jim Kelley – USA
Max Ray – USA
Jeremy Clark – Canada
Don Fredrick – USA
Jase Ramsey – USA
Ben Pearce – UK
Nitai Panchmatia – India
Johnnie Kashat – USA
Jeni Bonorino – USA
Eric Jones – USA
Bill Martin – UK
Bernard Morris – USA
John Graves – USA
Deepak Sapra – India
Alison McGowan – UK
Brent Gregory – USA
R Dub – USA
Tara Bianca – USA
Jack Hurley – USA
James Woodward – Canada
Tony O’Sullivan – Ireland
Anna Belavina – Russia
Jim Kirby – USA
Linda Halverstadt – USA
Michelle Monteiro – USA
Chris Mensah – UK
David Sundin – USA
Stephanie Glennon – USA
Julien Porisse – France
Hans Keeling – USA
Jim Adams – USA
Richard Murison – USA
Will Periam – UK
Jan Sandbert – Sweden
Jim Jones – USA
Mike Stricklin – USA
Edward Gowing – Australia
Adrian Woods – USA
Kevin Raub – USA
Pierpaolo Ciarcianelli – Italy
Zachary Heilman – USA
David Johnson – Bermuda
Cipriana Leme – Argentina
Timothy Bell – USA
Patti Beckert – USA
Timothy Bell – USA
Paul James – USA
David McLoughlin – Ireland
Pat Moraes – USA
Richard Dougherty – USA
James Weeds – USA
Tom Sluberski – USA
Peter Kefalas – USA
Sylvie Campbell – UK
Kathleen Haynes – USA
Matt Bowlby – USA
Alan Longbottom – UK
Eric Karukin – USA
Eddie Soto – USA
Kieran Gartlan – Ireland
Bryan Thomas Scmidt – USA
Emile Myburgh – South Africa
Bob Chapman – USA
David Barnes – USA
John Milan – USA
Chris Coates – UK
Matthew Ward – UK
Allison Glick – USA
Drake Smith – USA
Jim Jones – USA
Philip Wigan – UK
Atlanta Foresyth – USA
Lee Gordon – USA
Carmen Naidoo – South Africa
Lee Safian – USA
Laurie Carneiro – USA
Dana De Lise – USA
Richard Gant – USA
Robin Hoffman – USA
Wayne Wright – UK
Walt Kirspel – USA
Priya Guyadeen – Guyana
Caitlin McQuilling – USA
Nicole Rombach – Holland
Steven Engler – Canada
Richard Conti – USA
Zak Burkons – USA
Ann White – USA
Monde Ngqumeya – South Africa
Johnny Sweeney – USA
David Harty – Canada
Bill McCrossen – USA
Peter Berner – Switzerland/Brazil
Ethan Munson – USA
Solveig Skadhauge – Denmark
Sean McGown – USA
Condrad Downes – UK
Jennifer Silva – Australian
Justin Mounts – USA
Elliott Zussman – USA
Jonathan Abernathy – USA
Steve Koenig – USA
Kyron Gibbs – USA
Stephanie Early – USA
Martin Raw – UK
Sean Coady – UK
Hugo Delgado – Mexico
Sean Terrillon – Canada
Jessie Simon – USA
Michael Meehan – USA
Thales Panagides – Cyprus
Tammy Montagna – USA
Samantha Tennant – England
Ron Finely – United States
Bob Duprez – United States
Peter Baines – England
Youssef Bouguerra – Tunisia
Van Wallach – USA
Lesley Cushing – England
Alexander von Brincken – Germany
Hank Avellar – USA
Ed Catchpole – England
Penny Freeland – England
Yasemin de Pinto – Turkey
Amy Williams Lima – USA
John Naumann – England
Marsye Schouella – Eygpt
Rita Shannon Koeser – USA
John Fitzpatrick – Scotland
Liam Gallagher – Northern Ireland
Lorelei Jones – England
Adam Glensy – England
Tommie C.B. DeAssis – Japan
Aaron Day – Canada
Graham Debney – New Zealand
Silke Tina Tischendorf – Germany
Tanya Keshavjee Macedo – Canada
Frank de Meijer – Holland
Carl Emberson – Australia
Kim Buarque – Wales
Damiano Pak – South Korea
Jonas Helding – Denmark
Pari Seeber – Iran
John Milton – England
Ken Marshall – Australia